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ISSUE

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SPRING 2015

Discovering

URBAN BIRDS

CHICAGO Ethnic Food TOURS inside into a

Historic Wisconsin Mansion


Š 2015 LAKESHORE MAGAZINE All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying or other electronic methods, without prior written permission of the editor; except in the case of brief quotations embodied in the critical reviews and certain other non-commercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, please write to: editor@lakeshoremag.com

COVER PHOTOGRAPHER: RODNEY CAMPBELL

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CONTENTS

FEATURES DISCOVERING URBAN BIRDS 10 CHICAGO ETHNIC FOOD TOURS 20 GET SAILORED 26 MANSION BY THE LAKE 30 GREENSKY CHICAGO 40

STYLE INSPIRATION BRITISH INVASION 8 FOR THE BIRDS 18

LOCAL ADVENTURES ANDERSONVILLE 44 SHEBOYGAN & KOHLER 38

TRADITIONAL ELEGANCE 36

IN EVERY ISSUE FROM THE EDITOR 5 CONTRIBUTORS 6 SPRING EVENTS 7

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EDITOR’S LETTER When I arrived in Chicago in my early twenties fresh from my small town college, I was immediately enthralled with the city. I found a perfect little place in a vintage building on a tree-lined street in Lincoln Park and enjoyed exploring my new neighborhood with its stately town homes and beautiful gardens. On warm Sunday afternoons, as the weekend was winding down I loved to hop in my car and head north on Lakeshore Drive. Looking east from The Drive toward Lake Michigan are broad park lands where smartly-dressed urbanites stroll along lakeside paths and boats float in harbors. With the park and lake on one side and the bustling city on the other it’s easy to understand the wisdom of the city’s early planners who declared that the lake front should remain “forever open, clear and free.” At the edge of the city, I’d continue on Sheridan road and wind north through Evanston, Wilmette, and other North Shore towns sometimes going all the way to Lake Forest before turning back. Along the way I’d marvel at lovely old homes; ivy-covered Tudors, classic brick Georgians, colorful Victorians and many other timeless styles. The old ones always captured my imagination and made me wonder what it would be like in a place with so much history. I often thought about those Sunday drives along the Lake Michigan shore as I developed the concept for Lakeshore Magazine. I hope to capture the feeling of those afternoons and the sense of wonder at the remarkable place where we live, the interesting people who surround us and the natural beauty of all our seasons. I hope Lakeshore Magazine will inspire you to try something different, live a little better and explore new places.

We stayed close to home for our first issue visiting a unique Chicago neighborhood and charming towns in southeast Wisconsin. We learned about the migratory birds that visit this region in the springtime and drew style inspiration from the changing season. We look forward to more adventures in Great Lakes towns and the many lakeside communities of the region. You’ll find much more online at lakeshoremag.com. Please join us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Pinterest for a broader perspective of our vision for this publication. And, as always, I’d love to hear your comments and suggestions for Lakeshore Magazine.

With best wishes,

Alicia K. O’Connor Founder and Editorial Director Alicia@lakeshoremag.com     

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CONTRIBUTORS LINDSAY HUMES ART DIRECTOR WHITEOAKCREATIVE.COM



PHYLLIS PETRILLI PROPRIETOR, CHICAGO ETHNIC FOOD TOURS CHICAGOETHNICFOODTOURS.COM

BRION R. JUDGE FOUNDER + PRINCIPAL INTERIOR DESIGNER BRJUDGE.COM BASTIONANDLARK.COM BRJUDGE.TUMBLR.COM



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S P R I N G E V E N T S

CHICAGO MLB HOME OPENERS CUBS APRIL 5TH WHITE SOCKS APRIL 10TH RANDOLPH STREET MARKET APRIL 25TH & 26TH, MAY 23RD & 24TH THIS POPULAR MONTHLY EVENT FEATURING ART, FASHION AND VINTAGE ITEMS MOVES OUTDOORS IN MAY. BIKE THE DRIVE MAY 24TH ONE DAY EACH SPRING LAKE SHORE DRIVE IS CLOSED TO VEHICLE TRAFFIC TO WELCOME BICYCLISTS OF ALL AGES. GOSPEL MUSIC FEST MAY 29TH & 30TH THE OUTDOOR MUSIC SEASON OPENS IN MILLENNIUM PARK WITH THIS ANNUAL WEEKEND OF GOSPEL PERFORMANCES.

MICHIGAN FEAST OF SAINT VINCENT - TRAVERSE CITY APRIL 25TH ANNUAL CELEBRATION TO PRAY FOR GOOD SEATER FOR THE WINE GROWING SEASON TRAVERSE CITY CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL APRIL 26TH YOU’VE GOT TO EAT SOMETHING WITH YOUR WINE, OF COURSE. TULIP TIME - HOLLAND MAY 2ND - 9TH THIS CELEBRATION OF DUTCH HERITAGE AND CULTURE FEATURES MORE THAN 4 MILLION TULIPS PLANTED THROUGHOUT THE TOWN. GREAT LAKES BOATING FESTIVAL - GROSSE POINTE SHORES MAY 15TH - 17TH NEW BOATS AND VINTAGE CARS ARE FEATURED AT THIS EVENT THAT SUPPORTS THE GROSSE POINTE YOUTH NAUTICAL EDUCATION FOUNDATION. WARBLERS ON THE WATER - BEAVER ISLAND MAY 23RD - 25TH GUIDED BIRD WALKS PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY TO SEE MANY TYPES OF BIRDS AT THE NATURAL RESTING POINTS DURING SPRING MIGRATION.

