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WORD S W I S E FOR T HE

A WELLNESS PUBLICATION BY LAKEWOOD HEALTH SYSTEM

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HOMETOWN HERO Bernie St. Pierre Community volunteer VOLUNTEER’S VIEW Paying It Forward Giving back & growing HEALTH TIPS Sleepiness Put To Rest A sleep study story SPECIALIST SPOTLIGHT Blazing The Trail Dr. Sandra Hanson, Surgeon

Two Men, Two Stories,

One Passion (see page 4)

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PRODUCT PERSPECTIVE Finding The Way One man’s journey through depression

3 HOMETOWN

HERO

Bernie St. Pierre Community volunteer

4 PERSONAL

CONNECTION Two Men, One Passion Lyle Freer & Lee Denny

7 VOLUNTEER’S

VIEW

Paying It Forward Giving back & growing

8 HEALTH

TIPS Sleepiness Put To Rest A sleep study story

9 SPECIALIST

FOR T HE

It’s About You

CONTENTS 2

WORD S W I S E

SPOTLIGHT

Blazing The Trail Dr. Sandra Hanson, Surgeon

11 H O M E

FRONT Home Cook’n Recipes submitted by you... Look’n Back How well do you know the 1960s?

12 F I T

MIND FIT BODY Mind Puzzler Spooky creatures & critters

13 A F T E R

Welcome to Words for the Wise

I was recently on a flight from Minneapolis to Chicago and lucky for me, my boarding pass had 14F as the seat number. Yes! A window seat. Once I was all settled in, I waited for the powerful takeoff to press me far back into my seat. As my ears tightened, I noticed how the buildings below started to become wooden toys. I couldn’t help but think of Mr. Rogers and the aerial view they show of his neighborhood in the first moments of the show. Not only did I see the metrodome and brand-new Target Field turn into Barbie accessories, but I saw how what may seem large in real life, actually becomes miniscule in some perspectives. As the landscape became squares of colored fields with worm-path roads and the clouds took over, I realized how lucky we are to not only avoid anonymity at Lakewood Health System, but we’re each embraced with genuine interest and concern as patients. Flying above its customers isn’t what Lakewood Health System is about. Instead, the people at Lakewood Health System focus on every person and every detail to become an exemplary healthcare provider, helpful resource and stand-by friend. I invite you to delve into the stories shared in this edition of Words for the Wise and enjoy the close-up and personal accounts from providers, customers and friends to see just how personalized Lakewood Health System truly is. Have a happy and safe autumn everyone.

THE BEAT HealthBEAT for her Be in the pink

14 L O O K I N G

AHEAD

Happenings Upcoming events

-Maggie Koehler Public Relations Coordinator Lakewood Health System

WORDS4WISE@LAKEWOODHEALTHSYSTEM.COM


product PERSPECTIVE

Finding the way One Man’s Journey Through Depression

BACK TO NORMAL An outpatient connection

Clarence Nelson, a Motley resident, spent his working years in a number of trades. From a mechanic to a farmer to a minnow-truck driver, Clarence has always led a busy life. Since retirement, Clarence and his wife Enid enjoy socializing on Sunday mornings at Faith Lutheran in Staples, volunteering and spending time with family and friends…all of which came to a halt in the fall of 2008. An unknown illness started to control Clarence’s days. The first worry was that Clarence couldn’t urinate properly. “I brought him to the doctor to figure out what was wrong,” said Enid. “We were surprised when the doctors said there was nothing physically wrong.” But other problems arose—Clarence wasn’t eating or sleeping well, had pain all over his body and felt as though he couldn’t breathe on a number of occasions. “He was tired, quiet and sick all the time,” said Enid. Whatever the nagging illness was, Enid was also feeling the effects. “Our five children were just as worried as I was. It was a mystery.” Enid was determined to solve the mystery. “I kept a list of Clarence’s pains,” said Enid. “From complaining of chest pain to abdominal pain to difficulties breathing…Clarence seemed like he was falling apart.” Dr. Julie Benson, the on-call physician on a day Clarence suffered from breathing difficulties, took a look at Enid’s list. A surprising diagnosis was in store for Clarence. Dr. Benson was concerned about depression. The next day, Clarence kept an appointment he had made weeks prior. Dr. Bill Mennis, Clarence’s family medicine provider made one last evaluation and in concurrence with Dr. Benson’s diagnosis, agreed that Clarence had been suffering from depression. “Depression is a tricky disease because it presents itself in so many forms,” said Dr. Mennis. “Clarence’s serious physical pains led us to test for things like cancer, heart disease, and respiratory diseases. Enid’s keen attention to Clarence’s personality changes shifted our investigation to think depression.” After his diagnosis, Clarence was admitted to Lakewood Reflections, Lakewood Health System’s Senior Behavioral Health Unit. While in the inpatient unit, Clarence became himself again. Working with Dr. Mark Holub, a psychiatrist at Lakewood Reflections, allowed Clarence and Enid to finally find relief. “It was a miracle,” said Enid. “The few days he spent there made a world of difference. We owe a big thanks to Dr. Holub, the social worker Marilyn and the wonderful nurses.”

