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Be sure to check out the collage of Habitat for Humanity pictures from their spring break trip.

Dai Sugimoto finds home in Lakeland's atheltic deptartment.

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VOLUME Spr ing , IS SUE 5

Issue Highlights Features

W W W. L AK E L ANDM I RROR . C OM

Poet to speak at graduation David Lehman is Lakeland's commencement speaker for 2008 By Jason Ehlenfeldt Staff Reporter ehlenfeldtj@lakeland.edu

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Features

After two years as Director of Students Activities, Taliia says goodbye.

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A&E

avid Lehman will be the commencement speaker for Lakeland College this year. Lehman is an accomplished poet and writer who has also edited many a book as well as served on academic boards. Lehman was born in New York City in 1948. After high school he graduated from Columbia University with a Ph.D. in English. Afterwards he traveled to England to attend Cambridge University as a Kellett Fellow. Since then he has written multiple poems about a variety of topics from love to the idea that there are no new ideas in life. Lehman has also produced critical writings

http://prairiehome.publicradio.org

August Kelm shares his story about the Tokyo Auto Show.

Above: David Lehman will speak at this years commencement ceromony.

such as Avant-Garde:

“The Last The Making of

Getting a job after college doesn't have to be difficult

new master plan

Stephan, director of career development. peltierc@lakeland.edu Then there is the other 30-40 percent who does not n May 4, many seniors end up working in their major. will proudly receive their There are multiple reasons as college diplomas during comto why this happens. A couple mencement, but what hapof these include graduates pens next? who just need a college degree, Every year students gradand another is that they don’t uate from hundreds of colleges have enough experience. in the United States and get Although not all Lakeland ready to start their careers. majors require them, internLakeland has a 95 percent ships are a huge determining job placement rate among factor in whether or not an graduates, but not all of them employer will hire someone. are actually working in their The Career Development major field. On average 60-70 office encourages students to percent of college graduates get experience. actually end up working at a “Seventy-five wpercent of job in their major field. Some employers want students with private colleges have actually an internship and recently 50 hit the 80 percent mark. percent of employers want “Some majors, such as candidates with two internaccounting and resort manships,” said Stephan. agement have a pretty direct Many times students who career path, while psychology, did not have an internship writing and business have a will come out of college facbroader job market,” said Lisa ing a difficult job market, and go on to grad school. Did LC amply prepare you for your “Going career? (n=84) onto grad school is not always a good 4.8% 6.0% 22.6% idea though. You end up 23.8% getting over educated but still only have 42.9% little or no experience. 1 - Not at all 2 3 4 5 - Very well It makes you

opinions Page 4 Features Page 5 A&E Page 8 Fun House Page 10 sports Page 14

The Mirror is an award winning member of the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Collegiate Press, Wisconsin Newspaper Association and College Media Advisers.

LAKELAND COLLEGE UNDERGRADUATE SURVEY 2005-06

Index

from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Writer’s Award. In addition to these awards he has also received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Ingram Merrill Foundation. Currently Lehman is series editor of "The Best American Poetry" which was started by him in 1988 and is the general editor of the University of Michigan Press "Poets on Poetry" Series. He also lives in New York City and is a part of the core faculty of the New York University’s graduate writing programs, where he currently lives.

Lakeland College's

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the New York School of Poets” which was named by the New York Public Library a “Book to Remember 1999.” He has also delved into the world of mystery novels with “The Perfect Murder,” a book nominated for an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America. In addition to writing books and works of poetry, he also edited books. A few of these books include “Essays in Criticism,” “The Oxford Book of American Poetry,” and Ecstatic Occasions.” He has also gained praise from fellow poets such as John Hollander, as well as receiving several awards, including an award in literature

Experience is key By Crystal Peltier News Editor

On April 11, the comedy group "Second City" will take the stage.

T HUR SDAY, APR I L 3, 2008

SEE CAREER/PAGE 2

Generous donation brings new developments

By Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor hyrkase@lakeland.edu

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ue to an anonymous “extraordinarily generous gift,” as said by Lakeland College President Stephen Gould in Lakeland’s Crier, the college is undergoing an extensive process to develop a master plan for the main campus. JJR, a nationally recognized architectural firm of Madison, is the head of the project, and has teamed up with Boldt Company of Appleton and Comprehensive Facilities Planning (CFP) of Columbus, Ohio, for the analysis. The plan will provide a blueprint for the structural growth of Lakeland’s campus for the next 20 years. Space analysis was done for the initiative last week by CFP. “Their designers came through and we actually verified all of the space we have in key buildings,” said Lew Apel, director of facilities management and planning who will coordinate the project. The space analysis was done room by room, and all spaces on campus were measured for square footage as a base calculation for the master plan.

Stakeholder meetings regarding the plans began yesterday and are running through today. “It [the meetings] will be an interview process run by the contractors to flesh out stakeholder’s needs, wants, dreams, and visions. It will flesh out potential programs,” said Apel. Apel says the meetings will be helpful when putting together the physical plans for approval by the board of trustees in October. Some of the stakeholder groups going to the meetings include information technology, the 1862 Society, student affairs, and student government. The final stakeholder meeting is in two weeks with the executive council. This council includes, president Gould, vice president for student affairs Sandy GibbonsVollbrecht, director of athletics Jane Bouche, vice president for advancement James Cape, vice president for finance Joe botana, vice president of enrollment management Allan Mitchler, director of human resources Jack Schoemer, vice president for international programs Tony Fessler, interim academic dean Jeff Elzinga, SEE CAMPUS PLAN/PAGE 3


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News

Issue 5, April 3, 2008

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Students globe trot during May term

May term classes are giving students the chance to go around the world By Dawn Hughes Staff Reporter hughesd@lakeland.edu

M

ay term is fast approaching. With the onset of summer comes travel opportunities for Lakeland students. There are three trips leaving the country and one class heading trip to New York City. Dr. Martin Ulrich is making his third trip to Germany with students. The trip has been every two years. It is open to all students; no knowledge of German is required. The first two weeks of class will be spent on historical and cultural studies, which will prepare students for their travel. The students will then spend ten days in Germany. The trip starts in Frankfurt, where the students will tour a castle on the Rhine River. The castle marks the border of the Roman Empire. The trip will also visit Cologne (Köln) Cathedral, marking the Renaissance and Wartburg Castle, where Martin Luther hid during his exile. The students will then go to Dresden. “[It is] the most spectacular Baroque city in the world,” Ulrich said. The students will go to the palace of Frederick the Great in Potsdam and to Berlin. Ulrich

is also looking forward to visiting Lakeland’s sister school in Kassel. So far, 10-12 students have signed up to go to Germany. There is no maximum number for the trip. Pam Engebretson is teaching an honors seminar on immigration which includes a trip to New York City. Students are taking a train and will spend five to six days in New York. The first week of class will be spent reading about immigration and studying the topic. Since the trip is designed to teach students about the history of immigration, Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty, and the Tenement Museum will be visited. Students will be required to stay paired up for all of their activities. Engebretson wants the trip to be “as close to an immigrant experience as feasible.” Students will be walking a lot and eating ethnic food. Each student will pick an immigration topic to research and will be going to sites in New York City to aid in their research. For example, students who want to research immigrant art can visit any one of many art museums in New York City. The week the students get

back will be spent working on their projects and then present them. May 7-21, Greg Smith and Paul Pickhardt are taking ten students to Belize. All ten students are junior and senior biology majors. They will be spending 15 days in Belize, eight of which will be spent at Belize Foundation for Research and Environmental Education (BFREE). It is 1,100 acres of largely undisturbed rainforest at the heart of Mayan Culture. The students will be going on tours led by experts. Students will spend four to five days researching a subject they found interesting or want to learn more about. While in Belize students will visit Mayan ruins, taking school supplies to a local grade school, and doing a home stay for one night, immersing them in Mayan culture. The last three days of the trip will be spent studying marine biology on a barrier island reef. When students return they will finish up their projects. Students will present the findings of their research on Friday, May 23. The presentations will be open to the public. May 5-26, David Lynch will take a group of students to China. This is his second

trip with students. “I would like to be able to offer it as often as there is interest,” Lynch said. No exposure to Chinese is necessary. Students will be spending three hours in Chinese class each morning. Students will be spending the afternoons doing activities with Chinese students at Lakeland’s sister school in Shanghai and will be doing home stays on Saturdays. Lynch is hoping students will get to visit Suzhou. The trip is costing more than in previous years due to the rise in gas prices. There is also a rise in prices and traffic because the Olympics are taking place in Beijing in August. Lynch plans to take no less than five students to China, because otherwise it would not be cost effective. China, Germany, Belize, and New York City are only a few options for Lakeland students to travel and expand their horizons. Any questions? Call! Martin Ulrich Ext. 1416 Pam Engebretson Ext.1281 Greg Smith Ext. 1575 Paul Pickhardt Ext. 1406 David Lynch Ext. 1433 CAREER FROM PAGE 1