WISCONSIN GITCHEE GUMEE BREW FEST - SUPERIOR APRIL 11TH SAMPLE 125 BEERS FROM 35 CRAFT BREWERIES. MIDWEST HORSE FAIR – MADISON APRIL 17TH - 19TH THE ANNUAL THREE-DAY EVENT WILL DELIGHT HORSE LOVERS OF ALL AGES. WOMEN’S WEEKEND - LAKE GENEVA APRIL 24TH - 26TH CALL YOUR BEST GIRLFRIENDS AND PLAN TO MEET IN BEAUTIFUL LAKES GENEVA FOR THIS WEEKEND-LONG EVENT SPONSORED BY THE ROTARY CLUB OF LAKE GENEVA. WISCONSIN MARATHON - KENOSHA MAY 2ND FULL AND HALF MARATHON DISTANCES ARE OFFERED ALONG A LAKESIDE COURSE. ELKHORN ANTIQUE FLEA MARKET – ELKHORN MAY 17TH THE SUMMER TREASURE-HUNTING SEASON OPENS WITH THIS MONTHLY MARKET HELD AT THE WALWORTH COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS. 7


BRITISH I SPRING BLOOMS EVOKE FOND MEMORIES OF A TRIP ACROSS THE POND

PEONY & BLUSH SUEDE Jo Malone LONDON

PADDINGTON BEAR Amazon RAIN BOOT WELLY Target

ASSORTED SCONES Williams Sonoma

PETUNIA POLO DRESS Boden USA

CAKE STAND JCPenny

ENGLISH BREAKFAST TEA Soap 8

CIRCLE TEE Jack Willis


I N VA S I O N HEY JACK CARPET TILE Flor BEAGLE IN BRETTON SWEATER Joules USA

ESPADRILLE Liberty of London

WATCH Burberry

UNION JACK PILLOW

FIELD JACKET Nordstroms

RAINYDAY MAC Boden USA

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URBAN BIRDS ALICIA O’CONNOR

NORTHERN FLICKER PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE

On a secluded stretch of Lake Michigan beach front, a short distance from the buzzing traffic of Lakeshore Drive, a magical hedge attracts birds from all over the Earth. Of course, there’s no magic involved. It’s simple geography that brings feathered visitors from faraway places during the spring and fall migration seasons. The Great Lakes are a natural attraction and global landmark for hundreds of varieties of migrating birds. Birds that have traveled long distances over water find a much needed resting point at the southern tip of Lake Michigan as well as the admiration of Chicago’s bird enthusiasts. 10


Always eager to try something new, I sought the guidance of experienced local bird watchers to get started. Phyllis Petrilli, Lakeshore Magazine contributor and avid bird enthusiast, developed an interest in birds years ago by simply noticing the previously unseen inhabitants of her urban neighborhood. “When I started noticing birds I felt like I had developed bionic vision. Suddenly everything around me came into hyper- focus and I started to notice other everyday things I had been missing.” A simple walk through the neighborhood or a slower pace on the daily commute can reveal a thriving avian community within the urban landscape. AMERICAN KESTRAL PHOTO BY JOHN PICKEN PHOTO

COOPER HAWK PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE

CARDINAL PHOTO BY SHANTANAU BHARDWAJ

Brion R. Judge, a Chicagoan and bird enthusiast known to some as The Gentleman Birder, said, “I love finding rare and interesting birds around Chicago. The first bird that got me really excited was a Ross’s Goose, a relatively rare bird for the area. I remember it was the depth of winter and absolutely freezing out but I still wandered around Montrose for a couple hours to find it, then I stood there in the bitter cold for another couple hours just watching the bird...It was wonderful.” Asked where they seek out birds and fellow birders, both Phyllis and Brion directed me to the Montrose Point Bird Sanctuary. “Montrose Point between Montrose Harbor and Beach is considered one of the best birding locations in the Midwest. More than 300 species of birds have been seen there and you can count on a few rarities to show up there every year,” said Phyllis. A trip to Montrose Point in the early spring revealed several types of migrating ducks, geese and some rarer shore birds. Numerous finches populate the still leafless trees and beach grasses. Warblers are common in the spring and I’ll be back in May to seek out these colorful creatures. Gorgeous deep-blue jays, scarlet cardinals, nuthatches, chickadees, and all types of woodpeckers remain in the Great Lakes region throughout the year and are easy to spot in the early spring while branches are still mostly bare. 11


GETTING TO MONTROSE POINT Montrose Point Bird Sanctuary is easily reached by following Lake Shore Drive to the Montrose Exit. Travel east on Montrose staying to the right. Just past the bait shop you’ll see a sign at the entrance to the sanctuary on the east side of the street. Street parking is available and there are plenty of spots to safely lock up a bicycle.

