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WORD S W I S E FOR T HE

A WELLNESS PUBLICATION BY LAKEWOOD HEALTH SYSTEM

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HOMETOWN HERO Huck Holst Community volunteer VOLUNTEER’S VIEW Painting Kindness Tough as nails HEALTH TIPS Words From Dr. Halfen The best treatment for you SPECIALIST SPOTLIGHT Deciding Factor Dr. Kathryn Riordan, Rhuematologist

Piecing Together Peace

Marge Pearson (see page 5)

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PRODUCT PERSPECTIVE A Healthy imPACT Pat’s fight to prevent diabetes

4 A New Knee

LHS Joint Connection

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HOMETOWN HERO Huck Holst Community volunteer

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PERSONAL CONNECTION Pieces To Peace Marge Pearson

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VOLUNTEER’S VIEW Painting Kindness Tough as nails

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HEALTH TIPS Words From Dr. Halfen The best treatment for you

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SPECIALIST SPOTLIGHT Deciding Factor Dr. Kathryn Riordan, Rhuematologist

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HOME FRONT Home Cook’n Recipes submitted by you

11 Look’n Back

Favorite idols of the 1960s

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FIT MIND FIT BODY Mind Puzzler Where in the world?

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AFTER THE BEAT HealthBEAT Easing the pain of arthritis

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LOOKING AHEAD Happenings Upcoming events

WORD S W I S E FOR T HE

Stay Connected Welcome to Words for the Wise

Winter. We’ve had beautiful frosty mornings and soft, fresh snow. But what about the not-so-beautiful part of winter? When I step out into the dark, unwelcoming cold, I’m ready to crawl back into bed and hide under the covers. To be honest, winter isn’t all that fun for me. Maybe because I don’t own a snowmobile and I would be more likely to break a leg skiing than to make it all the way down the hill. Winter can be downright sad. And for us Minnesotans, we have to deal with it for quite a few months. So, what do I do to stay happy? First, I make myself spend some time at the gym. A nice, brisk walk or a jog can pull me out of a slump. Breaking a sweat does much more for your health than just keep you fit. It increases the “happy” chemicals in our brains called serotonin and wards off those winter blues. Another winter-combating act I do in these snowy months is keep in touch. After a long day at work, plopping down on the couch seems extra-appealing. But picking up the phone and staying connected with family and friends helps me feel a little less isolated in this frozen tundra we call home. Remember, if you’re feeling down, there’s help available. Lakewood Reflections is a senior behavioral health program designed to help seniors bounce back from emotional issues, ranging from severe to mild. Please call 218-296-1446 for you or a loved one. It feels great to get back to feeling “yourself” again. Make it a happy winter.

-Maggie Lausten Public Relations Coordinator Lakewood Health System WORDS4WISE@LAKEWOODHEALTHSYSTEM.COM


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A Healthy imPACT Pat’s fight to prevent diabetes with help

HEALTHY HELP PACT program & support

Diabetes affects 23.6 million people in the U.S.—that’s 7.8 percent of the population, and enough to keep the healthcare world working hard at preventing it. For some people like Pat Rydbom, diabetes prevention comes at just the right time. Pat’s family medicine physician at Lakewood Health System, Dr. Michael Hudalla, caught her high blood sugar during a routine check-up. Pat was determined a great candidate for the PACT program at Lakewood Health System. PACT stands for Pursuing Active Change Together. The program is led by Lakewood Health System staff members Kelly Coughlin and Laurie Bach. Coughlin is a registered and licensed dietician and Bach is a registered nurse. Both are certified as diabetes educators and set aside scheduled PACT meetings every month to educate and support patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes. “I was on the road to becoming a statistic,” said Pat. “My high blood sugar was a result of merely becoming older…but I’m sure my diet and lifestyle had something to do with it, too.” Pat’s lifestyle did have something to do with her pre-diabetes. Her dietitian knew one of the first things Pat had to do was change her diet. Pat hadn’t been very concerned with the amount of processed and “junk” food she ate. The PACT program instilled new standards for Pat’s eating habits. “I gave up pie and cake, and even my little fun-sized candy bars. I was just used to eating that kind of food often, so becoming aware was the first step towards becoming healthy.” Pat limited sweets and fats and replaced them with fresh fruits and vegetables. During her PACT meetings, Pat learned helpful tools to infuse her diet with vitamin-rich foods, without sacrificing the satisfaction of enjoying a meal. “I wasn’t a real fan of raw vegetables, but I learned which vegetables were the best for me when cooked. I even learned that some vegetables are better for me cooked instead of raw.” Whole grains, partnered with produce and lean meats, became her standard staple for healthy eating. Healthy eating started Pat’s transformation from unhealthy and sluggish to healthy and energetic. “Kelly and Laurie taught me how to incorporate exercise into daily living,” said Pat. “I dog-sit for my daughter while she’s at work, which gives me a great reason to walk a few blocks everyday—to give both of us a chance to stretch our legs and get some exercise.” Pat also has a stationary bike at home to use on days when the weather isn’t cooperating.“The encouragement and tools I was given to