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less marketable,” Stephan said. Through internships, volunteering, and part time jobs college students establish contacts and have a chance to network. They also gain a lot of hands on experience. “Internships and shadowing allow college students to figure out if something they are interested in is really for them. If it’s not, they can find something else,” said Stephan. A few top qualities and skills that employers look for include strong communication skills, strong work ethic, and teamwork skills. “Employers want to see the skills that you’re bringing to the table,” Stephan said. Lisa Stephan and Jessica Lambrecht , career counselors, will assist students on their resumes and get them connected online to Career Connect. Career Connect is a Web site that employers on Lakeland’s campus and around the area can use to find possible candidates for their job openings. Students and graduates can also use Career Connect to find jobs and internships. These days it’s difficult to get a job after college, the job market is very competitive. Even if you’re not required too, get the experience when you can. You’ll probably be glad that you did. SEE QUALITIES/PAGE 3

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R STAFFLIST Lori Sass Editor-in-Chief Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor Ashley Oleck Copy Editor Crystal Peltier News Editor

Jennifer Duenk Opinions Editor Sandy Sternitzky Features Editor

Nicole Holland Sports Editor John Sieglaff Fun House Editor Mariah Tess Online Editor Jason Ehlenfeldt Jake Frias Nicole Hoy Swe Swe Htay Dawn Hughes Tiffany Kelley August Kelm Liz Lange Becky Meyer Rob Pockat Matt Rutlin Brittney Sandberg Madeline Shields Mariah Tess John Wagner Brad Wilk Staff Reporters Takayuki Inukai Contributing Writer Ashley Oleck Matt Rutlin Ad Staff Jennifer Duenk Nicole Holland Erik Hyrkas Liz Lange Crystal Peltier Lori Sass John Sieglaff Madeline Shields Sandy Sternitzky Layout Staff

David Gallianetti Martha Schott Faculty Advisor The Lakeland College Mirror is printed by Wisconsin Newspress, Inc. The Mirror is published every two weeks during the first and second semesters while classes are in session and is distributed free of charge to students, faculty, and staff on the Lakeland College campus.

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R 2007 Best of the Midwest Best Overall Newspaper printed less than weekly at a four-year college 2005 Best of the Midwest Best Overall Newspaper printed less than weekly at a four-year college 2005 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award First Place in Region 6 for newspapers published not more than once per week


The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

News "The Mirror" honored with three journalism awards

Issue 5, April 3, 2008

Sports editor The Society of Professional Journalists awards "The Mirror" receives design “T award

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our staff members of “The Mirror” attended Associated Collegiate Press’ Best of the Midwest Convention in Minneapolis, Minn. Feb. 15-17. Sports Editor Nicole Holland received a fourthplace award for page design at Best of the Midwest. Holland’s full-color back page titled “In pink we think” published Feb. 14, 2008 was entered in the competition. Nearly 300 students representing schools throughout the Midwest attended the conference. Representing “The Mirror” at Best of the Midwest was Lori Sass, editor-in-chief; Holland; Sandy Sternitzky, features editor; and Crystal Peltier, news editor. The four Mirror staff members presented a workshop at the convention on Saturday which focused on newspaper design and layout. The session was attended by more than 40 collegiate journalists. Most of the breakout sessions at the annual convention are presented by professional journalists and journalism faculty members, but “The Mirror” student staff has been asked to present sessions every year for the past five years.

and Fall Issue 6, December 6, 2007. Taking first was St. Cloud State University’s “University Chronicle.” In the category of Editorial Writing “The Mirror” also received a second behind the editorial board of “The Daily Cardinal” from UW-Madison. “The Mirror” submitted a group of two staff editorials from the fall of 2007, “Apathetic attitudes need rectifying” and “Procrastination becoming more than a periodic problem,” plus one written by Editor-in-Chief Lori Sass titled “Four words and the four letter word” published Oct. 4, 2007. Sass, a Sheboygan Falls native, received a third-place award for Sports Writing. Her article about the women’s Above: (L to R) Reed Stratton, Lori Sass, and Brian tennis team,

“Young team blossoming,” was published on Nov. 1, 2007. Sass and two former staff members represented “The Mirror” at the conference. Reed Stratton served as Editor-in-Chief during 200304. Brian Kaufman was the Ad and Business Manager spring of 2004 and 2004-05. “It is so rewarding to be recognized regionally for the hard work the staff does,” Sass said. “We were competing against a lot bigger schools with much bigger staffs. It’s nice to know that we have what it takes to be honored in the journalism world.” Awards were given for print, television, radio, and online journalism. Region 6 is made up of Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Throughout the country, collegiate journalists submitted more than 3,900 entries for the Mark of Excellence Awards. First-place winners in the 12 regions go on to the national competition.

LORI SASS/SASSL@LAKELAND.EDU

Mirror members present workshop at Best of the Midwest

he Mirror” of Lakeland College was awarded three Mark of Excellence Awards at the Society of Professional Journalists Region 6 Spring Conference held March 28 in Bloomington, Minn. The staff received a second-place award for Best AllAround Non-Daily Student Newspaper (published less than four times per week). Three issues of the paper were submitted for judging: Spring Issue 3, March 1, 2007; Fall Issue 2, October 4, 2007;

Kaufman at the SPJ conference in Bloomington, Minn. CAMPUS PLAN FROM PAGE 1

and director of institutional research and planning David Stein. The meetings will help decide what Lakeland facilities need improvement and renovation. Part of the plan is also to study how effectively Lakeland is using its existing facilities. Apel says another thing Lakeland is concerned about is affordability. People have given Lakeland donations for new buildings in the past, but being able to afford to maintain and operate them can be a problem. “Some of that goes back to South Hall,” Apel said. “In today’s dollars just to operate that building, we’ll

spend $1,200 a year on toilet paper. But to put things in perspective there is going to be $80,000 in operating expenses. You have to heat it, you have to cool it, you have to have light it. There are a lot of behind the scenes costs.” In the past, numerous master plans were put together by various companies throughout the years. But once a new building was added, the plans were never followed through or conditions had changed. “Hopefully this plan gives a clear view of the future as the school grows and develops,” Apel said. “For the last 146 years we’ve had a roadmap to do that. I suspect one of the issues that

is going to come out is, ‘how big and where a resident hall goes, and how do we meet academic needs?’ It certainly is apparent a new type of campus center is going to be needed.” With Lakeland’s population growth, pressure is being put on classroom facilities, labs, and athletic facilities. Apel says much of the excitement surrounding the plan is for the fundraising opportunity it has for the Lakeland upcoming sesquicentennial. “It’s an opportunity as it goes forward. It’s going to be a great couple of years to be a muskie,” said Apel.