Once Clarence was discharged from the in-patient unit, he began the Lakewood Reflections Structured Outpatient Program with daily group sessions lead by therapist Marilyn Kiloran, LICSW and psychologist Julie Eggers Huber, PsyD, LP. “We had group discussions and oneon-one evaluations with both Julie and Marilyn,” said Clarence. “They weren’t only great therapists, but they also became close friends. I would consider each of the staff members at Reflections a hero. They turned my life around.” Kiloran and Dr. Holub made follow-up calls to Enid to check in with the family throughout Clarence’s therapy at the outpatient unit. “They were so concerned about making sure we were comfortable with the treatment options and Clarence’s progress,” said Enid. Clarence graduated from the outpatient program after four months of therapy. “If I could offer a piece of advice to anyone feeling like I did…don’t be bashful to get help. Depression is a disease just like anything else.” said Clarence.“I have my wife and Lakewood Reflections to thank for saving me.”

If you just ‘aren’t feeling yourself’ don’t hesitate to call—we can help. Referral for admission can come from you, a health professional or a family member. Contact Corrie Brown at 218-296-1446 for more information.

CONTACT LAKEWOOD REFLECTIONS OUTPATIENT PROGRAM AT: 218-296-1446 WORDS FOR THE WISE I FALL 2009

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hometown HERO

A PASSION FOR HER COMMUNITY...

Hometown Hero:

Bernie St. Pierre Nominated by Joyce Brever

Volunteers like Bernie St. Pierre keep our community running smoothly with their time and dedication.

Bernie St. Pierre, a native of Browerville, has a passion for teaching and being involved. At the time, Bernie didn’t know that moving into the community of Staples at the age of 22 would make an impact on the future of the town. It’s obvious that it has. Starting out in a country school, Bernie used her teaching talents at a young age. “I’m so glad I had that experience. At one point, I taught eight grades at a time,” said Bernie. After three years of public school, Bernie taught at Sacred Heart elementary school, where she stayed for 37 years. In the last 19 years of her career, she served as the principal. As principal, Bernie didn’t let go of her teaching passion. She always managed to fit in half days of teaching, mostly in the third and fourth grades. During her school days, Bernie served on the Community Education Board, a committee she still serves on today. In 1993, after a 40-year teaching streak, Bernie retired. “I didn’t want to retire,” said Bernie. But four bouts of cancer made it difficult for Bernie to continue

working. Soon after retiring, Bernie joined a group in Staples called the Retired Educators Association of Minnesota. At one point, Bernie served as president for the club. In addition to her passion for teaching, Bernie also shares her time with multiple organizations in Staples. Bernie’s responsibilities are widespread. She serves as secretary for the American Legion Ladies Auxiliary; member of the VFW Ladies Auxiliary; member of the Kappa Gamma Delta chapter of women educators, by which she was named the Woman of Achievement in 1992; a volunteer for the Lakewood Health System Auxiliary, where she organizes the bloodmobile; a trustee for Sacred Heart Catholic Church, where she is a member of the bereavement committee and finally, a member of the Staples Motley Area Arts Council. Two organizations Bernie has proven her passion for are the Staples Motley Area Arts Council and Staples Historical Society. For over 20 years, Bernie has helped organize bimonthly casino bus trips that raise funds for these organizations.

