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Course Catalog La Lumiere School

2016-2017


La Lumiere School Course Catalog for 2016-2017 School Year

Cover Art by Qingyuan Wu, Class of 2018 i


Chapter 1

Course Oerings La Lumiere School provides a college preparatory education based in Character, Scholarship and Faith.


Section 1

Mathematics GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Algebra 1

1. 4 credits of Mathematics, including:

This is a first year course designed to develop the essential basic mathematical techniques that will be used extensively in future courses. This course will focus on the development of mathematical problem solving skills. The topics covered in class can be grouped into four categories: Developing an understanding of unknowns, which includes the writing out and solving of expressions, equations, and inequalities; Working with Linear Equations including constructing graphs, solving systems of equations, and working with inequalities; Working with Polynomials including evaluating them, factoring them, and dividing them; The use of Exponents and Radicals in various operations, working with fractional and negative exponents.

a. Algebra 1 b. Algebra 2 c. Geometry 2. Each student must take a math course every semester they are enrolled at La Lumiere.

1 credit Prerequisites: None

Algebra 2 Algebra 2 is a second year algebra course designed to prepare students for higher mathematics classes. Topics covered will include; properties of numbers, equations and theirs graphs, systems of equations, intro to matrices, polynomials, rational expressions, quadratic equations, conic sections, logarithmic and exponential equations, including problem solving and applications in all of these areas. This course will focus on developing reasoning and problem solving skills while providing a foundation for additional mathematical studies. 1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in Algebra 1 or approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

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Algebra 2 - Honors

Precalculus

Algebra 2 Honors is an in-depth second year algebra course designed to prepare students for higher mathematics classes. Topics covered will include; properties of numbers, equations and theirs graphs, systems of equations, matrices, polynomials, rational expressions, quadratic equations, conic sections, logarithmic and exponential equations, including problem solving and applications in all of these areas. This course will be fast paced and cover the topics listed above in-depth.

Pre-Calculus starts the year reviewing skills learned in your previous algebra courses and then focus on more diďŹƒcult concepts. Topics covered will include; Trigonometry, Functions, Equations and theirs graphs, Systems of equations, Matrices, Polynomials, Rational Expressions, Logarithmic and Exponential equations, Sets and Sequences, including problem solving and Applications in all of these areas. This course will focus on developing reasoning and problem solving skills while providing a foundation for additional mathematical studies.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Algebra 1 or approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

Geometry Geometry is an examination of properties of two-dimensional figures, and the application of algebra and logic to find lengths, measures, and inherent relationships. Students enhance their problem solving skills while developing a sense of precision and accuracy in their communication with regard to these figures. 1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in Algebra 2 or approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

Geometry - Honors Honors Geometry is an accelerated examination of the properties of two- and three-dimensional figures, and the application of algebraic reasoning to find lengths and measures. In addition, students learn to clearly and precisely communicate and relate properties through organized, detailed proofs.

1 credit Prerequisites: Algebra 2 and Geometry or approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

Precalculus - Honors This is an honors level course designed to prepare students for the rigor of a first year Calculus class. Topics covered will include: polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, polar coordinates and vectors, conic sections, systems of equations, and applications in all of these areas. Students should expect, and be prepared for, this course to be a step up in diďŹƒculty from previous mathematics courses. 1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Algebra 2 and Geometry or approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Algebra 2 or approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

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Finite Mathematics

AP Calculus AB

Finite Math is an introduction to mathematical topics with applications to business, management, and social science. The course starts with a review of sets and numbers, followed by an introduction to data sets, counting arguments (combinations and permutations), and the Binomial Theorem, which sets the foundation for elementary probability theory and some basic statistics. Further chapters treat graph theory as it relates to modeling, matrices and vectors, and linear programming. The last topics are financial mathematics.

AP Calculus AB is a college-level introductory Calculus course, with complete coverage of dierentiation and single-variable integration. It is required that all students enrolled in this course take the AP Calculus AB exam in May; this takes the place of the second semester final exam, and cannot be exempted.

1 credit Prerequisites: Algebra 2 and Geometry or approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

AP Calculus BC

AP Statistics AP Statistics serves to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students in the course will be exposed to four broad conceptual themes: (1) Exploring data by observing patterns and departures from patterns; (2) Planning a study by deciding what factors to study and how to measure the factors that you want to study; (3) Anticipating patterns by producing models using probability theory and simulations; and (4) Statistical inference in order to confirm models. 1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Precalculus or approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Precalculus and approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

AP Calculus BC is a college-level introductory Calculus course, with complete coverage of dierentiation and single-variable integration. It is required that all students enrolled in this course take the AP Calculus BC exam in May; this takes the place of the second semester final exam, and cannot be exempted. 1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: AP Calculus AB and approval from the chair of the Mathematics Department.

Introduction to Computer Programming Introduction to Computer Programming is an examination of the logic, syntax, structure, and construction of computer programs. Students learn how to build interactive, practical programs and games using variables, conditional statements, loops, and methods. They are introduced to Python, Scratch, and Java programming languages. .25 credit Prerequisites: Geometry or approval from the instructor.

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Advanced Computer Science Advanced Computer Science is an in-depth application of the structure, logic, and application of the Java language to create interactive programs. Students have fun learning how to apply recursion, polymorphism, data structures, and graphics while using an object-oriented approach as they write classes that solve problems and interact with users. 1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ in Introduction to Computer Programming and approval from the instructor.

