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VOLUM E Fa l l, IS SUE 3

Issue Highlights Features

W W W. L AK E L ANDM I RROR . C OM

T HUR SDAY, O CTOBE R 9, 2008

Homecom

ing victo ry 2008

Career services Jessica Lambrecht's sister to appear on survivor.

PAGE 8

Features

LC alumna Lena Yurs talks to students about grad school and research.

PAGE 9

GINA D'AMATO/DAMATOG@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: The Muskies come together to win homecoming. SEE HOMECOMING STORY/PAGE 10

A&E

Lakeland reorganizes administration Restructuring allows President Gould to do more fundraising By Erik Hyrkas

Managing Editor hyrkase@lakeland.edu

Seeing dead people is funny in "Ghost Town."

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Index opinions Page 3 Features Page 6 A&E Page 12 Fun House Page 14 sports Page 18

The Mirror is an award winning member of the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Collegiate Press, Wisconsin Newspaper Association and College Media Advisers.

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akeland College President Stephen Gould will have more time to raise money for scholarships this fall after two new administrative changes were instituted at Lakeland. The changes grouped student affairs and administrative functions under two new vice president positions as of Sept. 16, according to Lakeland’s Crier newsletter. Nate Dehne, the current director for admissions, and Dan Eck, the special assistant to the president, will now assume some of the responsibilities of the president in these two new positions, so Gould can work on fundraising and communicating the vision and message of the college. The reorganization was established by Gould and the Board of Trustees. The new student affairs group combines student services, admissions, and athletics. Dehne, will lead this group in a new position, vice president for student development. The new administrative group joins institutional

research and the departments that currently report to Tony Fessler, the vice president for international programs and general counsel, and Joe Botana, vice president for finance and chief financial officer. David Stein, director for institutional research, Fessler and Botana, will now report to Eck in his new position as senior vice president for administration. Gould said, “From time to time, we take a look at the way in which we’re organized, and we ask ourselves, ‘Are we organized in a way that aligns with our goals and objectives?’ For a long time the answer was yes, and this time the answer was, ‘Well, we’re not so sure.’” Concerning the reorganization, Eck said, “It has a great goal of trying to free up some of Gould’s time from a lot of the day to day things. He can actually spend more time working on issues relating to the overall vision of the college. College presidents have to be highly involved in fundraising, so the plan is to give him a chance to do some of those big picture things for the college.” Lakeland also wishes to

put more emphasis on the four-year graduation rate. “How many students we graduate in four years has a lot to do with the students we recruit, and athletics recruits a third of our students. The other two-thirds are recruited by the admissions process. So we put those two things together in this student development package and it just makes a lot of sense,” said Gould. Regarding fundraising, Gould says it will be very important this year “as the economy is taking it on the chin.” Lakeland raises $2-3 million a year for the day program through advancement fundraising, most of which is used for student scholarships. Lakeland’s small donors may not be affected by the economic crisis much; however, it can have a much bigger impact on the large donors. “We don’t need to lose many of those large donors before we have trouble funding those scholarships,” said Gould. Meanwhile, the president thinks both Dehne and Eck are appropriately prepared for their new positions. “Dehne has a lot of ener-

gy. He communicates well with all of our constituencies, and that’s really the person we need in that job. He also relates well to athletics. He’s a former athlete himself,” Gould explained. Gould also commented on Eck, saying “He has a lot of non-profit experience and I’m impressed with his communication skills. I feel lucky to have him available.” Dehne says he’s honored to serve Lakeland in his new position. “It’s humbling for me to be able to have this responsibility, and I take it very seriously because the things that I do in this job now, in this position, so directly affects you all as students. There’s nothing other than doing this job all out as hard as I can do it, to make sure that it’s done right,” said Dehne. Eck also is thrilled with the changes. “I work really well with Joe and Tony, and the three of us together can take care of a lot of things and really streamline the issues that get to Dr. Gould so he can make the decisions based on a real succinct presentation of options,” said Eck.


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News

Issue 3, October 9, 2008

A class act for Ed. majors StWEA now available to students

By John Sieglaff Fun House Editor sieglaffj@lakeland.edu

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akeland College education majors now have an organization to call their own. The newly formed chapter of the Student Wisconsin Education Association (StWEA) will benefit those pursuing an education degree at Lakeland. StWEA is an organization consisting of college students interested in the field of teaching. It provides students with opportunities to meet other education majors and current teachers and to explore cutting-edge issues in education. It is a preprofessional association that will follow students after they graduate. At the local, state, and national levels, professional development, volunteer work, and social networking will be available to those who become members of this organization. This chapter of the StWEA was organized through the combined efforts of Dr. Eileen Hilke, professor of education, Tabitha Kniest, an elementary education major with an emphasis on English, and Rob Pockat, a secondary English education major at Lakeland. This newly formed organization held its first meeting on Sept. 16. Election of officers was conducted at this meeting, and the results

are as follows: Tabitha Kniest and Rob Pockat—copresidents, Kelly Ochalek— president elect, Krysta Matter and Ashley Falkenthal—cosecretaries, and Bridget Wiersema—treasurer. One of the primary goals of the group is to get as many education majors as possible involved. “Our education program can be a little intimidating to even the hardiest of souls. We’re hoping this organization will help freshman and sophomores to become comfortable in the program while offering leadership opportunities to all students who are interested,” said Co-President Pockat. “To become a true and exceptional professional teacher, one must fully understand the field of education,” said Kniest. “This organization will complement Lakeland’s education department in developing highly qualified educators.” Topics to be addressed at meetings include literacy programs such as Response to Intervention, Six Trait Writing, Super 6 Comprehension Strategies, and many more. Also planned is a presentation by Ryan Holm, a recent Lakeland graduate and fourth grade teacher in Howards Grove. He will be discussing his life as a new teacher. On Sept. 27, StWEA held its first workshop for education students. The topic

of this event was classroom management and discipline and was open at no cost to all students pursuing a degree in education. Students from this organization will also be attending a professional development seminar in October. “These workshops and professional development opportunities will be an important part of StWEA because it will supplement what students are learning in the classroom,” said Pockat. Members will also have the opportunity to attend the Wisconsin Education Association Council’s 2008 convention to be held in October. At this event, students can attend various professional workshops while also speaking about the profession with educators currently in the field. “This will be a great opportunity for students to expand upon what they learn in their college course work and help them to grow into professional educators,” Kniest said. “Education students need to be proactive in their professional development, and this organization will definitely help students to do that.” Any student majoring in education can get more information by contacting either Tabitha Kniest (kniestt@lakeland.edu) or Dr. Eileen Hilke (hilkee@ lakeland.edu).

ATTENTION STUDENTS: THE MUSKIE GRILL HAS EXTENDED ITS FLEX MEAL HOURS. ON WEEKDAYS FLEX MEALS CAN BE USED FROM 12 P.M. UNTIL 9:30 P.M.

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

SAAC involved in alcohol awareness

M I R R O R STAFFLIST

By Nicole Holland Editor-in-Chief hollandn@lakeland.edu

Nicole Holland Editor-in-Chief

M

Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor

onday Oct. 6 the StudentAthlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) sponsored an alcohol awareness presentation with guest speaker, Rich Barnes. Student athletes were all informed of the speaker, and they were expected to attend. The native Texan spoke openly with the athletes and coaches present about alcohol abuse, but his approach was slightly different than most awareness speeches. “I like to talk about alcohol because I like to do alcohol. I will never ever tell a student not to drink,” Barns said. “It’s not that you drink, it’s how much you drink that is the problem.” Barns explained that the college students today are drinking less than in previous years. However, they consume way more than college students of the past. Binge drinking is becoming a huge problem. SAAC representative, Jake Frias, who introduced Barns said, “He didn’t present it in a preachy way. He presented it in a fun amusing kind of way that caught a lot of the students’ attention.” Barns also relayed a lot of information concerning warning signs of alcohol poisoning, consumption limitations, and how to drink responsibly. He did say that underage drinking can never be responsible, because committing an illegal act is irresponsible in itself.

ON SATURDAY AND SUNDAY FLEX MEALS MAY BE USED FROM 4:00 P.M. UNTIL 10:45 P.M.