“I couldn’t be in all these groups when I was a principal,” said Bernie. Although it’s difficult to call it “retirement” with such a busy life, Bernie truly enjoys her time volunteering. “I like being around people. Volunteering has become an extension of what I didn’t want to give up so many years ago,” said Bernie. “I loved teaching; it was my home away from home.” Bernie is a widow to her late husband Philip, who passed away 37 years ago. She has one daughter who lives in Maple Grove, two granddaughters and two great-grandsons.

Nominations Know someone who helps your community in a unique way? Nominate your Hometown Hero by calling Maggie at 218-8948818 or e-mail words4wise@ lakewoodhealthsystem.com

TO VOLUNTEER WITH THE AUXILIARY CONTACT CONNIE AT: 218-894-8503

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WORDS the wise

PLAY BALL Two Men, Two Stories,

ONE PASSION

These minor leaguers aren’t only Hall of Fame inductees; they’re local heroes for the sport of baseball. The day Lyle Freer moved to Lakewood Health System’s Care Center, he noticed a friend and long-time baseball rival sitting on the couch in the lobby. “Well, hi there Lee,” said Lyle. Lee Denny, also a Care Center resident, came back with, “How’s your game these days?” The two local amateur baseball players, one from Wadena and one from Verndale, became inseparable.

WORDS FOR THE WISE I FALL 2009

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LET’S PLAY personal CONNECTION

Lyle Freer started playing baseball when he was a kid. In the 1940s, there wasn’t a high school baseball team in his hometown of Isle, Minnesota. But, a competitive family of four brothers and four sisters made it impossible not to play. “He started with the church league,” said Lyle’s wife, Marlyn. “Soon, he organized an amateur team in Isle.” Before and after his service in the Army during WWII, Lyle played for Isle. It wasn’t until after his training for the Korean War that he moved to Wadena to play for the amateur team, the Wadena Chiefs. Marlyn, a Wadena native caught his eye. “We met in 1952 in the dentist’s office where I worked as an assistant. We were married two years later,” said Marlyn. The woman who kept Lyle a diehard Wadena fan also became his No. 1 fan. “As a starting pitcher, Lyle made his way up to semi-pro ball,” said Marlyn. In the 1955 season, Lyle played for the Fergus Falls Red Sox. “I happily moved to Fergus Falls to cheer him on,” said Marlyn. As one of the first semi-pro teams, the Red Sox paid their players $100 each game. “We laugh now because we thought it was a lot of money back then.” After only one year of paid baseball, Lyle returned to the Wadena Chiefs where he made a difference for many. “The field was his home away from home,” said Marlyn. “He played, he coached, he announced, he umpired…he even took care of the pitching mound. If we couldn’t find Lyle, we had only one guess.” Early in their marriage, Marlyn knew baseball was 5

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going to be a big part of their lives. “I began to love the sport right away. While Lyle was on the Minnesota State Board of Amateur Baseball from 1970–82, it wasn’t unlikely for us to watch eight games in one day at a tournament,” said Marlyn. Lyle’s baseball resume is one of a Hall-of-Famer. As early as 1957, Lyle coached the American Legion Team in Wadena, bringing the team to the state tournament in 1966 where they were named the District 6 Champions. “I think he loved coaching more than playing,” said Marlyn. “It was a part of him to help kids succeed.” Lyle also coached the youth VFW team; umpired for all local baseball teams including the Hi-10 league; held offices on the Wadena Baseball Board; directed the Minnesota State Board of Amateur Baseball, where he also served as secretary, treasurer, first vice-president and second vice president over a period of 12 years; assistant coached the Wadena-Deer Creek high school team and selflessly volunteered his time to local baseball projects. In 1983, Lyle was duly recognized for his decades of service and was inducted into the Minnesota Baseball Hall of Fame. “Lyle found so many rewards in coaching,” said Marlyn. “He truly loved it.” ••• Lee Denny, a Verndale native, grew up with baseball. After watching his father pitch for so many years, he began his own baseball career while serving in the Navy during WWII. While stationed in Washington State, he was flown to Alameda, California to play organized softball for the Navy. Although basketball was his star sport in high school, baseball was his true calling. Immediately after returning from the service in 1947, Lee began playing amateur ball for the Verndale Bison at the age of 20. As an all-star 3rd baseman, Lee was a MVP for the team.


