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The Lakeland College

Charlie Krebs' first Lakeland theatre production is a success.

Jason Wilson takes on the role of head of security at Lakeland College.

MIRROR

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SINCE 1933

Shanty Town success

VOLUM E Fa l l, I S SU E 4

Issue Highlights Sports

W W W. L A K E L A N DM I R ROR . C OM

T H URSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2007

Students, faculty, staff sleep outside for good cause By Nicole Holland

S After securing the regular season NAC title, the women's volleyball team heads into the conference semi-finals tonight.

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Features

Pre-Health Club has good turn out at breast cancer awareness walk.

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A&E

NICOLE HOLLAND/HOLLANDN@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Seventeen people were in the running to sleep outside for Habitat for Humanity's annual Shanty Town event.

outside the Younger Family Campus Center. Gorshe was an active participant Monday night. Vice President Samantha VandenPlas and Treasurer Mike Muhs partook in the chili festivities also. For fun, the officers judged some artistic and structural aspects of the faculty and staff member’s shanties. Their advisor Greg Smith came in second. Habitat members set up tables in Bossard Hall last week to collect donations that would

“make” professors and staff members sleep outside. Faculty and staff members who helped raise money for this cause include Dale Carlson, Greg Smith, Tim Vallier, Hannah Hitterman, Talia Proffitt, Krista Feinberg, Bill Weidner, Alicia Helion, April Arvan, Nate Lowe, Rick Dodgson, Chuck Stockman, Paul Pickhardt, Brian Frink, Hilary Estes, Staci Abrahamson, and Jeff Schwehm. SEE SHANTY TOWN/PAGE 3

Lakeland loses student, friend Sophomore Megan Johnson remembered as dedicated student and friend By Sandy Sternitzky Copy Editor sternitzkys@lakeland.edu

Jackie Spinner speaks about PTSD for a Lakeland convocation.

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Index opinions Page 4 A&E Page 6 Features Page 9 Fun House Page 13 sports Page 17

The Mirror is an award winning member of the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Collegiate Press, Wisconsin Newspaper Association and College Media Advisers.

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By John Sieglaff Fun House Editor sieglaffj@lakeland.edu

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Staff Reporter hollandn@lakeland.edu

hanty Town took place on Monday, Oct. 29. People came out to support the popular fundraiser of the Lakeland branch of the national organization, Habitat for Humanity. This fundraiser was successful in raising approximately $600. The money goes to the club’s Spring Break Collegiate Challenge. The mission statement of the organization is “To aid in reducing poverty around the world, focusing on local areas.” Shanty Town has become a looked forward to event by faculty, staff, and students each year. It consists of people in the Lakeland community coming out to support Habitat for Humanity chapter. President Amanda Gorshe said that this is by far the biggest fundraising event they have. Students donated their time and money. By doing so, their peers, staff members, and faculty alike can ironically sleep in makeshift cardboard shelters

Two dead cats found on campus

n Wednesday, Oct. 24, Sophomore Megan Johnson died at her home at the age of 24 of natural causes. “She was a really healthy person and it was really odd that she died so suddenly,” said Junior Amber Thompson, a history major. Johnson was born on Jan. 18, 1983 in Phoenix, Ariz. She lived there until her family moved to the Sheboygan area, where she attended local schools. She was pursuing a business management degree at Lakeland College. This fall, Johnson was taking a Spanish class taught by Instructor Katie Shumway. “She [Johnson] was an exceptional and genuine student,” she said. “It’s amazing how motivated and driven she was.” Eight weeks into the semester Johnson had never missed a class and always had a smile, according to Shumway. “After giving birth she emailed me to make sure I received her final composition,” Shumway said. Johnson had written her paper in the hospital room. Although Johnson had missed two weeks for her pregnancy, according to Shumway, Johnson was still a topnotch student.

Shumway said, “I wish there were more Megan Johnsons in the classroom.” The Friday following Johnson’s death, Shumway’s Spanish class was scheduled to take their midterm test. SEE JOHNSON/PAGE 3

Megan Johnson and her Alpha Psi Alpha Sorority sisters in the spring of 2007.

he carcass of a tabby cat was discovered on top of the trunk on a blue Hyundai Sonata in the Muehlmeier parking lot around midnight on the night of Oct. 23. The cat was first found by Mike Solymossy, a sophomore living in Muehlmeier Hall. “This was obviously done by people who thought it was some cruel joke,” Solymossy said. Solymossy then found the on duty R.A., Jessica Lillie. Upon receiving the information, Lillie called security. “Somehow that call got forwarded to me,” said Jim Bajczyk, director of residence life. “It was a brown and gray tabby. It was most likely a stray.” “It was still warm by the time I went to pick it up,” said Bajczyk. This, as well as the bag that covered the cat’s head, are the only indications that lead to whether this was a prank or not. Though the cause of death is unknown, the bag over the cat’s head suggests suffocation. Its body was twisted so that the head faced the rear windshield of the vehicle, while the rest of the body was turned in the other direction. “The fact that the cat was still warm makes it seem like someone killed it, and that disgusts me,” Lillie said firmly. Bajczyk took the creature’s carcass to his yard, where he had planned to bury it in an attempt to give the unfortunate cat a proper goodbye. However, due to family reasons, Bajczyk was unable to bury the cat in his yard. He took it to Krueger Hall’s dumpster, knowing that trash pickup was the following morning. On the night of Oct. 30, around 9 p.m., a second dead cat was found lying in North St. outside of Krueger Hall. The cause of death of the second cat is unknown as well and harder to piece together, as many cars may had already ridden over its body. The head appeared to be dismembered and needless to say, the scene was rather grotesque. The possibility of this second occurrence is not proven to be another prank, however, the odds of a coincidence like this seems unlikely. The murders are reported to have been committed by a group of people affiliated with Lakeland College.


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Issue 4, November 1, 2007

News

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Staph is back, stay away

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Guard yourself from the superbug called staph

By Kelly Conard Advertising Manager conardk@lakeland.edu

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n outbreak of staphylococcus infections is sweeping the entire nation, especially affecting schools and colleges. Staphylococcus aureus, also known as staph, is a bacterium that causes boils or sores on the skin. Staph spreads when the sore breaks open and drains. The infection is spread much like a cold, through contact with another person’s infection. It can be spread by sharing contaminated items such as a towel or razor. It also spreads to the ground when an infected person walks on it. The type of staph that is circulating the nation now is called methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which is resistant to a lot of antibiotics including penicillin. MRSA looks like a normal sore, but the difference between staph and a normal sore is that staph

sores will not heal in the normal time that a regular sore will heal. There really is no way to determine whether a sore is MSRA or not. If you have a sore or boil that will not heal, go to see your doctor. Doctors need to swipe the infected area so that they can grow a bacteria culture which enables them to see if it is MRSA. Staph can infect anyone. Nationwide, there has been an outbreak of MRSA hitting hard in schools, especially athletic programs. Athletes need to be especially careful when dealing with workout equipment and shower rooms. If an infected person contaminates a piece of equipment in the workout room, the next person to use it will immediately pick up the infection. In the past five years, outbreaks have plagued the Cleveland Browns, University of Texas, and University of Southern California, where trainers now disinfect equipment almost hourly, accord-

ing to the October 2007 issue of “Newsweek.” Before you start to panic, doctors say that all we have to do is practice good hygiene. We have all been taught how to wash our hands, and doctors say that this is one of the best ways to prevent the infection. Lakeland College’s nurse practitioner Rhonda Adler said, “I see these patients all the time, and I don’t have the infection. I wash my hands and I’m fine.” When it comes to hand washing, only one in five people do the job properly, washing between all the spaces and under the nails for at least 20 seconds. We all know that there are a lot of unwashed hands out there, so to avoid picking up this infection during an outbreak, we need to be very cautious of hygiene. According to the Centers for Disease Control, germ killers like hand sanitizer do not completely reach germs through a layer of dirt. Alcohol

gels kill germs by drying them out, but it is not powerful enough to sweep clean the powerful MRSA superbug. Staphylococcus is treated with antibiotics, but the infection has become less responsive to most treatments. The cause of this may be an overuse of antibiotics in America, as the infection mutates and is immune to traditional anitbiotics. There are more outbreaks that are becoming very serious because this bacterium is so resistant to most antibiotics. Remember, staphylococcus is not a new outbreak. It has been an avid superbug for years, but with new inventions in medicine and the overuse of antibiotics in America, we may soon be facing a more serious form of staphylococcus. The best advice for guarding yourself from MRSA is to wash your hands, disinfect frequently used or shared items, and keep good personal hygiene.

As students mature, drinking habits change By Erica Flint The Miami Student

(U-WIRE) OXFORD, Ohio -At age 16 students get their first taste of freedom -- their driver’s license. At age 18 students receive affirmation of their freedom - they are labeled legal adults and given the right to vote. However, some would argue that it is not until students hit age 21 -- and are given the right to legally consume alcohol -- that they actually begin to act like an adult. Twenty-one can, by all accounts, be considered a rite of passage in the United States. Oxford Police Department (OPD) Detective Sgt. John Buchholz has witnessed 32 years of activity in Oxford, and he has found that student’s drinking patterns seem to change when they hit that magic number 21. “The last day you are going to be ‘wild’ is on your 21st birthday,” Buchholz said. “Society said 18, you are an adult, but in college the real rite of passage is 21, that’s when you start acting like an adult.” Drinking habits change when you turn 21 Miami University senior Lindsay Hamilton believes that her drinking habits have changed since she turned 21. “I rarely pre-game now,” Hamilton said. “After I turned 21 I started to pre-game less and go out earlier.” Hamilton went on to explain that since she became of age she probably goes out on more occasions during the week.

Her observations are backed up by “Environmental Correlates of UnderageAlcohol Use and Related Problems of College Students,” a study done by Henry Wechsler, Meichun Kuo, Hang Lee and George W. Dowdall, published in The American Journal of Preventive Medicine in 2000. The study shows that of age students tend to drink on more occasions then underage students, but when underage students do drink, they consume more drinks. “I go out more because I can, I don’t necessarily have to drink a lot,” Hamilton said. Leslie Haxby McNeill, acting director of health education at Miami, agreed that some research indicates a change in drinking habits of students as they age. “What some of the surveys I have seen indicate is that drinking patterns change between freshman and senior year,” Haxby McNeill said. She also highlighted the fact that the difference tends to be that seniors consume less alcohol then freshman. Miami Senior Dan Gibbons echoes Hamilton’s thoughts, by explaining that he no longer has to go out and get drunk, but can just enjoy a beer at a place like Steinkeller. Hamilton also sees a difference in the way society views drinking among 21 year olds. “It is socially acceptable to just go have a beer,” Hamilton said. Buchholz has also witnessed a change in the way

students tend to drink over their time in college, referring to younger students as “opportunistic,” in the sense that they head uptown hoping, but not knowing, if they will find a drink. “When you do find something to drink (as an under 21 aged student) you are going to make sure you drink as much as you can,” Buchholz said, explaining this is in comparison to 21 and over students who can drink at leisure and not worry about getting caught. And as far as getting caught-Buchholz explained that about half of the alcohol related offenses they charge people of all ages with is possession, while the other half are public intoxication. Although Buchholz did note that since there are a greater percentage of students who are under, there is a greater opportunity to charge students with possession. Also, the OPD charges a significantly higher number of underage students with public intoxication in comparison to of age students. Students are going to be wilder in their first two years of college, and then if nothing else, out of necessity, will calm down, according to Buchholz. As students get older they find themselves needing to get a job, their lives get busier and maturity tends to kick in. Gibbons found a similar trend in his own life. “Most of my friends drink, probably all of them do, (most have drank since freshman year) ... Personally, I was so

ridiculous and I got less ridiculous since I got legal, which is interesting,” he said. “I was making more risky decisions when I was under drinking, than when I was over.” Buchholz also explained the alarming part of charging underage students with public intoxication is that it has to be something an officer can see. “(Students) are drawing attention to themselves because of their actions,” Buchholz said, elaborating that this meant a student was sick, stumbling or passed out. Uptown bars that have 18 and over areas of the bar as well as 21 and over sections, such as Brick Street Bar and Grill, see much of what Buchholz explained. “I think that maybe over 21 patrons don’t seem to come to the bars having already been drinking a lot -- because they can obviously consume alcohol legally,” said Lara Pavloff, general manager of Brick Street. 21: the magic number As many college age students will lament -- the drinking age was not always 21. The drinking age of 21, however, is not a national law. It was in 1984 that Congress said they would withhold 10 percent of federal highway funds to states that did not prohibit selling alcohol to individuals under 21. After four years all states except Louisiana -- who held out until 1995 -- complied. Haxby McNeill explained that the drinking age came SEE DRINKING/PAGE 3

STAFFLIST Lori Sass Editor-in-Chief

Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor

Becky Meyer Sandy Sternitzky Copy Editor

Jennifer Duenk Opinions Editor

Matt Rutlin Sports Editor

John Sieglaff Fun House Editor

Mariah Tess Online Editor

Kelly Conard Advertising Manager

Adriana Coopman Shaun Forsyth Dawn Hughes Rhea Pirch Rob Pockat Brittney Sandberg Emily Wachel John Wagner Staff Reporters

Pratikshya Bhandari Swe Swe Htay Contributing Writers

Jennifer Duenk Erik Hyrkas Matt Rutlin Lori Sass John Sieglaff Layout Staff

Martha Schott Faculty Advisor The Lakeland College Mirror is printed by Wisconsin Newspress, Inc. The Mirror is published every two weeks during the first and second semesters while classes are in session and is distributed free of charge to students, faculty, and staff on the Lakeland College campus. The Mirror is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, University Wire, College Media Advisers, College Publisher, and Wisconsin Newspaper Association.