John Sieglaff Fun House Editor Sandy Sternitzky Features Editor

Jake Frias Sports Editor Jessica Lillie A&E Editor John Sieglaff Fun House Editor Dawn Hayford John Sieglaff Copy Editor Sandy Sternitzky Dawn Hayford Online Editor Dawn Hayford Tiffany Kelley Liz Lange Becky Meyer Rob Pockat Brittney Sandberg John Wagner Brad Wilk Amanda Sagal Kristen VanGasse JD Botana III Staff Reporters Jeffery Torres Business Manager Nicole Holland Erik Hyrkas John Sieglaff Sandy Sternitzky Jake Frias Erin O'Kane Jessica Lillie Dawn Hayford Brad Wilk Layout Staff

Martha Schott

2007-2008 Spectrum year disks are here

Information to let people know what's going on goes here!! Information to let people know what's going on goes here!! Information to let people know what's going on goes here!! the added benefit of playing on the DVD player in your PC or on your television's DVD player.” The theme of the new disk he Lakeland College is "The Faces of Lakeland: A Spectrum is ready to Global Community." Special distribute the new 2007-2008 sections highlight Lakeland's DVD yeardisks to students international students, and interested faculty and including a section in which staff. the departing Malawi According to Martha education students say their Schott, Spectrum faculty goodbyes in video. adviser, the new disks are The new disks are more different from disks in past user friendly than previous years. disks, according to Schott. "Since 2001, when we "You can click on 'student made the switch from a life,' for example, and print yearbook to a digital see about 15 minutes of disk, we've been creating continuous slides and video." a browser-based CD with There are six sections very limited capacity for on the disk: student life, video," Schott said. "These organizations, sports, new DVDs offer 90 minutes convocations, faculty & staff, of higher quality video and and graduation. slide shows, and they have "The move to a digital

T

The Lakeland College

in brief

book in 2001 was a response to the increasing cost of print books as well as an effort to provide Lakeland students with a training ground for photo and video editing, important skills in today's careers in journalism and communication," Schott said. This year's Spectrum Editor-in-Chief, Carlos Millan, is already hard at work for this year's disk. "The transition has been a bit slow from stills to video, but I think the 2008-2009 year disk will be better than expected. We have great leadership this year from returning staff members like Yi-Yun Wang as well as from new ones like Carlea Liermann and Cathy Pesch," said Millan. Millan believes with this new found leadership,

this year's disk will include more interviews and a wider variety of coverage than the 2007-2008 disk. "Carlos Millan brings a tremendous amount of video editing experience to the year disk effort," said Schott. "He's moving the staff to a new level of creativity in selecting video stories and editing." Disks will be distributed free to full-time day students who were on campus last year, 2007-2008. Pick up your free copy of the Spectrum Year Movie in the Bossard during lunch hours this Friday and next week. Interested staff should email Schott at x1526 for a copy of the disk. Faculty members will receive their disks at the next faculty meeting.

Faculty Advisor The Lakeland College Mirror is printed by Wisconsin Newspress, Inc. The Mirror is published every two weeks during the first and second semesters while classes are in session and is distributed free of charge to students, faculty, and staff on the Lakeland College campus. The Mirror is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, University Wire, College Media Advisers, College Publisher, and Wisconsin Newspaper Association.

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R 2007 Best of the Midwest Best Overall Newspaper printed less than weekly at a four-year college 2005 Best of the Midwest Best Overall Newspaper printed less than weekly at a four-year college 2005 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award First Place in Region 6 for newspapers published not more than once per week


Opinions

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 3, October 9, 2008

3

Why Homecoming is awesomely distracting and professors should act accordingly By Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor hyrkase@lakeland.edu

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or decades, Lakeland College has had a week of events leading up to the Homecoming football game (volleyball also had a home game). Every year since, Pledging students have Musko struggled to balance their academics with the much more pertinent Homecoming team games and events (put together by LC-CAB and other student organizations). Seriously, what’s cooler: your team’s name on a trophy or an A in your capstone course? I was on “The Kamikazes” team this year. Though, my own Lakeland Mirror’s team, “Publication Power” (victors of last year’s Homecoming competition), have been calling me a traitor, I thought a group of roommates and friends who did not represent an organization would be a great way to shake things up in the traditional student-organization driven competition. We took second

under “The Sigmas” team I had a lot of work to do. I pennies for the penny war in and we had a great time had a test to study for and a the campus center. doing it, but it was no walk water color painting to turn The busy Homecoming in the park. in, so I ended up skipping schedule requires team With this competition class twice to use that time members to be ready at all usually come midterms and for Homecoming and makeup hours and many students large amounts of homework. work.” think the professors should It becomes a marathon of Sophomore Carlea be more understanding. time-management, and for Liermann, a member of “Your When asked whether or most, a strain on sleep and Ride to Entertainment” LC- not professors should lighten academic diligence as well CAB’s team, said, “I was the workload, sophomore as a cause for illness. This is really stressed out because Cathie Pesch, an LC-CAB why I believe there needs to I was involved in too many member who helped run the be more understanding from organizations, and it was competition said, “Heck yes professors when it comes to hard to figure out which one they should. All professors the loads of homework and to help out with. I wasn’t know that Homecoming is studying during the week. able to do homework until a busy week and everyone During the week, late, and I had a lot of loves to participate. I think I attended all but two professors should lay off on events. I had a terrible the workload for just one cold, a 15-source annotated week so we can have fun.” “I think professors bibliography to write, lots LaRue said, “I think should keep that in mind, beof other homework, and I professors should keep missed a directed readings cause events like these are aimed that in mind, because meeting as well as a class. events like these are to get everyone on campus Then, of course, I put off aimed to get everyone the articles I had to write for on campus involved.” involved.” this issue of the Mirror. I agree with these Nevertheless, I was not students on all fronts. Like the only one struggling. presentations to do.” many of the campus getJunior Alex Giese, During the week, togethers, Homecoming week a member of Zeta Chi’s students spent late nights is a community building Homecoming team, said, “To preparing themselves for Mr. competition people love to be be honest, I put my homework Muskie, painting their team involved in. And really, who on hold. In other words, I did banners, and working on doesn’t love getting egg yolk jack squat academically.” their choreography for the on their jeans during the egg Riki LaRue, a junior lip-syncing competition. Oh, toss or scraping their elbows and team captain of “The and don’t forget the students on the inflatables during the Fantasic Phi Delts” said, “It who gathered their funds obstacle course race? was kind of hard especially and trekked to the bank We might be here for since I was team captain. to get rolls of nickels and academics, but we are also

Encouragement to global freshmen Surviving freshmen year at Lakeland as an international student By Swe Swe Htay Staff Reporter htays@lakeland.edu

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akeland College may not look like a college with students from 24 countries and regions. This small but cozy college is indeed a temporary home for 119 international students. As the new academic year just started, it is exciting to see many new faces from all over the world. According to Patrick Liu, the international student advisor, 35 freshmen from 7 different countries have added to the diversity of Lakeland. These freshmen remind me of how my international friends and I tried to survive during our very first academic year in 2007. When my international friends and I first came to Lakeland, there were many unfamiliar things to deal with: adapting to the new environment, understanding the education system, figuring

out how line meals and flex meals work, booking the shuttle ahead of time, learning how blackboard works, taking advantages of the library service, and planning to find a place to work. Becoming familiar with these things was difficult. It took a while to get used to everything. However, during our freshmen year, in the process of learning and observing, we helped and supported each other.

“I bought distilled water from which I drank until someone told me it was water for ironing.” We shared our joys and pains. Sometimes we just laughed about the silly mistakes that we made. For instance, I bought distilled water from which I drank until someone told me it was water for ironing. Some of the people on

campus such as the Lakeland faculty and staff members are also willing to help us. Whenever we have questions, they have answers for us or at least they try to find one. Pratikshya Bhandari, a sophomore from Nepal said, “Being away from home is hard but faculty and staff members have helped us in every possible way from inviting us over to their houses for dinner to giving us time outside of classes. They made it easy for us to adjust in our new lives.” As time passes, we become more comfortable at Lakeland. I believe our efforts pay off within this one year time frame. Our first year is successfully over. We made it. In addition, we have reached the point that we are really part of the Lakeland community. We are contributing significantly to this campus. We work actively in many departments of Lakeland.

Some of the international students are computer lab attendants, dish room attendants, library assistants, tutors, RAs (resident assistants). We are almost everywhere! We not only achieved some of our academic goals, but we also became part of Lakeland and extended our social network within our freshman year. Because of our perseverance, initiative, and willingness to learn, we made an excellent beginning. I wish all of you the best of luck for the rest of your journey. For now, I give high fives. Good job, friends! If you are one of the new international students, don’t stress out and don’t worry too much. There are some international students who experienced the same things, but finally succeed. At the end of this year, you will be amazed to find out that you have successfully survived your freshman year!

here to support the home team. However, some of those interviewed still see it from the professors’ perspectives. “I think professors should understand to a point, but it’s our duty to put academics first,” said Liermann. Giese said, “I don’t think it’s fair to have to adjust your schedule [as a professor] to the Homecoming schedule, though it would be pretty sweet if they did.” Though I agree it’s difficult to arrange courses around a Homecoming week so close to midterms, it’s equally hard for students to participate when they are being hit with the books. As Lakeland students, we are responsible for our own academics. Nevertheless, I think we should be granted a little lee-way to support our athletic teams and bring our community even closer together. A little competition never hurt anyone (though, we’re all pretty sore from that obstacle course). Homecoming brings out more passion from students than any other event on this campus. If you don’t believe me, check out my column last year titled “Homecoming claws,” at www.lakelandmirror.com. Pledge Musko.

editorials The Mirror’s staff editorial topics are agreed upon by the entire staff. The editorial board collaborates ideas and writes the editorials. All individual columns, cartoons, and letters are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial staff or The Mirror’s beliefs, or that of Lakeland’s administration, its faculty, or its student body.