Y BALL The young player met his better half, Donna at the Staples theatre during a night out with friends. “We still tease each other about who made the first move,” said Donna. “Even though I said the first word, he sat behind me first. That says something, doesn’t it?” Donna is a native of Staples. In 1951, the two were married. Throughout his career with the Bison, Lee helped take the team to six Minnesota amateur baseball state tournaments, taking 3rd place in 1976. Lee wasn’t the only Denny playing for the Bison. Lee and Donna had four sons and one daughter. All four of their sons, Rick, Ron, Roger and Randy played for the Bison. “That’s why he stayed in it for so long,” said Donna “He played for 34 years, until 1981. Each of our sons had a chance to play amateur baseball with him.” “At a New York Mills game against the Millers, Rick hit two home runs and Lee hit another,” said Donna. “I was sitting in the stands with tears coming down my face.” Donna loved baseball just as much as the men in her life. She managed the concession stand, sold tickets and even cleaned out the dugouts and stands after the games. “I was a one woman crew, but I enjoyed every minute of it,” said Donna. “We had to take our summer vacation after baseball because we couldn’t miss a game.” Lee was inducted into the Minnesota Baseball Hall of Fame in 1976 at the age of 49 while he was still playing for the Bison. The entire town cheered Lee on. “During the game after Lee was inducted, the announcers kept reminding the crowd about his induction,” said Donna. “The town and his team were so proud of him.” The day Lee played his last game at the age of 54, it was against Clarissa. “He could barely walk the next day,” said Donna. “He knew it was time to be done.” Donna still goes to baseball games to cheer on the Bison. “That team is part of our family.” After he retired from playing, Lee umpired for all local leagues.

Although they’re not playing anymore, Lyle and Lee didn’t leave their memories on the field. To this day, baseball is a hot topic for the two. The Freer’s and Denny’s have known each other for as long as they can remember. “Baseball is a part of our families,” said Marlyn. “We owe so many of our special memories to the game.”

Lee & Donna Denny and Lyle & Marlyn Freer.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CARE CENTER CONTACT PATRICK AT: 218-894-8358 WORDS FOR THE WISE I FALL 2009

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volunteer’s VIEW

Paying It Forward Volunteering: giving back & growing

Volunteer. A simple word that means so much. More than a service—a definite purpose.

“I wanted to give back.” The care her father received during the last six months of his life led Joann Schornack to become a hospice volunteer at Lakewood Health System. “Dad stayed with us during his last months,” said Joann. “I was so impressed with the hospice staff, including his wonderful volunteer. I wanted to give back and improve a life just like they did for my dad.” In the fall of 2006—just after her father passed away, Joann signed up for a free hospice volunteer training course offered by Lakewood. Since then, Joann has spent time with many patients. “To be recognized as a volunteer is very humbling,” said Joann. “I get back so much more than I give. It may be the appreciation of the family…or it may just be the smile of the patient…to help a patient through that time of their life is such a gift.” Joann has always been one to give. For more than 20 years, she has been a member of the Staples 93 Lions. In addition, she is active in her church, serves on the Dollars for Scholars

Board and has served on the Staples Community Foundation Board. Early in her hospice volunteering career, Joann was asked to help at the Seasons of Lights, the annual fundraiser for Lakewood’s Hospice Program. “Before then, I didn’t know how involved the Lakewood Health

The Serenity Sanctuary at Lakewood Health System. “The garden will offer a beautiful place for family members to recharge and find a quiet space,” said Joann. “What an incredible gift to the community.”