When Pat joined the PACT program at Lakewood Health System in September of 2008, she had an average blood sugar of 111. In August of 2009, when she finished the program, her blood sugar was down to a healthy 101. And on top of that, she lost 10 pounds and became more in shape. “Pat was able to avoid a diagnosis of diabetes for at least another 10 years,” said Bach. “When she started PACT, she was pre-diabetic and would have developed diabetes in the near future. Today, she’s in the normal range. Pat not only dodged diabetes, but she’s also adding years to her life.” Pat expressed her gratitude, “All I can say is the PACT program at Lakewood Health System is just what I needed to change. Kelly and Laurie are definitely cut out for diabetes education because they were so dedicated in helping me become healthier. I would recommend the program to anyone looking to improve their lifestyle and change their health for the better.”

Want to know more about PACT and developing a healthy lifestyle? Take the first step today. For more information please contact Nola at 218-894- 8586.

CONTACT LAKEWOOD HEALTH SYSTEM’S PACT PROGRAM AT: 218-894-8586 WORDS FOR THE WISE I WINTER 2010

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hometown HERO

A PASSION FOR HIS COMMUNITY...

Hometown Hero:

Huck Holst

Nominated by Virginia Rollins

Volunteers like Huck Holst keep our community running smoothly with their time and dedication.

Not many people know the meaning of “sticking to it” like Huck Holst. Not less than a decade at a time, Huck dedicates his heart and soul to local organizations. • • • • • • • •

Years working with the Staples Motley School District in transportation: 41 Years married to his wife, Marilyn: 41 Years as the Quarter Master of the VFW: 15 Years as a Lions member: 25 Years cooking lutefisk dinner for Faith Lutheran Church: 25 Years served as treasurer of the Men’s Club at Faith Lutheran: 25 Years in the VFW Color Guard: 20 Years as a foster parent: 10

Huck Holst was born and raised in Staples. This is where he went to school before he joined the Marine Corps at the age of 18. After four years of service and becoming a Vietnam Veteran, Huck returned home to marry the love of his life, Marilyn. His transportation experience in the service led him to work for the Staples Motley School transportation department. To make life just a bit more hectic, he also joined the Staples Police Department and drove

ambulance for the City of Staples. “I never had time to change out of my police uniform before starting the morning bus route, so I took off my gun belt and hung it behind the driver’s seat. I never had any trouble from the kids,” said Huck with a chuckle. Next on his to-do list was to have a family. “We are blessed with three natural children and one adopted child. Derek and Darren each have their own construction companies in town, Debbie has been working for Central Lakes College for 16 years and Kenny lives in Brainerd,” said Huck. Now with nine grandchildren, Huck and Marilyn have become No. 1 fans for Staples athletics. “If I’m not able to be at each sports game, Marilyn is there, cheering the kids on.” All of their own children were in sports—now the grandchildren carry on the tradition. Football, wrestling, cross-country, basketball, track, there’s no break for the Holsts. “I love every minute of it,” said Huck. The three eldest of their grandchildren have already lettered, at only seventh grade. Huck’s endless involvement has

given so much to others. “I like to help people—especially the elderly. I hope someday when I’m older, people will help me. I get a lot of selfsatisfaction doing what I do.” Every Sunday, Huck picks up elderly residents at Lakewood Pines and brings them to the service at Faith Lutheran Church. He’s even taken up the tradition to cook the annual lutefisk dinner. “The fall before he died, Bill Haugen brought me to Glenwood to pick out the lutefisk. That’s the fall he taught me how to prepare the dinner. I never imagined I would be making it by myself the very next year,” said Huck. “Volunteering is about being selfless. It makes for a great feeling at night when I get home.” Huck makes sure he gives due credit to his own support system. “Marilyn has been my rock. She supports me 100 percent,” said Huck. “I am also lucky to have such a dedicated crew at the bus garage and throughout the school district. After 16 years as the manager, I can’t think of a better group of individuals to help me. They make my job easy.”