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R 2007 Best of the Midwest Best Overall Newspaper printed less than weekly at a four-year college 2005 Best of the Midwest Best Overall Newspaper printed less than weekly at a four-year college 2005 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award First Place in Region 6 for newspapers published not more than once per week


News

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R SHANTY TOWN FROM FRONT PAGE

“I think it’s just great that the professors can get involved in this. I’m more than happy to freeze my butt off for this cause,” said Alicia Helion. The student participation in this event was also impressive. Pratiksha Bhandari, a freshman said, “It’s for a good cause.” “I like helping other people, and I wanted to get involved in something on campuss” said sophomore participant and member Kristie Heese. While the Lakeland chapter of Habitat for Humanity organized this event, they were supported by many other Lakeland organizations. The Global Student Association, Lakeland College Service Group, American Humanics Student Association, Circle K International, Lakeland College Pub, Mu Lambda Sigma Fraternity, Zeta Chi Fraternity, and the Phi Delta Omega Sorority all helped make this event a success. The President of the Mu Lambda Sigma Fraternity, DRINKING FROM PAGE 2

into affect due to groups such as MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving), who advocated for highway safety. With the different states and areas having different drinking ages, individuals would drive places to drink or get alcohol, resulting in a high level of drinking and driving. Making the drinking age a uniform 21 did have the result of reducing highway fatalities, according to Haxby McNeill. However, Haxby McNeill also cited other reasons for having a 21-year-old drinking age. “What we know now is there is a lot of information about brain development that supports delaying drinking as long as possible,” she said. “The longer you delay drinking, the less damage and less you are going to change your brain.” Buchholz has been around Oxford since the drinking age was 18 and does not feel that lowering the drinking age again would make a difference. “You do not reduce the drinking (when the drinking age is 18), but you do decriminalize an aspect of it,” Buchholz said. Changing the drinking age would not solve the drinking issue, because it is part of the culture of college, according to Buchholz. “What I saw anecdotally is that it just tends to lower the bar that people want to jump over,” Haxby McNeill said, in response to whether or not lowering the drinking age would change the way students drink. Haxby McNeill also brought up other countries, such as those in Europe, where the drinking age is lower then 21. “There are surveys that show if we change the drinking age, the drinking pat-

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

Above: Greg Smith, Habitat for Humanity advisor, crawls into his cardboard shanty.

Instead, her classmates wrote letters to her three children. “They used big fat markers, so when they [her children] can read, they [the words] will still be there,” Shumway said. “I hope that her kids know what a wonderfully good person she was,” Shumway continued. In the spring of 2007, Johnson pledged and became an active member of the Alpha Psi Alpha Sorority. She was dedicated to the organization where she held positions such as Inter Greek Council (IGC) representative, community service coordinator, and public relations coordinator. Known as “Blue Eyes” to her sorority sisters, Johnson had three children, Alexis, Kalea and Bryn, all under the age of four. Johnson also held two jobs, was getting ready for a wedding in June 2008. “All those things she took on, not only in the sorority, but wherever, she was dedicated to them,” said Junior Tiffany Magley. “She never used her children as an excuse not to

do something. They didn’t hold her back from what she wanted to do.” The Alphas will stay in contact with Johnson's family. “We want to be there for Megan’s children and see them grow up. We want them to know who their mother was,” said Magley. “It doesn’t seem very real yet. It seems like yesterday that I saw her in the hospital when she had her baby,” said Magley. On the night of her passing, a service was held for Johnson in the Ley Chapel. “A lot of people were there to show support for her. It was packed. It showed that they cared for her in some way,” said Magley. “Her mom was there and she was wearing Megan’s Alpha jacket that she always wore.” On Monday, Oct. 29 at 8 p.m., a candlelight vigil was held for her at Lakeland College. The group silently walked around campus to remember her. In order to provide for Johnson’s daughters, her family has set up a memorial fund in her name.

terns would change,” said Haxby McNeill, who went on to explain other studies that look at countries with lower drinking ages are starting to show the opposite. Studies, which look at other models of drinking, are starting to show that other countries are starting to drink the way we (in America) do, according to Haxby McNeill, who referred to this as the “Americanization of drinking.” Breaking down the social divide Perhaps one of the most difficult elements of the 21 and over drinking age is the social divide that it creates among students -- especially in their junior year as students start to turn 21. Hamilton felt the effects of the drinking age more than most -- she did not turn 21 until late August 2007, and by that time many of her friends had been 21 since around winter break. “It was hard ... going into winter break,” Hamilton said. “All of my friends were about to turn 21 and by the end of February I knew I would be the only 20-year-old. I didn’t want to be left out and I didn’t want them to feel like they couldn’t go anywhere because I couldn’t get in.” Fortunately for students Oxford has bars and establishments that will allow both under and over 21 aged students through their doors. “Miami does tend to be more unique than other colleges with respect to having more 18 and up bars,” said Mark Weisman, co-owner of Brick Street Bar, via email. “However, a large portion of the campus is under 21 and it’s our feeling that these students should have access to a variety of entertainment that we offer. Many ‘over 21’ bars simply offer a jukebox and a place to drink, so there is no need to appeal to the

under 21 demographic. We would have to have a major national music act and not allow two-thirds of the student base to attend.” Weisman also noted that his under 21 bars see a mixture of both under and of age students because most students who are over 21 still have friends who are under. And according to Weisman and Pavloff, both Brick Street; with Skybox, and 45 East, with Tonic; offer a setting that allows for interaction among the ages -- while still being able to provide perks to those students who are over 21. “By having 21 and over bars at both Brick Street (Skybox) and 45 East (Tonic) we can appeal to those students want to go to an ‘over’ only bar or those ‘overs’ who like to have their own area but also want the option to take in all of the entertainment in both buildings,” Weisman said. “We want to create a ‘best of both worlds’ scenario.” However, many students find that once they and their friends hit 21, they head to the “over bars” and never look back. “I find myself rarely going to 18 and over bars,” Hamilton said. “When I go out, I go to at least one bar that is 21 and over. It’s normally not as crowded and the fact is that I can.” However, until students and their friends turn 21, Oxford will continue to provide students with a chance to spend a night out on the town together. “Just because you are not 21 it doesn’t mean you should not be allowed to go dancing or enjoy entertainment,” Pavloff said. “It’s not all about the alcohol.” Weisman also sees safety as a reason to provide both under and of age students with a place to go out. “Ultimately, we want to keep the students on cam-

pus and not have them driving on (U.S. Route) 27 at 4 a.m. because there wasn’t anything going on in town,” Weisman said. “Hopefully, we can give every student, regardless of age, a compelling reason to come uptown and enjoy a variety of entertainment.” No change in sight The drinking age may not be changing anytime soon, and most believe under-age drinking won’t either. This is in part because drinking -- both under and of age -- has become such a part of the overall culture of college, not just at Miami, but all over. Buchholz believes that this culture of drinking in college comes about for several reasons -- being on your own, potentially peer pressure, and also students who bring bad habits with them. “That is a college culture -- doing what you want,” Buchholz said, adding that if there were no consequences (such as missing class, getting arrested, making poor decisions, etc.) no one would care about drinking. “The fallacy of (drinking) is that everyone does it,” Buchholz said, explaining that students surround themselves with other students who have similar habits, because there is approval with those students. “I wish there was a way to wrap your arms around the culture and say, it’s OK to drink in moderate amounts and it’s OK to drink and not get drunk,” Haxby McNeill said. And underage students, for the most part, many of them will continue -- for the time being -- to engage in risky behavior until they too have learned the lessons their 21 and over counterparts have learned. “You have to be 21 to understand the culture, and that’s probably why it won’t change,” Buchholz said.

Steve Emory said, “We like to help out other organizations on campus, when possible. It is also an opportunity for us to get to know our pledges better.” Overall, Shanty Town was again a successful fundraiser due to Lakeland community involvement to support a good cause. NICOLE HOLLAND/HOLLANDN@LAKELAND.EDU

JOHNSON FROM FRONT PAGE

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in brief

Information to let people know what's going on goes here!! Information to let people know what's going on goes here!! Information to let people know what's going on goes here!!

Gas leak scare causes evacuation of Old Main Tuesdsay

At quarter after four on Tuesday afternoon, students and tutors in the Academic Resource Center on the third floor of Old Main concurred that a natural gas stench was prevalent. After informing Paul White of the smell, the building was evacuated. The Director of Facilities Management and Planning, Lewis Apel was informed as was the Manager of Facilities Operations, Gary Bauer. Wisconsin Public Services was also notified, and a service representative arrived at the scene quickly. “Whenever something like this happens, we call them,” said Bauer. The cause of the potent smell did not have a definitive conclusion. “We don’t really know for sure,” said Apel. However, the building was thoroughly checked for a break in a gas line, and nothing was found. The explanation to the “sort of freak accident,” as Apel phrased it, was that the ventilation system malfunctioned that caused a back draft. It was assured within an hour that the situation had been a non-combustible combination. But the staff was not prepared to take any chances. “Safety of students is our number one priority,” said Apel. The classes that were supposed to start in the building at 4:30 were all moved. No classes were canceled, but he English Language Institute classes had to be held in the Library. Other students were re-directed to empty rooms the Laun Center for class. Everything is back to normal in Old Main.

NICOLE HOLLAND/HOLLANDN@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Students and faculty evacuate from Old Main on Tuesday in fear of a gas leak. A Wisconsin Public Services representative arrived at Lakeland shortly after the notification from campus officials.


Opinions

4

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 4, November 1, 2007

Problems Bathroom etiquette with parking The lessons you should have learned years ago By Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor hyrkase@lakeland.edu

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ne of the interesting things about Lakeland College is that it has a lot of parking spaces, yet you always hear people complaining about finding one. It’s funny when it is a Saturday night and, despite the fact half of the student Pledging population Musko left for home, when you get back from your run to Wal-Mart, the entire Morland/Kurtz/Muehlmeier parking lot is full of nonLakelander’s cars. When that happens, I’m forced to find a spot in the Hill lot, where I’ll walk further than normal to my apartment. On top of that, I live in the designated handicap Morland apartment, which is not legal to park in front of due to the handicap spaces. The lot has at least five handicap spaces, and I’ve never seen anyone legally park in them. It might be whiny to complain about having to walk 100 feet more than usual to your residence, but when I’m lugging groceries, it’s just a tad bit inconvenient. The problem becomes even worse on special parent weekends, or homecoming. I’ve parked in the Grosshuesch lot numerous times because of overcrowded parking on those weekends. We all

know walking an extra quarter of a mile in Sheboygan wind is not thrilling. Nevertheless, the worst part of the experience is forgetting where you parked your car. At one point, I couldn’t find my car anywhere, and I couldn’t fathom a reason why it would be anywhere but the Morland or Hill parking lots. After a campus tour with security in a golf cart, it shows up in Grosshuesch leaving me bewildered and jumping to conclusions. As it turns out, accusing your roommate of stealing your car can be a bit of a strain on the friendship. It took me two weeks to remember what actually happened, and it only came to mind when I was forced to park in Grosshuesch again. So how can we solve this problem? I for one would petition to remove some of the handicap spaces, or at the very least give some parking privileges to the residents who live in the apartments they exist for. But for the rest of the students plagued by these same problems, we could clearly use some more parking spaces. We have a lot of extra grass area to the left of the Muehlmeier lot, so why not tear it up? Not the most “green” of statements, I know. But hey, I didn’t come to Lakeland to mind the environment. I’m clearly in the wrong industry for that, all I do is print papers for you. Waste not, want not? What a confusing proverb. Pave paradise and put up a parking lot. Pledge Musko.