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Section 2

English GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

English as a Second Language 1

1. 4 credits of English.

ESL I is a course developing English language skills of our international students. It is teaches basic structure and style of writing, builds a strong grammar basis, and improves reading comprehension by working with various kinds of texts. Students work on their pronunciation and general speaking skills by presentations, classroom debates and activities, as well as games. An important part of the subject is also recognizing and learning about cultural dierences between the USA and the home countries of our students.

2. Each student must take a core English course every semester they are enrolled at La Lumiere

1 credit Prerequisites: None

English as a Second Language 2 ESL II is an advanced course for international students which focuses on getting acquainted with American and British literature. It works with authentic literary texts improving reading comprehension and the ability to analyze various texts including poetry. ESL II also strengthens grammar skills, and requires logical thinking about the English language system. An important part of the subject is also recognizing and learning about cultural dierences between the USA and the home countries of our students. 1 credit Prerequisites: English as a Second Language 1 or approval from instructor.

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Introduction to Literature and Composition

American Literature and Composition

English Literature and Composition explores four major works of art; The Odyssey, Antigone, Beowulf, and Romeo and Juliet. Our goal in this course is to increase comprehension skills, practice writing skills daily, and read aloud from the texts, as well as the students' own papers. We strive for quality, active writing, and expect to see growth throughout the year. Peer review and verbal communication are an essential component of the course.

American Literature, a survey course, focuses on the critical reading and analytical writing required in college. In this course, we explore movements in American Literature to see how American writers have artfully expressed some of the dilemmas of the human condition. Literary movements will include Puritanism, Rationalism, Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. As we read the master writers and reflect on their writing, we will become a supportive writing community, united in purpose, tackling the challenges and embracing the rewards of the effectively wielded written word.

1 credit Prerequisites: None

British Literature and Composition This course is a study of British Literature, surveying major works of British authors starting from the inception of the English language. Through a combined study of writing, literature, grammar and vocabulary, we will learn to understand what makes a work worth reading, studying, and remembering. Special attention will be paid to literary analysis, both oral and written, allowing students to continue their pursuit of developing their writing skills. In addition, the year’s vocabulary component will concentrate on a study of Greek and Latin roots for English words in an effort to build a more expansive vocabulary and allow more facility in determining the meanings of a wider range of words 1 credit Prerequisites: Introduction to Literature & Composition or approval from the chair of the English Department.

1 credit Prerequisites: British Literature & Composition or approval from the chair of the English Department.

Multicultural Literature and Composition This course provides students with an introduction to multicultural literature. Emphasis is placed on increasing students' understanding and awareness of the values, beliefs, and experiences of people from different cultures through literature. Students will isolate concepts in works of literature that may be unfamiliar, compare and contrast these concepts with those from their own culture, and research the historical and philosophical origins of these contrasting perspectives. Students will develop skills of close reading, literary analysis, and composition in preparation for college-level English courses. Grammar and vocabulary practice will accompany and enhance the study of the written word. 1 credit Prerequisites: American Literature & Composition or approval from the chair of the English Department.

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AP Literature and Composition

Creative Writing

As indicated by the Advanced Placement designation, this is a rigorous college-level English literature course. We will explore a wide variety of works of literature, from ancient to modern times, from Western and non-Western authors, from the fiction, drama, and poetry genres. Students will demonstrate mastery of the elements of literature through written and oral analysis of the works studied. We will also improve our ability to interact with the ideas of others, through class discussion, the study of secondary sources, and written responses. An ongoing study of vocabulary and literary terms will make us more observant readers and more precise writers. We expect all students in the course to take the AP English Literature exam in May.

This course introduces students to the rewards and demands of creative expression. Specifically, the course focuses on writing in three genres: poetry, the short story, and creative non-fiction. By looking at the works of professionals to distill the qualities of excellence and by participating in a weekly writing workshop, students will develop a litany of skills and start to build a creative writing portfolio, with the goal being to have one work ready to send into publishers by the end of the semester.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in American Literature & Composition or approval from the chair of the English Department.

Women Writers

Rhetoric The Art of Rhetoric will confront students with the essential elements of formal rhetorical analysis while pushing them not just to understand, but to synthesize their understanding of form, rhetorical devices, rhetorical modes, and rhetorical grammar into excellent essays on a variety of subjects. The course will focus on five key topics: stylistic choice and analysis, 7 rhetorical modes and how they meet the four goals of rhetoric, rhetorical devices (use and analysis), a rhetorical grammar and composition, and rhetorical analysis. By studying formal elements of composition, reading excellent rhetorical pieces, and writing both short pieces and longer pieces that will be honed, revisited, and revised throughout the semester, students will become better writers and thinkers. .25 credit Prerequisites: None.

.25 credit Prerequisites: Introduction to Literature & Composition or approval from the chair of the English Department.

This course introduces students to a range of female authors from the British and American traditions, from the middle ages to the present. We will read important statements in feminist theory alongside our primary texts to provide us with a critical vocabulary for literary analysis. You will develop skills essential for literary study through intensive reading and writing practices. .25 credit Prerequisites: Introduction to Literature & Composition or approval from the chair of the English Department.