TIPS FOR BEGINNERS BRING BINOCULARS. Birds are best viewed from a distance which allows the birds to feel safe and relatively un-stressed. If you had to fly thousands of miles in a few short weeks you’d want to be left alone too! An inexpensive pair of binoculars is a fine place to start. Look for a pair with 7 to 8x magnification. DRESS IN WARM LAYERS AND WEAR STURDY, WATERPROOF FOOTWEAR. The best time to see migrating bird is, unfortunately, also mud season. Brion advises, “Wear comfortable clothing that blends into the environment. In a wooded area wear browns and greens, if on a beach or dunes environment wear light tan pants and dull blue tops. You want to appear, as much as possible, to look like part of your surroundings. Try not to wear white or bright colors than often mean danger to birds.” Warm socks and rain boots are essential for an enjoyable experience. A jacket with deep pockets to hold your gear is also a good investment. STAY ON THE PATH TO PROTECT THE HABITAT. It may be tempting to inch closer for a better look, but keeping to the path protects the habitat for the birds and other human visitors. BE STILL AND BE CURIOUS. From Brion, “Sometimes the best strategy is to stand in one place and see what birds move around you, the longer you are still the less frightened birds will be and the closer they will come.” And listen. You’re likely to hear the birds before you see them so stay tuned. Phyllis tells us, “Woodpeckers are everywhere! They’re easy to find if you listen for the pecking sounds and their distinctive chirp.” ASK. If you see experienced birders in the area, easily identified by their large camera lenses and expensive-looking binoculars, don’t be afraid to ask questions. Birders are categorically friendly people who love to share their knowledge. For expert guidance, Chicago Ornithological Society and Chicago Audubon Society host guided bird walks throughout the Chicago area. 12


HOODED MERGANSER PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE

KIDS BIRD WATCHING PHOTO BY US FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE

GREAT EGRET PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE 13


AMERICAN COOT PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE 14


SEMIPALMATED PLOVER PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE

RED KNOT PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE

WARBLER PHOTO BY RODNEY CAMPBELL

RUDDY TURNSTONE PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE 15


When you’re ready to get serious, it’s time to purchase a good field guide. Phyllis advises, “Get the Sibley Field Guide for North America. Don’t be tempted to go for the Eastern version only.  You will see birds that have no business being in Chicago and you’ll need to know what to look for.” Good thing you’ve got that field jacket with deep pockets to hold your new book! As an alternative Brion recommends the Audubon Birds App. In addition to the Montrose Point Sanctuary many other Chicago-area locations offer excellent birding options in the spring. Brion recommends “North and South Pond in Lincoln Park, Wooded Island and Bobolink Meadow in Jackson Park, Fort Sheridan in Lake Forest, The Skokie Lagoons in Winnetka and Chicago Botanic Gardens in Glencoe. “ The entire Great Lakes region is a bird Mecca in the spring. A short distance from downtown Chicago the LaBagh Woods Forest Preserve attracts colorful varieties of warblers and songbirds in May. Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore is a bird watcher’s paradise with wooded trails bogs and sand dunes that attract a spectacular variety of birds during migration seasons. If you’re ready for more check out Warblers on the Water, a weekend-long event with guided birding field trips on Beaver Island, Michigan in late May.

ORANGE CROWNED WARBLER PHOTO BYSHANTHANU BHARDWAJ

GREEN HERON PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE

The incredible variety of birds that make a short stopover in the urban environs of Chicago truly boggles the bird-lover’s mind. The street-smart pigeons share the city with colorful, at times exotic, travelers for a short time each spring. It’s really something to experience. Getting started is easy. Just go for a walk and remember to look up.

We’d love to see and share your bird photos on Instagram! Just use #LakeShoreLife for a chance to be featured in our daily feed. WOOD DUCKS PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE 16


BIRD WATCHING RESOURCES CLICK LINKS TO VIEW PRODUCTS

MAP GUIDEBOOK BINOCULARS BOOTS JACKET

ROSE BREASTED GROSSBEAK PHOTO BY BRION R. JUDGE 17


FOR THE BIRDS STYLISH PRODUCTS INSPIRED BY THE SPRING MIGRATION

BIRDS OF AMERICA SLIDESHOW John J. Audubon BIRD FEEDER One Kings Lane

PENCIL SKIRT Talbots

EGG VASE FILLER Pottery Barn

PILLOW COVER Pottery Barn

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IVY BIRDCAGE Pottery Barn

EXTRAORDINARY BIRDS One Kings Lane

KIERA DRESS Boden USA

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CHICAGO ETHNIC FOOD TOURS ALICIA O’CONNOR

CONCHAS 20


SWEDISH-PERSIAN STREET CHICAGO ETHIC FOOD TOURS

Beyond the usual tourist destinations, visitors to Chicago and life-long residents alike may experience numerous cultures and traditions in ethnic enclaves throughout the vast city. Vietnamese specialties, European and Mexican baked goods, traditional beverages and all manner of exotic tastes are available to sample, if you know where to look. Sounds exciting, but for some of us venturing into the unknown can be intimidating. So let’s get some help.

We caught up with Phyllis Petrilli, an accomplished chef, food industry professional, and proprietor of Chicago Ethnic Food Tours to learn more about the rich diversity of cultures that contribute to the ethnic food scene in Chicago. In the hip North Chicago neighborhood of Andersonville, Phyllis guides her guests through a multi-cultural moving feast, all within a few city blocks.