TO NOMINATE YOUR HOMETOWN HERO CONTACT MAGGIE: 2 1 8 - 8 9 4 - 8 8 1 8

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A New Knee Your...Joint Connection

The Mayo Clinic—a veteran in providing top-of-the-line surgical care—defines joint replacement as a form of pain relief, and more importantly, a way to restore quality of life. At Lakewood Health System, a program called Joint Connection offers comprehensive knee replacements in partnership with surgeons from Northern Orthopedics in Brainerd. During knee replacement, a surgeon removes damaged bone and cartilage around the knee and replaces it with an artificial joint (prosthesis) made of metal alloys, high-grade plastics and polymers. There are a number of options for joint prosthesis, designed with age, weight, activity level and overall health in mind. A new knee will duplicate a natural knee’s ability to roll and glide as it bends. A knee replacement can decrease pain and disability in people with knee problems caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other degenerative conditions, such as avascular necrosis—a condition in which obstructed blood flow causes your bone tissue to die. Candidates for knee replacement may include those who: • Have pain that limits activities such as walking, climbing stairs and getting in and out of chairs, or if moderate or severe knee pain is experienced while at rest. • Have limited function or mobility, such as chronic knee stiffness and swelling that prevents bending and straightening the knee. • Have tried other methods to improve symptoms, for example, resting, weight loss, physical therapy, a cane or other walking aid, medications, braces and surgery, but they’ve failed. • Have a knee deformity, such as a joint that bows in or out. • Are age 55 or older. Knee replacement is typically performed in older adults, but it may be considered for adults of all ages. Young, physically active people are more likely to wear out their new knee prematurely. For those people, a doctor may recommend continued nonsurgical treatment or suggest an alternative surgery such as arthroscopy, leg straightening (osteotomy), or a partial knee replacement, which replaces fewer components than does a total knee replacement. • Are generally healthy. Good candidates for knee replacement are typically healthy, without conditions such as restricted blood flow, diabetes, obesity or infections that can complicate surgery and recovery. These conditions alone won’t disqualify you from surgery, but may slow healing and increase your risk of infection after surgery.

JOINT CONNECTION

Comprehensive Replacement Care When you receive a new knee at Lakewood Health System, it will be through Joint Connection, our comprehensive joint replacement program designed to work with patients from consultation to recovery. Joint Connection was created with the patient in mind, as a means to restore quality of life. Joint Connection staff members are knowledgeable, experienced professionals that specialize in joint care. Staff involved includes a Joint Connection Coordinator who will be your guide throughout the program, surgeons, physicians, physicians’assistants, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, social workers, dieticians, pharmacists and massage therapists. Northern Orthopedic surgeons will perform replacement surgery at Lakewood Health System, including Dr. Paul Rud, Dr. Christopher Metz and Dr. Amy Lelwica. Lakewood Health System has been offering orthopedic services through consulting physicians for over 25 years, but Joint Connection takes orthopedics to a whole new level. After surgery, a patient will move towards normal activity within 6 to 12 weeks.

To learn more about Joint Connection, call Jennifer Strickland, Joint Connection Coordinator at 218-894-8578.

CONTACT LAKEWOOD HEALTH SYSTEM’S JOINT CONNECTION AT: 218-894-8578 WORDS FOR THE WISE I WINTER 2010

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personal CONNECTION

PIECE Piecing together a...

LIFE OF

PEACE A diagnosis of any kind is tough to deal with. No one wants to hear that their health is in jeopardy. Marge Pearson knows the shock of deteriorating health better than many. For Marge, good news of possible cures didn’t come with her diagnosis more than 30 years ago. To date, there’s no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS).

Marge Pearson holding her favorite puzzle, one of many that decorate the halls of the Care Center at Lakewood Health System in Staples.

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Early in her high school years in Superior, Wisconsin Marge developed a love for art. From drawing to oil painting, Marge created beautiful works of art— many of which she still has today. While working as an LPN in Duluth, Marge met her boyfriend of over 20 years while he was visiting his hometown. Bud, also a native of Superior, lived in Wadena when they met. Three years later, Marge moved her two girls to Wadena with her to live with Bud. Their happy family was shaken the year when Marge was diagnosed with MS. “I realized something was wrong because I was always lightheaded. When I picked up something with my left hand, I would accidently drop it,” said Marge. She finally decided to quit blaming it on clumsiness and went to see her doctor.


E TO PEACE “I’ve lost all use of my left hand,” said Marge. Unfortunately, Marge had always been left-handed. She had to learn to use her right hand for everything. “The change was very difficult…it became harder to do everything, especially art.” A history of MS didn’t run in Marge’s family. She didn’t even know what it was until her MRI confirmed her diagnosis. “I had no reason to know what MS was. Now I know all too well.” On February 25, 2001, Marge moved to the Lakewood Health System Care Center to help her deal with the disabilities she aquired. For Marge, the years have flown by. Prior to celebrating her 8-year anniversary, she was elected by her fellow residents as the Care Center President. During her 2-year term, Marge will be responsible for meeting with residents to collect ideas and concerns for the Care Center. As president, Marge will be the voice for all residents and present those ideas and concerns to management. “It’s pretty fun to be so involved,” said Marge. At the Care Center, Marge has made a slew of friends. “I do a lot with the residents. It’s important to stay busy and keep a positive attitude.” One of her friends even made Santa hats for all the residents this year. For Marge, two hats were made. “One says Trouble and the other has my name. I swear I haven’t been up to any mischief!” Marge’s huge smile made it evident that she has fun at the Care Center. In 1986, when Marge was diagnosed with MS, her positive attitude was threatened. “When you’re used to being active, it’s upsetting to be confined to a wheel chair. Marge was only in her 30s when she was diagnosed. Now 61 years old, she takes one day at a time. “I’ve had to bear with it, but I still have my attitude. That’s the one thing I can control.” On Tuesdays,Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays, Marge leads Bingo. “She’s a real gem here at the Care Center,” said Marilyn King, Activities Director. “She always has new ideas for activities. For each idea, she’s willing to help carry out the plan.” Marge