By Becky Meyer Copy Editor meyerr@lakeland.edu

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t Lakeland College, there are an endless number of people who use the public bathrooms every single day. Of course public bathrooms are not the most sanitary of places, but the public bathrooms in the dorms have gotten out-of-control-disgusting. Here is a list to help out all those who need to know the rules of etiquette for using public restrooms. 1. Flush. It’s quite a simple action, and yet this seems to be forgotten. 2. Do not talk on your cell phone while you are in the stall. One day when I washing

my hands, someone was actually disobeying this rule! I felt bad for the person on the other end of that conversation. I for one would not apreciate the sound of a giant flush.. Is it really that hard to save phone conversations for when you’re not in the bathroom? I really do not think so, to tell you the truth.

baths. 4. One word: Aim!

3. Do not wash your dishes in the bathroom sinks. It may surprise you that no one wants to use a sink that has soggy food in it. Maggots are known to crawl up out of the drain when you put food down the sinks. Don’t wash your clothes in the bathrooms either. Hell, don’t wash yourself in the bathroom sinks. Yes, I’ve heard stories of people who think that the sinks are bird-

6. Do not leave razors, soap, or washcloths in the shower. It is not other people’s job to throw away your stuff.

www.supplierlist.com

5. When showering, try to resist the temptation to belt out Celine Dion. Sure, singing in the shower is fine when alone, but in a public place, others may not be so appreciative of the way you carry a tune.

7. Do not shed hair in the shower. This is probably one of the most revolting things I have noticed in the bathroom showers. I do not understand how someone could leave that much hair in the shower; unless he or she decided to give him or herself a haircut and leave the hair behind. How hard is it to bend over and pick up after yourself? The only people who would do such a revolting thing are those whose goal in life is to make people gag. So to those people, stop!

8. Do not shred toilet paper in the stall and throw it all over the floor. It’s toilet paper, not confetti, and it is not New Year’s Eve. As Lakeland students, we are going to have to put up with many different kinds of people. If everyone follows these rules of public bathroom etiquette I’m sure that life will be much more pleasant.

PHOTOOPINION Are you going to the Great Lakes Writer’s Festival? Why or why not?

Gary Pieper Freshman Undecided

Brandon Bennett Freshman Mathematics

Dave Geitner Junior Sports Studies

Kaitlyn Novara Freshman Sociology

Cole Zondag Junior Criminal Justice

Doug Kirchner Sophomore Accounting

Stephanie Tipler Freshman Music Education

“Yes, becuase Karl Elder requires it.”

“It depends if I’m busy or not.”

“The what? Probably not, I don’t know.”

“Probably for Karl Elder’s class.”

“Heck no! I have better things to do than waste my time.”

“No, because I’m not a writer.”

“Yes I have to go for a Core I class."


Opinions

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

5

Muskie Mailbox Chinese students express their opinions towards 2008 Olympics

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he article “Olympic boycott discussed,” published in The Mirror on October 4, implied that human rights in China have deteriorated in recent years. As native Chinese, we found this contention to be directly countered to our personal experience. We felt it was our responsibility to share this experience with The Mirror readers. Our personal motive drives us to challenge the validity of the “evidence” cited to support the argument that Chinese human rights are deteriorating. For example, the article characterized the Falun Gong movement as a religion that promotes truthfulness, compassion, and tolerance. It also stated that the Chinese government has employed severe methods to

restrict the movement. We believe the Falun Gong to be an anti-government political movement. Further, the so-called abuses reported in respect to the Falun Gong practitioners have been misreported by some of the press. For example, instances of self-immolation (suicide by burning) have been attributed to the actions of Chinese police, not to the actions of the Falun Gong members. In fact, we have witnessed such tragic instances of political protest, and believe that the police tried their best to prevent them. The article also observed that the Chinese government has promised to improve human rights, a promise which has gone unfulfilled, and that human rights have been even more deteriorated.

Feeling sleepy and blah lately? By Sherry Carstens & Cary Knier Columnists carstenss@lakeland.edu knierc@lakeland.edu

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ear nurse and counselor: Lately I’ve been feeling lousy. I am so tired and am falling asleep in my classes, even though I am getting more sleep at night. I have no energy and have not been going out with friends. I am feeling “blah,” Fishing for and just want an Answer to stay inside and eat junk food. Could I be depressed, or am I just getting sick? --Sleepy and blue Dear sleepy and blue: If you noticed these symptoms more recently, it could be a sign of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). This is what some people call “winter blues.” SAD is a type of winter depression that affects an estimated half a million people every winter between September and April, particularly during December, January, and February. It is caused by a biochemical imbalance in the hypothalamus due to the shortening of daylight hours and the lack of sunlight in winter. Most sufferers show signs of a weakened immune system during the winter and

are more vulnerable to infections and other illnesses. Here are a few things you can try: *Get as much sunlight as possible during the winter months. Consider taking walks outside during midday. *Consider light therapy. Light therapy has been shown to be effective in up to 85 percent of diagnosed cases. Light treatment should be used daily in winter (and dull periods in summer) starting in early autumn, when the first symptoms appear. It consists of sitting two to three feet away from a specially designed light box, usually on a table, allowing the light to shine directly through the eyes. You can carry out normal activity such as reading, working, eating, and knitting while stationary in front of the box. A light box is available through Health/ Counseling Services. *Some people take antidepressants to alleviate symptoms of SAD. *Counseling, or any complementary therapy which helps the person to relax, accept their symptoms, and cope with their limitations, is extremely useful. *Eat healthy meals (including fresh vegetables, fruits, and water) *Get exercise (especially outdoors) *Balance the amount of sleep/exercise you get

This assertion does not agree with the abundant evidence that shows human rights in China have improved dramatically in recent years. First, with the development of the opening-up and reform policy since the 1980s, the Chinese government has released restrictions in various aspects such as foreign trade, economy, stock transactions, traveling, studying abroad, and so on. To provide an example, according to “2007 World Investment Report,” China has been the fifth-largest country that absorbs direct foreign investment since the adoption of the opening and reform policy in 1978. With the tendency of financial globalization, more and more Chinese companies are listed and issued overseas. And the number of initially issued enterprises reached 84 in 2004. Besides, 20 years

ago, the generation of our parents had little opportunities to study and travel overseas. However, now students overseas are enjoying the fruit of the opening-up policy and improvement of human rights. Second, laws and regulations are gradually perfected through the National People’s Congress each year. On March 16, China passed “Property Law,” and it has been carried out since October 1. The relevant regulations also loosen the restrictions to foreign reporters during the period of Olympics in 2008. China’s entrance to the World Trade Organization, successfully holding APEC Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, and winning the bid for the 2010 World Expo, all of these show the approval from other countries of China’s improvement not only in economy, social stability and harmony, but in human rights

Student’s beware: Illness is spreading at Lakeland By Sherry Carstens School Nurse carstenss@lakeland.edu

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ear Students:

This is the season for colds and flus to start. We’ve been seeing many students in the health center with sore throats, stuffy or runny noses, headaches, coughs, and body aches. Most of what we are seeing is caused by a virus. The symptoms start suddenly and get worse over a few days, then gradually go away. This usually takes three to five days, but can last up to 14. There is no antibiotic that will cure a virus. The best remedies you can use to treat whatever symptom you have are rest, fluids, pain relievers, sore throat lozenges or sprays, and other over-the-counter cold/flu medications. Most medical providers won’t treat until your symptoms last longer than 14 days, or you have severe symptoms. Prevention is a key to not getting sick during this time. Avoid large crowds, and stay away from people who are sick. Washing hands can reduce your risk by almost half. If you share a space with someone, wipe down shared objects like remotes, doorknobs, keyboards, light switches, or

as well. Meanwhile, these advances paved the way for the forthcoming 2008 Olympic Games. Juan Antonio Samaranch, the former president of International Olympic Committee, spoke at the opening ceremony of the World Olympic Collectors Fair in the Chinese capital. “I would like to repeat, I am sure that the Olympic Games in Beijing will be the best in Olympic history.” “One World One Dream,” the slogan of the 2008 Olympics, fully expressed our hospitality to all the people around the world and our determination to facilitate world unity in terms of holding the Olympic Games. Through this opportunity, we believe we can improve human rights to a large extent. A boycott would only be counterproductive to the spirit of the Olympics.

editorials The Mirror’s staff editorial topics are agreed upon by the entire staff. The editorial board collaborates ideas and writes the editorials. All individual columns, cartoons, and letters are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial staff or The Mirror’s beliefs, or that of Lakeland’s administration, its faculty, or its student body.

LetterPolicy Lakeland’s students, faculty, and staff are welcomed to write letters to the editor to express their opinions on

anything that you mutually touch with some form of disinfectant like Lysol or bleach wipes. Learn to always sneeze or cough into your elbow. Avoid touching your face until you have washed your hands or used a hand sanitizer. You need to think of your body as a machine. You need to maintain it for it to work properly. Make healthy food choices like avoiding diets with too many high fats and carbohydrates. Go more for the fruits, vegetables, and lean meats as good fuel. Your body does a lot of its own repair work when you sleep, so get plenty of rest. Seven to eight hours a night is recommended. Staying hydrated will help your system flush out the viruses. Many people don’t realize how little they drink in a day. It’s time to put away your shorts and sandals. Take care of yourself!.

public issues or in response to editorials printed in The Mirror. Letters can be typed or handwritten and should be limited to 700 words. Letters should be signed by the author, although the author’s name can be withheld if he/she chooses. The Mirror reserves the right to edit all submissions for clarity and length and will be printed as space allows. They may be held for publication at a later date. mail: Lakeland College 607 P.O. Box 359 Sheboygan, WI 53082-0359 email: lakelandmirror@yahoo.com fax: (920) 565-1344 Phone: (920) 565-1316


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A&E

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 4, November 1, 2007

Play a success

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Students and staff perform “The Importance of Being Earnest” to laughing crowd By Nicole Holland & Lori Sass Staff Reporter & Editor-in-Chief hollandn@lakeland.edu sassl@lakeland.edu

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BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

he Importance of Being Earnest,” by Oscar Wilde, ran Thursday, Oct. 25 – Sunday, Oct. 23 in the Bradley Building. Although there were a few improvements that could have been made to the play, overall the play can be classified as a success. Ricardo Brown, as the butler Lane, humorously opened the performance, engaging the audience in laughter. Not only was Brown’s British accent impeccably humorous, but his words foreshadowed the play in its entirety. As the title suggests, words and names were the most significant part of the play. With a few minor adjustments, the script could have been emphasized more so than it was. On opening night, the large crowd did not respond to as many of the literary puns and jokes in the dialogue, as the Sunday afternoon crowd did. Maybe this notion is out on a limb, but a microphone system would have greatly helped the large audience absorb more of the script’s ironic genius. Also, by having an amplification system, the actors could focus more on acting than projecting their lines. Despite this, the crowd participation for this play is the best we’ve seen during our three years at Lakeland. This included a big gasp from Thursday’s audience at the end of the fourth act, when Earnest’s relationship to Algernon was revealed. By no means, however, was the cast disappointing. On the contrary, Joseph Janisch, Heather Gayton, and Holly Zielinski were all cast perfectly. Each delivered a spotlight-worthy performance. Ideal for the role of Gwendolen, Gayton stole the show with her presence. She had a flawless accent, diction, and inflection in her delivery. She stayed in character throughout the show. Her mannerisms were always on key, as was her timing and poise. As the title character, Janisch not only delivered his lines with clarity, but

seemed as if he reacted to his fellow actors’ lines. He was the essence of Earnest, showing the audience the growth of his character as the plot progressed. Zielinski also delivered a believable depiction of Lady Brachnell, who never slipped out of character. Zielinski’s over-the-top portrayal at points only added to the humor of the show, and was delightful. The role of Algernon Moncrieff, played by Chris Wray, could have been improved. At times his accent seemed forced. Also, due to the lack of an amplification system, his lines were occasionaly unclear. A number of witty lines went unnoticed because of a lack of inflection and emotion. The rest of the cast added to the show, as the witty and ironic comedy it was meant to be. A few new freshmen faces including Amanda Vardell, Katelyn Gussert, and Kayann Botana brought with them some raw talent. Botana delivered a solid performance as Cecily Cardew. Gayton and Botana played off each other with ease in acts three and four, bringing their characters’ fickleness to a forefront. The stealthy, eavesdropping qualities of Vardell, Gussert, Shastel Baker, and Jenelle Zito as the maids were ingenious. The constant dusting, refreshing of floral arrangements, and lurking behind trees added to their characters’ depths immensely. Speaking of freshmen, this show happens to be the first show at Lakeland College for Charles Krebs’, the new assistant professor of theatre and speech. He has now made his mark. If this show is any indication of his vision and professionalism, the Lakeland community should be looking forward to a growing theatre department. Although this play is not a definitive triumph, it was successful. Krebs has set the bar high. “The Importance of Being Earnest” was a step in the right direction for the theatre department as a whole. The Krebs era of Lakeland theatre has arrived. Krebs’ next production is the revamped Christmas at Lakeland. BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Far Above: Gwendolen, played by Heather Gayton, and Earnest, played by Joseph Janisch, carry on a conversation. Both Gayton and Janisch performed with excellent British accents. Above: Algernon, played by Chris Wray, and Earnest sit and discuss the reasons why to and why not to read the newspaper. Right: Miss Prism, played by Rebecca Bentz, and Cecily, played by Kayann Botana, sit on a bench in the garden at Earnest’s country home. Miss Prism tries to get Cecily to do her studies instead of write in her diary.