Public Speaking This course is designed to give students practice in organizing, writing and delivering speeches. Students will learn techniques for preparing demonstrative, informative, persuasive and occasional speeches. Frequent opportunities for practice and reflection will help students improve their skills and gain confidence in their abilities. .25 credit Prerequisites: None

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Section 3

Social Sciences GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

World History 1 - ESL

1. 3 credits of Social Science, including:

This course introduces students to world history by studying major civilizations. Examining change and continuity, throughout the world, will allow students to trace the origins of human societies (while considering new research and evidence). Furthermore, analyzing maps and migration patterns will help students expand their geographical knowledge. The history of religion will also be taken into account so that students may recognize the pivotal role it has played in human history. Finally, this course aims to cultivate an interest and appreciation for life by the study of diverse cultures.

a. World History 1 b. World History 2 or AP World History c. US History or AP US History

1 credit Prerequisites: None.

World History 1 As an introduction to high school social studies, world history is meant to expand student historical and geographic knowledge. World History I will encourage students to explore the art, architecture, culture of various civilizations up to the European Middle Ages. Students will participate in primary source readings discussion and analyses, lecture, and collaborative learning experiences. These classwork activities will develop students’ historical and critical thinking skills and give students the ability to detect trends, analyze movements and events, and develop a sense of history. 1 credit Prerequisites: None.

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World History 2

AP World History

World History II is a year-long course which covers material similar to the AP World History Exam from the years 1000 AD to 2000 AD. Major topics in this first semester will be The Age of Mercantilism, The Age of Enlightenment, The American & French Revolutions, The Industrial Revolution & Imperialism, World War I, and Nationalist Movements in the Third World. Following the recent development in the AP World History curriculum itself, more emphasis is placed on students understanding themes and interconnections in world history and less emphasis on students memorizing facts of isolated events. In addition, greater emphasis is also placed on students acquiring and developing historical skills such as crafting historical arguments, chronological reasoning, comparison & contextualization, and applying historical interpretation & synthesis.

AP World History is a challenging, college-level full year course that explores the expansive history of the human world from the beginnings of settled societies to the present day. This course will enable you to develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and interactions over time, and to compare societies in dierent regions and in dierent time periods. AP World History is equivalent to an introductory college survey course and therefore relies heavily on college-level resources. Students will explore intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, social, and economic developments over all human history, with particular emphasis on 1600-Present (as students already studied 1000 BCE-1600 CE in World History I). Solid reading and writing skills, along with a willingness to devote considerable time to reading homework, are necessary to succeed. Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, and analysis of a variety of original documents, and assessment will be similar to the AP Exam. A variety of learning opportunities will also be given to foster the development of skills required to analyze points, interpret evidence, and create plausible historical arguments. We will also do simulations and debates that will address questions about human commonalities and dierences and the historical context of culturally diverse ideas and values. The course, designed to develop critical thinking in order to analyze evidence, prepares students for what is expected at the college level. Successful completion of this course may result in college credits and placement into higher-level college and university history courses. Students will be able to show their mastery of the course goals by taking the College Board AP World History Exam in May. Even if a student fails to achieve a passing score on the AP Exam, the experience of taking a college-level course will be immensely rewarding.

1 credit Prerequisites: World History 1 or approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ in World History 1 and approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department. 11


US History

AP US History

This course is an Introduction to the History of the United States of America. One major theme of this course comes from the name of our textbook: Out of Many: A History of the American People. In other words, we will examine how there are many interpretations to United States History depending on one’s situation and viewpoint. In addition, great emphasis will be placed on studying the social history of normal people from various backgrounds. Following the recent development in the AP US History curriculum itself, more emphasis is placed on students understanding themes and interconnections in US history and less emphasis on students memorizing facts of isolated events. In addition, greater emphasis is also placed on students acquiring and developing historical skills such as crafting historical arguments, chronological reasoning, comparison & contextualization, and applying historical interpretation & synthesis.

This course is intended to be an expansion of the knowledge already learned in a US History course. This course will require students to go well beyond the memorization of historical facts and dates. Students will be expected to explore a variety of historical sources, both primary and secondary. In their exploration of United States History from 1491 to the present-day, students will be expected to develop historical perspective and apply critical analysis to the craft historical arguments. The course will seek to develop the four historical thinking skills set forth by the AP curriculum. First, the course will seek to develop an understanding of chronological reasoning by discussing historical patterns and the importance of periodization. Students will then develop comparison and contextualization skills by studying the great diversity of cultures that have inhabited North America and the United States’ global interactions since 1491. The third skill type is crafting historical arguments from historical evidence, which will be developed by the extensive historical writing in the class. The final skill type is historical interpretation and synthesis, which will be developed by our extensive discussions of content and by the investigation of selected historical writing throughout the year. In terms of the periodization of content, the course is divided into 9 chronological units, subdivided into 104 thematic lessons. The goal of this course is to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam with the expectation that students study United States History as amateur historians.

1 credit Prerequisites: World History 2 or approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department.

1 credit - Honors Textbook: Prerequisites: B+ or higher in World History 2 or approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department.

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Economics

Government

Economics is the study of money and business behaviors with an ultimate goal of understanding the processes necessary for an exchange economy to function. Although a social science, economics has pertinent real world applications. Throughout the class study of economics, we will examine both theoretical and real world applications of economic behaviors and systems. Due to the fluid nature of economic policies, we will spend a great deal of time exploring current global economic issues. The study of economics will develop students’ critical thinking and reasoning skills, as well as foster research and writing abilities.