has led many activities creating lapel pins, Christmas decorations and handwork. During her free time, Marge oil paints, draws, makes sequin-sewn felt calendars, puts puzzles together, makes crafts and chats with other residents. Many of her works of art are displayed on the walls of the Care Center. One special piece, called Lonesome Dove, was a 1,000 piece puzzle given to Marge by Donna Hildahl. After six months of putting the pieces together, Marge had the puzzle mounted and hung near the bird cage at the Care Center. “I donated Lonesome Dove to my home—the Care Center—so others could enjoy it too.” Marge’s boyfriend, Bud visits her every week to bring new crafts, thread her needles and change up her room decorations. “He found a photo of the 1956 Thunderbird that I used to own in my younger days,” said Marge. Right next to where the picture is hung on the bulletin board in her room, is a finished, mounted puzzle of a 1950s drive-in. “Marge has been a lucky charm for many of our residents,” said Marilyn. “When other residents are down, Marge has been known to cheer them up. She’ll take time out of her day to talk with them privately. She’s our very own Saint.” Marge has two children and four grandchildren. Her daughters, Candy and Tina live in Brainerd. “My family is my happiness. We are together each holiday.” Marge goes to her daughters’ homes for special occasions, goes to the movies and enjoys all the other fun things families can do together. Although wheelchair-bound, Marge still participates in community events as much as she can. Each year, she leads the Highways for Hospice motorcycles out of the Care Center parking lot in her motorized wheelchair and participates in the Staples Railroad Days parade as part of the Lakewood Health System Care Center Cruisers. “MS hasn’t stopped my life. It’s just changed it.”

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CARE CENTER CONTACT PATRICK AT: 218-894-8358 WORDS FOR THE WISE I WINTER 2010

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volunteer’s VIEW

Painting Kindness Caring for those around her by volunteering

By providing a bit of pampering, Peggy is making those around her shine...and not only on the outside.

Green, blue, red, pink, something with sparkles. Choosing a nail polish can be the most exciting part of a manicure. At the Lakewood Health System Care Center, a special woman stops in every Wednesday to let residents do just that—and of course, provide a manicure. Peggy Andersen and her husband moved to May Township in June, 2001 to retire. Her desire to work led her to a temporary position at the Crow Wing County offices. Five years later, Peggy finally retired for good. After deciding to only work as a volunteer, Peggy called Lakewood Health System in search of volunteer opportunities. Marilyn King, the activities director at the Care Center gave Peggy a few choices. “When Marilyn mentioned doing nails, I think everything fell into place,” said Peggy. “Volunteering makes you a part of the community. I’ve met so many nice people; not only staff, but patients too.” Every Wednesday morning, Peggy makes her rounds to do about eight or nine residents’ fingernails. Although she doesn’t cut fingernails, Peggy can file and paint. “Many of the ladies

make sure their nurse cuts their fingernails ‘just so’ before I come to paint their nails.” Although the activities department supplies all the tools and polishes for Peggy, she still picks up new colors when she finds a shade she thinks the ladies would like. “Often, one of the first things they’ll say is, ‘Oh, do you have new colors today?’ When they look through my bucket of goodies, it’s like a kid in a candy store. I can see how much enjoyment it brings to them.” Peggy has been doing nails at the Care Center for nearly three years. Naturally, she makes great friendships with the women she spends time with each week. “If I can’t be there for one week, I hear about it,” said Peggy. “There are a lot of reasons they look forward to a manicure. I give them undivided attention when I’m doing their nails. It gives them an opportunity to talk about anything they want. Plus, I think they like it when people compliment their nails,” Peggy chuckled. When Peggy finishes at the Care Center, she spends time at the guest services and rehabilitation services

desks at the Main Campus, greeting patients and answering phones. To finish the day, Peggy heads to the swing bed unit to do the women’s nails and read to the men. “Volunteerism is really important. It lengthens your life and keeps your mind sharp. I’ve learned that retirement is about doing the things you love.” Peggy doesn’t only volunteer at Lakewood Health System; she also takes two of her elderly neighbors with her to the grocery store every week and works on Quilts of Valor in a Brainerd quilt shop. Quilts of Valor is a national foundation that makes quilts for those wounded in war. The Country Fabrics shop in Brainerd has distributed over 1,000 quilts for the cause. “It’s more than things like making quilts for our wounded soldiers that makes me feel good when I go home at night,” said Peggy. “Come to think of it, it feels good when I wake up every morning, too.” Peggy Andersen doesn’t plan to stop volunteering anytime soon. To volunteer, call the Lakewood Health System Fou n d a t i o n at 218-894-8503.