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The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

7

Award winning journalist, author speaks at convocation Jackie Spinner talks about PTSD By Brittney Sandberg Staff Reporter sandbergb@lakeland.edu

“I

t’s not a hero’s story…” said Jackie Spinner about her book “Tell Them I Didn’t Cry,” which relates the nearly two years that she spent in Iraq as a journalist for the Washington Post. The book was a main topic of conversation during the convocation that she gave on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, as defined in the fourth edition of “The American Heritage College Dictionary,” is a psychological disorder of individuals who have experienced profound trauma, such as torture, marked by recurrent flashbacks, nightmares, eating disorders, anxiety, fatigue, forgetfulness, and withdrawal. When Spinner spoke with the Honors 190 class, she explained that her five-year-old nephew Aiden summed PTSD up by saying, “It is where someone has seen so many sad things that they forget how to be happy.” According to Spinner, that is a very accurate definition. “You have to learn how to live again.” For many, that is hard to do. As a journalist, words are Spinner’s life. Of the time she spent in Iraq, Spinner said, “I fought with my pen.” However, when Spinner returned home she was unable to find any words that expressed what she experienced.

Therefore, Spinner turned to art therapy. While there is no scientific evidence linking art therapy to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, art allows people to tell their story without actually speaking. Spinner, however, feels that talking about PTSD is necessary. “I have been very vocal about talking about [PTSD] to the detriment of my career...Most reporters will never talk about this. “We want to look tough. We go to war and see the worst things that humanity has to offer, and we come back unscathed. “But, we don’t come back unscathed. This is not healing… but it is important.” PTSD is a lifelong disease, and the longer someone waits to get counseling, the worse it is. However, after someone begins receiving counseling, it does get better. “I spent the last year, at the request of “The Washington Post,” in a PTSD clinic. I have actually been in three,” Spinner said. It was hard for Spinner to accept her diagnosis and the fact that she had to be on medication. “I’m from the Midwest, Illinois. We don’t do pills; we hoe the backyard to get rid of stress.” Post Traumatic Stress Disorder occurs after one is no longer in a dangerous situation. Acute Traumatic Stress Disorder is when a person is still in the midst of danger.

JARED PETRIE/PETRIEJ@LAKELAND.EDU

One is in “survival” or “fight or flight mode” everyday, and that can’t just be stopped after returning home. That is when PTSD takes over. “We reporters go [to war] for no political reason, for no personal reason; my career has not soared because I went to Iraq. We go to tell the truth… That is why you get into journalism. “It is very important for you to understand not only for reporters but also for soldiers, and Marines, and sailors, and airmen just what the human cost is of war. “That’s not a political statement for or against war; it’s just a reality that people go to war and they come back pretty screwed up.”

JARED PETRIE/PETRIEJ@LAKELAND.EDU

Far Above: The Oct. 23 convocation featured journalist and author Jackie Spinner. The open-forum-like atmosphere featured a discussion moderated by senior phsychology students Ashley Domask and Hannah Benton. The last fifteen minutes were open to questions from the audience. This was Spinner’s second appearance at Lakeland College. Above: Following the convocation, Spinner signed her book “Tell Them I Didn’t Cry.”

Sexy and sharp, romance novel with a bite By Dawn Hughes Staff Reporter hughesd@lakeland.edu

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he reader is immediately drawn into “Rising Darkness” as it begins with the history that the entire story is based on. First, we meet Emma, the leading lady with family ties to the demon of wrath, Asmos. She meets our sexy hero Damien: a vampire who has never drank human blood. The two are thrown together. They form a connection instantly, bonding on their shared loneliness and desire to feel love and their desire (for different reasons) to conquer Asmos. However, love is forbidden for Emma. If she falls in loves, and consummates that love, Asmos will inhabit her. Damien struggles to hide his feelings

and his true nature sex throughout the from Emma. He is novel, not common in afraid of her reaction most Silhouette books. to his vampirism. The biggest kink Emma strugthrown into the story gles with her selfis not Asmos, but Dadoubt as much as mien’s brother, Nichshe does with deolai. At first it seems mon essence flowhis purpose in the ing through her story is as a foil to Daveins. Damien’s mien, for Nicholai is struggle is with ISB Number evil where Damien is his vampire nature 978-0-373-61770-8 good. However, Nichand with the need olai’s presence in the to trust Emma. Until the two story grows in prominence. face their problems, they will Ultimately, Damien and not be able to face the demon. Emma must come together, The novel follows the typi- admit their feelings, face their cal romance plot. Boy meets demons (both actual and metagirl; boy loses girl; boy gets girl phorical), and connect on all levback. There are a few notables. els possible. This novel is a fun Damien and Emma do not ad- read, great relaxation from the mit their love for or to each heavy assigned school readings. other until almost the end of the It’s enjoyable to kick back and novel. Due to the curse placed enjoy the plot without having to on Emma’s family, there is little think about it.

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8

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Issue 4, November 1, 2007

The Lakeland College

MEDIAREVIEWS

M I R R O R

I screamed when it started and cheered when it ended PHOTO/ROTTENTOMATOES.COM

By Jen Duenk Opinions Editor dlduenk@aol.com

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ell, Halloween is over that must mean that it is time for another “Saw” movie review. Some people cheered and others groaned when previews started airing that announced that “Saw IV” was coming to theatres. With three others before this, the Saw movies have acquired quite a following. I personally have become a big fan. I have seen all of the others in the theatres. I know what most of you are thinking; sequels suck. No one ever wants to see a fourth movie that has been made. Critics love to smash sequels but I did not want to. I tried to give it a fighting chance. I tried to keep in mind that all classic horror films have many sequels. “The Friday the 13th” movies, “Nightmare on Elm Street,” “Child’s Play,” “Scream,” “Halloween,” “Hell Raiser” all have one thing in common: there’s many of them. However, I will admit that they kept getting worse. Unfortunately, “Saw IV” is exactly like the previous examples. Compared to the first

and second Saw movies, this one is crap. There was, thank goodness, a few moments in the movie where almost everyone got scared. The opening scene, although left some unanswered questions, left the audience screaming and intrigued. But it did not continue Saw IV well. Lions Gate Films By the Directed by Darren Lynn Bousman fourth one, things start to get predictable. Throughout the whole movie there was a sense that you have seen all there is to see. This movie, was supposed to prove us wrong, but failed. There was little character development, therefore I did not care about the new detectives, or even the new victims. To tell you the truth, almost all of the men in the film looked alike. Above: “Saw IV” picks up where “Saw III” ends. What will happen in the “Saw” games now that John is dead? There was never an explanation for why the victims are I lost the character con- did after the first one. doubtedly raised a gore-lovbeing placed in their games. nection that you get viewing The traps seemed to be a ing fan following. And no Usually there is a valuable a good movie, and soon it little repetitive in how they matter how many they make, life lesson that needs to be became an empty gore fest. work. The first two were chock there will always be fans. learned by the victim by the Everyone will flinch seeing full of elaborate, and creative However, this film did nothend of the trap. But in this body parts being dismem- devices. The fourth one need- ing unusual or detrimental to movie, some of the characters bered, and mutilated. But I ed some serious variety. horror film history. I watched died without anyone knowing didn’t feel the same actual Here’s the point people: it and I wouldn’t pay to see it why or who they were. fear leaving the theatre as I the “Saw” movies have un- again.

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PHOTO/ROTTENTOMATOES.COM

NOT

HOME t a h c t a w o A movie t

Couldn’t bring it home

By Nicole Holland

Staff Reporter hollandn@lakeland.edu

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n “Home of the Brave,” three soldiers come home from the war in Iraq only to face more challenges. The cast is lead by Samuel L. Jackson as Doctor Will Marsh. When returning from Iraq, he is welcomed home with the open arms of his wife and daughter. His son was ‘rebellious’ of his father’s profession, and the war entirely. The other two main characters played by Jessica Biel and Brian Presely also had to deal with recovering from the experience of war. Biel played a mother who was severely injured when an improvised explosive device

went off on her delivery route theme set up right off the bat, during her tour in Iraq. When with the camaraderie of the she came home, she had both soldiers we are set up to follow. physical and mental strug- However, as the plot thickens, gles. anti-war, or a pacifistic attiTommy, played by Prese- tude, is also introduced. ly, saw his friend shot in the Trying to show a neutral back, and held him as he died. standpoint made the movie When he got home, he was seem pointless. The anti-war unemployed and mentally un- message would have been stable. enough to carry a movie, and “Home of the Brave” deals has in the past. There were with important issues, but the scenes that were well-acted, story was not movie material. but on the contrary, scenes The writer, Mark Friedman, that should have ended up on had a good idea. However, the cutting room floor. it was not executed successPlacing the blame on fully. the actors The bewould be a Home of the Brave ginning of the mistake befilm was set MGM Studios cause they Directed by Irwin Winkler in Iraq. There w o r k e d was an Ameriwith what can patriotic they had.

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Above: Jessica Biel in a scene from “Home of the Brave.” According to www.rottentomatoes.com, this is a rotten movie.

From a movie-lovers standpoint, the forced dialogue seemed awkward, the plot needed to be tweaked, and there should have been a better conclusion. If I were asked to watch

this movie again, I would refuse. However, I do think that Biel portrayed her characters emotions wonderfully. I also have to admit some of the special effects were quite impressive.


Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 4, November 1, 2007

9

Lakeland hires new head of security Kellet school graduate Jason Wilson joins Lakeland’s security staff

By Dawn Hughes

Staff Reporter aurora2986@hotmail.com

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onday, October 22 was Jason Wilson’s first day as Lakeland’s new head of security. Lakeland has been without a head of security since the beginning of the 2007 fall semester. The security office’s walls are still bare. Those who pop into Jason’s office are welcomed with a cordial hand shake. Jason is very happy to be at Lakeland. Becoming the head of security at a college is a career advancement because there are more responsibilities, more buildings, and a different atmosphere. “Lakeland is like its own little city, so I am functioning in a more important role, as opposed to a school district, where there’s a lot of agencies involved on day-to-day operations,” he said. “From what I’ve seen and heard, everything was running smoothly. Johnny [Mallory] was doing a great job,” Jason said on coming in more than halfway through the fall semester. He said

more movable and wireless cameras would be helpful to the security staff. Lakeland has very specific needs when it comes to security. “It’s better for people who know this community to handle this community’s problems. The more people you get involved from the outside has a tendency to blemish the reputation of the school,” said Jason. Although Jason thought he wanted to go into social work, he found out he enjoyed working more directly with troubled kids. “The determining factor was being on the front line of helping people. Social work didn’t allow that as much. By the time the kids came down, they were more actively involved Above: Jason Wilson, Milwaukee native, takes a seat in his office as he takes on the task of being Lakeland’s new head of security. in things they shouldn’t have that so far, all of the secu- uating to work as a police Kellett Center in Milwaukee been. Police work allowed rity staff seemed to be well officer in South-Milwaukee. to work towards his master’s you to get the kids involved trained and they were do- He obtained his bachelor’s degree in counseling. How- in alternative programs run ing a good job. He looks for- degree in criminal justice at ever, he says it is going very by the community or police ward to working with them the Kellet Center in Milwau- slowly. department.” He said that throughout the year. kee in one year. Jason feels that Lake- he saw positive outcomes Jason was born and Before coming to Lake- land’s location allows for a from the programs. raised in Milwaukee. He at- land, Jason worked as the feeling of safety. However, he Overall, Jason said that tended UW-Oshkosh for four director of security for the feels that security upgrades it is too early to tell what is years, with a major in sociol- South Milwaukee School would act as a deterrant and going to happen with secuogy and a minor in criminal District. He also started decrease problems on cam- rity in the coming months. justice. He left without grad- BlendEd classes through the pus. He thinks that adding DAWN HUGHES/AURORA2986@HOTMAIL.COM