“I get back so much more that I give...” System Foundation was in executing community events like that,” said Joann. Before she knew it, Joann was volunteering with the Foundation for events like the Annual Golf Classic Tournament and Dinner Auction. While briefly working for the Foundation in 2009, Joann learned that the Foundation annually distributes over 600 bicycle helmets to area children. “The investment that the Foundation makes for the community is unbelievable.” Also during her time with the Foundation, Joann was part of the initial planning for the new memorial garden, called

To volunteer, call Connie Etzler at 218-894-8503 or e-mail connie etzler@lakewoodhealthsystem.com Lakewood Health System regularly holds a free Hospice volunteer training course. If you are interested in learning more please call Jessica Martensen at 218-894-8082.

for making a difference... Joann Schornack

TO VOLUNTEER AT LAKEWOOD HEALTH SYSTEM CONTACT: 218-894-8503

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health TIPS

Sleepiness Put To Rest Corlie Carter of Staples describes her diagnosis

“I knew it was time when I started to nod off at the wheel.” Corlie Carter, a special education coordinator for a multi-district area, felt her energy level and interest in everyday things drop dramatically. Corlie noticed little clues in November, 2008. “I started waking up a lot during the night and I didn’t feel rested in the morning,” said Corlie. “My co-workers would tease me when we traveled together about snoring.” Corlie finally found time to make an appointment in April with her family medicine provider, Kelly Thompson a nurse practitioner at Lakewood Health System. “I was ready for a change. I knew my sleepiness wasn’t normal,” said Corlie. “Kelly talked over the options with me. She said that my blood pressure had risen since my last annual physical, which could be due to menopause,” said Corlie. “She also said that menopause can cause changes in sleep patterns.” For Corlie, the possible reasons for bad sleep were endless. “December, January and February were tough months for my family,” said Corlie. “My mom was diagnosed with breast cancer and my son had brain surgery. For a moment, both Kelly and I suspected depression as the culprit for my sleep problems.” That thought changed when Corlie didn’t show any other signs of depression. Instead, Thompson helped Corlie make an appointment for a sleep study at Lakewood Health System’s Sleep Center. “It was just like staying in a hotel room for the night,” said Corlie. In Corlie’s sleep study, sleep technicians monitored her brain wave activity and snoring patterns. “I slept just like I normally did at home,” said Corlie. Corlie found out that she didn’t reach a “deep sleep” during her night at the sleep center. Not even once. The diagnosis for Corlie’s poor sleep patterns was determined as sleep apnea. Sleep apnea can be dangerous if left untreated because it causes a person to stop breathing. While she slept, Corlie’s brain would fail to send signals to her lungs to take a breath—up to a minute at a time. “No wonder I wasn’t feeling rested in the morning,” said Corlie. “I was fighting for air the whole time I slept.” At her next sleep study, the sleep technicians connected Corlie to a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine. With the CPAP equipment, Corlie’s lungs received a normal amount of oxygen during sleep, eliminating the exhausting fight for air. “They told me I slept like a rockstar!” said Corlie of her second night at the sleep center. “I couldn’t believe I slept through the whole night.”

HELPING YOU

FALL BACK TO SLEEP

ZZZ...

Snoring, daytime sleepiness and insomnia are common symptoms of a sleep disorder. But did you know that sore or dry throat, headaches, forgetfulness and mood changes can also be symptoms? A sleep study at Lakewood Heath System can help you fall back to sleep with a diagnosis, equipment and follow-up... all from one provider.

Call today to tour our sleep center.