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W o r d s f r o m M e d i c a l D i r4 e cthe t owise r DR. JOHN HALFEN

Healthcare Question: How do you decide the best treatment for me?

When you make an appointment, you show trust in the doctor’s capabilities, probably due to previous experience. However, seeing someone new sparks this question, especially in an unfamiliar setting such as the emergency room. Lakewood Health System has been a particularly reassuring institution for patients by continuing to have the emergency services staffed mostly by your own family medicine providers. At Lakewood, we’ve even developed a “Medical Home” for people with more severe or multiple illnesses that allows the patient to contribute to and keep track of their healthcare. The communication between patient and Medical Home physician is wide open, and accepted at any time for quick dialogue. The question still remains: “How do you decide the best treatment for me?” A number of factors come into play when deciding a route of treatment. Sometimes, the most advanced treatment is not given, because it may not fit the patient’s needs. This critical factor in medicine has many implications in the current Healthcare Reform era. Seeing many doctors and getting many opinions may not be healthy, could be dangerous and is expensive. The consensus agreement in all the Healthcare Reform legislation is that your “best” care is delivered by a doctor familiar with you. We have established guidelines called the Lakewood Health System Preventative Care Guidelines. These are general principles based upon scientifically proven facts. For example, simple aspirin therapy has been proven to decrease the chance of strokes in women over 55 years old. However, at 80 years old, the risk of causing other problems reduces the value of the aspirin. Your doctor wants to be reasonably assured that you are more likely to achieve benefit from a therapy than to be harmed. There is also the matter of choice. Sometimes the course of therapies and investigations recommended is not what the patient wants. Patients have the right to refuse therapies, but cannot prescribe their own medications or chose their own therapies independent of their family medicine physician. For example, people often ask for specific x-rays, but without proper indications, these cannot be done. Also, medications like antibiotics are often requested for colds, but because a cold is a viral infection, antibiotics will not work. You may, and SHOULD, ask your doctor the “How” question whenever you wish—it is your right to know why a specific treatment is recommended. For the success of the treatment, it’s important that you and your doctor are on the same page.

YOUR HEALTH

And Your Neighbor’s Health When your doctor choose a treatment plan for you, he/ she will take many things into consideration—including the effects your treatment may have on society. A good example is the rationing of influenza vaccines during this season’s outbreak. The initial vaccinations were reserved for the most susceptible people (young children) and for those most in a position to get the illness and spread it (healthcare personnel). Recommendations are also favored for the most “cost effective” measures, meaning those that affect a large number of people. For example, decreasing cigarette smoking benefits the public dramatically, so it is focused on in public health efforts. At Lakewood Health System, the No. 1 priority is the patient and his/her overall health. Each decision made by a family medicine physician is in pursuit of health and wellness to the highest degree.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT LAKEWOOD’S CLINIC SERVICES CALL: 218-894-1515 WORDS FOR THE WISE I WINTER 2010

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specialist SPOTLIGHT

ON-STAFF RHUEMATOLOGIST...FOLLOW HER JOURNEY

Dr. Kathryn Riordan, Rhuematologist

DECIDING FACTOR At the tender age of 10 years old, the rheumatologist we know as Dr. Kathryn Riordan decided she wanted to make her career in medicine. At such a young age, most children don’t even think about their future, let alone what they’ll do ten years later. For Dr. Riordan, it was a traumatic event that got her thinking about medicine. Dr. Riordan grew up in a small town in Wisconsin, where her family owned a crop farm with cattle, horses and chickens. She and her sisters loved to show their horses in dressage, jumping and equestrian classes. The path to the practice area was a regular trip for Dr. Riordan and her thoroughbred mare, but when another horse spooked Dr. Riordan’s, she ended up in the emergency room instead. “I broke two bones in my leg, cracked my pelvis and broke my wrist and collarbone,” said Dr. Riordan. When her horse spooked, it lost balance and fell—landing on Dr. Riordan and putting nearly 1,200 pounds of pressure on her small frame. “It took some time to heal, but my injuries didn’t keep me from getting back on.” The close-call accident got Dr. Riordan thinking about the resilience of the human body. Her interest in learning how the body works helped Dr. Riordan make the decision to pursue medicine. Dr. Riordan rode horses until the age of 18 when she left Wisconsin for her pre-med training. Over 2,000 miles from home, Dr. Riordan earned her bachelor’s degree in the San Francisco Bay Area. From there, before signing up for medical school, Dr. Riordan decided to join the Army. “I first joined to pay for medical school, but my time in the Army turned into a long-term relationship.” In the 70s, Dr. Riordan finished her general internal medicine at Fort Hood in Texas. At that time, Dr. Riordan was undecided about her specialty. “I listened and followed many different specialists. We were lucky to have a rheumatology teacher in medical school because there has always been such a shortage of practitioners.” What Dr. Riordan found interesting about the rheumatologists she studied under was, “…the rheumatologists were having a thoroughly good time. I put it on the list of specialties to look at.” By the time she decided on rheumatology, Dr. Riordan was on her way to Walter Reed Medical Center in Maryland for her residency. Then, only a couple years later, the new doctor was skipping across the country to practice on her own in Seattle, Washington at a teaching