These were some top candidate qualities as rated by employers -Communication skills -Strong work ethic -Teamwork skills (are you able to work well with others?) -Initiative -Interpersonal skills (do you relate well to others?) Above: (L to R) Crystal Peltier, Sandy Sternitzky, Lori Sass, Martha Schott, and Nicole Holland at the Best of the Midwest.

in brief

Information to let people know what's going on goes here!! Information to let people know what's going on goes here!! Information to let people know what's akeland goingison hosting goes here!! the 22nd annual student conference for the Wisconsin Institute for Peace and Conflict on Friday, April 18, 2008. The theme for this conference is “Resolving Conflicts over Human Needs and Rights.” Students will be presenting papers related to these issues. The keynote speaker is a Latin-American scholar called Thomas Walker who will be talking about his work in Nicaragua. The conference is open to the public. Bossard Hall has been reserved to provide local peace groups with a place to promote their activities and distribute information to students. Tables, chairs, and media equipment are available upon request. Discussion on the Iraqi war has been scheduled to take place during lunch time. A concert featuring local musicians has been arranged for the evening. If you or your organization would like to participate in this conference, or if you have any particular questions, then please contact Rick Dodgson at dodgesonr@lakeland.edu.

Peace conference call for participants

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BOOK HEADS

There’s one on the shelf for you!

QUALITIES FROM PAGE 2

LUCRETIA CRAWFORD/CRAWFORDL@LAKELAND.EDU

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OPEN Monday-Friday 9:30 am - 5:30 pm Saturday 10 am - 4 pm Shut on Sunday Greeting cards • Seasonal Gifts • Children’s Items • Complimentary Tea & Coffee

10% off with Student ID 216 E. Mill Street Plymouth, WI 53073 920-892-6657 bookheads@excel.net www.bookheadstore.com

-Problem-solving skills -Flexibility/adaptability According to NACE Research: Job Outlook 2008


4

Opinions

Technology going too far?

By Becky Meyer

Staff Reporter meyerr@lakeland.edu

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n our current 21st century society, there are so many new advancements in technology that it can be difficult at times to keep track of them all. Advancements are being made to make laptops nearly paper thin, digital books are in the works, and there are many more ways to revolutionize the way we purchase music. Many of these advancements have happened in merely a few years. Our generation has seen numerous new forms of technology, and while many of these advancements were once valued, now they are not seen as nearly as big of a deal. Technology has its advantages, although lately it seems that the disadvantages are becoming much more apparent, even though technology may have some good intent, I have to wonder: is current technological advancement going too far? Is technology doing harm to our world and society? Are we making unnecessary advancements? First of all, technology does have its positives. According to the Small Business Bible Web site (yes, I used a form of technology to research technology), some of the advantages include having more of a means of communication with those of other cultures, and we are therefore able to bridge the communication gap. Also, we have more free time available because things such as the internet save time. Technology also creates jobs for those wishing to have a job dealing with technology. And technology in the form of medical advancements is completely beneficial to the world if it is bettering the health of others. Although, in my eyes, the disadvantages are changing our society and our world so drastically that it is almost scary, and it also can be very detrimental. Technology is replacing jobs that people used to have, and it is eliminating numerous lower-level jobs. We no longer have the privacy we once had thanks to things such as Facebook and Myspace. We have to be much more cautious in our society because technology makes it so much easier for stalkers and other such criminals to commit crimes. Technology is now a means of distraction, and we at times tend to procrastinate because of iTunes, Myspace,

etc. We have more time to accomplish tasks because of the advancements in technology that help in saving us a lot of time and stress; although, we use technology so much that we have difficulty accomplishing the tasks that are most important. It is true that technology makes communication easier with those of other cultures and such, though another problem arises: verbal communication with those around us may be more difficult. When people did not have the internet available to use for communication with others, they had to use something called a telephone (NOT a cell phone!) and talk to the person verbally. And before the telephone was invented, they actually had to go find the person to communicate. Sure it was more difficult, but it made communication with others in person easier to do (because there was no way to avoid it). In our day and age we tend to say, “Should I go and talk to the person or call him/her? Never mind, I’ll just send the person a comment on Facebook!” Technology can also be a slight factor in why the people can be so lazy. We become so fascinated with the internet or what’s on television that we forget about the world outside of our room. Advancements in medicine and science have been helpful and beneficial, but some other advancements are completely unnecessary. They are made just to make our lives easier because we are too lazy to do certain tasks (like write on paper with a pen or pencil, for instance). Or maybe we cannot deal with current events in our personal lives, so things like television offer a distraction from what is truly going on with us. Would you keel over if television or the internet was not around? No, I am sure you would survive just fine, although you may have had to do more work to accomplish what you needed to. I feel that right now in society, we are relying far too much on technology. Some cannot live without their favorite television shows (or without the television on for that matter) or their cell phones. I think that in order to appreciate how easy we have it compared to past generations, we need to discover the world outside our dorm rooms and realize that there’s more to life than the digital world.

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 5, April 3, 2008

Muskie Mailbox of

To the Editor and Staff the Lakeland Mirror:

I was severely offended by the article “More Spirit Please” written by Nicole Holland who complained about the lack of “Muskie Pride” on our campus. Holland described the atmosphere of home sporting events: “… people do not cheer, They don’t get mad when we lose, and they don’t seem proud when we win. The stragglers in the gym seem apathetic toward the game, which is a problem.” Holland also said, “The lack in numbers is almost as disappointing as the frown plastered on five of the six cheerleaders’ faces during [the] regular season.” I am an immense supporter of Lakeland athletics and I feel that I am being sucker-punched with this article. I will concede the author’s point—attendants at home athletic events are not exactly rushing into the Wehr Center doors, but this article not only patronized those who do not attend events, it alien-

ated those who do attend. By complaining about those that go to games and those who do not, it only leaves a single person who shows “absolut” Lakeland pride. That would be you Ms. Holland. It does not take a very big person to point their fingers at everyone but themselves, but I will tell you a couple of things that requires some courage and dedication. It takes a very big person to organize fundraising events like the Think Pink event. It takes a very big person to dedicate the time and energy demanded of the Lakeland cheerleaders who put themselves out there for school pride. You know what? It also takes a big person to get out of their rooms after a long day of school and attend these events to support their friends and fellow peers. As far as the people who do not attend home events, leave them be. Lakeland is a small, diverse liberal arts school. This is not Madison. You must concede that some people simply are not interested in basketball. College

life is tough enough without being guilt-tripped by a columnist. What I do not see in Ms. Holland’s article is a solution, which seems to be a recurring thing in Mirror Opinion pieces. I am very tired of reading Pledging Musko (the cell phone thing was interesting though) or any of the other opinion pieces and only seeing various spews of constant bitching. A solution would add another dimension to these pieces instead of the “you know what sucks about Lakeland…” template. Ms. Holland, it sounds like you came from a very nice high school, but this is Lakeland and if you want to change something you need to do it yourself. I would suggest looking into more effective ways to draw students to games other than guilt and derision. Also, here is a brainbusting idea—how about you work to entertain those who do attend the games. Until then, think before you write another opinions piece. ~Beau Markut

PHOTOOPINION What are your plans for May term?

NiKeshia Gardener Freshman Criminal Justice

David Fayne III Freshman Art

Dominique Olds Junior Biology

“I’m taking a May term because I have to, but I wish there were more options for every major.”

“I wish there were more art classes available.”

“I am going to Belize!”

Virgil Snipstad III Junior Resort Management

Sam Johnson Freshman Early Childhood Ed.

Chris Fiffer Freshman Fine Arts

Staci Abrahamson Super Senior Writing

“I would like the selection of classes to be much broader.”

“I hope to take costumeing for theatre but if not I’ll be working.

“I want classes that are actually helpful towards your major or minor.”

“I will be working four different jobs.”

Erica Brown Freshman Buisness Management “It sucks having last pick. I don’t know what I’ll do if my class is full.”


Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 5, April 3, 2008

5

s n i a r t o w t f o e l a t A By August Kelm

Staff Reporter kelma@lakeland.edu

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had planned on going to the Tokyo Motor Show for a long time; in fact, a good three months before I even left for Japan. Purchasing a ticket while I was still in the U.S. was next to impossible since they didn’t go on sale until two days after I would have arrived in Japan anyway. So I figured, since this was a large auto show, I should be able to purchase a ticket at the door. The only thing I need to do was find the place. Sounds simple enough. I’d been in Tokyo for two months and I could mentally map the city (at least the areas I’d been too). Plus, Google Maps helped me too. On top of that, I asked a friend to go with me who had already been there before. I thought I had everything set up, but I was dead wrong. Two days before the, my friend had to cancel due to a surprise exam in one of her classes. Alright, that’s fine; I knew enough about the train lines to get me there. But just to double check, I asked my friend to make sure I got on the right trains to get me there. See, even though it’s called the Tokyo Motor Show, the place is actually outside of Tokyo, mostly due to space issues. So the day comes, I roll myself off my futon, let my host family know where I was going, grab the breakfast my

host mother made for me, and rode my bike to the station. Looking at my watch, it was around seven in the morning. “I should have plenty of time,” I thought. I just needed to take two different trains (other than the one I needed to take to get to Shinjuku), and when I got to the station outside the place, I could either walk or take a shuttle bus for free. Walking past the now familiar “Platform 3-4” and venturing off into another part of the station I’d only been to once before, I hunted for the Keio Line. The instant I got to the platform, I had a feeling this wasn’t my train, but by the time I got down the stairs, the train just arrived, and another wouldn’t arrive for another 45 minutes. Not wanting to wait to find out, I hopped on and sat down on the maroon bench that ran the length of the train. And there I sat, watching the ebb and flow of the morning passenger’s change from each stop. I was a bit concerned since, it was raining outside at some stops and I didn’t have an umbrella. That’s the other funny thing I found out. Just because it’s raining at one stop, it could be dry at the next one. Hoping that was the case at my stop, I waited until it came up. Walking out of the station, I thought it was strange I didn’t see any signs for the

Tokyo Motor Show. It’s a large show, so you think they’d advertise it in the area it’s being held. But I shrugged it off. Since I was going on the second to last day of the show, and it had been going for two weeks previously, maybe they just took them down early. And that’s what I kept telling myself while I walked around a small, unknown town. It was a quiet town, about the size of my host family’s town I would estimate. But it was certainly not the town where the Tokyo Motor Show was being held. Standing at a street corner, I came to this crushing realization. With an outcry of frustration, I called out “could this get any worse?” Oh, indeed it could, and it did. I was now in the midst of a sudden downpour. Wet, angered, and knowing I was a bit lost, I did the next best thing, I followed the train tracks to the next station. I figured I’d ask someone there how to get to the Tokyo Motor Show. I wasn’t that far off, was I? Once again, the crushing realization came when I asked the guard looking over the station gates, he laughed at me. Quickly regaining his stone cold demeanor, he pointed on a train map to where I was, and where I should have gone in the first place. Seeing that it was just a big mess of train transferring, and knowing I’d

probably get even more lost, he said I should just go back to Shinjuku and get further instructions from there. Right, so back to Shinjuku Station I went. Getting there, I zeroed in on the “Help Desk.” Not wanting to sound like a stereotypical American, I asked if the person at the desk spoke English, in Japanese mind you. She said yes, which was a big relief to me. Asking how to get to the Tokyo Motor Show, she pointed out the platform I needed, and then said take that train to another station, and that’s it. That’s it? I was lost for three hours getting rained on, laughed at by a station guard and “that’s it!” Alright, I figured, I had already been lost once during the day, I suppose I could do it again. Thankfully, it really was the right way to get there, and after another hour and a half of riding in trains, I was there at the front gates. I was even able to purchase my ticket at the station by motor show employees. Walking into the place was awesome. I have to admit, I’m a bit of a car enthusiast, so this was heaven for me. Within minutes I had my camera out, snapping pictures. I started to think I would give myself away to be a tourist, but as I took a look around, I was not alone. Every millisecond was filled with a flash from a per-

son’s camera, tourist or not. Exploring the ever-expanding exhibition halls, I noticed a large group of people outside of the Nissan display. Being a social creature, I decided to join in. What I was standing in line for, I had no idea. Could be a pamphlet, a picture with a model, who knows? After about a minute of standing, I realized the group began to grow, and I was now trapped. Hoping it would be something good, I saw a glimpse of what everyone was looking at. The new 2008 Nissan Skyline GTR. Oh, and by the way, expect to see these at the dealerships here in America soon! After fighting my way to the front, I felt like the paparazzi, pushing people out of the way and unleashing a fury of shutter clicks and camera flashes just to get a glimpse of this car. Getting my fill, I moved on to the other exhibits. A feeling of relief washed over me. I was here; I was at the 2007 Tokyo Motor Show. As the afternoon rolled on and my cameras SD memory card began to fill up, along with my free souvenirs bag, I felt like it was time for me to head on back home. That day I saw cars I may never get to see again in my life, let alone afford (like the BMW Tii concept car), but I had pictures of them, and that was just as good.

AUGUST KELM/KELMA@LAKELAND.EDU


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Features

Issue 5, April 3, 2008

Talia says goodbye By Sandy Sternitzky Features Editor sternitzkys@lakeland.edu

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f you happen to go to any LC-CAB activities such as comedians and karaoke, you’ll notice that Talia Koronkiewicz is usually there. Talia came to Lakeland in the fall of 2006 as the director of student activities. “It was my first job right out of grad school,” said Talia. “It was a great stepping stone to get me started in my career.” Now Talia is taking another step in her career: moving on to a different location. She will be the director of student life and campus activities at McHenry County College in Crystal Lake, Ill. Even though she will have a different job title, Talia will still be having the same job responsibilities as she has at Lakeland, such as student organizations, student senate, and event planning. “Everything’s practically the same there as it is here, but they don’t have an orientation program, so I won’t have to worry about doing that during the summer months,” Talia said. The two-year college will be able to provide Talia with many leadership development opportunities. There are several benefits for Talia taking on the job at McHenry. “It’s close to home, so I will be able to see my family and my old friends a lot more than I am now,” said Talia. She is originally from Union, Ill., which is about 15 minutes away from Crystal Lake. Another benefit for Talia is that she gets to do most of her job during the day. “The

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Alan Berg officially

named in new position

programs that they hold are geared towards being held during the day, so I won’t have to worry about getting burnt out so easily on weeknights,” said Talia. “I also get to have a life outside of work like spending more time with my husband and having more time to myself and relaxing.” Talia’s last day here will be April 23 and will start at McHenry on April 28. “Since there is still some time before the end of the term, I will be able to see what they’re like,” said Talia. Although saying goodbye isn’t one of Talia’s preferred sayings, but she does say that she is grateful for the opportunities Lakeland has offered her. “It’s bittersweet that I’m leaving. Everyone here has been so supportive about it and it’s nice to know that I’m leaving here on good terms,” said Talia. “It’s really sad to see her go, but she’s doing what’s best for her,” said sophomore Chris Grotegut, secretary and treasurer for LC-CAB. “I’m grateful for everything she’s done for me.” The main aspects Talia will miss about Lakeland are the students and the student life staff. “I’ve been able to interact with so many students and it’s just amazing to see how much they have grown from when I first got here up until now. It’s remarkable,” Talia said. As far as the position is concerned, it has been posted and Lakeland has been receiving applications from many people. They are hoping to find someone to fulfill the job by the early part of the summer.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Below: A photo of Talia on a recent trip to Spain.