Exploring your academic options How choosing your major can be a minor problem By Rhea Pirth Staff Reporter pirchr@lakeland.edu

I

what all these things are.” Some students find their major by doing this. They may discover they like history better than the accounting classes they were thinking of taking. A key for students to find the right field of study is to consult with their advisor on a regular basis. As a freshman with an undeclared major at Lakeland, your advisor is your Core I instructor. Since Core I is required in the first semester for all freshmen, it gives students opportunities

f you are struggling with choosing a major, you are in good company. Each year, seventy percent of incoming freshmen have undeclared majors. Despite concerns of worried parents, delaying the decision to pick a major just may work to your advantage. Even though students may enter college with an idea of what they want to major in, not declaring a maAbove: Lakeland’s website has many career development tools including “Career jor right away gives them Connect,” “Focus,” and “Vault.” the opportunity to explore It’s important to their options. cifically advises students tools such as “Focus,” “a Suzanne House, direc- think about what career I want, with undeclared majors. web-based, personalized cator of academic advising House said, “We haven’t reer and educational planwhat kind of job I’m going to have, utilized them much in the ning system.” It guides the and instructor of writing but it’s not the only thing to and ESL said, “It’s best for past. We’re trying to uti- student through steps that students to be open to a lize them more now. We’re can help assess their interthink about. lot of different disciplines meeting to have conversa- ests, goals, lifestyles, and or areas of interest. One tions about how to help stu- needs. They also offer a “maof the reasons we have all to have contact with their dents more and we’ve been jors market” (that was held the general studies require- advisor at least twice a week talking to career develop- on Tuesday, Oct. 30) which ments is that it gives stu- during class when advising ment, because they have a lot gives students the opportudents the opportunity to take issues can be brought up. Af- of things that can help [stu- nity to talk with representaa history class, take an art ter the second semester, if a dents deciding on a major].” tives from each division and class, take a science class; major is still undeclared, an On Lakeland’s Web site, discuss what is involved with then they can get a taste of advisor is assigned who spe- career development offers the different majors.

"

"

Career Development Information Career Development Staff: Chelsy Cegielski and Lisa Stephan Office Hours: 8:00am - 4:30pm Monday through Friday, with afterhours appointments available. Phone/e-mail: (920) 565-1255 cegielskicm@lakeland.edu stephanlm@lakeland.edu

“It’s important to think about what career I want, what kind of job I’m going to have, but it’s not the only thing to think about,” said House. “It’s also important to think about what my interests are. What do I want to spend my time learning about and do?” Find your passion, find your skills, enlist help from advisors, and you will find the major that is right for you.


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Issue 4, November 1, 2007

Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Breast cancer awareness walk Pre-Health Club hosts American Cancer Society fundraiser

By Erik Hyrkas

ERIK HYRKAS/HYRKASE@LAKELAND.EDU

Managing Editor hyrkase@lakeland.edu

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he Lakeland College Pre-Health Club held a breast cancer awareness walk Sunday, Oct. 28. The fundraiser was located inside the Chase Center, where club members registered the walkers, collected donations, and put out refreshments for walk participants. The walk cost $3 per participant and looped 3.1 miles from the Chase Center Above: Nicole Holland, president assistant of the Pre-Health Club, and group memto County M, onto FF going ber Jessica Gagnon joke with Paul Pickhardt as he fills out the liability form for the left, to the church, across the breast cancer awareness walk. bridge, and back to Lakeland. All donations went to is a great thing because one, In total, the walk had 27 the American Cancer Society we can make people aware participants, many of them (ACS). of breast cancer, and two, students, faculty, staff, and Jennifer Huang, presi- we can raise some funds for their families. The fundraiser dent of Pre-Health Club, or- ACS,” she said. made $175.71 for ACS. Pink ganized the event. “October is The Pre-Health Club ad- ribbon breast cancer awarethe breast cancer month, and vertised the event through ness t-shirts and ACS bears Pre-Health Club is a health- many avenues including signs were also sold. The T-shirts care related team organiza- all over campus and in other went for $10 and ACS bears tion, so we really want to do community establishments, were $10 for one bear, $15 for something for the community. as well as on Lake TV, in the two, and $20 for three. Our goals include community “Sheboygan Press,” The MirMany involved in the walk service, and I think the walk ror, and by word of mouth. had specific reasons for par-

ticipating. “I think it is very important to raise awareness for breast cancer. I had a sister-in-law who died from it,” said former Lakeland professor Lynn Lauer. “I’m walking for my aunt who is currently in stage four of cancer,” said Sam Tonn, a junior environmental science major. “My grandma is a breast cancer survivor, and the whole ‘Knowledge is Power’ is very important. I know a lot of people who have detected it early enough to be treated and survive,” said Lakeland graduate Danielle Duranceau. The weather was brisk and windy during the walk, and some participants complained of the cold. Nevertheless, most of those who came back afterwards for concessions were optimistic. “I think it was a very good thing. I also think it could be longer. Three miles isn’t a whole lot, and they should make pledges. It could be a flat fee/per mile. They should do it in spring again, but do

ERIK HYRKAS/HYRKASE@LAKELAND.EDU

pledge forms,” said Jackie Flesch, manager of the business office. Pre-Health Club members Kasey Gussert (vice president), Nicole Holland (president assistant), Kasey Peschke-Williams (secretary), and Jessica Gagnon, also volunteered to help out at the event. While Holland and Gagnon helped those inside Chase, the rest stood at checkpoints on the walk route to help direct participants. The breast cancer awareness walk had cookies, soda, water, chips, carrots, and salad for walkers to munch on after their exercise, as well as ACS pamphlets to educate them on breast cancer. “Overall, I think it’s been a really great success,” said Holland. The Pre-Health Club will continue to sell ACS bears and breast cancer awareness t-shirts. For events in the future, the organization is currently planning a Healthcare Fair for a local elementary school. ERIK HYRKAS/HYRKASE@LAKELAND.EDU

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C h

Above: Three students sign up for the Pre-Health Club’s breast cancer awareness walk. In total, 27 donated and participated in the event.

Above: The first group of the breast cancer awareness walk participants begin their trek to fund the American Cancer Society.

Right: Walkers gather in the ground floor of Chase for refreshments after a brisk 3.1 mile long loop. The Pre-Health Club provided all snacks and beverages to participants. All Breast Cancer statistics taken from www.ACS.com

Breast Cancer Statistics Continued

Breast Cancer Statistics 1. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers.

4. Women living in North America have the highest rate of breast cancer in the world. At this time there are about 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States.

2. The chance of developing invasive breast cancer at some time in a woman’s life is about 1 in 8 (12%).

5. Breast cancer incidence rates showed a rapid increase in the 1980s, although the rate of increase slowed in the 1990s compared to the 1980s. In the years from 2000 to 2004, incidence rates decreased slightly.

3. It was estimated that by 2007 about 178,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed among women in the United States.

6. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, exceeded only by lung cancer. The chance that breast cancer will be responsible for a woman’s death is about 1 in 35 (about 3%). ERIK HYRKAS/HYRKASE@LAKELAND.EDU


Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

11

Students attend state teacher convention Education majors take home tips of the trade By Rob Pockat

ROB POCKAT/POCKATR@LAKELAND.EDU

Staff Reporter pockatr@lakeland.edu

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s an education student at Lakeland College, I am constantly looking for experiences which will help me as I develop into a professional educator. I recently had one of those experiences. With two fellow students, Tabitha Kniest and Paul Davis, I had the opportunity to attend the Wisconsin Education Association Council’s (WEAC) annual convention in Milwaukee on Oct. 25 and 26. WEAC represents the public policy, labor, and professional interests of its 98,000 members. It is a strong voice for its members and for the 865,000 children in Wisconsin public schools. This experience was made possible by Dr. Wayne Homstad, assistant professor of education, who made many phone calls to the WEAC offices in order to procure complimentary passes for students in the Lakeland education program. This convention, held in the fall of each year, is attended by many educational professionals from throughout the state. It is a time for them to reflect upon the practices that they currently use in their classrooms, while giv-

Above: Lakeland education majors Rob Pockat and Tabitha Kniest are two of the students who attended the WEAC convention in Milwaukee.

ing them the opportunity to further develop their teaching skills. The keynote speaker for this convention was radio and television talk show host, Tavis Smiley. Smiley, in front of a packed house at the Midwest Airlines Center, gave many illustrations of the impact of teachers on society and on individuals. “I believe teachers are the

most undervalued resource in our society,” he said. Smiley spoke of the importance associated with educators and the high expectations that they have for their students. He acknowledged that teaching has its ups and downs, but urged the audience to persevere. He said, “You aren’t going to win every fight, but you have to stay in the game.”

During this convention, Kniest, Davis, and myself had the opportunity to attend many workshops, discuss the profession of teaching with practitioners in the field, and peruse the many booths set up, which contained resources available to educational professionals. Some of the workshops discussed authentic assessment of oral language skills in

school-age populations, how to get students to write and love it, tips for teaching using differentiated instruction, No Child Left Behind issues and concerns, using storytelling to promote change, and how to use magic in the classroom as a character-building tool. Workshops were conducted by educational professionals, authors, and consultants. “This was definitely a great learning experience for me,” said Kniest. “I hope to use many of the techniques that I learned when I am teaching in my own classroom.” Davis said, “The convention was more than I expected. I was able to visualize how many of the techniques that I have learned in my education classes can be applied to the classroom in useful and creative ways.” On a personal note, I found the convention to be quite exciting. For me, attending these types of events is very motivational, and always inspires me to look at the profession of teaching from a new angle. I learned many new techniques, which I will forever hold in my teaching arsenal. It was a great event that I will definitely attend again next year, hopefully with a busload of education majors.

Illinois native joins Lakeland’s faculty Nate Lowe urges students to keep reading and writing MARTHA SCHOTT/SCHOTTM@LAKELAND.EDU

By Swe Swe Htay

Contributing Writer htays@lakeland.edu

“I

hate the process of writing because it is very hard and time consuming,” said Nate Lowe, the new assistant professor of writing, “But I have to write; that’s something in my life I have to do. Because of that I like writing. It takes me to places that I didn’t realize that I wanted to go. For instance, writing short stories takes me to some places that I had not previously known.” Lowe is currently teaching four classes at Lakeland: two sections of writing workshop and two sections of expository writing. He said that his classes are going quite well and he enjoys teaching his students. He expects his students to read and write a lot. Moreover, he wants them to not only challenge him but also to teach him. He said, “We are all learning from one another. I want

Above: Nate Lowe is the newest addition to Lakeland’s writing department.

that exchange of ideas and thrive on that. That’s why I am at Lakeland College.” He grew up in Illinois. During the past five years, he spent four years in Moscow, Ill. and one year in Seattle with his wife Carrie. He obtained his B.A. in English and his teaching certificate from the University of Iowa. He took some nonfiction writing classes as an undergraduate student and thoroughly enjoyed them. Perhaps his in-

terest to write started at that time. He decided to attend the graduate school at the University of Idaho where he completed his Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. After graduation, Lowe spent another three years teaching and writing at four different colleges. When he saw the opening for a writing professor online, he knew it was the type of job he was looking for. That’s how Lowe came to Lakeland College.

According to Lowe, his inspiration came from one of his mentors in Idaho. He shared one of his favorite expressions: “Don’t get it right. Get it written.” He believes that writers should write down whatever comes to their minds rather than spending hours trying to figure out exactly what theywant to say. Then, writers should go back and see how the sentences work together. He also said, “Write, write as much as you can. Don’t stop. Just keep going.” Lowe enjoys not only writing, but also reading. He admits that reading inspires his writing. He said, “Whenever I read something, it always makes me put it down and start writing.” He believes he always has to read and write, and he can not separate the two. He thinks sometimes his students might wonder why they are reading so much in his writing classes. This is his answer for those students: “If you want to be a writer, your

teachers are other writers.” Besides writing and reading, Lowe loves to go hiking and biking. His favorite hobby is fly fishing. He has not tried fishing in the Sheboygan area yet because he has been very busy. Like everyone at Lakeland, Lowe is excited about Thanksgiving break. Lowe has a special plan to spend his Thanksgiving in Oregon. He looks forward to visiting his two nephews, Henry and Ethan, who are fiveyears old and nine months old, respectively. He has not seen Henry yet. “Henry and his family live in New Zealand, and I wouldn’t have many opportunities to spend time with him,” added Lowe. Lowe seems to be fitting at the Lakeland College well. International student Grace Jairo said, “Professor Nate brings things that trigger my brain to work. He does not spoon feed. He lets students work in their own groups, and I like doing group discussion. That’s how I learn from other students.”