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OCUSED hospital where she finished her time in the Army. “I served for a total of 20 years. I had experienced war games in Korea and practiced as a general internist in Honduras and Alaska. When I was done, it was time to start something new.” From Seattle, Dr. Riordan brought her family of seven back to the Midwest. “After my husband and I married in 1976, we had all five of our children while I was in the Army. Our eldest child was just starting high school when I got out, so we had another good reason to plant ourselves somewhere permanently.” St. Cloud attracted Dr. Riordan and her family because of the size and location. During her time at CentraCare, Dr. Riordan consulted with Lakewood Health System on a regular basis. Eleven years after moving to Minnesota, Dr. Riordan wanted a more personalized approach to treating patients. “In 2008, I asked Lakewood Health System about becoming a full-time rheumatologist right in Staples,” said Dr. Riordan. “It didn’t take them long to hire me on.” At Lakewood Health System, Dr. Riordan has a very unique connection with her patients. Although her initial reason to become a rheumatologist was because of the allure of the investigative qualities, her real passion for preventing and treating rheumatic diseases came when she was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) after her residency. “I noticed some suspicious joint problems after my fourth child was born. But when the problems went away during my fifth pregnancy I dismissed the issues as joint overuse and overextension.” However, the problems came back after pregnancy and persisted. Dr. Riordan suffers from one of the diseases many of her patients have— giving her an unfortunate, but incredibly useful asset in understanding the pain and frustrations associated with RA. “RA can happen to anyone of any age,” said Dr. Riordan. “The pain can truly become unbearable. That’s why I make sure I have emergency appointments available in case someone waits until the last minute to get help with their pain.” Luckily for Dr. Riordan and her patients, the research of rheumatology has exploded. “There are so many new therapies available. When I first started training, we could slow the progression of RA, but we couldn’t stop it. Today, we can put the disease into remission for years at a time, sometimes even decades at a time. We can finally stop the damage that RA causes. It makes work much more fun because I know I can help my patients lead a normal life instead of becoming crippled with pain.” The types of patients Dr. Riordan sees are those with soft tissue and muscle pain, arthritis, osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency consequences. “Rheumatology isn’t a ‘black and white’ type of medicine,” said Dr. Riordan. “It’s a lot of puzzle-solving.”

LOVING LIFE Sharing the journey Dr. Riordan and her husband Daniel have five children—Katlin, Abby, Collin, Megan and Rose— who are all currently studying for their careers, ranging from environmental studies to nursing to teaching. The rest of her family, a dog and two AfricanGray Parrots, live with her in St. Cloud. “Apparently, there are a couple alleged cats on the other floor of the house. But I’m severely allergic so they’re truly ‘alleged’ to be living there because I have never met them.” Dr. Riordan finds quiet time at her cabin on Lake Alexander. “I love the quiet. This time of the year, when it’s cold, it’s the most peaceful at the lake.” In her free time, she knits, reads, spins her own wool, makes pottery and drives her “red sports car”—a restored 1967 Datsun Roadster.

LEARN MORE ABOUT RHEUMATOLOGY AT LAKEWOOD BY CALLING: 218-894-1515 WORDS FOR THE WISE I WINTER 2010

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home FRONT

Home Cook’n Recipes submitted by you...

Carrot Cake

From the kitchen of Connie Hall, Wadena Refrigerated butter-flavored cooking spray 2 large egg whites, at room temp 1/2 cup plain nonfat yogurt 3 tablespoons canola oil 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce 1/3 cup dark brown sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 cup shredded carrots 4 oz. unsweetened crushed pineapple w/juice 1/2 cup dark raisins

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Position top rack in the center of oven. Lightly coat a 9-inch bundt pan with cooking spray. Dust with flour and tap out excess. In a large bowl, whisk together egg whites, yogurt, oil applesauce brown sugar and vanilla. On a piece of waxed paper, sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. Gradually add to egg-applesauce mixture, stirring until mixed. Stir in carrots. Drain and reserve the juice from the pineapple. Stir the drained pineapple and raisins into the cake batter. Spoon the batter into the prepared pan, smoothing the top with a spoon. Back for 40-45 minutes, until tester comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes. Slide a thin knife around the edges and center of the cake to loosen it from the pan. Invert onto a rack to cool.