DESSERTS CHICAGO ETHIC FOOD TOURS 21


WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THE ANDERSONVILLE/ ARGYLE NEIGHBORHOOD FOR YOUR ETHIC FOOD TOUR? Ever since I took a food tour in Boston’s North End, I daydreamed about someday creating my own tour in Chicago. When I moved from Old Town to Andersonville after graduating culinary school, I realized I had stumbled onto the ideal place to do it.  While Andersonville is widely known as a Swedish neighborhood, I was amazed at the diversity of eateries, groceries and bakeries that co-existed among each other in so few blocks.   These are not trendy, themed Lettuce-Entertain-You- type restaurants, but family businesses that have been rolling along for 20, 30, even 80 years.  And they are still bustling and important to the community today.  Then make the short trek from Clark Street to Broadway, and it starts all over again with Vietnamese, Thai and Chinese businesses that also mingle with African and Caribbean markets.  I worked at Epcot Center in college and I loved to hang out in the World Showcase after my shifts.  Here was my World Showcase, only it’s so much better because it is real.  And the people are so much better because they are not Disney cast members but real Chicagoans, no matter where they were born. PHYLLIS PETRILLI CHICAGO ETHIC FOOD TOURS

WHAT DO YOUR TOUR GUESTS EXPERIENCE? They join me for a one and a half mile walk through two neighborhoods that are both listed on the National Register of Historic Places. We make seven stops in various groceries or bakeries to sample the food (and in one case, the drink) they are known for.   We talk about the history of the business but also about the history of the neighborhood and how the various ethnic groups came to settle that part of Chicago.   We even stop at a famous but forgotten location that was once the  hot spot of the nation’s silent film industry.  

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE PLACES TO EAT IN CHICAGO? Although I love to experiment with world cuisine, I’m 22

PHYLLIS PETRILLI CHICAGO ETHIC FOOD TOURS


still an Italian girl at heart. I used to be reluctant to name a favorite Italian restaurant because each has a unique specialty.  Now I have two neighborhood favorites that nail it…food, wine, service, authenticity, atmosphere. If you’re looking to revive memories of your recent trip to Italy, go to Spacca Napoli on Sunnyside and Ravenswood.   Their specialty is real Neapolitan pizza (they import their flour from Naples) but everything they do is on point.   Try the minestrone and the Prosciutto e Rucola pizza.  If the burrata appetizer is on the menu, don’t hesitate, just do it. I also love Anteprima in Andersonville.   The cuisine is authentic, comforting and ever changing.   I once had a very simply prepared grilled rabbit dish that was out of this world. Their prices are friendly for the quality and quantity of food compared to some “downtown” Italian restaurants.   Check them out Monday through Thursday for a threecourse fixed-price menu for $29. My latest find is Cookies and Carnitas in Edgewater.   These are meat guys, you can tell.  Our trio sampled the tacos made with carnets (pork shoulder), skirt and goat (yes, goat).  Everything was succulent and wellcooked.  Treat yourself to a Kitchen Floor cookie on your way out.

YOU DIDN’T START OUT AS A CHEF AND FOOD EXPERT. WHAT PATH THAT BROUGHT YOU TO THIS PROFESSION? I graduated from Penn State before “yuppie” became a dirty word, and I wanted the corporate, professional career that came with it.  I landed it by getting hired by Ford Motor Co. in Detroit, and later transferred to Chicago.  I fell in love with the city instantly.  I was dazzled by the number of restaurants and the wonderful things you could find in stores like Whole Foods and Treasure Island.   Soon I found myself sitting in business meetings and thinking about what new thing I would attempt to make for dinner that night.  I was pretty much self-taught by the Joy of Cooking and Cooking Light by the time I decided to go to culinary school.  I honed my craft every year by hosting an elaborate Christmas party featuring handmade hors d’ oeuvres made in my tiny, six-square foot, kitchen.

YOU LOVE TO COOK AND ENTERTAIN. WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE SOURCES FOR THE BEST INGREDIENTS?   With the expansion of Whole Foods and Mariano’s, I think we are in the golden age of grocery stores in Chicago.   That being said, I prefer to shop small and only hit the big guys for what I can’t find elsewhere.  For 23


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CHICAGO ETHNIC FOOD TOURS chicagoethnicfoodtours.com TOURS OPERATION ON FRIDAY & SATURDAY AT 11:30 AM AND LAST 3 HOURS $49 PER PERSON INCLUDING FOOD