Berg named assistant director of food service By Nicole Hoy Staff Reporter hoyn@lakeland.edu

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lan Berg came to Lakeland College in Mar. 1997. At first he was the kitchen supervisor which he did for seven years. Three years later, Berg unofficially took the position of assistant director of food service. Berg has been in the food service industry for 23 years. Before coming to Lakeland, Berg went to Fox Valley Tech. Instead of going for a culinary degree, he went through the internship program. The internship program allowed him to work at the American Club in Kohler. The American Club then sponsored him to go through the program and continue working in the food service industry. Berg worked as the breakfast supervisor in the Wisconsin Room of the American Club. Berg also worked in the bakery and pastry kitchen at

the American Club for five years. The work included wedding cakes and pastries among an assortment of baked goods. Eventually, Berg earned his Cook Journeyman Degree. Berg said he learned most of what he knows on the job. He found that his passion for cooking had a central reason. He said, “The main reason I went into cooking was because my dad was a fireman. He was a good cook. My mom was a good baker.” He said later, “I took the job because I was already doing the job, so Dale wanted me to have the title to go with the job.” Berg says he likes the creativity of cooking. “I like creating. The ability to create, experiment.” Later, Berg commented on his favorite thing about working for Lakelands food service. He said, “I like the diversity. No two days are exactly alike. Interacting with the students is fun.” Alan Berg has a way of

making people laugh, and he has a good repertoire with the students much like his colleague and kitchen supervisor, Mark Wagner. Berg has brought many styles of cooking to the kitchen, one of the most interesting is Southwestern. The different spices along with the way the food is prepared seemingly tantalizes the tongue, giving the meal a whole new experience. One of the best things about having Alan Berg as the assistant food director here at Lakeland College is he is able to make the food tasteful and not bland. He uses spices but keeps them to a minimum. It gives the food flavor and it does not overpower the dish itself. After working 23 years in food service, Alan Berg has achieved a knack for cooking and preparing food in ways that I you may have never thought to combine. He is a good asset to the Lakeland College food service.

IT after hours help desk By Madeline Shields Staff Reporter shieldsm@lakeland.edu

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ave you ever had a computer problem and trekked over to IT only to find that it’s closed for the day? Have no fear, the IT night desk is here to help! How does it work? Simply type the word ‘helpdesk’ into your Internet browser, and you’ll be directed to the Lakeland College IT Help Desk. Here you will be asked to log into your account and will then have access to the services of the IT department. To place a help request click the green “new request” button on the right side of the window. A screen resembling that of an e-mail message will pop up with your name as the requester. Next, pick a category that your request falls under, and then type up the problem. Once sent, the request will be received by IT’s night help person, Nicole Hoy. Situated in the upper level of Chase, Hoy waits to

help you work through your problems. You can also use this system during the daytime hours. Along with being able to send in help requests, you can browse topics to see if you can fix your own problem. Topics include audio/visual help, phones, blackboard, hardware, software, network, etc. According to Hoy, common technical problems dealt with include log-in issues and audio/visual issues. A downfall about the help desk is that there is no tele-

phone number you can call to speak with a real person if it is after hours. This may present some problems, especially for troubles that are internet related. You can, however, call extension 1643 and leave a message with your contact information and an explanation of your problem. Otherwise, your situation can be easily remedied by using the patience required to wait until the following day, when you can speak with the IT department directly. Lakeland IT Department: 920-565-1643


Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 5, April 3, 2008

7

In Focus: Juxiang “Jennifer” Huang By Sandy Sternitzky Features Editor sternitzkys@lakeland.edu

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ou’ll notice that many students at Lakeland College spend a lot of their time in the building where their major classes are. Juxiang “Jennifer” Huang is one of those students, spending the majority of her time in the Chase Center. Jennifer is a native from Suriname, South America, and graduated from her high school called Lyceum Two in 2004. After graduating from high school, Jennifer came to Lakeland as an international student in 2004, where she double majored in biology and chemistry. Since then, Jennifer has participated in many organizations on campus, such as the dance team, Chemistry club, tennis team, Global Student Association, and pre-health care club. “It was a great experience for me to join different organizations because I was able to make more friends, learn more English, and also interacting with people,” Jennifer said. She also did subject tutoring in the HARC for three years.

Jennifer was part of the Lakeland Undergraduate Research Experiences (LURE) program where she and other students did a research project during the summer. During her education time here at Lakeland, Jennifer got to know many of her professors and other students who also have the same majors as she does. “Everyone in the department is very supportive of their students, especially my advisor, Greg Smith. He was great,” said Jennifer. When Jennifer graduated last year after only three years of study, she was able to do some volunteering and preparing for medical school. She took the MCATs (Medical College Admission Test) and went through the process of applying for medical school. “I had to get a decent score on the MCATs, two letters of recommendation, one from the doctor I worked with and one from my advisor, certain amount of volunteer work hours, and have an interview. It was a lot, but I got in,” said Jennifer. Next fall, Jennifer will be attending Midwestern University in Glendale, Arizona for the next four years. She wants to be a doctor, but is not sure

SANDY STERNITZKY/ STERNITZKYS@LAKELAND.EDU

Outstanding senior Jennifer Huang looks forward to medical school in Arizona

on the specifics yet. “I’m thinking about going into family medicine or maybe OB. I don’t know yet,” Jennifer said. Jennifer wanted to be a doctor ever since she was little. “Everyone else in my family is doing business, but I want to do medicine. The dermatologists have actually

inspired me to do so,” said Jennifer. To get some of her volunteer work hours, Jennifer spent time admitting patients at St. Nicholas hospital for a year. She also spent time volunteering in the radiology department at Memorial Hos-

pital. There, she sat with patients while they were waiting to be transferred and she also learned many techniques that they use there. She is currently still volunteering time there. Another way Jennifer was able to get some volunteering done was through a medical mission’s trip down to Mexico. She went with a couple doctors and other volunteers. They were there for about ten days and all they did was just help the people that needed it. “They were poor and couldn’t afford health care, so everyone who went did it to volunteer. They were very thankful for us,” said Jennifer. Last semester, Jennifer taught a chemistry lab here at Lakeland. “It was kind of different doing it, because I had to make up the quizzes and grade everyone. I learned a lot from doing it and I would do it again if I could. It was a great experience,” said Jennifer. “She was very well organized, and created a group that will hopefully last,” said junior Kasey Gussert, treasurer of pre-health care club. “She has done so much in so little time, and put in so much effort.”

Habitat for Humanity heads to Wyoming

SUBMITTED PHOTOS


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A&E

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 5, April 3, 2008

Legendary comedy group coming to Lakeland By Mariah Tess Staff Reporter tessm@lakeland.edu

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hat do Tina Fey, Stephen Colbert, John Belushi, and Steve Carell all have in common? They all ‘graduated’ from the Second City comedy troupe in Chicago. They are but a few of the famous names to be attributed to this legendary improvisational comedy group. Many of the famous actors and comedians you know today got their start with Second City. On April 11 at 7:30 p.m., instead of going to Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, or any other of the locations where Second City has its theatres, you can instead simply go to

the Bradley Building here at Lakeland and see the Second City Touring Company (SCTC). Started back in the early ‘50’s, Second City was founded by a few University of Chicago students. Since then, Second City has gone on to start workshops, produce films, and even have its own TV show, SCTV. The company is set to debut its 95th revue on April 13 in Chicago. However, Second City is not limited to just improv— they also do theatricals, including musicals. Most of these theatricals are original to Second City. R e c e n t l y, N o r w e g i a n Cruise Lines has teamed up with Second City to of-

fer shows and workshops on their cruises. In addition to those locations, Second City also has its touring company, which is coming to Lakeland. Some recognizable names that performed in the touring group include Bill Murray, Mike Myers, Tina Fey, Julia Louis Dreyfus, and more. Featuring a cast of 18 members,  a director, musical directors, and three stage managers,  the SCTC travels around the world to various campuses, theatres, festivals, and the like. Second City is one of only a handful of touring improvisational groups, and is easily the most recognizable of the few. It is seen as a stepping www.reviewjournal.com

stone on the way to fame. Not only does the company showcase tomorrow’s famous actors and actresses, it also provides training and workshops to those who aspire to be among the comedy greats, including classes on improvisation, writing, and acting. The classes are taught by professionals in the field, and can teach people how to perform individually or in an ensemble. Some of those famous names, including Fey, Meyers, Colbert, Chris Farley, and Halle Berry have been through these training centers. Armed with satire on the most current events, Second City is guaranteed to be relevant to what is going on today

as well as hilarious. The current cast of the Second City Touring Company has many prior experiences and backgrounds including performing in various stage shows, college education at differing institutions, and membership in other types of theater groups. Based on the many successful actors, actresses, writers, and others that have gotten their start from Second City, any one of these performers that will be appearing on the Bradley stage could one day become famous. Do not let this opportunity to see future stars on their way to the top pass you by. Tickets are required for this event.