LetterPolicy Lakeland’s students, faculty, and staff are welcomed to write letters to the editor to express their opinions on public issues or in response to editorials printed in The Mirror. Letters can be typed or handwritten and should be limited to 700 words. Letters should be signed by the author, although the author’s name can be withheld if he/she chooses. The Mirror reserves the right to edit all submissions for clarity and length and will be printed as space allows. They may be held for publication at a later date. mail: Lakeland College 607 P.O. Box 359 Sheboygan, WI 53082-0359 email: lakelandmirror@yahoo.com fax: (920) 565-1344 Phone: (920) 565-1316


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Opinions

Issue 3 October 9, 2008

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

PHOTOOPINION

What issue(s) is/are important to you in choosing a presidential candidate this November?

Mike Pionke Junior Undecided “Healthcare."

Kelly Broeren Senior Marketing

“Education is very important. Healthcare is also very important.”

Hannah Lane Junior Spanish

Travis Konz Senior Resort Management

“Women’s rights.”

“Healthcare and taxes.”

Jennifer Dunning Freshman Psychology

“Minimum wage.”

Colin Campbell Sophomore Accounting

Jason Polcyn Sophomore History Education

“Foreign oil and drilling off-shore.”

“I don’t know because I’m not voting.”

Chris Weber Freshman Undecided

Ryan Trieloff Sophomore Marketing

“How they are going to help out the middle class."

“The war in Iraq is a big issue for me.”

Seiji Kumon Senior Business Management

Brianna Ecxford Freshman Psychology

“Environment, increase in hybrid cars.”

“Gas prices, tax cuts, and college funding.”

Anna Schumacher Sophomore Psychology

“Abortion. I am prolife.”

Tinashe Ota Junior Accounting

Bridget Johnston Senior Criminal Justice

“Economics and job availability and getting out of the recession and universal healthcare."

“I look at the war factors because my fiancé is going over to Iraq.”

Heather DiDonato Junior International Business

“Healthcare, education, economic policy, and gay rights. I want a politician who will follow through with their promises. Because God knows we don’t need another Bush.”

Jeff Mallegni Senior Business Administration “Honesty and experience, and I want less taxes and less governmental intervention."


The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

ad

Issue 3, October 9, 2008

BIG BUCKS. BIG MACHINES. AND YOU’RE THE DRIVER.

Envision a career in newspapers. See your adviser. Visit www.wnanews.com Or call 800.261.4242

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Features Alumni Now

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 3, October 9, 2008

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2008 Lakeland College graduate, Dino Mujakovic, becomes an American citizen and is now a teacher at Oak Creek West Middle School

Once a student, now a teacher Above: Dino presents at the Best of the Midwest newspaper convention in Minneapolis in 2007.

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ino Mujakovic, Lakeland College alum, is now a German teacher at Oak Creek West Middle School. He started that position in late Aug. 2008. Raised in Doboj, Bosnia, Dino reflects on what life was like before he moved to America. “[Doboj] is a medium-sized city, kind of in the center of the country,” he said. “It was, and still is, based on a lot of farming and factory work.” Dino said that his mother was a stay-at-home mom while his dad worked in a factory for a while and traded money (currency exchange) as well. “The trading money on the side was more of a money maker than his work in the factory,” he said. When they lived in Bosnia both of Dino’s parents worked in Germany as well. “They would switch with one working for three months and then the other one,” he said. “In a way, Grams raised me the most.” In April 1992, Dino, his mom, and grandparents moved to Munich, Germany. A war had broken out between Serbia and Bosnia, because Bosnia wanted separation from Yugoslavia. Dino’s dad had to stay to fight in the army. “He joined us in Germany within a few months [due to a wound],” Dino said.

“He is also the kind of father and husband who could not handle his family being in a foreign country and was constantly worried.” They stayed in Germany until 1998, before they moved back to Bosnia. “The German government decided that it was a safe country to go back to,” Dino said. “So many Bosnians were kicked out of Germany and had to go back. My mom was worried that I would get caught up in drugs and bad friends,” Dino said. “So we moved back to Bosnia instead of trying to come straight to America.” Bosnia’s economic situation wasn’t the greatest. After two years, Dino, his parents, and grandparents moved to Sheboygan, Wis. “My aunt had actually moved in 1999 and once she was there for a year, she was able to send us paperwork to try to come to America,” he said. “Luckily, this all happened before 9/11.” The transition from Europe to America was not easy for Dino. He said it was like a double-edged sword because he knew he could have a future in America, but he left everything he knew and loved behind. Dino explained some of the many differences between

Europe and America, such as transportation and being open-minded. “Europe is way more open sexually,” he said. “There are not too many topics that are taboo and it shows in social situations as well as in the media. They know that sex and relationships are out there and what the consequences are. The youth is not made to feel guilty if they decide to do something. “Transportation is different, too,” Dino said. “Cars are not the main way of transportation and getting from one place to another is rather quickly done with public transportations, such as the bus, subway, or train. “Life in Europe wasn’t so fast-paced either,” he explained. “People took their time, spent more time together, and seemed to enjoy life more.” The culture shock had a major effect on Dino when he came to America. “We were lectured on it, but I didn’t take it seriously,” he said. “Sadly, I did experience it, and it led to a three month depression and a 60 pound weight gain. But my main goal was to learn English, as I had no major prior knowledge about it.” Dino was placed in Sheboygan’s South High’s English Language Learner (ELL)

By Sandy Sternitzky

Features Editor sternitzkys@lakeland.edu

department and learned the language quickly. After about three months, he was finally able to talk comfortably with other students at school. Over a year passed before Dino got over his culture shock and he became accustomed to practically everything in America. “I had also lost most of my weight and was back to normal,” he said. In a way, Dino probably feels a little guilty about living in America, “My parents would have never left Bosnia if it wasn’t for me. They gave up everything they knew and a life that was familiar and no matter how bad the situations were, it was still a life surrounded by relatives and comfort. No matter how messed up Bosnia was, it is still their country with their family there. It was and is very hard for my mom as almost all of her family is still there. “My dad was lucky since my aunt (his sister) and his parents, my grandparents, also moved over here with us. I know and respect everything they have done and to this day I see them wishing they were not living here but they knew they had to do what had to be done. Since they did such a major sacrifice for me I tried my best to show them it was

PHOTOS PORPERTY OF LAKELAND COLLEGE

worth it. After eight years they are pretty much used to it all now, just as I am as well.” When Dino graduated from Sheboygan South High School, he attended Lakeland College with German and Secondary Education as his majors. He had English as a Second Language (ESL) as his minor, but decided to drop it when he was student teaching. After graduating in May 2008 with his Bachelor’s Degree, Dino got a job at Oak Creek West Middle School and is enjoying it immensely. “Teaching at Oak Creek has been a blessing in a way,” he said. “It’s beyond busy, but it showed me that I did pick the right career choice. Even though there are some bad days, I still look forward to my job on a daily basis and enjoy it. Bad days will happen at any job.” Other than that, Dino said that he is as “Americanized” as one can be. He said he does the same things as others and has the same issues anyone else in America has. Besides graduating and becoming a teacher this year, Dino also became an American citizen. “I place major value on the passport and being able to vote, which I intend to do come November,” he said.


Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 3, October 9, 2008

7

Sandy’s Saucy Soup

By Sandy Sternitzky

Features Editor sternitzkys@lakeland.edu

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his week I set my sights on a restaurant that everyone knows and loves: Ponderosa Steak House. My parents, several of my sorority sisters, and I decided to go to Ponderosa after watching the Lakeland football team beat Rockford College. This restaurant has seafood and a buffet as well as steak. We didn’t have to worry about not having anywhere to sit because this restaurant has a lot of sitting room, probably about 150 seats or so. It was also before the dinner rush. Besides having the buffet, I ordered grilled shrimp ythat came with a baked poltato. This shrimp was at my table before I could eat my mfirst plate of food consisting of ,a nice sized salad. Talk about efast service! y The 14 shrimp came out eon two wooden skewers and -the potato on one end of the tplate. There was a sliced slemon and a condiment cup filled with melted butter that yI assumed was for the shrimp. k l . s e t k n d o d n

SANDY STERNITZKY/STERNITZKYS@LAKELAND.EDU

The shrimp was burnt in so many places that it didn’t taste the way it should. I had to dip them in the melted butter to make it palatable. The potato was, regrettably, tasteless. I added sour cream, butter, and cheese to it, and it was still bland. It was also very dry because it probably was cooked too long. Luckily, the salad made up for it somewhat. Consisting of lettuce, ham, peas, cheese, egg, carrots, cucumbers, and

d ” s d e

ranch dressing, enjoying the subtle taste of the salad was highly anticipated, yet it did not happen. The lettuce itself was a bit soggy and the ranch dressing was a bit off kilter. Hoping the salad was just a fluke, a plate of mashed potatoes with beef gravy, chicken nuggets, and pizza would put the salad in the back of my mind. Once again, this did not happen. The gravy was put on the potatoes to add flavor. Unfor-

SANDY STERNITZKY/STERNITZKYS@LAKELAND.EDU

d , g o

SANDY STERNITZKY/STERNITZKYS@LAKELAND.EDU

tunately, it was too much flavor. It’s not because there was a lot of gravy; it was because it was salty, and it suppressed the beef flavor of the gravy and even the natural taste of the potatoes. As much as I like chicken, I was let down with the nuggets. There was no happymedium with the spices used in the pre-made (and probably frozen) “crispy” chicken nuggets. Some had too much spice; some didn’t have enough spice at all. It created a fight among the taste buds on my tongue. Thinking the pizza would be another disappointment, I prepared my taste buds for a tiny piece that wouldn’t satisfy one’s appetite, even on an almost full stomach. I was a little stunned that it was pretty decent. The crust wasn’t thin, crispy, and a tad burnt like many places that serve quick and easy pizzas. It was actually chewy, and the simple taste of the cheese, sauce,

and the pepperoni was good. If only the pizza was eaten when the meal first started, I would have been saved from an unsatisfying meal. To save myself from unsatisfying desserts, I decided to skip the treat bar at the buffet. I’ve had bad experiences with the desserts in the past. The ice cream has no flavor, the cakes are usually dry, and the pudding doesn’t really taste like pudding. Even though the food was rather frustrating, the waitress’ prompt and accurate service was delivered with a smile. Everyone took advantage of the free refills, keeping the waitress busy and not once did she falter. Although Ponderosa is a famous franchise, I do not wish to return to the Sheboygan location for a meal anytime in the near future. Hopefully, my next food foray will not disappoint my taste buds.