United States Government and Politics is a one semester, comprehensive course designed to give students a solid understanding of the constitutional foundations as well as the fundamentals of democracy and governance. The course will analyze the importance of checks and balances, court decisions, executive power, legislative processes, as well as the allimportant fourth pillar, the media. All of these concepts will be weighed and measured against the Constitution, most notably in the context of the original intent of the Founding Fathers, watershed court cases, and our current situation as a society in the second millennium. Students will be required to participate in class discussions, moot courts, pro se courts, legislative hearings and debates, and town meetings. It is imperative that students come to class prepared to discuss assigned readings and exercises. Through class discussion and analysis students will develop valuable problem-solving skills in addition to conflict management and the self-control needed to engage in respectful and meaningful dialogue with fellow classmates. Controversy will be encouraged to promote an environment similar to that of the Founders at the Constitutional Convention, where compromise and mutual respect was critical to drafting a Constitutional government.

.5 credit Prerequisites: 4th form or higher or approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department.

.5 credit Prerequisites: 4th form or higher or approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department.

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AP US Government (offered 2017-2018)

AP Psychology

This course seeks to foster an understanding and love of the American political process in preparation for the AP United States Government & Politics Exam. The course is equivalent to a college level political science course, which means that the students will be expected to be active learners. Students will be expected to complete a thorough amount of required readings and research current political topics. The goal and focus of this course is to provide an introduction to an active political life. Students will be exploring the constitutional foundations of American politics, the nature of the American political process, the institutions of governance, and the policy choices made created by the American political process. Needless to say, the course will be rigorous.

The purpose of AP® Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. A variety of activities, demonstrations, and projects will be provided to meet this goal of instructing scientific and empirical approaches.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in World History 2 or approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department.

AP Comparative Government (offered 2016-2017) This course is designed to familiarize students with the concepts and methods necessary to develop an understanding of some of the world’s diverse political structures. We will examine six countries in detail: China, Great Britain, Russia, Mexico, Nigeria, and Iran. These states represent a diverse range of cultural complexity and governance, allowing us to uncover similarities and differences across a wide ranging ideological spectrum. The three world approach to categorization will also be used to place governments in the proper context. Empirical and normative methods of comparison will be used consistently to analyze and assess nations historically and currently. This will equip students with the ability to identify political behaviors and patterns that lead to economic and political changes.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in World History 1 or instructor’s approval.

International Relations This course is intended as a study of geopolitics since 1945. While the United States played a major role in almost every world event since 1945, the class is not a study of US History. As a result, there will be very little discussion of US domestic history during this period. The class will instead focus on international events and look at the events through the eyes of the various parties involved in the event. Frequently, your author and I will offer sharp criticism of US policies. Vaguely speaking, the course will be divided into the Origins of the Cold War, Nationalism and the End of Colonialism, the Shifting Sands of Global Power, the Third World, and the Transition to a New Era. This course will operate like a college seminar. Instead of traditional lectures, we will tackle each unit in a group setting. I will offer you my class notes, and we will discuss each unit by going through the notes. .25 credit Prerequisites: 4th form or higher or approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in World History 2 or approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department. 14


Leadership

Model United Nations

Leadership class will challenge you as an individual and help you implement the skills and behaviors needed to lead people. The aim of this course is to grow as a student, learn about yourself, and become a better you. You will learn strategies of leadership, popular leadership styles and important leadership principles so that you may contribute to the society at large.

Political Activism is an interactive class, and the path of the course will be determined by the students in it. We will start by studying the psychology of changing opinions and behaviors, then move on to a study of how to accomplish this. We will learn about many different movements, techniques, and challenges of activism. The course will include discussions with working activists and policy-makers, as well as projects that give you experience with activist endeavors.

This course culminates with students taking part in a “Model United Nations Conference” simulation in Chicago in May 2017 in which students from 100s of schools around the USA and world come together for a real “United Nations” simulation Conference. As such, much of this course is preparing students for success at this Model United Nations Debate and Conference in Chicago. After registration for the Conference in Chicago, we will be given 1 specific country we must represent at the conference. Therefore, much of the course will be devoted to researching the history, culture, politics, and needs of our specifically designated country. However, much of the course will also be devoted to several “UN issues” in general which will be addressed, such as human rights, environmental protection, free and fair trade practices, etc. In order for success at the conference, students will also practice and improve several skills including research, debate, speaking, and presentation. This class is a unique opportunity to not only study modern global issues but also improve debate and presentation skills through a real United Nations Conference Simulation.

.25 credit Prerequisites: None.

.25 credit Prerequisites: None.

.25 credit Prerequisites: None

Political Activism

Psychology Introduction to Psychology provides students with a basic foundation in the study of the mind, its functions, and their relationship to behavior. In this class, students will cover topics including cognition, perception, personality, and mental illnesses. Genetic, environmental, biochemical, and sociological influences on the development of the human person will be considered. The text will be supplemented with films, fiction, nonfiction, and selfreports. .25 credit Prerequisites: 4th form or higher or approval from the chair of the Social Sciences Department. 15


Section 4

Sciences GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Biology

1. 3 credits of core laboratory Science, including:

Biology is a course devoted to the study of the characteristics of life and of living things and how they interact with one another. The subject matter deals with how living things are organized, (i.e. how they are put together), how they function (i.e. how life processes happen), the relationships between dierent organisms and between organisms and their environment (i.e. classification and ecology), and how organisms adapt to changes in their environment. Emphasis in this course is on the development of an understanding of the concepts through lab activities, demonstrations, problem solving activities, class discussions, and other types of activities in order to provide a solid foundation for future work in science.

a. Biology b. Chemistry 2. .5 credit from the Health and Wellness course

1 credit Prerequisites: None.