Submit a recipe To submit your favorite recipe to Words for the Wise, call Maggie at 218-894-8818 or e-mail words4wise@ lakewoodhealthsystem.com

1960s

Look’n Back Favorite idols of the 1960s 1.

Which is false about Mary Tyler Moore? A. She had a screen name of Laura Petrie B. She won three Emmys for The Dick Van Dyke Show C. CBS hosted The Mary Tyler Moore Show

4.

John H. Glenn Jr. became famous in 1963 for what? A. Starring in West Side Story B. Coining the dance “Twist” C. Completing the first American orbital flight

2.

How did Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy meet her husband John F. Kennedy? A. At George Washington University B. During a Washington Times-Herald interview C. In Southampton, NY where they were both born

5.

Jimi Hendrix performed at Woodstock in which year? A. 1968 B. 1969 C. 1967

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Cassius Clay beat who to become the heavyweight champion in 1965? A. Sonny Liston B. Henry Cooper C. Cleveland Williams 1. B, 2. B, 3. A, 4. C, 5. B, 6. A

6. 3. Martin Luther King gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech on what date? A. August 28, 1963 B. June 26, 1963 C. August 28, 1964


fit mind FIT BODY

Mind Puzzler Where in the world? 1

2

3

4

7

5

6

8

STEP-BY-STEP 9

Fall prevention

10

11

12

Making simple changes can prevent even the scariest falls— inside and outside of your home.

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15

17

16

18

19 20

22

21

23

Across 7. World’s largest desert (6) 8. Belgian port (6) 9. Europe’s highest active volcano (4) 10. Caribbean island (7) 11. Quito is the capital (7) 13. African mountain range (5) 15. Capital of Egypt (5) 17. Famous Italian opera house (2,5) 20. Spanish city at the foot of the Sierra Nevada (7) 21. Russian city (4) 22. Capital of the Philippines (6) 23. South American river (6) Down 1. Sea to the east of Sweden (6) 2. Indonesian island (4) 3. Capital of Thailand (7) 4. These Asian countries are North and South (5)

Answer will be printed in our next issue.

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5. 23 empties into this ocean (8) 6. Capital of Turkey (6) 12. Sea to the east of Italy (8) 14. Island group east of Florida (7) 16. Sea between Greece & Turkey (6) 18. Capital of Portugal (6) 19. Asian country (5) 21. Muscat is the capital (4) Answer to last issue’s puzzle.

Tips to prevent falls: • Remove things you can trip over from stairs and places where you walk. • Move furniture so you have a clear pathway. • Remove small throw rugs or use double-sided tape to keep them from slipping. • Install handrails and lights in all staircases. • Improve the lighting in your home. • Install a night light. • Keep items you use often in cabinets you can reach easily without using a step stool. • Have grab bars installed next to your toilet, tub and shower. • Use non-slip mats in the bath tub/shower floors. •

Wear shoes that give good support and have non-slip soles. Avoid wearing slippers and shoes with deep treads.

• Keep phone within easy reach. • Apply salt/sand to icy sidewalks. WORDS FOR THE WISE I WINTER 2010

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after the BEAT

Couldn’t be there? Here’s what you missed!

Easing the Pain­

ANSWERS ABOUT ARTHRITIS The term arthritis is used to describe more than 100 rheumatic diseases and conditions that affect joints, the tissues which surround the joint and other connective tissue. • Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis and there is no known prevention or treatment to slow its progression. The hands, knees, hips, back, neck, shoulder and base of the big toe are the areas that osteoarthritis is most commonly found. • Vitamin D is necessary for bone health in order to prevent bone loss. A deficiency in vitamin D can decrease muscle strength and worsen pain in fibromyalgia. If you think your pain may be linked to a vitamin D deficiency, consult with your doctor or rheumatologist. • Risk factors for osteoporosis (a type of arthritis) include: being female, being Caucasian/Asian, sex hormone deficiency, low body mass, lifelong low calcium intake, sedentary lifestyle, excessive alcohol use and smoking. • Sleep deprivation can cause an increase in pain for those with fibromyalgia. Lakewood Health System offers Rheumatology services that focus on medical diagnosis and treatment of arthritis and other disorders of the bones, muscles and joints. To schedule an appointment, please call 218-894-1515.

YOUR TEAM

Psychiatric Services Mark Holub, MD Tom Wittkopp, MD Deb Herbaugh, APRN, MS, CNS Psychological Services Julie Eggers-Huber, PsyD, LP Licensed Therapist Marilyn Kiloran, MSW, LICSW On-site Medical Care Marc DeBow, PA-C Psychiatric Services Director Kathe Dellacecca, MSW, LICSW Clinical Nurse Manager Danette Diethert, RN, MSN Social Services Nancy Rach, MS Outreach Coordinator Corrie Brown, MA, LPCC, LAMFT

The Right Step. Right Here. Here for you to lean on Lakewood Reflections offers hope for adults 55 years and older, who just ‘aren’t feeling themselves’. If you or a loved one is experiencing any of the following symptoms, please call­—we can help. • Lack of energy, motivation or interest • Avoiding family and friends • Constant worry/sadness/loneliness • Sleep irregularity or changes in appetite

A referral can come from you, a medical provider or family member. Take the right step and call today.