“Hood” is an exciting new take on “Robin Hood” By Tiffany Kelley

Staff Reporter kelleyt@lakeland.edu

“H

ood” by Stephen Lawhead is a retelling of the original Robin Hood story. It is set 100 years earlier than the traditional tale. The book deals with the complex relations between the Welsh, Saxons, and Normans before William the Conqueror’s victory in 1066. Although the book is steeped in medieval history, the tale is quick paced and socially provocative. The plot centers around Bran ap Brychan the heir to Elfael, a Welsh kingdom. Norman invaders kill his father and war band unceremoniously. Bran barely escapes the Norman forces and is forced to flee into

the woods. The same Normans enslave Elfael and plan their campaign against all of Wales. The story follows the traditional plot of the British classic, but each original character is given new life in this version. The characters seem more human, with individual moral dilemmas being played out across a splintered island. By looking at the Norman and Welsh point of view, the story begs the question of who decides right and wrong. Lawhead has written over 22 novels. Most of his works are historic reimagings of old legends and fairytales. “Hood” will be followed by “Scarlet” and “Tuck”.

www.ticketweb.com

www.popmatters.com

“Water for Elephants” Liz Lange Staff reporter/layout langee@lakeland.edu

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www.google.com

www.amazon.com

n this novel, author Sara Gruen juxtaposes her fictional characters and storyline with the historically accurate details of circus life in 1931. Gruen’s characters are lively, unique, and humanly flawed. The novel follows three months in the life of main character Jacob Jankowski. A veterinary student in his last semester at Cornell, 23-year-old Jacob shares issues typical of most college aged men: girls, illegal booze, and exams.

Everything is going well for Jacob until the Dean of the college removes him from class to tell him that his parents have just been killed in an automobile accident. With no family and nothing to inherit, Jacob begins a dramatic, life-changing journey on foot. Hopping a train that belongs to a circus, he makes a new life for himself by caring for the performing animals as the show’s veterinarian. Despite the hard work and little pay, Jacob manages to earn the trust of laborers and performers alike. He even

develops a special bond with Rosie, the unforeseen heroine of the story. The novel transitions between Jacob’s story in 1931, and Jacob in a present-day nursing home. The time shift keeps the story lively and balanced with real life drama that reminds us of our own mortality. Intelligently written, Gruen’s novel doesn’t miss a beat. From depression era circus jargon to individually developed characters, “Water for Elephants” is truly a unique literary experience that will bemuse its readers.


The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Advertisement

Issue 5, April 3, 2008

9

Jalisco’s Restaurant Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 8 am-3am Fri.-Sat. 8 am-4am $5.50

Jalisco’s features a full menu of authentic Mexican food. Jalisco’s Restaurant is family owned and operated. The family franchise began in Milwaukee. Efern Martinez branched out and started the Sheboygan location which opened in 1999. There are six Jalisco’s spread out in Wisconsin. They are all related to one another. Jalisco is a state in Mexico. Jalisco is known for being the birthplace of mariachi music and tequila.

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EXPIRES 12/2008


10

Fun House

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 5, April 3, 2008

Easter egg dying; Sieglaff style My brothers and I show my parents what wonderful boys they raised

By John Sieglaff

Fun House Editor sieglaffj@lakeland.edu

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ou know, I really have a deep, passionate hatred for the spring. I love fall, summer, and I can even appreciate winter through the heart of it. But spring has always equated to hell for me—at least here in Straight from the John Wisconsin. My allergies flare up, so I have to take a small pharmacy’s worth of Clariton, Nasonex, and Advair; none of these, however, actually prevent the inevitable war that allergies declare on my body. Spring is so often thought of as the season with love and romance in the air. Try picking up girls with an abused handkerchief hanging out of your back pocket while you uncontrollably sneeze every five seconds. I see more allergens in the air than love. By the way, ladies, I’m single and quite easy-going. Anywho… I guess because of my hatred for spring, I cling to Easter very tightly. This holiday seems to be the only thing that can put a smile on my face during this foul season. My family doesn’t do much, but we get together anyhow. Our traditions are fairly…uh, traditional. We do the usual egg-dying the night before, we hunt for the baskets our

parents—I mean the “Easter Bunny—” hid for us, and we hide plastic eggs around the house for each other to find. It’s a pretty wild time. I think my parents are officially fed up with encountering unfound plastic eggs all over the living room, kitchen, laundry, and dining room. I’m still finding them in my socks here at school! T h i s may sound normal to those of you with younger siblings, but for those of you who don’t know, I have two older brothers and two older sisters. My oldest sibling is 13 years older than me and I’m 21. You do the math. This year, my brothers and I dyed eggs with my parents. I can’t imagine how my parents have any remaining pride for “their boys” after our display this year. My sisters apparently deemed egg-dying too immature for them to participate in, so my brothers and I decided to prove them right. At the present time of our idiotic behavior, I thought our antics were witty and intelligent. Now, in retrospect, I figure we made ourselves out to be some fairly large jackasses. My oldest brother Mark, 35, tried to dye an egg that wasn’t boiled. He was then quite perplexed when he found only the bottom half of his egg dyed a pastel pink. I was trying to be new and inventive. I

took an artistic approach to dying my eggs. I knew of some famous artists who simply stared at the blank canvas in front of them—waiting for hours before beginning what would become a masterpiece. By doing this, the artists hoped to ascertain what the canvas wanted to be painted. So much of my time was spent with an intent gawk at an untouched egg while I pondered what color this particular egg might desire to be. The result of my eggs was not much less than beautiful. In fact, my other older brother, Brian, 32, astutely noted that one egg I dyed was the color of fart gases. He then thought it would be funny if he attempted to eat the egg without peeling the shell and just after dying it. His face expressed something of disgust and the first bite he took was spit right back out. I can’t imagine what possessed him. I think he just wanted attention. Hope you’re proud of us, M o m and

Above: My 35-year-old brother, Mark, tries to understand the concept of bouyancy while I stare down my egg in my artistic approach to dying.

Dad! Well, Easter has left me with an entire two months of spring to deal with yet. I don’t k n o w how I’ll muddle through it. Maybe I could get a girlfriend. *Achhooo* Above: My 32-year-old brother, Brian, attempts to eat a freshly-boiled, freshly-dyed Easter egg without peeling the shell. Below: My brothers and I enjoying our time dying eggs on Easter Eve.


The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Fun House

Chase and Eddie

Issue 5, April 3, 2008 By John Sieglaff Fun House Editor sieglaffj@lakeland.edu

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Fun House

Issue 5, April 3, 2008

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Rob receives heir to kingdom Oh, Boy! By Rob Pockat Staff Reporter pockatr@lakeland.edu

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ell, it’s official my friends…I’m having a baby. Well, not me exactly, but the woman of the house who, ironically, wears the pants in the family is. The baby is due at the beginning of September, which happens to coordinate nicely with the beginning of the next semester. Who needs sleep anyway? My wife and I recently went in for one of those hitech ultrasounds. These machines don’t just look at the baby in two or even three dimensions. Beyond these is another dimension - a dimension of sound, a dimension of sight, a dimension of mind. You’re moving into a land of both shadow and substance, of things and ideas. You’ve just crossed over into the Twilight Zone. Okay, it wasn’t that cool, but it was pretty close. With the old-school ultrasound equipment I could never quite make anything out that was supposed to resemble a human being. I always felt like I was looking at a Doppler image of tornado-producing storms blowing through Oklahoma. With this puppy, though, you could see absolutely everything both inside and outside of the baby. To balance the ease with which this technology made

viewing the fetus possible, we were given a four-foottall, 150-year-old German doctor who wielded the delicate instrumentation of the ultrasound machine with the finesse of an eight-year-old playing Whack-A-Mole at the local county fair. He poked and prodded my wife’s abdomen from every possible angle, muttering unintelligible commands to himself at each new image displayed on the viewing screen. My wife swore that he was speaking English, but I barely understood a word that came out of his mouth. So, while this eighth little dwarf was examining everything from the baby’s spleen to its eye sockets, I started wondering what the chassis looked like. Would I be able to see the makings of a little shaveling? I needed to know if we were having a dude or dudette! After about 45 minutes I finally told the doctor that we wanted to know what its sex was. He stopped, muttered something about schnitzels, then he continued to prod. Finally he said, in perfect English and at the top of his lungs, “You see what that is there? It’s a little penis!” To which my wife promptly looked at me and replied, “Well, if it’s a LITTLE penis we definitely know the baby is yours.” It took a little while for it