Sleep Studies

YOUR HOME FOR HEALTHCARE

218-894-8518 QUICK SCHEDULING—CALL TODAY! www.lakewoodhealthsystem.com

FOR INFORMATION ON OUR SLEEP STUDIES CONTACT KARLA AT: 218-894-8518 WORDS FOR THE WISE I FALL 2009

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BLAZING

specialist SPOTLIGHT

ON-STAFF SURGEON...FOLLOW HER JOURNEY

Dr. Sandra Hanson, Surgeon

BLAZING THE TRAIL In the 70s, women were still fighting for equality in the professional world. Making pivotal decisions in big business came few and far between. Dr. Sandra Hanson, a general surgeon at Lakewood Health System found this inequality an exciting challenge when she was studying to become a general surgeon. “I had always been known as a trailblazer,” said Dr. Hanson. “As the last of 10 children, I was able to watch my brothers and sisters grow up and make a difference. Once I was old enough, I was ready to blaze my own trail.” A native of Waukesha, Wisconsin, Dr. Hanson went to the University of Wisconsin for her undergraduate degree. Without hesitation, Dr. Hanson began her decade of schooling and training for surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis. When asked why she chose medicine, Dr. Hanson said that people’s personalities and professions choose each other. “My mother died of pancreatic cancer when I was 17 years old,” said Dr. Hanson. “I wanted to prevent others from going through the horror of cancer.” Dr. Hanson chose surgery because it’s a definitive type of medicine. “There’s no conceptual work. I’m able to take a patient to the operating room and fix their problem. I find great satisfaction in helping my patients become well again.” After medical school, Dr. Hanson was selected to train at the University of Minnesota for eight years of surgery training, and then moved to Duluth to begin her professional practice. In Duluth, Dr. Hanson became a clinical professor and head of surgery teaching at the University of Minnesota while also leading a private practice in general surgery. It wasn’t until 1999 that Dr. Hanson left Minnesota to move to Oregon. “I was asked to create a general surgery practice from the ground 9

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G TRAIL COMMITMENT Everyday life

up at a hospital in Oregon,” said Dr. Hanson. “I’m a builder, so it was my nature to accept the challenge.” Once Lakewood Health System got wind of Dr. Hanson’s skills in building a reputable surgery practice, she was recruited back to Minnesota. “Some of Lakewood’s physicians were my students when I was a professor in Duluth,” said Dr. Hanson. “I was honored to build a general surgery practice here.” Since 2004, Dr. Hanson has been practicing in all areas of general surgery including gastrointestinal, thyroid, biliary and a specialty of hers, breast surgery. “Early in my career, I did a lot of peripheral vascular work and trauma work, but I started noticing the number of women requested me to do their breast surgery. As one of the few female general surgeons, I realized that breast health was the most important contribution I could make,” said Dr. Hanson. “It’s an area of medicine that requires genuine compassion. The unfortunate part of breast surgery is that it involves difficult emotional aspects in addition to the physical ones. Women need a surgeon that can provide the sensitivity too.” Dr. Hanson’s passion for complete and empathetic care in breast health shows in her practice. “We look at not only what’s presented to us, but we also look at our patients in their entirety to see if we can do anything else for them,” said Dr. Hanson. “The relationship with a patient doesn’t end after the operating room. With the help of my nurse Naomi, we provide the tools and the resources for our patients to become the healthiest they can be. Whether that’s putting them in touch with another physician or specialist at Lakewood or just providing simple health tips, we always try to help.” Now that Dr. Hanson has been a general surgeon at Lakewood Health System for five years, she can see the difference she’s made. “The system that Lakewood has created for its rural communities is amazing because it’s not rural at all,” said Dr. Hanson. “We’re urbanized, compassionate, thorough and still growing. I feel great satisfaction to see how far we’ve come. I can’t help but smile.”

As a general surgeon, Dr. Hanson’s life seems to revolve around her practice. “I do have a life away from work! Even though I put in 110 percent during the day at work, I have found a true passion away from work too.” Dr. Hanson raises, trains, breeds and sells quarter horses of all disciplines. “They are my children until I have grandchildren,” said Dr. Hanson. “Watching the horses I sell win national titles all over the United States and Canada is a great return, but I love just having them around to watch in the pasture. There’s something good about a horse for your soul.” Dr. Hanson’s daughter, Tara, is an attorney in Washington D.C. She graduated from George Washington University after finishing her undergraduate degree at Princeton. “I’m so proud of her,” said Dr. Hanson. “I think she’s become quite a trailblazer herself.”

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SURGICAL SERVICES CONTACT US AT: 218-894-8413 WORDS FOR THE WISE I FALL 2009

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home FRONT

Home Cook’n Recipes submitted by you...

Garden Vegetable Spread

From the kitchen of Marilyn King, Staples 6 radishes finely chopped 1-8oz. fat free cream cheese 4 tsp. finely chopped onion ½ cup of finely chopped green peppers 1 tsp. dill weed 2 stalks of finely chopped celery 2 medium carrots finely chopped Mix all ingredients together and chill. Serve with crackers or snack bread.