Chemistry Chemistry is an introductory course examining the properties of matter and energy. This course will prepare students who may wish to take a Chemistry class in college, or take Advanced Chemistry during their Junior or Senior years. The subject matter deals with the principles that govern the properties and reactions of materials as well as the energy changes associated with these reactions. The course places emphasis upon problem solving and lab experiences in order to prepare a proper foundation for future studies in science. 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology.

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Physics

Oceanography

This course is a yearlong introduction to several major topics in physics, including energy, force, light, sound, heat, and nuclear physics. Students successfully completing this course will have a good foundation in physics, and will be able to build upon it in a college-level physics course.

This course represents an introduction to the oceans and the study of the oceans and bodies of water like the oceans. Oceanography emphasizes the physical, chemical, geological, biological, and ecological aspects of the marine environment. Several types of marine environments from the intertidal zone to the deep sea mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vent communities will be examined. During this course an introductory survey of marine organisms will also take place emphasizing the ecology, anatomy and physiology, reproduction, and behavior of marine organisms. The course consists primarily of laboratory work and emphasis is placed on research skills.

1 credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry and Algebra 2.

Anatomy Physiology Anatomy and Physiology at La Lumiere is a Science elective course designed for upperclassmen to explore an interest in the human body; how it is structured and how it functions. The class will meet everyday for 45 minutes to learn and review material related to both anatomy and physiology of the human body. Material will be delivered approximately 50% lecture based, 25% group and activity based (including laboratory work) and 25% individual presentation based. There will also be daily homework and/or reading assignments. 1 credit Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry.

1 credit Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry.

Advanced Biology The goal of advanced biology is to prepare students for a science major college biology course and to introduce students to extensively used lab techniques and procedures. In the first semester, students focus on cell biology. In the second semester, students study genetics (molecular & Mendelian) and biotechnology. Over the course of the year, students will utilize the compound microscope, pipettes(micro and standard), spectrophotometer, volumeter, gel electrophoresis units, microcentrifuge, thermocycler, and incubator. In addition, students will learn how the processes of spectrophotometry, chromatography, gel electrophoresis, microarrays, bacterial transformations, restriction enzymes, and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) are used as tools in the laboratory. 1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Biology and instructor’s approval.

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Advanced Chemistry

AP Physics 1

Advanced Chemistry is a course designed to cover the topics that build upon what the students have learned in a first year general chemistry course. The course will assist the students in becoming proficient in chemical problem solving, while helping them to attain a reasonable depth of comprehension of fundamental chemical principles. The course also places emphasis on developing competence in problem solving skills, on developing the ability to think clearly while expressing ideas in a logical manner, and on developing and perfecting lab skills and techniques.

AP Physics 1 can be taken either as a standalone college preparatory course, or as the first year of a two-year course (the second year is AP Physics 2). It is required that all students enrolled in this course take the AP Physics 1 exam in May; this takes the place of the second semester final exam, and cannot be exempted. Topics covered include a complete study of mechanics and dynamics (including rotational motion and harmonic motion), waves and sound, electric circuits, and the Theory of Relativity.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Chemistry and instructor’s approval.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Precalculus or higher and instructor’s approval.

Biochemistry

AP Physics 2

Biochemistry is a course that extends the students knowledge of basic chemistry concepts to the biological system. It is a yearlong course that begins where we left off in Advanced Chemistry, with a short, but deeper look into some of the Organic Chemistry reactions that are important to living organisms. The remaining time will be spent looking at the three major categories of biomolecules, mainly sugars, nucleic acids, and proteins. During the progression of this course there will be numerous labs designed to give the students exposure to various online databases used in research, more practice writing formal lab reports, as well as a hands-on approach to using laboratory techniques and cutting edge technology.

AP Physics 2 is the second year of the two-year college preparatory physics program at La Lumiere. It is required that all students enrolled in this course take the AP Physics 1 and 2 exams in May; this takes the place of the second semester final exam, and cannot be exempted. Topics covered include fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, electric potential, magnetism, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and modern physics. 1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: AP Physics 1 and instructor’s approval.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: Advanced Chemistry and instructor’s approval.

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AP Environmental Science

Health and Wellness

The AP® Environmental Science course is a full-year course designed to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory college course in environmental science. Unlike most other introductory-level college science courses, environmental science is offered from a wide variety of departments, including geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography. The AP® Environmental Science course has been developed to be a rigorous science course that stresses scientific principles and analysis and includes a laboratory component (on average at least one period per week will be devoted to labs); as such, it is intended to enable students to undertake, as first-year college students, a more advanced study of topics in environmental science or, alternatively, to fulfill a basic requirement for a laboratory science and thus free time for taking other courses. The course provides students with the scientific principles required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world and draws upon various scientific disciplines. In both breadth and level of detail, the content of the course reflects what is found in many introductory college courses in environmental science.

Health at La Lumiere is an elective course required by the state of Indiana for graduation. The class will meet weekly for 90 minutes to learn and review material on topics related to a healthy lifestyle focused on a decision making approach. Topics include epidemiology, nutrition, fitness, alcohol, drugs and tobacco, stress management, dating and interpersonal relationships, sexuality, stereotypes, and sexual education. Material will be delivered approximately 50% lecture based, 50% group and activity based. There may also be homework and/or reading assignments.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry and instructor’s approval.