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Issue 3, October 9, 2008

Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Family member of LC faculty is on

Jessica Lambrecht’s sister participates in this season’s reality show By Jennifer Duenk Staff Reporter duenkj@lakeland.edu

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or those of you who don’t know, Jessica Lambrecht has been working at Lakeland for over a year in Career Services. Her only sister, Jacquie Berg, was picked to be on the reality show “Survivor Gabon - Earth’s Last Eden.” The first episode aired Thurs., Sept. 25. “Survivor” is on its seventeenth season. The recent season was taped in Gabon during the summer over a thirty-nine day time span. Gabon is a coastal country in central west Africa. Jacquie Berg is 26. She is single, blonde, tall, and an athletically built woman who works in medical device sales. “She (Jacquie) likes adventures, living on the wild side and doing things differently, so this (involvement with this Survivor) didn’t really surprise me.” Jessica said. From near the middle of June until early August, Jacquie could have no contact with anyone from the outside world, including her

family. Before this amazing experience Jacquie was already well versed in travel. Though she had never been to Gabon, before she has studied abroad in Australia and visited Italy and Mexico, as well as covering a good portion of the U.S. When asked if Jessica had ever traveled along with her sister she said, “No, I can’t say I’ve traveled very much out of the country. My sister is the thrill seeker of the family. I don’t think I’ll be going on any wild adventures lately, unless you consider motherhood an adventure.” Jessica is due to have her first child in December. When asked if she was a fan of the show Jessica said, “I’m definitely watching it this year because of Jacquie, but I haven’t in the past, except for maybe a half of an episode when the first season started. I haven’t missed a show yet, but it all depends on my work schedule. I don’t think she (Jacquie) had watched it much either.” Jessica and her family were not surprised to find out that Jacquie had sent in

an audition tape for Survivor. Jacquie is very outgoing, was involved in athletics every season when she was in school, has lots of friends, and has always been photogenic. Jacquie sent in an audition tape in March. A week-long interview took place during April. After the interview Jacquie and all of her family had to sign a confidentiality agreement stating that they would not divulge any of the information about the show until after the season had aired. Jacquie even had to submit different outfits of clothing for the television show’s approval. Throughout the entire process, Jacquie did not know she was going to be picked. She was finally notified only a few days prior to the taping in Gabon. After the notification Jacquie told her family that she would not be able to have any contact with them until the show wrapped up and off she went. To catch Jacquie in action, check out the next episode of “Survivor: The Last Eden” on Thurs., Oct. 9.

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WWW.CBS.COM/PRIMETIME/SURVIVOR

Dan Eck is not just a suit Senior Vice President has ties with art and history By JD Botana III

Staff Reporter botanajd3@lakeland.edu

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irst impressions would not suggest that Dan Eck is trained as an Egyptologist, nor that he’s a connoisseur of meteorites and dinosaur bones. He sat in the coffee shop in business attire, looking very much like a “suit,” enjoying the buzz of activity from the more casually dressed students. Dan’s career as a museum attorney has taken him in unusual directions. However, it is clear Dan’s path has lead him, the new senior vice president for administration, to a place where he can use his plethora of talents, a place where he can feel “like I’m supporting something that is meaningful to our experience here.” Born in a small town in Min. with a population not much larger than Lakeland College, Dan began to follow his dream: “I wanted to see the world.” After high school Dan’s education began in Beloit College, a two-and-a-half hour drive Southwest of Lakeland. He worked in the school’s museum which correlated with

his major, anthropology. While he was in high school, he wrote a senior thesis on how to translate hieroglyphics. While at Beloit College he had an opportunity to spend a semester in Cairo, Egypt. Dan’s dream of being an Egyptologist seemed to be within his grasp. Unfortunately, his ambitions for being an archeologist were never fully explored. He was not able to experience a dig since at this time it was hard for foreigners to gain access. Instead “[I] did a lot of wandering around.” “I think that every student should have the opportunity to go overseas…it totally changes your perspective about the world.” Not sure of what to do with his B.A. in anthropology or his minor studies in museum studies he went to Bloomington, Indiana where he studied law. “Being a lawyer you get pushed head first into how the business world works….After a sufficient time of being beat down by that system, I decided to go back to the non-profit world.” He ventured back to the Midwest to work as a non-

profit lawyer for the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois. “It was a great job. I was helping buy and sell meteorites, licensing reproductions of dinosaur bones, and helping scientists set up partnerships with foreign institutions to do archeological digs in Peru or China. Places like that.” Slowly the hour-and-ahalf commute to work began to wear on Dan. He wanted to live in a community where he did not have to spend three hours of his day on the train. Dan’s next move brought him to Sheboygan, specifically to the John Michael Kohler Art Center, where he became the deputy director for administration. “It was nice to get out of Chicago. I love Chicago, but we had kids,” Dan said. “It is hard to live downtown Chicago where all the fun stuff happens if you have young children.” Dan and his family left Sheboygan for a short time. He went to work at Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Georgia. It is the largest art and design school in the United States. He and his wife wanted

to move back to Sheboygan where there are “good schools and good friends.” When they returned he did not have a job but they moved back because, “I really liked the way it feels here.” An opportunity arose for him to work at Lakeland and having worked at Savannah, as director of development and external relations, he was “really excited.” Dan’s job at Lakeland began part time as special assistant for Dr. Gould where he began researching potential programs for both the adult program, Kellet, and the day program of Lakeland. His job entailed, “scanning the horizon for opportunities that are appropriate for the college, that have the level of quality that is acceptable for the college.” One such program, he said, is the Alternative Teacher Certification Program. This program was already in the works when he got here by Dr. Khodavandi. With the Milwaukee public schools severely understaffed, he said, Lakeland is providing a way to assist. With his recent change in ti-

tle, senior vice president for administration, his job still entails “scanning the horizon” but also the behind the scenes financial workings of the college. On the weekends he spends his time working the financial side of a non-profit organization called M12. One of their projects involves fresh water distribu-B tion in Haiti. “Clean water isS a serious problem in this coun-d try,” he explains. “Our hope is to use the art component to show there are other ways to make a difference too.” Their ambition is to create works of art “primarily that have some sort of function, not just a piece of bronze.” M12 is not sure if this will cause the spark they desire but something has to be tried. “That is another eye opener; Haiti just has a real strange beauty to it. It does two things: It shows you how much suffering there is in this world, but it also shows you how tough and resilient people are.” Dan, a man dedicated to selflessly bettering the world, is a welcome addition to Lakeland’s Campus.


Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 3, October 9, 2008

9

Alumna Lena Yurs returns to LC to lecture Graduate chemistry student talks about research opportunities and grad school

By Nicole Holland

Editor-In-Chief hollandn@lakeland.edu

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ena Yurs is a Lakeland College alumna and a third year physical chemistry graduate student at UWMadison. On Monday, Oct. 6, Lena came back to Lakeland to talk to undergraduate students about both the work she has accomplished in graduate school thus far, and why graduate school may be an option for some current Lakeland undergrads. Lena was one of two guests asked to come speak to the principles of chemistry I and the quantum chemistry classes. The lecture during the general chemistry course was open not only to students from the “organic” or “analytical” chemistry classes but to the Lakeland community. The turnout made it evident that this opportunity was not overlooked. One of the most accommodating rooms in the Lucius P. Chase Center building for the natural sciences was packed with students and professors, eager to hear what Lena had to say. Lena’s presentation, entitled “Photovoltaic Devices and Materials,” was a brief overview of what she has been researching the past few years at UW-Madison under the John C. Wright group. “Energy consumption is increasing,” said Lena. “And it is projected to increase further.” She proceeded to talk

about renewable energy sources, with a focus on solar energy. “If you do the calculation, there is enough energy shining on the earth, in one hour, to power the whole planet for a year. That’s how much is here for us to use, but we don’t know how to harness that.” She went on to describe the process of photosynthesis. “There is a part we don’t understand once you get inside these photosynthetic complexes, the molecules that actually take the light and turn it into useable energy and storage,” she said. “There is research being done right now on these photosynthetic complexes to try to understand the mechanism and the how the plants are able to do it,” Lena said. “The thought is if we can understand how plants are able to accomplish this maybe we can mimic what they do.” Although the presentation of her research did not inspire every person in the room, half of the attendees were science majors. Some students really became intrigued by Lena’s research. “I think that she is in a similar field that I want to go into, and I learned a lot about her research and her interests,” said sophomore Amber Koenig. “I think it was a very good opportunity because you got to hear a student’s perspective more-so than reading about it or hearing different teachers’ perspective. And you got to learn the struggles