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Features

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Dashain: National festival of Nepal Insight into the culture of the Nepalese

By Pratikshya Bhandari

Contributing Writer bhandarip@lakeland.edu

W

hile most Lakeland students were planning Halloween activities and costumes in early October, others were thinking of home and the traditions there. As a highly international community, Lakeland international students celebrated Dashain, a holiday in the month of Kartik, on the Nepali calendar, which falls in the first two weeks of Octo-

ber. Dashain is regarded as the most important festival for Nepal, a small country situated in the lap of the Himalayas. Dashain’s history traces back to the period when a great battle was fought between Shri Ram, Prince of Ayodhya, and Ravan, a demon in the battle field of Lanka, renamed as Sri Lanka today. The battle was won by Shri Ram only when Goddess Durga was evoked. The celebration marks the victory of good over evil when

www.nepal.org Above: Jamara is a specific type of grass that people celebrating Dashain grow, starting on the tenth day of the festival. On the same day, family elders put tika (a mixture of rice, yogurt, and red colored powder) on their foreheads.

Goddess Durga killed demon Maisashur, who had terrorized the world in the guise of a brutal water buffalo. The first nine days of the festival represent the nine days of battle, the tenth day marks the day of victory in the battlefield, and the last five days are the celebrations that followed the victory. The first nine days are called Navaratri, where all the holy rituals are carried out. People clean their houses, even repaint them with the hope that Goddess Durga will come and bless them. In Ghatasthapana, the first day of Dashain, a holy pot called Kalash is decorated with the images of Goddess Durga. People plant grains in this pot to grow a specific type of grass called jamara that is used in the tenth day of Dashain. This pot is kept away from sunlight in a sacred room that is closed to everyone in the family except for priests. The activities from the second to sixth day vary among communities. On Fulpati, the seventh day, Kalash is brought out into the sunlight, where they are wor-

shipped and ready for use in the tenth day. On Nawami, the ninth day of the festival, Lord of Creativity, Vishwakarma is worshipped along with various family assets like cars, houses, shops, and anything considered valuable by the family. Prayers are offered for the asset’s safety. The tenth day, Vijaya Dashami, is the most significant day of this festival. The elders of the family put tika (a mixture of rice, yogurt, and red colored powder) on the foreheads of youngsters, and give them jamara and blessings. At the beginning of the festival, people in the lower region of Nepal erect big statues of Goddess Durga that are floated away in rivers after the tenth day of celebration. Like all festivals, Dashain brings family members together in a mood of celebration. Kite flying competitions are held among families’ neighborhoods. All the schools and businesses are closed, allowing people to put all their worries aside and enjoy spare time with their loved ones. Celebrated

by almost all the communities of Nepal, Dashain binds all the Nepalese together with a sacred thread of national unity.

media.tiscali.co.uk

www.visitnepal.com Far Above: Nepal is located between India and China. Above: The Goddess of Durga is an important symbol during the celebration of Dashain.

Lakeland College honors program

DEAR OLD BOOKS

Meg Albrinck encourages students to join up

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of Plymouth

10-5 Tue, Thu, Sat; 10-8 Wed & Fri;

✦ Fiction, Non-Fiction and Children’s By Emily WachelBooks and Erik Hyrkas ✦ 75,000 Books Stock - Hard Cover Staff Reporterin and Managing Editor and Paperbacks in all subjects wachele@lakeland.edu hyrkase@lakeland.edu

www.dearoldbooksofplymouth.com DEARClosed OLD Sun &BOOKS Mon 4 4 4 7 College’s honors of Plymouth( 9 2 0 ) 8 9 2 -akeland

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404 E. Mill Street • Plymouth, WI offers 53073 challengprogram ing opportunities that will benefit students’ college expe• Fiction, Non-Fiction riences and job placements and Chilren’s Books after college. According to Meg Al• 75,000 Books in brinck, an advisor of the honStock - Hard Cover ors program, there are 65 and Paperbacks in all students involved in the prosubjects gram this year. This is an excellent number of students to have involved, but honors is HOURS: always willing to build their Tues., Thurs. & Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. numbers. Wed & Fri. “If you are somebody who 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. feels limited in course work Sun. & Mon. offered at Lakeland, honors Closed gives you more responsibility and pushes your education to different levels,” Albrinck 920.892.4447 said. 404 E. Mill Street Plymouth, WI 53073 “Students who choose to be in this program are able to www.dearoldbooksofplymouth.com design their own course work at their level of challenge and interest. These students also off have a social benefit on camwith pus due to the great amount student of one on one interaction with id professors.” The honors program at

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Lakeland replaces the core curriculum with its own set of requirements. For freshmen immediately enrolled in the honors program, Intro to Honors course number HON 190 is the first course. Intro to honors focuses on knowing the self much like core 1, however is more arduous with discussion, writing, and projects than the traditional core 1 course. This is due to the fact that it also counts for the expository and persuasive writing courses, which is why intro to honors is six credits, and a great way to get ahead on your general requirements. “It’s a lot of work, but I have to say it prepares you for many of the more difficult courses at Lakeland,” said junior honors student Matt Rutlin. The second course in the honors curriculum is Revolutions in Thought HON 290, a three credit course taught by associate professor Peter Sattler, which investigates three distinct moments of intellectual “revolution,” and includes a fieldtrip to the Art Institute of Chicago. Heather Gayton, a junior

in the honors program said, “The one class that has truly benefited me was Revolutions and Thought. This class provoked extra thinking, which I am now able to take more in from other classes.” Other required courses in the honors curriculum include two honors seminars, which are “interdisciplinary courses on challenging topics; they offer students and faculty the opportunity to explore more experimental subjects and/or learning environments,” according to Lakeland’s 20007-2008 Academic Catalog. These courses are approved by the honors committee and change every year. Seminars in the past included Aliens, taught by Karl Kuhn and BioVisions with Jeff Schwehm. The last requirements for the honors curriculum include two directed readings, one-credit courses used by students to research and study topics of their choice, developing an original project, a one credit course used to develop a proposal to give to the honors committee for approval, and finally the capstone three credit course, the

senior honors project. Becoming a part of the honors program has many benefits both during and after college. “Students leave this course when completed with a better sense of problem solving and a more clear thinking process. The honors program is also recognized by future employers for these students on applications after college,” Albrinck said. “The best time for a student to join is during their freshman year or at the beginning of their sophomore year,” Albrinck said. For students interested in the honors program, an application is required and forms are available in Meg Albrinck’s office, WAK 307. Applicants must have a 3.25 GPA or a score of 24 or better on the ACT to be recognized, though exceptions have be made for ambitious students.

Upcoming Honors Seminar topics Immigration in America/ New York City trip & Harry Potter


Fun House

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 4, November 1, 2007

13

Fall break sucked terribly Seriously...it sucked like an Oreck vacuum

By John Sieglaff

Fun House Editor sieglaffj@lakeland.edu

O

ver fall break I was so sick I made Linda Blair look like she was possessed by an angel. What kind of sick, twisted angel would possess an innocent twelveyear-old girl is beyond me, but my point should be Straight from the John taken just the same. Seriously, I was sick, man! My guess is that I became infected by some strange, mutated strand of the West Nile virus, which makes its victims bleed out of every orifice on his or her body, much like Ebola. But the doctor just said it looked like strep throat. Come to think of it, that would make a lot more sense, seeming how there was no blood involved. And he is a doctor, so I suppose he might have been correct about the strep. They did, however, take blood from me while they were doing another test. Something smells fishy. I took a test for mononucleosis (that’s “mono” for any of you non-doctors reading this) as well. The strep and mono test results both came back negative which, just like George Costanza, I was thrilled to hear was a

good thing. However, it was also at this time that my doctor told me he didn’t trust the tests and that I definitely had strep throat. It was then that my state of pure bliss plunged to hysteria, and I jumped upon the counter with an outstretched arm pointing at the doctor and accusing him of being a “quack” and a “mad medicine man.” He seemed irritated by my behavior, but I felt there was a bit of due credit coming my way. Seriously, who takes their time to alliterate their insults? The editor of the Fun House section, that’s who! He gave me a prescription for penicillin and got me the hell out of there before I started maligning the patients in the waiting room with alliterated insults—trust me, I’ve got a bunch! I got back home and took the penicillin just to find out several hours later that I don’t react well to penicillin. I had suspicions that I had had an adverse reaction when my throat started closing up and breathing became a feat so uneasily reached I felt I deserved an Olympic medal by the time I caught my breath. I got a

prescription for Zithromax instead of penicillin, but I have yet to see that Olympic medal. My unfortunate parents had to deal with my sick carcass all week, and my poor mother took her vacation at the same time as fall break. Either she really gets a kick out of pampering ill children, or she’s got some of the worst timing known to man! Truly, though—I’m incredibly lucky to have parents who actually take care of their sick child. I know of many people who claim that their parents would see they had a cold and send them right back out into the rain. Of course, when my parents let me in, they were under the impression that I’d caught some strange, Ebola-like virus and probably figured I was on my deathbed any-

way. I suppose that may require more attention and pampering than the common cold. As if fall break couldn’t have held much worse in store for me, I was practically blind for the whole thing. I’d lost my right eye’s contact the night I got home, and whenever I tried putting another contact in or wearing glasses, my vision was only made worse than what it was with my naked eye. I wandered around campus in this blinded state for a couple of days after fall break had ended until I finally realized I had lost my right eye’s contact in my right eye!

Anyway, now I’m trying to get a bunch of people to sign a petition for a second fall break as some time off is much needed after a “break” like the one I had. I already forged eight signatures on the petition, so I only need 92 more. Coming up with the names to forge is the hardest part, but by this time next year, the petition should be ready! I will not fail you, students of Lakeland!


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Issue 4, November 1, 2007

Fun House

Chase and Eddie

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R


Fun House

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

15

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

Sponsor your very own Yooper

For less than a dollar a day, you can make a vast improvement in a Yooper’s life By Rob Pockat Staff Reporter pockatr@lakeland.edu

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he Upper Peninsula; supplier of mosquitos to the free world. A place where there are only two seasons--swat and shovel. It is not recognized by Wisconsin, and not wanted by Michigan. Early last year, I learned of this undeveloped little country and its proud but sad inhabitants: Yoopers. As America begins to exploit this area of the world, it seems that Yoopers are on the fast track to extinction.

To save the world we need to save these Yoopers. Through a state reciprocity program we are able to send American students to this quiet little nation to learn the lost art of paper making and egg pickling. In return, we accept many of their students and try to acculturate them into American society. I felt an intrinsic duty to learn more about this nomadic band of Yoopers. This proved to be quite difficult for several reasons. First, I was unable to procure the necessary paperwork and vaccinations to

travel to this remote area. Second, I cannot speak their language. Through the state reciprocity act, however, I was able to meet some of these unusual people right here on our college campus. This particular band came from the village of Gladstone, apparently named after a large rock which appears to be very happy. It took many months for me to understand their language, which consisted of guttural grunts and awkward hand gestures, yet we became friends. Over the course of a year,

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they were able to learn at least one dozen words from the English language, and limited communication became possible. As my interest in this backward band of people grew, my research intensified. One night, as I surfed the web, I found a Web site that had information on how to sponsor your very own Yooper. Interested, I sent for an informational packet and applied to sponsor a Yooper that I could call my own. For just 79 cents per day, less than a bottle of Vernor’s ginger ale, a staple drink in the Yooper’s diet, I could sponsor one of the UP’s finest. In just two short weeks, there was a Yooper of my very own, right on my doorstep. It was delicately packed in a crate full of foam peanuts, which this particular Yooper used as sustenance for the long journey. At this point my wife was peeved. She proceeded to educate me about the legal ramifications involved with buying human beings on the black market. I, of course, told her, “It’s not a human being, it’s a Yooper!” I then told her that I did not own the Yooper, I was just sponsoring it. Eventually, my wife was accepting of our newly acquired family member, and decided that we had to name it. Sexing of a Yooper is difficult to do. Luckily, we found instructions for doing this on Wikipedia. We were thus able to ascertain that our Yooper was in fact a male. To protect the true identity of our Yooper, we will refer to him simply as “Homer”

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The name of the doctor who compiled dead carcasses to create a monster Mischievous menaces pulling pranks and switching human babies Evil spirits Ancient pharoahs wrapped and well-preserved Cursed beings that transform at a full moon

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from this point on. Our first order of business was to find Homer a spot in the house to call his very own. According to the owner’s manual that we received, Yoopers prefer cold, dark, damp, buginfested areas. The basement would be the perfect spot for our Yooper. The second order of business was to figure out what to feed Homer. According to the manual, Yoopers normally live on a diet of pickled eggs, which are easy to find in this area, and pasties, a complete meal of beef, carrots, potatoes, and rutabagas wrapped in a flaky pastry shell. Our Yooper came with a dozen pasties, a jar of pickled eggs, and a six pack of Busch Light. Because the recommended foods are really unfit for human consumption, we disposed of the included items and decided to feed Homer “people” food. The first few days of this were difficult, but keeping some windows open really seemed to help our situation. As time passed, we grew to love Homer more every day. Yes, there have been difficulties, such as potty training and hygiene issues, but we have gotten through these challenges and have helped him to become almost human. I like to call him our little Homer-Sapien. Sponsoring a Yooper has been one of the greatest experiences of my life. When Homer grows up and adapts to life as a human, I hope to sponsor yet another Yooper. I am hoping that I can save the world one Yooper at a time.