.5 credit Prerequisites: None.

Environmental Stewardship Environmental Stewardship is a course designed to increase awareness of ecological, social and scientific issues facing the Earth as they relate to the environment. Students will discuss the implication of human action on the environment, both positive and negative. Special attention will be afforded to human impact on the environment and current hot topic issues.  .25 credit Prerequisites: Biology.

Engineering The purpose of this class is to learn and apply methods of engineering to hands-on projects. Students will research a project, tinker and work with different materials, then build a device that meets specific parameters. After testing their device, students will repeat the process so that at the end of the semester they are ready to present their best efforts to the class. .25 credit Prerequisites: Instructor’s approval.

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Section 5

Classical and Modern Languages GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Chinese 1

1. Students must reach the third level of an individual language

In French 1 students are introduced to the sounds of the French language as they develop the four basic skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. The emphasis during this first year will be on building a working vocabulary while learning basic grammatical concepts.Students are also introduced to aspects of French culture. From the first day of class students are encouraged to use the language as they participate in class discussions, review homework assignments and perform oral presentations. 1 credit Prerequisites: None.

Chinese 2 Students will continue to learn how to speak, read, and write Mandarin Chinese. Students will continue to develop all 4 skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will be able to read and write 450-500 Chinese characters. Students will learn about the culture and history of Mandarin Chinese and its speakers. 1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in French 1 or instructor’s approval.

Chinese 3 Students will develop higher level skills including giving presentation in a variety of skills. Students will be prepared for the Hànyǔ Shuǐpíng Kǎoshì (a Chinese proficiency test) for level 3 and read a Chinese biography. 1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in Chinese 2 or instructor’s approval.

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Chinese 4

French 3

In the Honors Chinese class, students will be prepared for HSK level 4 (college Chinese major requirement). In addition, students will use projects and presentations to practice and apply higher level four skills in writing a short story;making a story book; performing short plays. 1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Chinese 3 or instructor’s approval.

French 3 will continue to develop the skills acquired in French 1 and 2. The course will review and reinforce the grammar and vocabulary already learned as well as introduce additional new material. The goal is to integrate the grammar and vocabulary into useful, authentic spoken and written language. Literary excerpts and film may be used as a basis for this integration. The majority of the class will be conducted in French.

French 1

1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in French 2 or instructor’s approval.

In French 1 students are introduced to the sounds of the French language as they develop the four basic skills: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. The emphasis during this first year will be on building a working vocabulary while learning basic grammatical concepts.Students are also introduced to aspects of French culture. From the first day of class students are encouraged to use the language as they participate in class discussions, review homework assignments and perform oral presentations.

French 4

1 credit Prerequisites: None.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in French 3 or instructor’s approval.

This course will include a complete review of all previously taught grammar and will integrate it in all four skills with a goal of authentic usage regardless of subject matter. Literary selections and films will be used as the basis for this integration. Students will be expected to demonstrate the ability to communicate with reasonable fluency and accuracy in both spoken and written French.

French 2

Latin 1

French 2 is designed to further develop the basic skills acquired in French 1. Basic concepts will be reviewed and more complex grammatical structures will be introduced. Students will be expected to communicate in French both orally and in writing. Additional readings and research will deepen students’ knowledge of French culture. The majority of the class will be conducted in French.

Latin 1 is designed to give students a solid foundation in the basic grammar and vocabulary of the Latin language, as well as introduce the civilization and literature of the ancient Romans. The primary emphasis of the course is to develop reading and translation skills in Latin while learning the first three declensions of nouns and adjectives, personal and relative pronouns, all four conjugations of verbs in the present system, both active and passive, as well as indirect statement. Culture topics include Roman houses, weddings, clothing, and literature.

1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in French 1 or instructor’s approval.

1 credit Prerequisites: None. 21


Latin 2

Latin 4 - Latin Literature

Latin is designed to increase students' knowledge of Latin grammar and vocabulary, to continue their introduction to the culture and writings of the ancient Romans, and to strengthen the skills they learned in Latin 1. The primary emphasis of the course is to improve reading and translation skills in Latin while learning the perfect system of verbs, 4th and 5th declension nouns, demonstrative pronouns, more infinitives, participles, comparison of adjectives and adverbs, deponents, as well as some of the forms and uses of the subjunctive mood. Culture topics include a unit on Pompeii, Roman education, Greek heroes and monsters, among others.

In Latin 4 - Literature, students will continue to develop and improve skills in reading and translating through a year-long examination of Vergil’s epic poem, the Aeneid. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the cultural and historical background behind the work, and will learn to further analyze Roman literature on a thematic and poetic basis. Skills in grammar and vocabulary will be reviewed throughout the year through homework assignments and daily quizzes, as well as inclass review.

1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in Latin 1 or instructor’s approval.

Latin 3 This course is designed to complete students' study of Latin grammar, and to introduce them to the conventions of Roman poetry. Students will transition to a reading/translation-focused course after the first semester. During the second semester, students will begin to read real Latin in the form of selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses. They will continue to develop and strengthen their knowledge of vocabulary and grammar, while expanding that knowledge to include features specific to poetry, such as scansion. In addition, students will begin to gain an understanding of the cultural and historical background behind the works they read, and learn to think critically about, and to analyze, Roman literature on thematic and poetic bases.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Latin 3 or instructor’s approval.