my day-to-day shopping I like to hit Mexican produce markets. They have all the essentials plus heaps of fresh, budget friendly produce.  My favorite is Edgewater Produce in Andersonville.  Great quality produce, organic eggs, and tortillas from El Milagro that are often still warm to the touch.  Since it’s a small place, I’m in and out in less than ten minutes with a week’s worth of groceries. For dry grains and spices, I go to Middle East Bakery and Grocery at the corner of Foster and Clark.  They have this lovely black rice that releases a dark purple starch as it cooks.  It’s striking on a plate and has a rich, unique flavor. After a citywide quest, here I finally found pomegranate molasses.  In fact, Jim would sell it to me by the case for the restaurant I ran.  They make their own pita, and it’s always hot and steamy on the shelf.  This place is a wonderland and run by the nicest people.  If I’m making Thai or Vietnamese food, I hit Tai Nam on Broadway for lime leaves, galangal, tamarind and all kinds of basil and mint.   Since these cuisines rely so heavily on fresh herbs, you’ll never get the true flavor by using canned goods or more mainstream substitutes. WHAT’S NEXT FOR CHICAGO ETHNIC FOOD TOURS? This business started with a daydream and I just keep going.  My focus this season will be to build participation and add extra guides to the Argyle/Andersonville tour.   I want to expand to other neighborhoods as much for the fun of putting together another tour as for the profit potential.   Lincoln Square and Edgewater are on my short list but so many places in this city fascinate me.  I’m even entertaining the prospect of doing one-time tours to further flung areas likes Bridgeport and Edison Park. Join Phyllis for one of her regularly scheduled tours by visiting her website ChicagoEthnicFoodTours.com to book online. The Andersonville neighborhood is easily accessible by public transportation within the Chicago area. Street parking is available throughout the neighborhood. And be sure to see our Andersonville Guide for more information on this great Chicago neighborhood. 25


GET SAILORED COPY: ALICIA O’CONNOR | PHOTOGRAPHY: LESLIE ATHMER AND ERIN WHITE

Leslie and Brian Athmer, founders of Sailored brand clothing and accessories, grew up on the Great Lakes and feel a strong connection to the waters. Leslie hails from Toledo, Ohio and Brian from Lapeer, Michigan where summers were spent enjoying all the natural wonders of the Great Lakes region. Now living in Chicago, these Leslie and Brian found a way to support the lakes that have played an important role in their lives. We spent some time getting to know these young entrepreneurs and their brand.

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WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO CREATE YOUR SAILORED BRAND? The Lake Erie algae bloom was so bad last summer that Southeast MI and Northwest OH residents had no access to tap water for several days. The saying really is true, you never know what you have until it’s gone. It’s easy to take this great natural resource for granted, but when water stops flowing from your tap you realize the impact it has on your daily life. We wanted to do something to help. We created Sailored, an apparel company that donates 15% of profits to The Alliance for the Great Lakes, so consumers can buy a great product and give to an important cause at the same time.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO PARTNER WITH THE ALLIANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES? We initially considered starting a 501c3 however, after researching various charities, we realized that The Alliance is already so well established and their mission is perfectly aligned with ours. With The Alliance focusing on supporting the Great Lakes it allows us to focus on our product line, customers and raising money for the cause. The Alliance covers all five Great Lakes which was a priority for us, and by supporting them we feel that they will be able to make an even greater impact on the Great Lakes in the future. 28

WHAT ARE THE MOST SERIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS AFFECTING THE GREAT LAKES RIGHT NOW? The algae blooms that first caught our attention are affecting Lake Erie, Michigan and Huron. This problem is primarily caused by excess nutrients from agricultural runoffs. Also, Asian Carp and other invasive species are entering the Great Lakes and can quickly dominate and threaten our local fish population. And plastic microbeads enter the Great Lakes from personal care products that have tiny exfoliating beads in them. These tiny beads look like food to fish so we inadvertently introduce plastic back into our food chain. On top of that they are so small it’s nearly impossible to filter them out of the water so we have large concentrations of these plastic pieces floating in our lakes. With over 40 million people relying on the Great Lakes as their source of fresh water it’s really important that we support organizations such as The Alliance which are working on all of these pressing issues.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE PLACES AND ACTIVITIES IN THE GREAT LAKES REGION? Leslie: My aunt and uncle have a house on Lake Michigan in Door County, Wisconsin and I’ve been visiting there for as long as I can remember. Brian actually proposed to me during a hike on Drummond


Island overlooking Lake Huron so that will forever be one of my favorite spots. He grew up vacationing there every year so I always joke that he proposed to me there so that I will always want to go back with him! Traverse City and the Sleeping Bear Dunes are so pretty I can’t forget them from the list. I grew up in Toledo sailing on Lake Erie in my parents’ sailboat, Holy Toledo! We raced every Wednesday evening. My all time favorite race is the Mills Race which ends at Put in Bay, a great place to celebrate. Brian: My favorites are Drummond Island, where my family would visit every summer, and Marquette, MI. I really like that it’s still relatively untouched compared to many northern Michigan vacation spots. Marquette is a really cool town with a lot to offer - lots of great hiking and camping spots and also a college town with plenty of great restaurants and bars. I enjoy fishing, tubing and power boating, although I feel like I’m starting to get too old for tubing. It’s a lot more painful than it used to be! Um, no. Leslie and Brian are not too old for anything. We expect great success for these two whose business achievements support our most valuable natural resource. Find Sailored brand clothing and accessories online at sailored.com.

LESLIE + BRIAN RECOMMEND BREAKFAST BARRY’S BAGELS - TOLEDO LUNCH CEMITAS PUEBLA - CHICAGO LAKESIDE COCKTAILS FRED & FUZZYS - SISTER BAY, DOOR COUNTY LIVE MUSIC THE LAKE INN - LAPEER, MI

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M A N S I O N BY THE L A K E ALICIA O’CONNOR

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High on a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan sits a grand Georgian mansion that tells a story of Wisconsin’s industrial past. Built in 1912 by JP Reiss, an executive of the coal and shipping firm founded by his father, this home has witnessed a century of change in Sheboygan. Shipping of coal and other industrial fuels was a major industry on the Great Lakes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Reiss family owned a successful operation in Sheboygan and other port cities throughout Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota.