A composite image of a baby’s body and the head of Rob Pockat. Note: this is not intended to represent a real person.

to sink in that we were finally going to have a man-child in the house. I love my girls more than anything, but they’re so…pink and frilly. It’s going to be awesome to have a kid in the house that presumably won’t want to wear dresses, tights, and fancy shoes everyday. This kid will be able to wear jeans and t-shirts until he has to get a job—or at least until he takes an education class at Lakeland anyway. With the thoughts of a Robby Jr. running around the house come thoughts of what I’ll need to teach him to become a man. Sports, beerdrinkin’, and womanizing will have to be at the top of this list. Unfortunately, I know nothing about any of these subjects. Thank God for Google! As time passes I look forward to the day that I’ll be able to hold the heir to my throne in my own hands. I also look to this day with a feeling of sorrow because I know he will have to experience the first mark of manhood…circumcision. Sorry, son.

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M I R R O R

Advertisement

Issue 5, April 3, 2008

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14

Refocusing By Brad Wilk

Staff Reporter wilkb@lakeland.edu

Sports

Issue 5, April 3, 2008

Volleyball team still has eye on the prize

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he Lakeland men’s volleyball team has accomplished a lot of great things this season, and they are ready to finish off this year by going for their ultimate goal of winning a national title. The Muskies finished second at the Midwest Intercollegiate Volleyball Association Championships at Ohio State University, suffering a loss to the University of Illinois in the championship match. There are two tournaments left this season. The Wisconsin Volleyball Conference tournament is this weekend at La Crosse. The National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association (NIIRSA) National Championships in Dallas, Tex. will be April 1012. The Muskies have six seniors on this year’s team – Avdo Omerbegovic, Jared Rohland, Tim Frillman, Andrew Lietz, Shawn Voelz, and Chris Plamann – and head coach Chad Schreiber said one senior might go to graduate school at Lakeland. Outside hitter, Matt Martin is in

graduate school and might also return next year. Schreiber said the team does not feel a sense of urgency, but the Muskies are focused on their goal of winning the national championship. “You can tell yourself or create an environment where the only goal isn’t to win everything,� Schreiber said. “When we have finish second and third at nationals the last two years and finished first in the conference and second in MIVAs two years in a row, there is not a whole lot of room to feel like we’ve improved ourselves. “We feel we’ve got as good a team or better. We want to play well. If don’t win everything, the only thing that will make us feel good at the end of the year is if we truly were beat by someone with us playing our best volleyball, and even then it will still be disappointing.� Schreiber said the team is good as far as injuries, but some of the players are feeling spent with a long season behind them. “There are maybe one

or two achier than I would like them to be, but not have to play until Friday (at the WVC Tournament), I think we’ll be close to 100 percent,� Schreiber said. The Muskies got some good experience for the national tournament at the MIVA Championships this past weekend. They lost to Illinois in the championship game. The Muskies beat UWOshkosh in the quarterfinals for their second win over Oshkosh this season, after losing to them the first four times they played. “I think they’re (Illinois) the best team in the country,� said Schreiber, whose team

Emotional Wrestling Banquet By Jacob Frias

Staff Reporter friasj@lakeland.edu

S

howcasing this wrestling season’s highlights was the main objective of this year’s wrestling banquet on March 28. Whether it is the emotional senior speeches or watching of this season’s highlight video, head coach Pete Rogers feels that this annual banquet motivates the

M I R R O R has lost to Illinois three times this season, twice this past weekend. “We have to have our top game and catch them down a bit to beat them.� Schreiber said the Muskies did not play very well on Saturday, other than the Illinois match in pool play. They lost a match to Grand Valley State, when they decided to rest their starters to keep their legs fresh for Sunday. Schreiber said Sunday was a good day, and the win over Oshkosh was one of the more complete matches Lakeland has played this season. “They jumped out to a lead and they were all fired up after we had just beaten them,�

Schreiber said. “Then we went on a tear and shut them out the rest of game one, and won game two pretty handily. In the end, I’m impressed with how we played. “Saturday was very worrisome to me. Our guys used a lot of excuses about the long drive, being tired and having a week off for spring break, and all these things. They were focused too much on Illinois. I’m not doing a good enough job of getting them interested in every match, because that’s how they played. They weren’t interested in playing very many matches outside of Illinois on Saturday.�

Intramurals Flag football is about to begin!

The fun will take place April 7-10 and April 14-17 It starts at 4pm every day. You should get teams together ASAP! It will be 5 on 5 with three subs. Talk to Mike Bachar at Ext: 1411

Sign up at the campus center! FREE FITNESS CLASS!

Certified personal trainer, Vijay Gadhia, wants to get the student body in shape! He will be offering a free fitness class to anyone who shows interest. The classes will be tailored to each individual as far as scheduling and the different physical goals of participants. If you are interested contact Vijay Gadhia vijay_pt_fitness@yahoo.com or at Ext: 1717 move on.� To add on to the touching goodbyes, Benson, who fought for our country in Iraq all of last year, gave Rogers a cherished gift. It was an American flag that meant a lot to Matt. He brought with him wherever he went during battle and atop various monuments all across Europe and Asia. “I have never received a gift with that much meaning.� said Rogers. Even through the tears, there were some awards handed out to those wrestlers who stood out in certain statistical categories. Senior national qualifier Paul Hartt took home much of the hardware winning the trophies for “Most Takedowns,� “Most Near Fall,� and “Most Team Points,� edging out sophomore heavyweight Adam Sutter by half of a point for that award. Sutter did not go away empty handed though. He took home the award for “Most Pins� with 21 (which also put him at second in the country this season). After being asked where he sees the team heading after this season, Coach Rogers replied, “Everyone is going to be a year older and we are going to get better.� Next season, the wrestling Muskies will look for leadership in the five future seniors, as well as many other juniors and underclassmen involved in the program.

Below: Sophomore infielder K.C. Blahnik hit a .381 on the spring break trip.

NICOLE HOLLAND/HOLLANDN@LAKELAND.EDU

younger guys in on the team to take the next step in becoming an accomplished college wrestler. “[The banquet] puts purpose behind what they are doing,� said Rogers. Not only was this an opportunity for the underclassmen to be recognized individually, but it also gave the seniors of the team one more chance to address their teammates and coaches. They were recognized for their four years of hard work towards the program, as well. Sam Copp (133 pounds), Paul Hartt (197 pounds), and Matt Benson (Hwt.) all bid their farewells 'SFF8JSFMFTT in “very emotional speeches� according to Rogers. “It’s always hard 0QFO%BJMZBUBN saying good bye to people you have been through a lot with,� said Rogers, “When someone goes through the challenge of wrestling, it is tough to see them

The Lakeland College


Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 5, April 3, 2008

15

Rocky starts on Spring Break Sunday

Monday

April 2008

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

2 Baseball @ CUW 1pm

3 Baseball Home VS Wisconsin Lutheran 1pm

4

5 Basball Home VS Maranatha Baptist Noon

Softball @ Marian College 3pm

6 Baseball @ Marian College Noon

7 Softball Home VS Maranatha Baptist 3pm

8 Baseball @ Lawrence University 1pm

9

14 Baseball Home VS Finlandia 3pm

15 Softball Home VS Alverno College 3pm (Parent Day)

16 Baseball @ Cardinal Stritch 2pm

Softball @ Concordia University Chicago Noon 13

Baseball Home VS Dominican University Noon Softball Home VS Benedictine University Noon