they had and what they liked about it. And you got the more real picture of it.” After Lena lectured about her research, she gave insights about her graduate school experience. She made it evident that there were real world applications for chemists in the academic scene, industry, and natural laboratories. Her calling is academia. Lena has had the opportunity to teach undergraduate chemistry classes as a teacher’s assistant. While she decided to primarily focus on research in graduate school, she would like to become a college chemistry professor. She talked about aspects she believes, in retrospect, encompass a good candidate for graduate school. She mentioned how she used to think that “smart,” was a qualifying factor, but pointed out that a hard-working thinker will do just fine. Freshman biochemistry major Tarra Bourgeois said, “I was interested in graduate school, but I didn’t really know what I want to go for. So it helped me open my eyes, because she said really you don’t have to know until your senior year. You don’t have to focus on it all the way through [undergrad].” After the forty-five minute presentation, predominate science majors from the audience gathered upstairs to have a complementary taco bar lunch with the guest speaker. While the “cinnamon twists” and free salsa may

seem like the attention getter, the spotlight certainly remained on Lena. She was kind enough to speak with professors and students. She explained how she did stress out the first year of graduate school. “It actually happened because I didn’t get into any theory research groups. They tell you to hone in on a few research groups that you like,” she said. “Then not until Nov. 1 can you say ‘I want to join your group,’ and the research advisors can’t say ‘I would like you to join my group’ until Nov. 1. “I remember I sent emails and told the theory faculty, one of them in particular, that ‘he was my first choice.’ There were two of us vying for this position,” said Lena. “He e-mailed me, and said ‘well I gave it to this other candidate. I’m really sorry if I had two available spots I would take both of you.’ I found out from the other grad students in the group it was because she asked more questions than I did.” After finding out that her second research group choice had also already taken somebody, she really felt the stress. “‘What do I do? I don’t have anywhere to go,’ and that was sort of the day that I thought, for like twenty minutes, I was going to quit,” she said. However, she did not give up her pursuit. She e-mailed an experimental research

NICOLE HOLLAND/HOLLANDN@LAKELAND.EDU

group professor. “John Wright is my advisor; he emailed me back ‘I love theory experiments too! Let’s talk,’” she explained in a relieved tone. “The second year was also stressful but I was more used to it. I had a tougher skin because of that first year. And this year I can say I love it, it’s great. The coursework is done, and I can really focus on research and teaching a little bit. I’m no longer jumping through hoops,” she said. After finding a place to belong, Lena didn’t sugar coat the stress she was under, but that was definitely not her focus. She sat around a table with undergraduates asking questions about their plans for the future. She let them know they should ask a lot of questions, and the future chemistry professor will sure be ready to explain the answers.

Majid Hosseini, new professor at LC Iran native is named an assistant professor of mathematics

By Jennifer Duenk

Staff Reporter duenkj@lakeland.edu

M

ajid Hosseini is Lakeland’s new assistant professor of mathematics. He is so new here that his name is not even in the new Lakeland faculty directory. But here’s your chance to find out all about him. Hosseini is a mathematician who says he is very willing to help his students at any time. This fact proved to be true from his friendly greeting and his pleasant demeanor when interviewed. Hosseini was born and raised in Iran. He decided to come to the United States and attend Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. He earned his master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering. Growing up, and even

more so as an adult, Hosseini’s favorite subject has always been mathematics. “I have always been interested in doing and talking about math with different kinds of people,” Hosseini said. Since the early age of fifteen, his appreciation for math has exponentially increased. “What appealed to me most about mathematics was its pure logic. There are no exceptions. If you say something in math, it is always true,” Hosseini said. He also went on to explain that the creative process of math was fun as well. Hosseini first heard about Lakeland College when he read an ad in “The Chronicle” and he decided to come for an interview. “I really enjoyed the people I met when I first came here. I thought that they were very friendly, and they take

pride in their jobs. I also really like how this college is so centered around its students. As soon as I finished my interview I said to myself, that this was the place I would like to work,” he said. He said it was good to be back in the Midwest of the

LAKELAND WEB SITE

United States again. When asked what his teaching philosophy was, Hosseini carefully chose his words. He began to explain how his views on teaching are difficult to summarize in only a few sentences. He decided to quote his favorite “math hero,” George Polya: “If you want to learn how to swim, you have to jump into the water.” He then went on to explain that an active learner in his classroom will learn more than a passive student. “You learn by doing things. Mistakes are always going to happen no matter who you are, but it’s how you handle them that is what makes you who you are. You have to learn from and build upon the mistakes that you have made,” Hosseini said. He prefers students to be engaged in the classroom ac-

tivities rather than just being silent observers. Hosseini’s favorite hobbies include cooking and hiking, though he will admit to not having the chance to do the latter. He has been too busy with unpacking and getting settled in to worry about the hiking trails around here, though he is looking forward to it. On the subject of cooking he says, “I like the outcome and the process of cooking, combining different things together to make something different. You have the chance to create something new, that’s the interesting part. It’s like applied chemistry in the kitchen.” Hosseini has only been here a month and a half but he says that students should feel free to come by his office anytime in Chase 208.


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Issue 3, October 9, 2008

Homecoming 2008

The Lakeland College

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

M I R R O R

Homecoming 2008

“Field of Dreams” at Lakeland By Becky Meyer Staff Reporter meyerr@lakeland.edu

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omecoming took place at Lakeland this past week, and coordinators were pleased with the turnout for the events. The Field of Dreams themed Homecoming week began on Monday with the penny wars and window painting. A caricature artist was on campus, and teams competed in relay races. On Tuesday, teams competed in games including a hay bale toss in front of the campus center. From 9-11 p.m. the band 32 Below performed in the tent near the campus center.

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY THE SPECTRUM

“The concert was a huge success,” LC-CAB president Joy Harvell said. On Wednesday, the Homecoming nominees participated in the Farmer Fashion Show in Bossard, and a trivia competition was held afterwards for the Homecoming teams. On Thursday, team games were held in front of the campus center. At 8:30 p.m. Mr. Muskie was held in the Bradley building and comedian Richie Holliday hosted the event. Senior Andre Glass took the coveted crown this year.

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY THE SPECTRUM

Muskies get first win of season Despite slow second half, football team holds on for the victory By Jacob Frias Sports Editor

“Thanks to the dance team, Mr. Muskie went very well. It seemed to be very well-received,” Kaye Martin, director of student activities, said.

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY THE SPECTRUM

friasj@lakeland.edu

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oming into Sunday’s game against Rockford, the Muskies were more than ready to crash shoulder pads with someone after being talked down by their opponent earlier in the week in interviews.

On Friday, teams competed in an inflatable obstacle course.

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY THE SPECTRUM

On the offensive side of the ball, things started to click early as the Muskies led the Regents 33-6 at half time. “[The offense] had a breakout game in the first half,” said head coach Kevin Doherty.

Sophomores Ben Lombardi and Jeremy Williams both led the way in the rushing category behind the young offensive line, with Lombardi rushing for 108 yards on 12 carries and Williams rushing for 75 yards on 19 carries.

Lombardi also rushed for a touchdown as well. “It was the best [the offensive line] looked collectively all year,” said Doherty. Behind center, sophomore quarterback Jake Dworak was seeking out his second

Top left: The receiving core was key in the Muskies 33-28 win over Rockford.

Bottom left: Ben Lombardi sweeps to the outside for extra yardage.

Top: Students particapated in many activities during the Homecoming week.

Middle left: Studemts Erik Hyrkas and Samantha Vanden Plas enjoying the Homecoming game.

Below: ‘The Return of the Orange Rubber Balls’ performing at the pep rally.

Right: Brent Woodruff looks to lead block for running back Jeremy Williams

successful start in as many games. Dworak ended the day going 11 for 19 in pass completions for 161 yards and four touchdown passes. “He played a great first half,” Doherty said. Wide out Jacob Heinemeyer

Issue 3, October 9, 2008 and fullback Brent Woodruff each caught one touchdown pass each from Dworak, and wide out Matt Pawlyk snagged two from the air himself, as the Muskie offense seemed to be clicking going into the half. On the defensive side of the ball, the ‘soft front seven’ according to Rockford’s beliefs earlier in the week showed no mercy as they alone accounted for 10 tackles for a loss. Leading the whole ‘dark side’ in tackles was defensive back Justine Medard who had 12 total tackles and one interception. The defensive line was also in a league of its own in the first half with Gary Clark and Kellen Grott both collecting a sack each along with Josh Gordon, Mike Nerat, and Matt Stuebs who all contributed in a strong effort as well. According to Doherty, Gary Clark stood out the most on the defensive line, playing his best game so far this season in Doherty’s eyes. “[The defense] did a good job containing Rockford to minimal gains,” said Doherty. Other main contributors to the defense were John Wagner, who had nine tackles and one sack, Stephan Johnson, who had seven tackles and a sack, and Tony

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Faller, who had two interceptions. Paul Smith also made a huge contribution with a blocked punt in the 3rd quarter. Going into half time with a 27 point lead, the Muskies were very confident, even though there was yet another half to be played. “[The team] was a little complacent,” said Doherty. Coming out of the locker room, the Regents had a no quit attitude as they scored 22 unanswered points in the second half. Fumbles in the red zone and an interception thrown by Dworak also aided to the Regents big comeback. “We didn’t close the door, and we gave them something to play for,” said Doherty. Despite the big comeback on Rockford’s side, Lakeland’s defense buckled down and bent instead of breaking. Defensive back, Keith Woodson recovered a Regent onside kick late in the 4th quarter to stop the bleeding and assure the Muskies of a 33-28 win. “We need to learn how to finish games,” said Doherty. Lakeland will go on the road for their next game as they play Wisconsin Lutheran, who is currently sitting at a 2-2 record and coming off a big conference road win.