Spanish 1 The primary goal of teaching a foreign language is that each student acquires the ability to communicate the target language through listening, speaking, reading and writing. These four skills of the language are consistently reinforced in Spanish 1. In the first year of Spanish, students begin to build their vocabulary and grammar structures. They are introduced to a wide variety of lessons and begin to explore the varying cultures of the 21 Spanish speaking countries. The course is taught using an online text book and additional supplements including online videos and Spanish instructional websites. 1 credit Prerequisites: None.

1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in Latin 2 or instructor’s approval.

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Spanish 2

AP Spanish Language and Culture

The primary goal of teaching a foreign language is that each student acquires the ability to communicate the target language through listening, speaking, reading and writing. These four skills of the language are consistently reinforced in Spanish 2. In the second year of Spanish, students continue to build their vocabulary and grammar structures. They are expected to utilize the material learned during Spanish 1, as Spanish 2 builds from this course. We continue to explore the varying cultures of the 21 Spanish speaking countries. The course is taught using an online text book and additional supplements including online videos and Spanish instructional websites.

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational skills in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in Spanish. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music , laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions). 

1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in Spanish 1 or instructor’s approval.

Spanish 3 The primary goal of teaching a foreign language is that each student acquires the ability to communicate the target language through listening, speaking, reading and writing. These four skills of the language are consistently reinforced in Spanish 3. In the third year of Spanish, students continue to build their vocabulary and grammar structures while also reinforcing the previously learned material. By the end of Spanish 3, all grammar and verb tenses have been introduced. We continue to explore the varying cultures of the 21 Spanish speaking countries. 1 credit Prerequisites: C- or higher in Latin 3 or instructor’s approval.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Spanish 3 or instructor’s approval.

Advanced Spanish Literature In this advanced course, students read novels, short stories, prose, and poetry taken from the required reading list of the AP Spanish Literature exam. The readings range from as early as the Middle Ages to present day. The course includes works by Spanish authors as well as Latin American authors.  Our most notable piece is Don Quijote de La Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes. Students may take this course who have previously taken the Advanced Spanish Language course.  Seniors may choose to enroll in the Advanced Spanish Language course and the Advanced Spanish Literature course in the same year.  1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: Advanced Spanish Language and instructor’s approval.

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Section 6

Fine Arts GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Foundations of Art

1. .5 credit of Fine Arts

Foundations of Art is semester long course for students to focus on the building blocks of visual thinking and art making. Students will learn to analytically and intuitively problem solve using drawing and 2-dimensional design skills. Students will also gain an introduction to color theory and 3-dimensional design. Brief sections of art history will also be studied. .5 credit Prerequisites: None

Art Studio 2-D (oered 2017-2018) 2-D Studio Art is a year-long advanced art course that covers studies in drawing, printmaking and painting. In the first semester you will primarily learn advanced drawing techniques based on specific classroom assignments from our textbook and will conclude with a general introduction to the medium of printmaking followed by experiments with monotype and/or linocut. Various value studies in painting media and exercises in drawing from imagination will supplement our observational skills throughout the semester. In the second semester you will be introduced to painting in egg tempera, acrylic, oil and watercolor. We will also be viewing contemporary art and artists and afterwards produce paintings centered on specific conceptual themes. Class critiques will take place throughout the year, and during the second semester you will have an individual critique on a selected piece of art in front of the class. Students may take the first semester independently of the second semester, but you may not enroll in second semester without first having completed the first semester. 1 credit Prerequisites: Foundations of Art 24


Art Studio 3-D (oered 2016-2017)

Photography

3-D Studio Art is a year-long advanced art course that covers studies in sculpture, ceramics and beginning casting and moldmaking. In the first semester you will learn to create low relief sculptures, hand-built ceramic pieces, body casts and assemblage, along with several small-scale 3-D studies. A fair amount of drawing and idea development is required in the sketchbook as well. During the second semester you will learn about environmental architecture, figurative low relief sculpture, hand-made books environmental installation. Additional emphasis will be placed on overall composition, principles of design, solving structural problems and experimentation.

This 1 semester course in photography introduces students to creating photographs, including basic layout and design, color theory, shape, form, and composition. This course will familiarize the student with both digital and film photographic equipment and methods through hands-on practice. Students will finish the course by presenting a portfolio of their work.

Students may take the first semester independently of the second semester, but you may not enroll in second semester without first having completed the first semester. 1 credit Prerequisites: Foundations of Art.

Advanced Projects in Art Studio Advanced Projects in Art Studio is a course for the student who has met all previous requirements in art and wishes to pursue concentrated studies in specific 2-D or 3-D media in order to prepare a portfolio for college. Each student will meet with the instructor for an evaluation of weaknesses and strengths culminating in a rigid course of self-driven projects meant to enhance the student's art experience and goals. Monthly critiques, self-evaluation and a weekly drawing journal will also be required. Students will end the year with an art exhibition of their cumulative work.

.25 credit Prerequisites: None.