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16

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

AD

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

BIG BUCKS. BIG MACHINES. AND YOU’RE THE DRIVER.

Envision a career in newspapers. See your adviser. Visit www.wnanews.com Or call 800.261.4242

Wisconsin Newspaper Association


Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

17

Women’s soccer runs on empty Five significant seniors leave which will hurt future

By Shaun Forsyth

Staff Reporter forsyths@lakeland.edu

W

hen it seemed as if the lady Muskies were completely turning the season around, they took a few too many blows at the end of their regular season as they were unfortunately unable to advance to the NAC tournament. Lakeland’s final loss took place on Oct. 27 against Benedictine University to wrap up the 2007 season as the Eagles easily flew past the Muskies in a 3-0 shutout. However, despite the outcome of this match up, Lakeland was already knocked out of tournament contention three days earlier to the Falcons of Concordia Wisconsin. “It’s very frustrating,” claims head coach Dave Madsen. “We knew the importance of the Concordia game and how much it meant to our season. Probably the biggest problem I saw from my team this year was how we waited for too many opportunities instead of going out and grabbing them ourselves.”

Although the season didn’t quite end the way both the players and Coach Dave Madsen expected, the coach was extremely proud of the work ethic and dedication given by the girls. “Benedictine simply came out much stronger out of the blocks and although we did in fact match the Eagles tempo in the second half of play, the damage was already done”, said Madsen. “These girls are

a bunch of strong individuals and their individual and team class is sensational. It’s going to be difficult seeing the seniors leave.” Lakeland completed the year with both a decent 7-12 overall record and a 5-6 conference record. Home field advantage never really was a factor, both having a similar home and road record. The ladies were either on top of their game or they were not. LORI SASS/SASSL@LAKELAND.EDU

The Muskie’s tallied up 33 goals out of 225 goal attempts throughout the 2007 regular season. Leading the team in goals this year was Gina Weiss with five and both Amy Christenson and Maria Santelli were right behind Weiss with four. A big thanks and farewell is given to all the seniors for their non stop dedication and commitment to the team these past four years here at Lakeland. These ladies include goalie Savannah Johnson, defender Kelly Hopfinger, midfielder Tracy Bins, mid-fielder Laura Engel, and defender Eliza Waltz. All five players have been an essential factor over the years and they will be missed tremendously both on and off the field. Other thanks go out to the Lakeland coaching staff who has worked with the girls non stop all year and they absolutely deserve a lot of credit. Head coach Dave Madsen finishes his second year here at Lakeland and intends to only im-

prove the team in years ahead. He has a ton of experience with the game of soccer, excelling as a player in high school and leading his team to a Division 1 WIAA state championship. Also on the coaching staff is assistant coach Alli Weiss. Alli was a tremendous talent for the Muskies just a year ago, holding numerous goal keeping records such as saves in a season and saves in a career. Because she is a former teammate to many of the current players, she is very close with them and contributes greatly to their success.

2007 NAC Standings School NAC Aurora 12-0 Edgewood 11-1 Dominican 9-3 Benedictine 8-3-1 Concordia Wisconsin 8-4 MSOE 7-4-1 Marian 6-6 Lakeland 6-6 Concordia Chicago 4-8 Maranatha 3-9 Wisconsin Lutheran 2-10 Alverno 1-11 Rockford 0-12

Left: Senior midfielder Laura Engel works around an opponent from Concordia Wisconsin

Overall 17-2-1 15-3 12-7 10-5-1 10-8-1 9-7-3 9-9 7-12 4-15 5-12 2-16-2 6-13 4-14

Football team almost to playoffs Muskies need one more win to move on By Shaun Forsyth Staff Reporter forsyths@lakeland.edu

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he Lakeland College football team’s 2007 season is close to the end, but not nearly as close as what most expected. After the Muskie’s suffered a tremendous heartbreaking loss to Concordia Wisconsin back on Oct. 20, the team was considered finished by means of not making the playoffs. Last Saturday on Oct. 27, the Muskies made the Cougars of Concordia Chicago seem like house kittens, winning in complete dominating fashion with a final score of 56-7. The team couldn’t have bounced back any better after the loss from a week prior. Sophomore Jacob Heinemeyer contributed impressively on special teams with not one but two punt returns for touchdowns. Heinimeyer is currently seventh in the nation for punt returns. Coach Kevin Doherty was obviously pleased with Jake’s and the rest of the special teams performance. “Something Jake did really really well in the game was playing smart, knowing when to call a fair catch and when to make a big play,” complimented Doherty.

Now in the IBFC, only one team can advance to the playoffs and that team obviously is the one who takes first in the conference. Concordia and Lakeland were on top of the conference when gut wrenching game took place. Because Concordia came out victorious, they were considered conference champs. No one expected Concordia to lose the next game against Greenville. But despite the odds, that exact thing happened. So just like that, a win this Saturday for the Muskies will give them at least a share of the conference title. If the Falcons also emerge victorious this weekend, they will both have a share of the title and the playoff berth due to the previous head to head matchup with Lakeland. Standing in Lakeland’s way this coming weekend is Aurora. The game will take place here at home beginning at noon. The Spartans come into town with an overall record of 3-4 and a conference record of 3-2. The Muskie’s will have to look at this game like a playoff game and have a do-ordie mentality to make sure they play to the best of their abilities. Head coach Kevin Doherty believes that the idea of the playoffs still being in reach will factor into this weekend’s game. “The

possibility of playoff contention should put more focus into both the players and coaches,” says Doherty. “Just like the week prior to the Concordia Wisconsin game, it shouldn’t take much from me or the other coaches to get the team fired up and ready to go.” With hope and enthusiasm in the air here at Lakeland, excitement may be at its peak come kickoff this weekend. The football team needs their fans now more than ever. If you’re able to come on out, then dress up in your blue and gold colors and

BEAU MARKUTIMARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Senior Cleveland Pierce makes a tackle and forces a fumble against CUC. Freshman Keith Woodson looks on and learns from the senior.

Left: Junior John Wagner stares down the quarterback waiting to pounce on his fresh meat. Wagner is number eleven in the nation for solo tackles

2007 Standings School Aurora Benedictine Concordia Chicago Concordia Wisconsin Lakeland Maranatha Rockford Wisconsin Lutheran

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Overall 4-4 5-4 3-6 6-3 5-4 2-7 6-3 2-6


18

Sports

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Men’s soccer moves to NAC tourny Muskies give and take a couple of losses

By John Wagner

Staff Reporter wagnerj@lakeland.edu

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he Lakeland College men’s soccer team came away with another win in an overtime match against Marian College. They won 3-2 on Wednesday, Oct. 15 in Fond du Lac to improve their record in the Northern Athletics Conference record to 2-5. Sophomore defender Doua Vang made the goal to end the contest, kicking in a shot past Marian’s goal-keeper. The two teams managed to get almost identical shot attempts off with seven and eight. “It was a back-and-forth type of game,” said head coach Dave Madsen. “There were times where we were pushing forward against them and times they were pushing forward against us.” Lakeland’s senior defender Tyler Haug put in a free

kick for his first goal since 2005 to put the Muskies up 1-0. Marian, however, countered back with their one goal to send the two teams into halftime tied at 1-1. “Tyler took a free kick about 50 yards out, and it caught the prevailing wind and their keeper was off his line,” Madsen said. Sophomore forward Ryan Malo put in Lakeland’s second goal, but was once again countered by Marian, sent the game into overtime at 2-2. “When they tied it up again, it definitely kept us on our toes,” Madsen said. “But we were able to keep our concentration. It was a good victory for us, and a tribute to our effort throughout the game.” Vang put in the game winning goal. After the win versus Marian, Lakeland was unsuccessful in beating Aurora the following Saturday, Oct. 20.

Lakeland was down early as Aurora put in their first goal just over one minute into the game. Aurora brought the lead to 2-0 by putting in a corner kick before the half. Lakeland’s offense did not get into a rhythm, but Aurora’s did as they put in two more goals. “Right from the start we came out with a lack of effort,” said Madsen. “We had some individuals who were fighting hard, but for the most part we weren’t working for each other and we weren’t pulling for each other. “Aurora came to play today, but I think we could have given them a better game and finished on some of the chances we had to score.” The Lakeland College men’s soccer team fell to Carthage College, 5-2, in nonconference play on Sunday, Oct. 21, in Kenosha. Although the Muskies tied Carthage 2-2 during most of

the first half, thanks to goals by senior midfielder Zach Buchman and freshman forward James Trazile, Carthage was able to put in another goal before the half to gain the 3-2 advantage. Lakeland was only able to get off two shot attempts in the second half while Carthage had ten shot attempts and was able to score on two to make it a 5-2 win for Carthage. Lakeland was able to pull off a win in their Northern Athletics Conference schedule, beating the Milwaukee School of Engineering on Tuesday, Oct. 23. The Muskies fought hard against MSOE in the first half. However, MSOE was able to get eight shot attempts, with two of those goals bouncing off the post. At halftime, the score was 0-0. Junior forward Carroll Devlin was able to liven up the game with a goal early in

the second half, followed by two more Lakeland goals by junior midfielder Kevin Fitchett. Another goal by sophomore defender Doua Vang put the Muskies up, 3-0. “We came out kind of flat in the first half, but I think once we were able to get a goal it helped relieve a little bit of the pressure,” said head coach Dave Madsen. “We relaxed and started to play the way we are capable of playing.” MSOE broke the shutout but Ryan Malo ended their comeback attempt with a fourth goal that wrapped up the win. “We started playing together and talking to each other more,” Malo said of the Muskies’ improved play in the second half. “That helped us get some goals and dominate the game. Our defense played well, too, and did a good job of getting us the ball.”

SEE MEN’S SOCCER/PAGE 19

MVP OF THE ISSUE Shelly Bruni, record breaker, role model

By Nicole Holland Staff Reporter hollandn@lakeland.edu

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helly Bruni, a senior middle hitter on the Lakeland women’s volleyball team, has made the record books. On Oct. 12, Bruni had 12 kills in a match against the Milwaukee School of Engineering. That translated is a .706 hitting percentage, which is the third highest of any Lakeland woman volleyball player ever for a single match. “I’m pretty pumped about it,” said Bruni as she tried to hold back a smile. “Its kind of funny because of Monica Draeger. She

is first on the list, and we went to the same high school.” Bruni said. As soon as the novelty of the issue dwindled, Bruni’s focus became clear. Even though Bruni is happy about her individual game against MSOE, her focus was on the big picture. The team had secured the Northern Athletics Conference regular season title with a 3-0 win against MSOE that same night. Bruni was more excited about having that accomplishment return to the team. She is definitely a team play Bruni’s Statistics Games Played 103 Kills 234 Kills/Game 2.27 Total Attacks 592 Assists 3 Assists/Game .03 Digs 26 Digs/Game .25 Solo Blocks 10 Block Assists 76 Blocks/Game .83 Left: Shelly Bruni, number seventeen, goes up to block Edgewood’s spike with ease.

Right: Bruni elevates over the competition and tallies up another great hit.