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY THE SPECTRUM

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY THE SPECTRUM


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A&E

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 3, October 9, 2008

MEDIAREVIEWS

“Ghost Town” by David Kopp Small comedy brings popular British actor to life By Jessica Lillie A&E Editor lilliej@lakeland.edu

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irected by David Koepp, “Ghost Town” is a light comedy that has the ability to be both clever and clean, which has become a sad rarity in American comedies. Although not the funniest of comedies, “Ghost Town” accomplishes a level of wit that is commendable. “Ghost Town” tells the story of dentist Bertram Pincus (Ricky Gervais) and his near-death experience during a routine medical procedure which lends him the ability to see ghosts. All the ghosts want something from Bertram, a nightmare for this obscenely anti-social dentist. Fortunately, supernatural Frank (Greg Kinnear) promises Bertram that he

will make all the ghosts go away if Bertram will split up Frank’s previous wife, Gwen (Tea Leoni) and her new fiancé. Now all Bertram has to do is somehow get Gwen to ditch her fiancé and fall for him – a real challenge for this unfriendly dentist. In the meantime, Bertram falls for her and has to pick up the slack for problems that Frank left behind. The film’s cast is full of delightful surprises, including Aasif Mandvi of the Daily Show playing a dentist in Bertram’s office and Kristen Wiig of Saturday Night Live as a ditzy, spray-tanned surgeon. However, it is truly Gervais who steals the show. He has the uncanny ability to turn a nasty character like Bertram Pincus into a likeable guy while maintaining a realistic feel (or as real as one can be in

httpwww.realmovienews.composters88400

a film where ghosts are main players). Koepp is not known for comedies, and although he has told ghost stories before (think “Stir of Echoes”), comedy has never played a part in his mostly dramatic action films. These include screenwriting for blockbusters like “Spider Man,” “Jurassic Park,” and more recently, “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.” Koepp has moved from his element, but he shows no sign of discomfort in this new genre. He has managed to create a strong comedy without resorting to sex jokes or drunken frat parties – a real feat in the majority of American comedic films. Koepp also takes a risk with Bertram, an unlikeable character who hates people and seems to have no social skills. One could imagine plenty of actors taking his place, but the ability of Gervias to make us sympathetic towards Bertram is what makes him unique and fun to watch. Moreover, the dialogue given to Gervais is perfectly timed, and when we least like Bertram, the character throws out a line to draw us back in. The film accomplishes a sort of sweet, mild romanticism suggestive of older black-and-white romance films. And although it is not a screenplay full of big laughs, each witty comment deserves a smile and a bigger laugh here and there, all of which are well-earned and worth waiting for. By creating Bertram Pincus, Koepp invented a character that is fun to watch, great to laugh at, and, in the end, worth redemption. And that is more than most comedic actors can ask for. Left: Bertram Pincus, the unfriendly dentist, in “Ghost Town”

Myspace music reviews

MYSPACE LINK: www.myspace.com/plutoniates NUMBER OF PLAYS: 7,665 (as of October 5) SOUNDS LIKE:

REM, Stone Temple Pilots, Alice in Chains

LABEL: None iTUNES? : No – Free downloads available By Jessica Lillie A&E Editor lilliej@lakeland.edu

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lutoniates are a rockin’ band with some chill tunes, fresh out of the Midwest and ready for a galactic takeover. Fun music, a simple yet catchy layout, and three strong tracks make this band one to watch. The best part? They’re centered in nearby Sheboygan and actually have a Lakeland alumnus as a member. Not quite pop and not quite rock, the Plutoniates have tracks that seem to flow from sound to sound rather than from verse to chorus and vice versa. This produces a somewhat dreamy sound, which is multiplied by lead singer Ross’s smoky and sometimes unintelligible voice. The band makes great use of their electric/acoustic mix tracks, nearly pulling the electric sound clear of the purpose an electric guitar generally has. This shift creates riffs that are both strange and rhythmic, sliding from noise to noise with ease. Listeners will find themselves singing along to the tracks, even if sometimes the words aren’t quite clear. The layout of the page is simple and clean, with a heading photo on top clearly reflecting their Midwest roots with plowed fields and their

mascot, the grinning green alien Shavek, as a pseudo crop circle in the dirt. The rest of the page is a light brown with no details in the background, creating an earthy tone. Their picture section has photos of shows and performances, as well as several band posters. Some photos are plain but most are visually interesting. Many show band members Jason, Ross, Ryan, and Steve performing or even recording their tracks, giving an interesting behind-the-scenes look at the Plutoniates. Plutoniates also have a list of upcoming shows on their page, and many of them are local (The Spot on Oct. 16 and the Paradigm Coffee House on Oct. 19, to name a few). Others that aren’t in Sheboygan are nearby, including one show in Elkhart Lake. The band members are all Wisconsin based. Steve of Hingham, Wisconsin, went to school for art in Milwaukee and now works as a tattoo artist at SKIN tattoo parlor. Drummer Ryan of Sheboygan has played for a multitude of bands and currently works in Kohler. If you stop by their page and like their music, this band will be easy to see live and appreciate their sounds in person. Otherwise, you might be able to catch Ross on campus, where he sometimes works for Admissions.


a&e

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 3, October 9, 2008

13

CAMPUSREVIEWS Jabali Afrika brings international flair Dance group performs with a flash of color, pride, and humor at Lakeland By Brittney Sandberg Staff Reporter sandbergb@lakeland.edu

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mere 13 days ago, Jabali Afrika graced the stage of the Bradley Building. Hailing from Kenya, this combination song-and-dance group wowed the audience with its African rhythms and footwork. In Kenya’s national language Kiswahili, “Jabali” means “rock,” and while that name was chosen simply because the original group

would meet on a large rock to discuss music, it fits with how the performers rocked that Friday night. Audience participation was not only expected, but demanded. Joseck Asikoye taught the audience how to sing an African love song about Lakeland’s “fwoine” (fine) ladies. Victor Elolo, also known as “Belly Man,” led separate male and female groups of belly dancers, where the girls and guys were meant

to compete as best dancers. The male group included one show stealing little boy who looked to be about five or six years old. Justo Otongo Asikoye vaulted into the audience to pull sophomore Alyssa Hoehne from her seat. “When I saw him leaping off the stage, I was terrified because I can’t dance, so being forced to dance in front of everyone was a nightmare,” said Hoehne. “Overall though, I had fun. It

definitely brought me out of my comfort zone.” The fourth performer, Dumisizwe Vuyo Bhembe, kept beat on several different instruments throughout the night while the audience clapped along. All the performers were very talented, each with his own special style of music and humor. “They were really funny,” says Erin O’Kane, sophomore. “[They were] making jokes…

one guy was really funny, all he did was dance [and] play the cowbell. That’s when everyone was really screaming.” Overall, the performance was a huge success, with positive feedback from many students. To learn more about the group and future performances, go to www. jabaliafrika.com. “That’s Africa with a ‘k.’” Below: Jabali Afrika pulled several students on stage in the Bradly building.

CARLOS MILLAN/MILLANC@LAKELAND.EDU


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Fun House

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 3, October 9, 2008

Homecoming: to come home A spirited student’s adventures and mishaps of Homecoming week By John Sieglaff Fun House Editor sieglaffj@lakeland.edu

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ecently my school spirit has been called into question as it is every year around this time when the leaves start changing color and the autumnal equinox occurs. Yes, that time of year is upon us once again when the campus competitively unites to perform relay races, lip- Straight from the John synced skits, and other self-sacrificing stunts. That’s right, Homecoming. Derived from the dead language of Latin, I discovered the literal translation of the word “Homecoming.” The roots of the compound word—“domus adveho” (in the Latin)—translated, mean “to come home.” After this breakthrough discovery, I knew what had to be done. I packed my bags and hitched a ride to that place where the meals are homecooked and the laundry loads don’t cost a dime. Not only is home where the heart is, but it’s also the place where no one insists that I put on a dress and parade THIS student’s body in front of LAKELAND’S student body. Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate the campus life of Lakeland College. I’m not such a party-pooper that I refuse all Homecoming

activities with a firm “no.” In fact, forced by—I mean—at the request of Nicole Holland, my boss and the leader of team “Publication Power,” I participated in an event or two. The first activity to which I was dragged—I mean— excitedly attended, was the relay race. It wasn’t so much a race as it was a horrible form of torture. Whose idea was it to have us students dress up in garbage bags and shower caps so that we can pass a series of flour, maple syrup, oats, pork n’ beans, and rice from cupped hand to cupped hand, overhead? Who, I ask you, who? The garbage bag and shower cap didn’t protect nearly as well as I had hoped. Thermasilk clarifying shampoo and Aussie’s three-minute miracle conditioner has yet to sweep the remnants of maple syrup out of my hair and I have no idea where to go to get my dignity back. I’ve checked the lost-andfound three times now. After an hour-long shower, I thought to myself “this is enough Homecoming for me!”