Recipe For Happiness

Submit a recipe

From the kitchen of Marge Pearson, Staples Take 2 heaping cups of patience 1 heart full of love 2 handfuls of generosity Dash of laughter 1 head full of understanding Sprinkle generously with kindness. Add plenty of faith and mix well.

To submit your favorite recipe to Words for the Wise, call Maggie at 218-894-8818 or e-mail words4wise@ lakewoodhealthsystem.com

Spread over a period of a lifetime, and serve everybody you meet.

1960s

Look’n Back

How well do you know the 1960s?

1. In 1963 which U.S. president was assassinated? A. Andrew Johnson B. Harry S. Truman C. John F. Kennedy

2. Which American baseball player was placed in the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962? A. Jackie Robinson B. Hank Aaron C. Ernie Banks 3. Which company invented the fist hand-held calculator in 1967? A. Unicom B. Texas Instruments C. Casio

4. In which year was the Civil Rights Act passed? A. 1961 B. 1964 C. 1969 5. Which popular TV show first aired in 1966? A. Star Trek B. Andy Griffith Show C. Bewitched 6. Who was the first man to walk on the moon in 1969? A. John Glenn B. Kathryn Sullivan C. Neil Armstrong

1. C. John F. Kennedy, 2. A. Jackie Robinson, 3. B. Texas Instruments, 4. B. 1964, 5. A. Star Trek, 6. C. Neil Armstrong

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fit mind FIT BODY

Mind Puzzler Spooky creatures & critters 1

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FLU FIGHTERS

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Simple precautions... the best prevention

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Across 1. Dromedary (5) 4. Burrowing rodent (6) 8. Warm-blooded vertebrates (7) 11. Musteline mammal (5) 12. Spider trap (3) 13. Striped equine (5) 15. Large edible ray (5) 20. Mythical bird (3) 22. Gulls (5) 23. Eight-armed cephalopod (7) 24. Tropical bird (6) 25. Horned ruminant (5)

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10. Female hog (3) 14. Male chicken (7) 16. White ant (7) 17. Major food source for whales (5) 18. Stinging insect (4) 19. Small adders (4) 21. Pigeon call (3) 22. Long pointed walrus teeth

Influenza is a contagious disease and this year there is a new flu virus spreading called H1N1 which may cause more widespread illness than usual. The seasonal vaccine does not protect against H1N1, but taking these important precautions can:

WHEN ILL STAY HOME WASH YOUR HANDS SNEEZE IN YOUR SLEEVE COVER YOUR COUGH GET A SEASONAL FLU SHOT

Answer to last issue’s puzzle.

Down 2. Sirenian mammal (7) 3. Foxy-faced arboreal prosimian (5) 5. Showy bird (7) 6. Decapods (5) 7. Amphibian (4) 9. Female horse (4) WORDS FOR THE WISE I FALL 2009

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after the BEAT

Couldn’t be there? Here’s what you missed!

for her Be in the Pink Breast health starts with you. By the age of 20, it is recommended women perform self breast exams in addition to clinical breast exams. If you weren’t able to make it to our “Be in the Pink” event, here are some tips to remember. • A woman’s chance of developing breast cancer in her lifetime is one in eight. • Breast cancer is the second leading cancer death in women. • Nearly 40,000 women die from cancer each year. • It is recommended to start having annual mammograms by the age of 40. If you have family history, you should start sooner. Lakewood Health System now has digital mammography. To schedule your clinical breast exam or mammogram, call 218-894-1515.

UNIQUE & SPECIALIZED WOUND & OSTOMY

specialty care

Lakewood Health System’s Wound and Ostomy department improves patient outcomes and quality of life. This specialized care benefits patients with ostomies, traumatic wounds, pressure ulcers and chronic ‘non-healing’ wounds. We also provide diabetic foot care, right here close to home. Our Wound and Ostomy nurses develop a personalized plan of care that’s right for you. They’ll work with you to: • Promote independence and healing • Educate you and your family

QUICK SCHEDULING—CALL TODAY!