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

er. Concentration on the team’s upcoming tournaments was also more important than setting an individual record. The women’s volleyball coach, Chad Schreiber, had the same mindset. He said that Bruni’s offensive record was impressive, but he also had the future games on his mind. “I feel pretty good about it,” Schreiber said. The only issues he was apprehensive about going

into the NAC Tournament and the NCAA Tournament were unexpected injuries or a meltdown. However, with one game already under the belt in the NAC Tournament, a meltdown seems unlikely. They have already defeated Edgewood College in a quarterfinal match. The Muskies are hosting the NAC Tournament this week. They will compete in the semifinal match against Concordia University Chicago, held

at home on Thursday, Nov. 1. Bruni not only seems to possess an outstanding team mentality, but is a person with an admirable character. Her future plans are not yet set in stone, but she hopes to stay active as a fitness studies major. However, she did admit to still dreaming about becoming a country singer. But this aspect only makes Shelly’s outlook on life more endearing. BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU


Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 4, November 1, 2007

19

Young team blossoming Coach Cherveny excited for new recruits and building a strong tennis program By Lori Sass Editor-in-Chief sassl@lakeland.edu

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anked tenth in the Northern Athletics Conference in the preseason poll, the women tennis players at Lakeland College needed to stay focused on the positive things. First year head coach Leigh Cherveny said in an email, “I was not aware of the ranking when I took the position. But it does not surprise me. With no returning players and six who had limited or no high school experience my goal was to have them be better at the end of the season and to keep them positive.” Despite not having a full roster, the first match of the season against Mount Mary was successful for the lady Muskies resulting in a 7-2 win over the non-conference Blue Angels. Play in the NAC was not so friendly for the women, finishing with a 0-10 record in regular season play, good enough for last place in the conference. “After our first win I

thought with six players we could be competitive with several teams,” Cherveny, 23-year high school coaching veteran, said. “However, two players became ill and did not return. With six players we could have won two to three more meets. With four we gave up three matches going in and in many cases the competition was much better than us. The players always did their best throughout the season.” Lone senior, Sakie Matsubara (No. 1 singles and doubles), held the best records for the team with 2-12 and 112 records in singles and doubles, respectively. “In addition to being technically competent she [Matsubara] was the team leader in many ways,” Cherveny said. “She showed the others a level of tennis that is possible. She was always on time, supported her teammates, never missed a practice, was her worst critic and always looked to improve, demonstrated sportsmanship, and played through injuries. She even convinced me to try sushi.” “We liked him,” Matsubara said of Cherveny and

his coaching techniques. “He can see how we are feeling or playing. Usually he would tell us we lost mentally.” She found Cherveny to be extremely attentive to her during her matches and found his specific tips in each individual match very helpful. With Matsubara graduating, Cherveny has an eye on a current freshman. “Mariah Tess from Kewaunee High School grew immensely this year. If she works on her game she can be a major contributor in the future,” he said. Tess recorded records of 112 in both singles and doubles (paired with three different teammates throughout the season). Depending on the match, Tess played between No. 2-4 singles and either No.1 or No. 2 doubles. Despite the losing season, the team and Cherveny did accomplish some goals for the program. “I am pleased the team kept trying and worked to be better, that I was able to understand the college game better, and have a better understanding of a college sports department,” Cherveny said.

“I believe every player court quickly. So I encourage improved. At our conference former high school athletes to tournament every match join our group and or players where we played against pre- in other sports to play tennis vious opponents we did better. as well.” I am pleased Erica Brown and In the off-season, CherJacquelyn Love, two play- veny plans on running spring ers who never played before, practices and finding addicontinued to play and grow as tional players. tennis players,” he said. There is no doubt that the program will look to improve in years to come. “My goal is to help build the tennis program at Lakeland in both quality and quantity of players and also to be successful in terms BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU of wins,” said Cherveny. “I have started to contact some local players and plan to expand the search to a number of eastern Wisconsin teams,” Cherveny said about recruiting players for next season. “Another area of recruiting is the present student body. Thanks to the women’s basketball coach and Jane Bouche, our athletic director, we had two women basketball players join us for a practice and a meet. “They obviously had ath- Above: Sakie Matsubara practices her letic skills and after a prac- form as her opponent from Concordia tice one could see those skills University-Wisconsin looks on. could translate to the tennis

Golf teams make progress Coaches hopeful for next season By Becky Meyer Copy Editor meyerr@lakeland.edu

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he Lakeland College men’s and women’s golf teams made progress throughout the season, and both teams are hoping to play even better in the next season. The women’s team had three golfers. One of the main contributors was Nikki Com-

mons, who finished third in the conference. Cathy Hanek, the women’s golf coach, said that the team made progress during the season, and said that she is hoping to have more golfers in the spring. Hanek said that she is “hoping to have four by next year.” The men’s team finished seventh out of nine teams in the conference this season. There were two to three fresh-

men contributing in the tournaments. Aaron Aanonsen, men’s golf coach, said, “We started out a little slow...we were pretty young…there’s one senior [Justin Goosen] that we’re losing.” The team is hoping to improve in the off-season. Both the men’s and women’s teams have made progress, and hopefully in the next season, they will achieve even more.

Final Results Women’s Golf 1. Aurora University, 788 2. Concordia University Wisconsin, 840 3. MSOE, 934 4. Marian College, 956 5. Wisconsin Lutheran College, 981 -. Benedictine University, DNQ -. Edgewood College, DNQ -. Lakeland College, DNQ

Final Results Men’s Golf 1. MSOE, 645 2. Benedictine University, 654 3. Aurora University, 666 Marian College, 666 5. Concordia University Wisconsin, 686 6. Wisconsin Lutheran College, 689 7. Lakeland College, 693 -. Edgewood College, DNF -. Rockford College, DNF

Muskie soccer outdone Men’s soccer ends season with quarterfinal loss to Edgewood By Matt Rutlin Sports Editor rutlinm@lakeland.edu

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he No. 6-seeded Lakeland College men’s soccer team tragically fell to No. 3 seeded Edgewood College, 50, in the Northern Athletics Conference Tournament quarterfinal on Monday, October 29, in Madison. Edgewood’s attack came in the first half. Eagle’s Kevin Fisher tallied up a hat trick to tally up three of their five goals.

“We hung in there for awhile in the first half,” said head coach Dave Madsen. “Then we gave up the first goal and the floodgates opened. I was disappointed in our first half play because we were kind of playing scared.” The Muskies put up a fight and let the Eagles know they were there in the second half by preventing them from scoring. Lakeland was unable to counter with any goals; therefore, putting themselves in a rut.

On the other hand, Coach Madsen seemed pleased with the way Lakeland came together in the second half. He feels these brave men can walk off the field knowing they accomplished a lot this season and have come a long way. “Our second half play showed that we belonged there,” Madsen said. “The way the guys have stuck through the hard times we had this year and learned to support each other shows a lot about

them. I think this game is a good snapshot of the season because it shows how we can play to our potential, but it also shows there is room for improvement.” Lakeland is ousted from the future competition and Edgewood will move on to compete against No. 2 Aurora University in the semifinals on Wednesday, Oct. 31.

2007 NAC Standings School NAC #11 Dominican 9-0-1 Aurora 8-0-2 Concordia Wisconsin 7-3 Edgewood 7-3 Wisconsin Lutheran 6-3-1 MSOE 4-6 Lakeland 4-6 Marian 3-7 Maranatha 2-8 Concordia Chicago 2-8 Benedictine 1-9

Overall 14-3-1 12-3-4 12-6-1 10-7 10-9-1 8-8-1 4-14 3-12-1 7-13 3-14-1 2-13


20

Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 4, November 1, 2007

The queens rule again!!! Women’s volleyball digs up another conference title with a perfect 12-0 record By Matt Rutlin Sports Editor rutlinm@lakeland.edu

fter a tough weekend away at UW-Oshkosh losing to UW-Stevens Point and UW-Whitewater, the women’s volleyball team made a roaring return to the top. These talented ladies have been digging through the competition. With four recent wins, this determined group has smothered the fire of doubt

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due to their outstanding play and team coordination. These wins have put the ladies in a commanding lead once again. This year is a different story compared to last year’s performance, when the queens finished 18-18 (.500) overall and 8-3 (4th) in conference. The first of the string of slaughters began with Wisconsin Lutheran. The Muskie ladies entered the Warriors’ house stealing the first game 30-19. The next game was just

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

as easy with a win of 30-24. The Muskie volleyball queens finished the last game hitting .455 to pull out a win of 30-17. The main offensive duo included Ashley Domask and Jessica Keller. Domask led the lady’s offensive attack by hitting .588 and recording eleven kills. Not far behind was Keller with nine kills. Keller led the queens’ blocking with six block assists, while Shelly Bruni racked up five blocks and five kills. The queens went 3-0 against the Milwaukee School of Engineering to bring home the Northern Athletics Conference regular season crown on Friday, Oct. 12. “Winning conference has become an expected accomplishment for this program,” said head coach Chad Schreiber. “It’s nice that we were able to get back to that this year, and it really means a lot to our seniors because this is what they are used to as well.” What better way to win conference than to do it right at home? A perfect 12-0 record in the Northern Athletics Conference regular season is now in the record books for the queens. It was completed with a 3-0 win over Rockford College on Saturday, Oct. 20. The match against Rockford was the first of two for the queens. They also went on to take out Lawrence University easily 30. The queens were (19-11-1 overall and 12-0 in conference) going into the UW-Whitewater tournament against UW-Platteville, UW-Oshkosh, Simp-

son, and Stevens Institute. The winning streak was short-lived for the queens as they were punished by UWPlatteville (1-3). The Muskies started off well against the Pioneers by taking the first game (30-27). However, the Pioneers came back to win the remaining three games of the match, 30-28, 30-20, 30-28. The queens were able to take one game from the UW-Oshkosh Titans who are ranked ninth in the nation. After dropping the first game 3020, the Muskies played well to win the second game (30-23). Lakeland soon lost focus and dropped the final two games of the match, 30-21 and 30-24. Lakeland did not gather enough momentum the next day when they fell to Simpson (0-3). However, there was a spark of determination in the

queens when they fought Stevens Institute, who is ranked 17 in the nation and No. 1 in the New York region. The Lakeland College women’s volleyball team might have earned a high rank at this year’s NCAA Tournament with a commanding 3-0 win over Stevens Institute (30-27, 30-25, 31-29). “That win vastly increased our chances of making the NCAA Tournament,” said Schreiber. “Beating a No. 1 team from another region is a huge feat. It’s a huge monkey off our back to get a win over a nationally-ranked team, and it was great to end our regular season on a win.”

Left: Junior Heidi Kramer extends to the full amount to block a spike by Edgewood. Below: Sophomore Kimberly Linger climbs over the competition and spikes down on Edgewood as they look on in fear.

Ladies cruise through NAC quarterfinal By Matt Rutlin Sports Editor rutlinm@lakeland.edu

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he queens showed no emotion on their faces. They looked Edgewood right in the face. No fear. The Muskies had a desire to win before the match started. There was an intimidation factor that helped the women’s volleyball team overcome Edgewood in the quarterfinal of the NAC tournament. It was nothing new to the queens as they started dominating right away, while Heidi Kramer led the team into battle with her on-court awareness and team spirit. The ladies came into the bought with a 20-14 overall record. Coach Chad Schreiber showed a vast amount of emotion as he fought for every point.

Senior Ashley Domask motivated the queens throughout the night by leading them with her dedication for every point. An enormous amount of support came from the sidelines as the rest of the team cheered for the queens on the court through the good and bad times. The ladies battled through their first game with the help of loud screams and claps of support from the crowd at the end of the first game, which finished (30-21). Sophomore Brittanie Paulus aided the team with her patience and ability to tally up kills. She is currently in tenth place in the NAC with 304 kills, which is an average of 2.92 per game. Another outstanding player is Shelly Bruni, who once again guided the ladies with her outstanding performance. She currently is fourth in the NAC with a .291 hitting

percent. Game two was wrapped up with a (30-21) win for the queens. Junior Jessica Sparling assisted throughout this quick battle with her many assists once again. Her dominance in the NAC is seen by everyone. She is currently fourth in the NAC with 932 assists, which averages out to 9.05 per game. In the third game, the queens began to lose focus, falling behind 24-23. In order to offset this conundrum, Domask was sent in to help the ladies. Paulus was able to put the final icing on the cake with a monstrous kill, which resulted in a (30-28) win over Edgewood. The queens have now clinched a spot in the semifinals on Thursday, November 1. The Muskies will host No. 4 Concordia University Chicago.

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2007 School Lakeland Concordia Wisconsin Benedictine Concordia Chicago MSOE Maranatha Rockford Edgewood Aurora Wisconsin Lutheran Dominican Marian Alverno

NAC Standings NAC 12-0 10-2 9-3 9-3 7-5 6-6 6-6 6-6 4-8 4-8 4-8 1-11 0-12

Overall 21-14 22-9 25-6 17-13 11-19 14-13 11-13 9-17 9-18 8-18 8-18 4-25 2-27


Fall 2007, Issue 4  

Lakeland Mirror

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