HOSPITAL I CLINICS I SENIOR SERVICES

Lakewood Reflections S E N I O R B E H AV I O R A L H E A L T H

Staples • Motley • Pillager • Eagle Bend • Browerville

218-296-1446 • www.lakewoodhealthsystem.com LEARN MORE ABOUT RHEUMATOLOGY AT LAKEWOOD BY CALLING: 218-894-1515

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words for the wise

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WORDS the wise

Happenings SUPPORT GROUPS Gastric Bypass 3/9, 4/13 6:00 - 7:00 p.m. LHS Senior Campus Call: Jena at 218-894-8509 Grief Support 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9 3:00 - 4:30 p.m. LHS Main Campus Call: Gayle at 218-894-8623 Multiple Sclerosis 3/11, 4/8 4:00 - 5:30 p.m. LHS Senior Campus Call: Angela at 218-894-8393 Sleep Apnea 2/23, 3/23, 4/27 2:00 - 3:30 p.m. LHS Main Campus Call: Tracy at 218-894-8482

CLINICS Foot Care Clinic 3/5, 3/11, 4/2, 4/9 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. LHS Senior Campus Foot Care Clinic 2/19, 3/19, 4/16 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Scandia Valley Town Hall Foot Care Clinic 2/26, 3/26, 4/23 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. LHS Motley Clinic Call: Home Care Office at 218-894-8080

EVENTS/EDUCATION Laugh & Live Well: Her Story Women’s Health Expo 2/20 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Central Lakes College, Staples Tickets: Nola at 218-894-8586 Go Red Battling Heart Disease in Women 2/25 4 - 8 p.m. Grand View Lodge, Nisswa Tickets: Amy at 218-838-0368

Take action—reduce stress

If something is worrying you, be it a health problem, debt, or divorce, make that doctor’s appointment. Get some debt counseling. Find out your rights. The reality is often less stressful than sitting alone worrying about it. Think positive thoughts

When you leave the house each morning, say and mean, “I’m going to have a great day, it’s going to be lots of fun,” rather than thinking “Oh no, another dreary day to get through.”

ON-STAFF SPECIALISTS AESTHETIC SKIN CARE Leighanne Holmes, M.D. OB/GYN Carol Uhlman, M.D. Oncology John Weitz, M.D. Orthopedic Sandy Boily, PA-C podiatry David C. Schleichert, D.P.M. Psychiatry Mark Holub, M.D. Thomas Wittkopp, M.D. Deb Herbaugh, R.N., C.N.S. Psychology Julie Eggers-Huber, PsyD, L.P. Rheumatology Kathryn Riordan, M.D. Surgical services Sandra Hanson, M.D., F.A.C.S. Patricia Mahoney, M.D.

VISITING SPECIALISTS CARDIOLOGY DERMATOLOGY GASTROENTEROLOGY NEPHROLOGY OPHTHALMOLOGY PATHOLOGY PULMONOLOGY ORTHOPEDICS PODIATRY UROLOGY SURGICAL DENTISTRY EAR, NOSE AND THROAT

Specialists are seen under the guidance of your family medicine physician, to make an appointment call 800-525-1033 or 218-894-1515. Visit www.lakewoodhealthsystem.com for a full list of specific specialists.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SPECIFIC EVENTS CONTACT KRISTEN AT: 218-894-8577 WORDS FOR THE WISE I WINTER 2010

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WORD S W I S E

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A WELLNESS PUBLICATION BY LAKEWOOD HEALTH SYSTEM

Staples Hospital Lakewood Health System 218-894-1515 FOUNDATION 218-894-8503 The Shoppe 218-894-8669 MEDICAL MARKETPLACE 218-894-8276

Clinics STAPLES CLINIC 218-894-1515 MOTLEY CLINIC 218-352-6922 PILLAGER CLINIC 218-746-4550 BROWERVILLE CLINIC 320-594-2231 EAGLE BEND CLINIC 218-738-2804

Senior Services CARE CENTER 218-894-8345 LAKEWOOD REFLECTIONS 218-894-8200

YOUR HOME

for healthcare.

HOSPITAL I CLINICS I SENIOR SERVICES Staples • Motley • Pillager • Eagle Bend • Browerville

49725 County 83 Staples, MN • 218-894-1515 www.lakewoodhealthsystem.com

LAKEWOOD MANOR 218-894-2124 LAKEWOOD PINES 218-894-4460 HOME CARE & HOSPICE 218-894-8080 CARE VAN 218-894-8331

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER USING SOY BASED INKS

Words for the Wise Winter 2010  

A wellness publication by Lakewood Health System

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