• Assist with Durable Medical Equipment YOUR HOME FOR HEALTHCARE

HOSPITAL I CLINICS I SENIOR SERVICES STAPLES • MOTLEY • PILLAGER • EAGLE BEND • BROWERVILLE

218-894-8402 • www.lakewoodhealthsystem.com TO SCHEDULE A CLINICAL BREAST EXAM OR MAMMOGRAM CALL: 218-894-1515

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Happenings SUPPORT GROUPS Gastric Bypass 10/13, 11/10, 12/8 6:00 - 7:00 p.m. LHS Senior Campus Call: Jena at 218-894-8509 CLINICS Foot Care Clinic 11/6, 11/13, 12/4, 12/11 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. LHS Senior Campus Foot Care Clinic 10/16, 11/20, 12/18 8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Scandia Valley Town Hall Foot Care Clinic 10/23, 11/27 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. LHS Motley Clinic Call: Home Care office at 218-894-8080

EVENTS/EDUCATION HealthBEAT for Her: Knowledge is Power Diagnostics & Treatment for Breast Cancer 10/29 5:00 p.m. LHS Main Campus Call: Nola at 218-894-8586

ON-STAFF SPECIALISTS OB/GYN Carol Uhlman, M.D. ONCOLOGY John Weitz, M.D. PSYCHIATRY Mark Holub, M.D. Thomas Wittkopp, M.D. Deb Herbaugh, R.N., C.N.S.

HealthBEAT for Her: Diabetes 11/16 5:00 p.m. LHS Main Campus Call: Nola at 218-894-8586

PSYCHOLOGY Julie Eggers-Huber, PsyD, L.P.

HealthBEAT for Her: Rheumatology 12/7 4:00 p.m. LHS Main Campus Call: Kristen at 218-894-8577

SURGICAL SERVICES Sandra Hanson, M.D., F.A.C.S. Patricia Mahoney, M.D.

RHEUMATOLOGY Kathryn Riordan, M.D.

VISITING SPECIALISTS CARDIOLOGY GASTROENTEROLOGY NEPHROLOGY

MAKE LEISURE TIME A PRIORITY

Do things for no other reason than that it feels good to do them. Go to a funny movie, take a walk on the beach, listen to music, read a good book, or talk to a friend. Play is an emotional and mental health necessity.

OPHTHALMOLOGY PATHOLOGY PULMONOLOGY ORTHOPEDICS PODIATRY UROLOGY

MAKE TIME FOR CONTEMPLATION AND APPRECIATION

Think about the things you’re grateful for. Meditate, pray, enjoy the sunset or simply take a moment to pay attention to what is good, positive and beautiful as you go about your day.

SURGICAL DENTISTRY EAR, NOSE AND THROAT

Specialists are seen under the guidance of your family medicine physician, to make an appointment call 800-525-1033 or 218-894-1515. Visit www.lakewoodhealthsystem.com for a full list of specific specialists.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SPECIFIC EVENTS CONTACT KRISTEN AT: 218-894-8577 WORDS FOR THE WISE I FALL 2009

14


A WELLNESS PUBLICATION BY LAKEWOOD HEALTH SYSTEM

STAPLES HOSPITAL LAKEWOOD HEALTH SYSTEM 218-894-1515 FOUNDATION 218-894-8503 THE SHOPPE 218-894-8669 MEDICAL MARKETPLACE 218-894-8276

CLINICS STAPLES CLINIC 218-894-1515 MOTLEY CLINIC 218-352-6922 PILLAGER CLINIC 218-746-4550 BROWERVILLE CLINIC 320-594-2231 EAGLE BEND CLINIC 218-738-2804

SENIOR SERVICES CARE CENTER 218-894-8345 LAKEWOOD REFLECTIONS 218-894-8200

YOUR HOME

for healthcare.

HOSPITAL I CLINICS I SENIOR SERVICES STAPLES • MOTLEY • PILLAGER • EAGLE BEND • BROWERVILLE

49725 COUNTY 83 STAPLES, MN • 218-894-1515 www.lakewoodhealthsystem.com

LAKEWOOD MANOR 218-894-2124 LAKEWOOD PINES 218-894-4460 HOME CARE & HOSPICE 218-894-8080 CARE VAN 218-894-8331

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER USING SOY BASED INKS

Fall 2009  

Words for the Wise is a quarterly publication by Lakewood Health System.

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