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enjoy this game as some twisted form of payback, I found myself rather upset with the results. I hadn’t nailed Nicole’s face with a single Cheese Ball. Unlike the remnants of syrup in my hair, any remaining dignity that I may have possessed at that time was now absent, absolutely. Though after this event I asserted myself as being adamant that I would not participate in any more of these reindeer games, I found myself forced into another activity. Come Wednesday night, I was sitting in my room when I developed a hunger that required immediate satisfaction. To remedy this, I journeyed to the Muskie Mart where an ambush lied in wait. I had walked right into the Homecoming trivia challenge. There sat a lonely Nicole who looked at me upon my arrival with pouting lips and sad puppy eyes. Usually I allow the coldness of my heart to direct my actions. But for some odd reason, I turned on my heart light and sympathized with the same woman who had put me through such hell.

Above: Mistaking the shower cap for a suicidal weapon, I saw no other way of escaping the “fun” of Homecoming than to suffocate myself.

Word Search BALL BASE BAT CATCHER DUGOUT GRAND SLAM INNING OUTFIELD

The next morning I went to class and then stumbled upon Ms. Holland who frantically grabbed my arm and towed me to the next Homecoming activity. “You’ll like this one, I swear,” she told me as we rushed into our positions. I was handed a bag of Cheese Balls and informed of this activity’s objective. After Nicole’s face was lathered in whipped cream, I was to chuck the aforementioned Cheese Balls at her in an attempt to successfully fill her face with cheesy spheres. Though expected to

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After this, I figured my assistance had helped beyond expectations and that I couldn’t possibly be requested to participate in anymore Homecoming events. I was wrong. I received a cellular telephone call from Ms. Holland in which I was begged to do the Mr. Muskie competition. Despite my obvious qualities of macho masculinity, I think we all know who would have been Mr. Muskie had I agreed to participate. Would it even be a competition? However, cross-dressing is where I draw the line. Say what you will. Perhaps I’m not as comfortable about my sexuality as are some other willing young men on campus. Or maybe I’m too selfconscious about how I look in a strapless. Either way, I stood my ground. Nothing doing. It was decided that night that I was to retreat to my home base. I packed up and left town within an hour of that phone call. “I’m sorry,” I told Nicole. “I must be home tonight. My parents need me!” So I suppose, you might say I fled Homecoming. But hadn’t I fulfilled my patriotic duty to “Publication Power?” How could my school spirit be called to task so unappreciatively? Alas, I haven’t allowed their ingratitude to affect me. No matter what one may say, on campus or at home—on or off the stage—I know in my heart, I am Mr. Muskie.

Y H W D N F X R T I B U I S N A

Q E O G I M E O I W A A E W L T

K R N Y B U P S B Z T V L T B J

X E S B P V M B G C Q K D L M D

SEE ANSWERS ON PAGE 17


Fun House

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Out of the Pockat

Issue 3, October 9, 2008

15

Below: The many stages that Rob Pockat underwent when establishing his new hobby.

Robby needs a new hobby

By Rob Pockat

Staff Reporter pockatr@lakeland.edu

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ith the birth of my final offspring, my wife found it necessary for me to find a brand new hobby that would last me approximately four to eight weeks, or whenever her doctor feels I can resume my old one. Being a man of limited time and means, I had to find something simple, brainless, inexpensive, and that preferably lasted only three to seven minutes at a shot. I decided that this would be the perfect opportunity for me to imbibe in a little college experimentation. In theory, the possibilities were limitless…as long as those possibilities were approved by my wife, inlaws, local authorities, my therapist, and my clergyman.

ROB POCKAT/POCKATR@LAKELAND.EDU

I first considered reading all of the books published by current Lakeland faculty but ultimately decided this would only get me through the commercial breaks of one “Grey’s Anatomy” episode. Anyways, I needed something that would keep my mind off of school. Then it hit me; THE BAND! I could get my high school rock band back together. I immediately began to make phone calls. I quickly found out, however, that our lead guitarist lost an arm in a golfing accident, the bass player was in prison for stealing the brass pole from a gentleman’s club, and our singer passed away in a pool of his own vomit. How much do you have to vomit to fill a pool? Unfettered, I continued my search and decided to give jogging a try. I had been on my high school cross-country team just 20 short years ago, and I had been able to run three miles in 17 minutes without a single drop of perspiration moistening my brow. I threw on my favorite pair of Asics and passionately began a quest which would not only be a great outlet for my excessive energy, but would put me in great health as well. Soon I would be galloping with the breeze blowing through my flaxen hair, and the fresh, particulate-laden

Sheboygan air would be filling my lungs with the oxygen that I had deprived them of since quitting the above-mentioned high school cross-country team due to a horrific groin injury. I stepped out of my door, and within minutes I could feel the burn…then I felt a cramp…then I felt lightheaded…then I felt my knees hit the pavement…then I felt the nice men put me on the stretcher. The last thing I remember was the ambulance driver saying, “Nice job, buddy. You almost made it out of your driveway.” After the by-pass, angioplasty, and installation of a pace-maker, I was feeling like a new man. Reinvigorated, my pursuit continued. I furiously searched the Internet, and I did find a few interesting hobbies, but they required a credit card and verification that I was over 18 years of age. I was curious as to why my priest’s website would need that information. Finally, my wife suggested that I follow the election. BRILLIANT! This was

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something simple, brainless, and inexpensive. I sat down to watch the vice-presidential debate, and then I saw her—Sarah Palin. Full of beauty, wit, charm, and charisma, I was enamored. She had me at “You betch’a.” Before the debate I was but a mere boy, but after seeing Sarah smile…I became a republican. I had finally found something simple and brainless I could enjoy. I read everything I could about her. I joined her fanclub. I put up McCain-Palin signs in my yard and drew big hearts on them. The next morning I turned on the television and heard Governor Palin—or should I say “Luvin’her” Palin—talk about her plan to singlehandedly invade Afghanistan with a hockey stick while mounted on a moose. It was then that I got the news. My wife told me that I no longer needed a new hobby. It’s good to be a democrat again.

__________ died in a 1959 plane crash along with the Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens This group believed in magic and jug band music. Frankie Valli and the Four _______. Davy Jones, Mike Nesmith, Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork’s band, The _______. The Beatles’, “A Hard Day’s _____.” Little _______ gave Paul McCartney singing lessons. “Sloop John B,” “Good Vibrations,” and “Surfer Girl”: all songs by the _____ Boys. Paul Simon’s singing partner

He made his career as a “Solitary Man,” Neil _______. 3. Bob _____ found the answer blowin’ in the wind. 4. The king of rock and roll 5. Bill Haley and the ______ rocked around the clock. 7. Mick Jagger and the _______ Stones 8. “Walk Don’t Run” by the ________. 11. ______ Checker taught the world to twist. 16. Diana ____ and The Supremes

SEE ANSWERS ON PAGE 17


16

Issue 3, October 9, 2008

Cori and Teak By Jessica Lillie

A & E Editor

lilliej@lakeland.edu

Fun House

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R


Fun House

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Only in Canada, eh

By J. D. Botana III

Staff Reporter botanajd3@lakeland.edu

Baby Names

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18

Issue 3, October 9, 2008

Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Men on four game winning streak

Soccer team has best start in three years

ByBrad Wilk

Staff Reporter wilkb@lakeland.edu

With five wins already this season, the Lakeland College men’s soccer team has surpassed its win total for each of the last two seasons, and there are still plenty of games on the schedule. The Muskies have won four in a row and are 5-4 overall and 4-1 in the Northern Athletics Conference. Lakeland has outscored its competition 19-7 during the four-game winning streak and is getting a lot of contributions from different people. Lakeland is second in the conference in goals per game at 3.22, and senior Kevin Fitchett and juniors Ted Cormier and Ryan Malo are among the NAC leaders in points per game, goals and goals per game. “We’ve got a couple of talented upperclassmen that can score goals,” said head coach Dave Madsen. “I think we know they’re good for a goal when we need one. The younger players are definitely capable; it’s just a matter of finding them in the right situations. “It goes back to them being comfortable and how quickly do they adapt to this level. When those situations come around, do they take advantage of them and finish on them? On Saturday (in a win over Wis. Lutheran), they finished on them.”