1980’s until its recent purchase by Christine and Roger Castino.

According to Mrs. Castino, Mr. Reiss spared no expense in creating a grand home for his family. The 10,000 square foot mansion features 11 fireplaces, nine bedrooms, and as many bathrooms. The third floor included a grand ballroom in addition to quarters for the servants who attended the family. “The finest materials were used in this home and most still remain,” said Ms. Castino. Expert craftsmen created custom ornamental Years after JP Reiss’s untimely death, the mansion plaster details for the barrel-vaulted dining room ceilpassed to his children and ultimately became the ing, stone and iron ornamentation for the exterior and home of another generation when JP Reiss II pur- mahogany woodwork throughout the house. chased his sisters’ shares and established a home for his own family. Under his wife’s direction, the mansion What twist of fate introduced them to this piece of hiswas updated and redecorated. This generation owned tory now called Castino Lakeview Mansion? “We came the home until the time of Reiss’ retirement and relo- to Sheboygan to enjoy a quiet weekend at a bed and cation in the late 1960’s. Ownership changed several breakfast. Not only did we enjoy our stay immensely, times over the next 50 years and the mansion saw a we noticed the For Sale sign. After several cocktails, period of decline followed by a complete restoration. we were convinced that buying this was the right thing The estate served as a bed and breakfast from the late to do! The house called to us and the area evokes such 31


a peaceful and less harried lifestyle. Of course, once the drinks and the spontaneous allure wore off and we crunched the numbers to see if this could work as a semi-retirement option. We confirmed that this would be a good fit for us as we approached empty nester status.” Grand patios overlook the lawn and garden. The beach and lake beckon beyond. The lakeside veranda offers a spectacular view of the sunrise over Lake Michigan past the formal garden with perennials and fountains. It’s easy to imagine glittering, jazz age parties on this lawn as the sunset reflected over Lake Michigan. The Castinos, owners of a Chicago-area home services firm, completed a renovation of the lower level to create a tavern and game room complete with mahogany bar, pool and foosball tables and multiple flat screen TVs. The five second-floor bedrooms, named for the five Great Lakes, each include a private bath. The previous owners lived on the third floor with their four sons while running the bed and breakfast. The former ballroom and servants quarters of the third floor are now four additional bedrooms with space for families to gather, including a kitchenette area. The mansion and grounds are now available for private rental. The beautifully appointed first-floor rooms with traditional furnishings, crystal chandeliers, and a grand piano are the perfect setting for an elegant party, wedding, family reunion, or another private event. The home accommodates as many as 25 overnight guests, including the carriage house apartment. The sweeping front lawn with its enviable view of the lake is the ideal spot for a tented outdoor reception for up to 100 guests. Steps away from the mansion across Lakeshore Avenue are Sheboygan’s public beach and the newly developed Sheboygan Harbor Center with a boardwalk area and yacht harbor. “It’s the most beautiful beach with eight volleyball courts. We feel like it’s our own private beach because it’s never crowded. At times we take our wood burning fire pit down to the beach to roast marshmallows for s’mores.” said Ms. Castino. All of downtown Sheboygan is nearby. “Our guests have access to four kayaks and ten bicycles. More are available for rental in town if needed.” The outdoor patios include a large gas grill for group barbecues and two outdoor propane fire tables. At the time of construction, the Castino Lakeview Mansion overlooked the coal shipping operation at the mouth of the Sheboygan River that provided the family’s fortune. Now The Blue Harbor Resort and Spa is located on the site of the former coal loading dock and the riverfront is a recreational attraction with shops and restaurants. The city of Sheboygan is a charming coastal town just a few miles away from the resort destination of Kohler with its five star American Club Resort and Spa along with two world class golf courses. “My husband, an avid golfer, is just drooling to get out on The Bull, Blackwolf Run, and Whistling Straits. Running the house will keep me plenty busy, but I might have to take up golf if I ever hope to see him again!”

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Learn more about the Castino Lakeview Mansion by visiting CastinoLakeviewMansion.com. To begin planning your visit, see our Sheboygan/Kohler guide.

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TRADITIONAL ELEG CLASSIC DESIGN REMINISCENT OF A BYGONE ERA

NESTING TABLES Pottery Barn

ALABASTER BLOCK LAMPS Williams Sonoma

BRASS-BORDERED STONE JAR Williams Sonoma

PAISLEY BEDDING Williams Sonoma

DISPLAY CAB Ethan

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GANCE

CHANDELIER Rejuvenation

BARRET POSTER BED Ethan Allen

BINET Allen

TWENTY REMARKABLE HOMES Amazon

RUG Williams Sonoma HALE NAVY Benjamin Moore

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LOCAL ADVENTURES

SHEBOYGAN & KOHLE On the western shore of Lake Michigan, Sheboygan is a surprisingly hip coastal town worth a visit. Behind unassuming storefronts of the downtown area we discovered local treasures and a cool vibe that will bring us back for future visits. Nearby, the beautiful resort town of Kohler draws visitors from across the area for five-star luxury and world-class dining.