10 11 Softball Home VS Lawrence University 3pm

12 Baseball @ Rockford 1pm Softball Home VS Aurora University Noon

Softball @ CUW 3pm

Softball looks forward to regular season play

Staff Reporter wilkb@lakeland.edu

T

Softball Home VS Edgewood College 3pm

he Lakeland softball team had some great weather on its spring break trip to Arizona, but the weather has not been cooperating since they have been back at Lakeland. Head coach Chad Buchmann said he and assistant coach, Annie Morgan, chipped six inches of ice off the infield by hand last week, but the field is still not ready to host a game. The Muskies have had to re-schedule their first two home games because of the bad weather and the poor field conditions. “We need wind, 50 degree weather, and for it never to rain again, if that would be possible,” said Buchman with a laugh. Depending on what happens with the games scheduled for this week, it could be two weeks or more before the Muskies play another game. However, the Muskies played several nationallyranked teams when they were in Arizona, and Buchmann said even though their 1-7 record is not that impressive, it can help the team during this stretch with no games. “If we would have played a poorer level of competition out there, our record would

have maybe held us up and given us some false hope,” Buchmann said. “But I think playing that competition, and every player saying ‘I need to work on something’ will actually help us over those two weeks. It will help us because they just can’t be bored in the gym. You have to work on something.” Buchmann said the Muskies scheduled the toughest competition they have ever taken on in Arizona because they want to prepare to play at national level. “To take on the best is the best way to find out what we need to work on,” Buchmann said. “We scored first often and we were in a lot of games until about fourth inning, so we were just three to four innings away. We know we can compete if we clean up a couple of errors and be more disciplined at the plate and more aggressive.” Sophomore centerfielder Chelsea Coenen hit .429 during the trip, sophomore second baseman K.C. Blahnik hit .381 and senior first baseman Allison Lock and freshman rightfielder Kayla Vande Wettering both were .333. Vande Wettering hit three home runs, one in a varsity game and two in JV games. She is starting for the Muskies

along with freshman catcher Kristine Raeder. “When you get the opportunity, prove to me I should not take you out,” Buchmann said. “They proved to me I had to keep them in. It’s based on skill. It’s based on who is coachable, who will be committed, who is doing the right things and taking advantage of it during the game.” Buchmann said the team needs to work on putting more hits together on offense. “Every run has got to be more valuable. We’ve got to work harder to get runs. “In the past, our runs have come a little bit easier. Against real good competition, you have to be able to

manufacture more runs.” The Muskies pitching struggled on the trip, but Buchmann said that will happen when the opposing teams have already played 10 or 12 games. “Usually the hitting is the last thing to come along and pitching holds you up because a lot of people haven’t seen your pitching,” Buchmann said. “We had a situation where they’ve already seen pitching for a week. We were strong enough for first three or four innings until they saw us for the third time through, then they made their adjustments and that’s when we struggled. We know what we have to work on.”

By Nicole Holland

Sports Editor hollandn@lakeland.edu

T

he Lakeland College baseball team returned home, from spring break, with a 1-6 record. They suffered three losses to DePauw (Ind.) right off the bat. The Muskies split a double header at Manchester, with a 8-2 win the second game. Kenyon College swept the double header on March 20 to wrap up the Muskies’ spring break trip. Freshman pitcher Bill Miller took the win against Manchester. In his debut start at Lakeland, Miller had four strike outs in six innings. Senior Adam Hablewitz came in as the reliever, while sophomore Doug Novak and freshman Andrew Schartner’s bats came alive. Novak went 2 for 2 (3 RBIs, 1 run scored) for the game. Senior left fielder Paul Smith went 2 for 4 with an RBI and 1 run scored. Schartner went 2 for 4 (3 RBIs). Junior Jake Van Camp took the first loss of the season, from the mound, as the Muskies fell to DePauw 3-2. Lee Chepil came in to relieve Van Camp in the eighth. Senior pitcher Nate Brusewitz conceded an 8-4 loss to DePauw, while freshman Alex Ackerman suffered the following 9-0 loss. Freshman Matt Katzman endured the loss in the first game to Manchester, 4-2. Tony DeMuth and Chepil suffered the losses to Kenyon College (Ohio) 8-5 and 9-3, respectively. The weather has affected the Muskies’ schedule since they came home, as multiple games were postponed. Conditions permitting, April 2 will be the kick off of their regular season against Concordia University, Wis., in Mequon. The first home game is set for Thursday, April 3, as the Muskies take on Wisconsin Lutheran.

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16

Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 5, April 3, 2008

NICOLE HOLLAND/HOLLANDN@LAKELAND.EDU

Athletic trainer of the Issue By John Wagner

Staff Reporter wagnerj@lakeland.edu

“E

Above: Dai Sugimoto keeps Danny Ehnert hydrated during a game at Aurora University earlier this year.

Get to know the man who keeps the Lakeland athletes in physical and mentally good shape

veryday is the best day,” said Dai Sugimoto when asked what his best moment at Lakeland was. Who doesn’t know Lakeland’s outgoing and optimistic head athletic trainer? The athletes, coaches, and his co-workers all sure do. Dai has been a trainer for ten years. In the three years he has been here, Dai has touched the hearts and healed the wounds of many. Dai (pronounced Dī) was born in Tokyo, Japan. He did not come to the United States until he was twenty years old, to pursue an education in athletic training. Dai traveled all over before the Lakeland College community was lucky enough to hire him. He received his undergraduate degree at UW-La Crosse. He then was a graduate assistant at Lakeland for a year. He took positions in Rhode Island, and Penn. before returning to Lakeland as the head athletic trainer and a professor. A reason Dai came

back to Lakeland is because he met some great people, and he wanted to keep learning. He wanted to work in a friendly environment and Lakeland was the best place for such a close-knit community. “After Lakeland, most the students go on to the real world and this is their last chance to get an education, life lessons, and to learn from their mistakes. I like to try and create an environment that helps them realize it’s okay to make mistakes and that you learn from them. I just wanted to have a positive impact on students as they enter adulthood,” Dai said. Although he is well known in the athletic community on campus, most people do not know that Dai became interested in sports, medicine, and training because he use to be a swimmer. He was offered scholarships in Japan. However, because he had a condition that could lead to hearing loss, unfortunately Dai had to give up the sport he really enjoyed.

“I just became interested because I wanted to help people that shared the type of situation I had.” said Dai. Dai still enjoys exercising by running and lifting weights. He also likes to hang out with friends. Dai said he would also be lost without his staff, work-study students, co-workers (like coaches), people around Lakeland, and of course his family. His family plays a heavy role in his life. His mother, father, and sister all influence Dai. His mother is a nurse and his father is a plumber. They are currently living in Japan. His sister, Mary Janet Ryan, is a student at a college in Penn. “All of them helped give me inspiration in how to change my life. They helped make me a better person I think,” said Dai. “I love Lakeland. I love the students, the student athletes, the coaches,” said Dai. “I have no complaints. I feel happy here.” The optimism he expels

DAI is contagious. Even on someone’s worst day, Dai can sympathize and use his innocent demeanor to extract a smile. When spending time with Dai his witty humor cannot be overlooked. Senior athlete Tom Kelly referred to him as “Jokey McJoke Maker,” in passing by. And while Dai is indeed an enthusiastic Muskie supporter, he remains unbiased, when posed the question, which Lakeland team is his “favorite?”

“I can’t pick one. I like watching and being a part of all teams from football to tennis to cross country,” he replied. Dai sees himself staying here at Lakeland for as long as he can. “Where do you see yourself in five years?” The light-hearted humorous Dai replied, “Getting old!” But that is hard to believe because Dai seems so young at heart.


Spring 2008, Issue 5