Madsen said that Fitchett and Malo have helped lead the recent offensive push and they are playing at a consistently high level. Fitchett was named NAC men’s soccer Student-Athlete of the Week on Monday for the week of Sept. 22-28. “Kevin has brought a lot of energy to games and been able to turn a couple games on their head,” Madsen said. “When we need a goal to get back in or to counter the other team, he’s there usually to create the goal. He’s drawn a handful of penalty kicks that we’ve scored on. He’s creating a lot for us on the offensive end. “Ryan has had his best year out of the three years he has been here. This past week especially, he’s really stepped his game up. It’s been good to see because he’s really starting to figure out some things. It’s coming back to benefit him individually, but also the team as a whole. His statistics have been going up, and it’s been getting us wins.” Madsen said that he was impressed with the efforts of his goalie, freshman Ross Soukup, in Saturday’s win at Lutheran. “Ross had some big saves on Saturday that I think might have gone unnoticed,” Madsen said. “He had a couple of saves that really kept Wis. Lutheran frustrated.” The team has not seen a need to change its goals for this

Young golf teams take steps ahead By Jacob Frias Sports Editor friasj@lakeland.edu

W GINA D’AMATO/DAMATOG@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Adam Benson sprints after the ball after leaving defenders behind.

season, because even while some people may not have expected much from Lakeland because of their lack of wins in the last few years, the Muskies were expecting a lot from themselves. “We knew we had talent on our team and it was just a matter of how quickly it came together,” Madsen said. “So far, they’ve progressed really well. As a young group, each game they get a little better

and learn something, and fortunately we can be learning right now while we’re winning games. We set the bar high originally and we’re trying to get our guys to start thinking don’t just settle with the minimum we can do.” The Muskies will hope to make some noise in the conference tournament at the beginning of November. The top six teams in the conference make the tournament, with the top two teams getting a bye into the semifinals. But Madsen said that right now he just wants his team to focus on their next opponent and not get ahead of themselves. “After each game, we enjoy each victory as we get it, but we focus on the next thing,” Madsen said. “We don’t want to look too far ahead because I think it we do that, we’ll find ourselves in trouble. We’re taking things one game at a time, and when our guys are able to focus on each task at hand, they play very well and very focused. Our seniors have been doing a good job of keeping our minds on what we need to keep them on.” Left: Jeremy Hardy stretches out to steal the ball from his opponent.

GINA D’AMATO/DAMATOG@LAKELAND.EDU

ith the nice weather outside beginning to come to a cold and abrupt halt, the men’s and women’s golf teams are both nearing the end of their respected seasons. On the weekend of Oct. 4-5, the men’s team participated in their final tournament at Benedictine before their NAC conference tournament this Monday at Whistling Straits Golf Course. Overall, Lakeland took 13th out of 17 teams, with freshman, Gary Petit scoring the highest individually placing 25th. “We are taking the necessary steps to get better and we have the tools to do it,” said head coach Tyler Bormann. Also looking consistent for the men’s team are sophomore, Mike Ruzek and freshman, Ben Laubusch, who looked good this weekend according to Bormann. As for the women, Nikki Commons notched a second place finish in the women’s NAC conference tournament on Oct. 3-4. Sarah Mallion also participated for the Muskies, as she has improved every time she has stepped on the golf course this season according to head coach Cathy Hanek. According to Hanek, the ladies are looking forward to the spring, where they will have 3 more meets and a little more time to practice. Both the men’s and women’s teams have improved this season since last year, and will look to use this season as a building block for seasons to come.


Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 3, October 9, 2008

19

Intramurals

GINA D’AMATO/DAMATOG@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Gina Weiss reels in a pass from one of her fellow teammates.

Soccer at .500 so far

Rogers helping team in scoring department By John Wagner

Staff Reporter wagnerj@lakeland.edu

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n Parent’s Day, Sept. 27, the women’s soccer team brought down Rockford in an 8-0 win. Senior forward Amy Christenson was the spotlight of the game scoring three goals. Freshman forward Lindsay Rogers, Junior forward Gina Weiss, freshman midfielder Brittney Smit and freshman midfielder Dana Schmidt contributed to scoring for the Muskies by scoring a goal each. "A couple of the goals that we scored, I know Amy and Gina kind of had carbon copies, but the receiver turned into the provider for the second one," said head coach Dave Madsen, "It was nice, because it showed that our girls were working off the ball well to create their goals." "Scoring early was nice, getting the shut-out, getting the goals we needed to and limiting their shots and their chances going forward, to me it showed that we had a better focus coming from the game against Ripon on Tuesday," Madsen said. On Oct. 1, the Muskies searched for another win against Edgewood. Brittany Smit accounted for the only score in the game for the Muskies, however, as the Muskies lost 4-1. "Edgewood has really

good, talented forwards," Madsen said. "We ended up playing pretty well, but in the end it was just too little, too late." "We started off pretty well, but we gave up some early chances offensively," Madsen said. "We were a little picky with our chances even though they weren't flowing. We need to be a little better in key moments with tracking our runs. We came out pretty flat in the second half," Madsen said, "It was disappointing because we put together a great effort throughout the entire game, and we played as hard as we had to for the win." On Oct. 4, the ladies started fresh again as freshman Lindsey Rogers, who now leads the team with 15 goals, scored four goals in a 5-2 win over Wis. Lutheran. Freshman midfielder Kristi Borts also contributed making a goal herself. The ladies were shutout on Oct. 7 as they lost to MSOE 1-0. "MSOE is a good team, but I felt like we were the better team from the start, and then we kind of just let our grip on the match slip away and we didn't finish our chances," Madsen said The Muskies are now 6-6 overall and 3-3 in the conference. Their next opponent is Alverno College at 11 a.m. on Saturday in Milwaukee.

- Flag Football started Wednesday, Oct. 8. There are nine teams that will compete Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoons in the field between Grossheusch and Muehlmeier halls, for the next three weeks. The winning team will receive championship Tshirts. -Darts will begin on Nov. 3 in the Pub; time TBD. Sign up with Mike Bachar X 1411 before Oct. 31. The winners of Darts will each receive a T-shirt and a 20 dollar gift certificate for the Pub. -Five on Five Basketball will begin in Nov. also.

Below: Kristi Borts dribbles through a Rockford defender.

GINA D’AMATO/DAMATOG@LAKELAND.EDU


20

Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 3, October 9, 2008

Women’s volleyball 6-0 in NAC Crowds at home games have boosted team’s confidence

By Brad Wilk

Staff Reporter wilkb@lakeland.edu

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he Lakeland College women’s volleyball team has enjoyed the support of great crowds on its home court and is rolling through the Northern Athletics Conference. The Muskies have won

nine of their last ten matches and are now 13-5 overall and alone in first place in the conference at 6-0. Lakeland has not lost a set in its last four conference matches, including a 3-0 win during Homecoming weekend over Concordia Chicago, which is considered one of the top teams in the conference. Lakeland was shorthanded for that match due

to some injuries. Junior Kaylan Kasper was moved from outside hitter to middle hitter for the first time since her freshman year for the match. “We played our most complete game without a couple of players either here or at full strength,” said head coach Chad Schreiber. “We were playing undermanned, under-

healthy and playing a team that many thought would be our closest competition in the conference, and yet it was one of our biggest margins of victory against the so called best team we’re going to play.” Lakeland won three of four matches at a tournament in Wheaton, Ill., and junior Brittanie Paulus was named to the all-tournament team. Paulus was also named NAC women’s volleyball Student-Athlete of the Week for the week of Sept. 22-28. Schreiber said he has been happy with the way the team is responding when its opponents turns up its game. “The biggest trend I’ve seen is that when another team pushes, we push back,” Schreiber said. “Everybody has been playing well. (Senior) Heidi (Kramer) and (junior) Kim (Linger) have been consistently good on offense. Brittanie’s game has turned around. (Junior) Tonia (Strebelinski) has been steady in the back row. We’ve had steady contributions from our whole lineup.” After playing most of their matches on the road, the Muskies played three times at home last week, and Schreiber said that the fan turnout really helped the team. “The crowd support has been awesome this year,” Schreiber said. “Anybody on our team wants to be on the court right now given the

crowd support we’ve been getting. I think that made us feel like we weren’t missing anyone because the crowd made up for anything we were missing in personnel.” Lakeland plays three more conference matches on the road (this weekend at Aurora and Benedictine and Oct. 15 at Alverno) before spending fall break playing several matches in California at the University of La Verne and La Sierra University. “We put ourselves in a position to control our own destiny in the conference, so we don’t want to look past this weekend until we get through these conference matches,” Schreiber said. “We’ve given ourselves a couple of opportunities to play some nationallyranked teams throughout the year, and California is a spot where we’re going to get to play at least two of them. It’s a chance for us to test ourselves and hopefully prove to ourselves and to others that, come the end of the year, we belong in the NCAA Tournament.” Lakeland plays two more regular season matches at home this season on Oct. 21 and Oct. 24 at 7 p.m. The conference tournament begins on Nov. 3 and since the higher seeded team hosts each match, the Muskies will probably get some more home dates near the end of the season.

GINA D’AMATO/DAMATOG@LAKELAND.EDU GINA D’AMATO/DAMATOG@LAKELAND.EDU

GINA D’AMATO/DAMATOG@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Andrea Mueller concentrates as she prepares for her serve during the game against Concorida-Chicago last Saturday.

Above: Jessica Keller serves in last weeks match. Lakeland won all three games against Concorida, a competitive team in their conference.


Fall 2008, Issue 3