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WHISTLIN


ER, WISCONSIN SHOP

NG STRAIGHTS PHOTO BY DAN PERRY 1: SHEBOYGAN RIVERFRONT BY BRETT VA 2: BOOKWARM GARDENS BY KENNETH CASPER 3: SHEBOYGAN BEACH BY BRETT VA

EAT IL RITROVO PIZZA Il Ritrovo was one of the first pizzerias in the U.S. to have been certified by the Associazion Verace Pizza Napoetana for creating true Neapolitan-style pizza. The pizza is simply prepared, perfectly baked in a wood-fired oven and legitimately outstanding. 8TH STREET ALE HAUS Sheboygan’s only microbrewery offers an impressive selection of homemade sausage and bratwurst along with house smoked and brined meats and local cheeses. The beer list is impressive and the menu includes all manner of local Wisconsin specialties. When is Rome, as they say… PARADIGM COFFEE AND MUSIC This funky spot with eclectic furnishings serves expertlymade, strong coffee (necessary for some of us who may have spent time across the street at the Ale Haus the night before) along with excellent sandwiches and breakfast fare made with local ingredients. Live music takes the stage in the evenings.

STAY CASTINO LAKEVIEW MANSION Live like a local, a very fortunate one, in this century-old, nine bedroom mansion on Lake Michigan. The full home is available for rental and perfect for extended families or large groups. BLUE HARBOR RESORT At the other end of the spectrum, the Blue Harbor Resort, Spa & Conference Center offers a family-friendly experience and plenty of activities for all ages and interests. The property includes six dining options, an indoor water park and full service spa. 3

NEST This elegant store features and ever-changing array of products for the home. Appropriately described as “sophisticated yet casual” the collections of bedding, tableware, and accessories include many hand-crafted items made my independent artisans. THE SHOPS AT WOODLAKE With a short drive to the resort town of Kohler you’ll find The Shops at Woodlake, an assortment of elegant stores and dining venues under one roof. A favorite of ours is The Wisconsin Trader, a charming shop specializing in apparel and home goods made in Wisconsin and other parts of the Great Lakes Region.

FOR THE KIDS BOOKWORM GARDENS More than 50 children’s’ books including The Giving Tree, The Magic Schoolbus, Charlotte’s Web and The Secret Garden come alive with natural, interactive exhibits. Children and adults alike will delight in exploring their favorite scene from literature. Open May through October. ABOVE AND BEYOND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM This fun spot on 8th street offers three floors of handson exhibits and activities to entertain and educate young visitors.

FOR THE GROWN UPS KOHLER WATERS SPA The American Club’s Five-Star spa offers the full range of spa treatments including some that allow you to experience Kohler’s top-of-the-line bath and shower products. The beautiful relaxation pool area and rooftop deck with Jacuzzi and fireplace room is open to all spa guests. WHISTLING STRAIGHTS GOLF COURSE Designed by Pete Dye in the style of classic Irish links courses, Whistling Straights occupies two miles rolling, windswept Lake Michigan coastline. The two courses have hosted past PGA Championships and have been selected to host the Ryder Cup in 2020. 39


GREENSKY COPY & PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALICIA O’CONNOR

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PHOTO COURTESY OF GREENSKY

Sometimes the best places are found just slightly off the beaten path. It would be easy to spend an entire day wandering through the shops on Clark Street in the Andersonville neighborhood on Chicago’s north side, but in keeping to the well-worn path you risk missing one of the area’s treasures. A brightly colored façade with cheerful mosaic adornments welcomes the curious wanderer a half block west of Clark Street to GreenSky on Balmoral Avenue. 41


Your detour is well rewarded in this charming shop where whimsical artisan crafts are all sustainably sourced, environmentally responsible and handmade. More than 80% of the items are sourced from artisans in the Great Lakes Region within 250 miles of Chicago. I had the pleasure of spending an afternoon with Nadeen Kieren who owns GreenSky along with her husband Thom. Each item in the shop offers a uniquely interesting story and Nadeen positively bubbles with enthusiasm as she shares them. After spending more than two decades in the corporate world, Nadeen created GreenSky to fill a niche in the neighborhood she clearly loves. WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO START YOUR BUSINESS? We got here somewhat by happenstance. We’ve always enjoyed the “localness” of where we live and, at the time, had lost a couple of great gift stores in our neighborhood. We wanted to boost the retail presence in the neighborhood as we had been losing more and more of our storefronts to bars, restaurants and banks. We decided to create a little s hop that you could visit whenever you needed a gift or wanted to treat yourself. Thom and I enjoy exploring new places, and we always seek out those small, interesting little mom and pop shops along the way. We thought that kind of place would be good for our neighborhood. We are all about local and wanted to bring some of that localness to our neighborhood. WHAT’S THE STORY BEHIND THE NAME “GREENSKY”? “GreenSky” comes from the name of the Ojibway Indian church where we were married. It was founded in the 1860s by Peter GreenSky in Charlevoix, Michigan. We’ve always loved the name. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE ITEMS IN THE SHOP? There are so many! I love the milk jug furniture – colorful year-round outdoor furniture made from recycled milk jugs. Our handbag room holds many fair trade items like the Imaginart handbags made by 42


women in Mexico from recycled soda pop tabs. Our license plate art is always popular. Anastasia Mak’s art is special to us. We commissioned a piece from a photo of the Andersonville water tower and street sign. The origninal hangs in the shop and high-quality prints are sold here exclusively. Gabriel John candles are made right here in the neighborhood. Each one is set in a wine or cocktail glass that is reusable after the candle is gone. As a proud Michigan native, I love the Cherry Republic Sweets and Leland Blue and Petosky stone jewelry. I could go on and on! They are almost all favorites! That’s why they are here!