Introduction to Drama This is an introductory course that examines the history and art of theatre. Recognizing that drama is an ancient and continuing aspect of human civilization, the first part of the semester will explore the historical aspects of the theatre. Students will begin their study in ancient Greece, the setting surrounding the birth of theatre, as we know it, and then survey the major innovations that ushered drama into its modern existence. Several major works of the Western canon that represent hallmarks in the development of drama will be studied during this time. Recognizing that drama is not merely an artifact of the past, but is a living art, we will spend the second half of the semester writing and producing a one-act play. Students will be introduced to light design, set design and construction, sound design, costume design, make-up design, stage management, and properties. .5 credit Prerequisites: None.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: Art Studio 2-D, Art Studio 3-D or instructor’s approval.

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Music Appreciation

Introduction to Music Theory

Students will learn to trace the historical musical trends which have shaped the sounds of their favorite songs and musical artists. The course will begin with a four week exploration of the historical, social, cultural, and musical impact of the Blues on Contemporary Music. A second unit will explore the roots of Western European music. A final project will consist in performing a song, or an instrumental work for the class, either as a soloist or as an ensemble. This course fulfills students’ first-year art-credit requirement.

Students will learn to write music using standard staff-notation and by studying classic compositions. The course will cover keysignatures, intervals, triads, voice-leading procedures, time signatures, rhythmic values, phrasing, timbre, and range. Each student will work independently on a personalized music-theory project. Options for the project include writing an original song or piece of music or analyzing a favorite piece of music or a song.

.5 credit Prerequisites: Instructor’s approval.

.25 credit None

AP Music Theory

Concert Choir is an opportunity for students to grow as musicians. Singing is the foundation of all music, whether choral or instrumental. Learn how to make your body an efficient musical instrument, pitch tuning through vocal intonation, and intra-personal skills required to make music in a group, musical expressive techniques to bring music off the page and into your listener’s hearts.

The ultimate goal of an AP Music Theory course is to develop a student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. The achievement of this goal may be best promoted by integrated approaches to the student’s development of: aural skills through listening exercises; sight-singing skills through performance exercises; written skills through written exercises; compositional skills through creative exercises; and analytical skills through analysis of musical scores.

.5 credit Prerequisites: Instructor’s approval.

1 credit - Honors Prerequisites: Introduction to Music Theory and instructor’s approval.

Concert Choir

Jazz Ensemble Jazz Ensemble provides students who can play an instrument to expand their performance experience through improvisation. Students will listen to music and incorporate the ideas of worldclass musicians into their own playing. They will learn how to express their own musical ideas in a spontaneous way. Students will improve their sense of rhythm and expand their understanding of scales and chords. .5 credit Prerequisites: Instructor’s approval. 26


Section 7

Theology and Philosophy GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Biblical Literature

1. 1.5 credits of Theology and Philosophy, including...

In this class we will be studying the Old Testament (OT) and the New Testament (NT). It will enable you to recognize allusions to the OT and NT in literature, art, and Western culture. This class will focus on OT tradition and NT application, in order to encourage faith formation. During this term, a familiarization will be developed with the major characters, vocabulary and stories in the Bible. Students will also be exposed to introductory Theological material.

a. Biblical Literature or World Religions b. Ethics (6th form only)

.5 credit Prerequisites: None.

World Religions This class begins and ends with humanity’s big questions: 1) What is the meaning of life?; 2) Is there a God?; 3) What happens after you die?; 4) Is the Universe moral & just?; 5) What does it mean to be human? During the course of this semester we will explore together how different world religions & cultures have answered these questions. Major philosophies explored will be Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Native American Spirituality, Goddess Spirituality, Judaism, Christianity & Islam. A major theme of this class is to also explore if there are different “ways of knowing” the answers to these big questions through the use of different faculties: reason, emotion, faith, imagination, intuition, language, memory, and experience. The goal of this course is to assist students in the exploration of these questions by looking at how different religions, cultures, and ways of knowing have approached them. As such, we will not only read about religious ideas but also experience them through doing yoga, meditation, mandala-making, tai-chi, calligraphy, and field trips .5 credit Prerequisites: None.

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Ethics

Catholicism

The primary goal of this course is to think critically about right and wrong - good and evil - in human actions. This includes thinking about the meaning of human life itself, the ultimate basis of right and wrong in general, and the application of ethical principles to particular controversial cases that aect our lives and our daily choices. The course includes an intensive study of logic, extensive primary source readings in moral philosophy (e.g. Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Mill), and study and debate of matters of contemporary controversy such as abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, and animal rights.

The goal of this course is to come to a deeper understanding of and appreciation for the fundamental tenets of the Catholic faith. The course is divided topically into two sections: (1) the fundamentals of Christian apologetics, which is a defense of the rationality of believing in the existence of God and the divinity of Jesus Christ; (2) the fundamentals of Catholic theology, which is an exploration of the teaching contained in the Apostles' Creed.

1 credit Prerequisites: 6th form students only.

Apocalyptic Literature Apocalyptic Literature is a style of writing popular among postexilic Jews and early Christians. This course will use the book of Revelation as its central text, while using other passages out of the Old and New Testaments as secondary sources. Over the course of the semester we will study the dierent viewpoints and theories of the apocalypse within Christianity. After an understanding of the text is acquired, we will compare and contrast other religious and non-religious text/media in an attempt to understand how these religions/societies believe the world will end.

.25 credit Prerequisites: None.

Advanced Logic The goal of this course is to expand upon the study of logic initiated within the Ethics course and to explore the philosophical foundations and applications of Aristotelian Logic. .25 credit Prerequisites: First semester of Ethics course.

.25 credit Prerequisites: None.

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