HOW DO YOU FIND SO MANY INTERESTING PRODUCTS FOR YOUR SHOP? We actively seek out our artisans, mostly in small art fairs and handmade shows. We look for what is interesting or a “delighter” in some way. We curate our offerings based on their stories, where and how they are made, the good it does in our world. We get a kick out of folks who have a vision for things that are about to be thrown away and who then transform them into things that are both functional and put a smile on your face! They are all things that you can feel good about buying because it does something good. If an item has a story, it has a soul. More than 80% are sourced within about 250 miles of us, many items are made within blocks of our shop, and we carry lots of Michigan products (it’s our home state!).

Nadeen Kieren’s ANDERSONVILLE FAVORITES SUMMERDALE ON CLARK CITY OLIVE WOODEN SPOON SIMON’S TAVERN

I found a few favorites of my own at GreenSky. The beautiful lamps made of fallen cocoa leaves caught my attention right away. I’ll be back for one of those. I also loved the intricately hand-crafted cutting boards inlaid with several types of wood. They are made by an artisan in Grand Rapids from virgin wood scraps from furniture manufacturers in the area. I left with two John Gabriel Lake House Collection candles. How was I supposed to choose between the Beach and Bonfire scent? Easier to just get both. When you’re in the Andersonville neighborhood I hope you’ll peek around the corner on Balmoral and head over to GreennSky. You’ll leave with a smile and story. 43


LOCAL ADVENTURES

ANDERSONVILLE Andersonville, one of Chicago’s most charming and diverse areas, is an excellent choice for visitors who want an authentic neighborhood experience. Settled by Swedish immigrants in the last century and known more recently as a friendly enclave for Chicago’s LGBT community, Andersonville offers a fun mix of one-of-a-kind shops and eateries. It’s well worth a trip for visitor and locals alike. Start at the intersection of North Clark Street and West Foster Avenue and enjoy all A-ville has to offer.

PHOTO BY RON COGSWELL 44


PHOTO BY MARC TARLOCK

PHOTO BY JUHAN SONIN

EAT With so many ethnically diverse restaurants it may be difficult to choose, but you can’t go wrong with these options. M. HENRY Weekend brunch is a special treat at this cozy spot. The menu is organized in two columns; Sweet and Savory. I’m a savory girl, but I like to bring along a sweet tooth who doesn’t mind sharing a bite or two. These guys get me. HAMBURGER MARY’S This place is as colorful as the neighborhood. One look at the weekday drink specials and your liver will thank you for living elsewhere. ANTEPRIMA A favorite of our Food & Entertaining contributor, Phyllis Petrilli, Anteprima will satisfy your craving for classic Italian specialties. Rather than choose one spot, join Phyllis for an Ethnic Food Tour of the neighborhood and sample everything.

REFUEL LA COLOMBE You only think you’ve had a real café latte. These guys will show you how it’s done. THE SWEDISH BAKERY You can’t come to Andersonville and not stop here. If sugar is your fuel of choice, the options abound.

DRINK HOPLEAF Too many beers to mention. Get some help when making your choice. Trust me. It’s overwhelming.

SHOP MILK HANDMADE All items in this women’s clothing boutique is handmade and unique. How often do you find that? But wait GREENSKY This colorful shop carries funky, artistic house wares made of reclaimed materials. Everything is eco-friendly and most are hand-made by artisans living in the Great Lakes Region. THE T-SHIRT DELI T-shirts made to your specifications and delivered in a deliwrap with a side of chips. The whole concept is irresistible. I bought an “Abe Froman – Sausage King of Chicago” shirt for my sister. I need you to understand that joke if we’re to be friends. Go ahead and click the link if you must. WOMEN AND CHILDREN FIRST Any independent bookstore in this millennium deserves a mention, but this one dedicated to promoting female authors and women’s interests and is worthy of our complete devotion. Check the events schedule. It’s impressive. BRIMFIELD This might be my favorite shop in the whole city. The carefully curated vintage finds, tartan plaid wool blankets, swank barware and cozy vibe make me feel right at home. If the pages of Lakeshore Magazine feel like this shop we’re doing something right. Give yourself plenty of time.

GETTING THERE Andersonville is easily accessible from the CTA Red line (Berwyn stop) or Metra (Ravenswood Station). Street parking is available in the neighborhood, but be sure to check signs and pay the meter on main streets.

SIMON’S This place feels like the favorite of the neighborhood crowd. Try the Glogg to get into the Swedish spirit. 45


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Lakeshore Magazine Spring 2015 - Issue 1  

Celebrating the people, style and spirit of the Great Lakes region.

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