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Find the right Muskie Spirit apparel for you at the Campus Shop.

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South Korean man dies from playing computer games.

The Lakeland College

MIRROR

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Homecoming SINCE 1933

VOLUM E Fa l l, I S SU E 2

Issue Highlights

Muskies drop another to Edgewood sinking their record to 2-3.

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Features

ELI students receive a lesson about American culture on the football field.

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Features

F e v e r !

T HURSDAY, O CTOBER 4, 2007

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Sports

W W W. L A K E L A N DM I R ROR . C OM

Homecoming Schedule

Thursday: Banner Judging, 4 p.m. Mr. Muskie, 8 p.m. in Bradley Friday: Volleyball, 7 p.m. Pep Rally, 8:30 p.m. in Wehr, followed by Lighting of the L, Bonfire, Fireworks & Dance Party Saturday: Homecoming 5K, 9 a.m. Football, 1 p.m. Volleyball, 1 p.m. W. Soccer, 1 p.m. M. Soccer, 3:30 p.m. Dance Parties, 10 p.m.

Lakeland's Movies Through the Decades themed Homecoming is in full swing. Fourteen teams are competing for pride, cash prizes, and for their name to be engraved on the Homecoming trophy. Points awarded to the teams can be seen in the campus center. See page 15 for more pictures. Issue 3, distributed on Oct. 17, will have full coverage of all Homecoming activities.

Private college tuition rates reach new highs Lakeland proud to be second to last in terms of tuition and room and board for undergrads By Brittney Sandberg Senior Wendi Kulas welcomes her fiance home from Iraq.

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Index opinions Page 5 FEATURES Page 11 A&E Page 16 Fun House Page 18 sports Page 21

The Mirror is an award winning member of the Society of Professional Journalists, Associated Collegiate Press, Wisconsin Newspaper Association and College Media Advisers.

Staff Reporter sandbergb@lakeland.edu

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s the price tag of a college education continues to swell, no one feels the burden more than those students who choose to attend a private institution. The average tuition and fees for a private Wisconsin college jumped from $20,921 in 2006 to $22,029 in 2007. That figure does not include room and board, which went from $6,245 to $6,525 over the past school year. That means the average student attending a private school in Wisconsin absorbed an extra $1,388 in expenses. That is an increase equal to 5.11 percent. Topping the list for the most expensive private Wisconsin school is Lawrence University in Appleton. This year’s tuition, fees, room, and board total $37,770. That is a $1,350 difference from last year’s $36,420, or a 3.71 percent increase. What is the most “user friendly” private institution in America’s Dairyland? Alverno College in Milwaukee is the least expensive, weighing in at $23,402 for tuition, fees, room, and board

this school year. That equals a five percent increase of $1,114 from $22,288 in 2006. So, where does Lakeland fall in this list? Near the bottom, and in this case, that is good. Lakeland is the second most affordable private university in the state of Wisconsin. The 2007-2008 tuition and fees total $17,595, and room and board equals $6,145. Subtracting last year’s tuition and fees of $16,795 and room and board of $5,919, students paid $1,026, or 4.52 percent more to attend Lakeland this year than in 2006. David Stein, director of institutional research and planning, said that paying for college is becoming a burden because parents’ disposable incomes are not increasing at the same rate as tuition. So how does Lakeland intend to combat the ever increasing cost of education? According to Nate Dehne, director of admissions, financial aid is key. Ninety-nine percent of fulltime students at Lakeland receive financial assistance. Patty Taylor, director of financial aid, said that financial

aid opportunities are based on a student’s percentage of financial need. Lakeland’s four year financial aid plan shows how support increases as tuition increases. Taylor also said, “Lakeland is working with donors in the Endowed Scholarship Fund to give students more scholarship opportunities.” What do the rising costs mean for Lakeland’s future enrollment rates? “Tuition is a leading topic of discussion when we’re recruiting students, but Lakeland really is a bargain since it is the second least expensive [private] school in the state. Lakeland’s cost increase was only about four and a

half percent from 2006 to 2007, while the state’s increase was 5.11 percent,” Dehne said. Luckily, Lakeland students are understanding when it comes to all the increasing costs. Freshman Jason Polcyn said, “I get why the tuition is going up. Private schools don’t get funding from state programs.” In fact, Polcyn even stated that tuition was not a deciding factor in his choice to attend Lakeland College. While many students beg to differ that tuition is a major factor in one's college education, almost everyone agrees, expensive price tag or not, it is always a great day to be a Muskie. Between 2006 and 2007, Lakeland's tution and room and board has increased 4.52 percent.


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Issue 2, October 4, 2007

News

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

connects LC

Alumni relations department looks to reconnect with Lakeland alumni By Lori Sass Editor-in-Chief sassl@lakeland.edu

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aunched this summer, my.Lakeland is an interactive, networking Web site with capabilities similar to that of Facebook. Currently, my.Lakeland is only available to alumni and the admissions department. In the future, my.Lakeland will be available to students and employees of Lakeland College as well. Alumni relations is using my.Lakeland to inform alumni about Homecoming events. There are special group pages for Lakeland classes celebrating reunions this year. These classes include 1957, 1967, 1982, 1997, and classes 1970-1979. Members of these classes were given logins and passwords this summer. Featured on these group pages are pictures from The Spectrum and the events going on this weekend.

Alumni from other graduating classes will receive usernames and passwords with the fall edition of Lakeland, the magazine of Lakeland College, coming out within a couple of weeks. Alumni returning for Homecoming this weekend may get a username and password from the alumni relations staff located in the Younger Family Campus Center. The admissions department is using my.Lakeland as a way for potential students to apply to Lakeland. There is an online form for applicants to fill out. “Right now it is in its early stages,” said Bridget Thomas, assistant director of alumni relations. “Things will be added.” Some of these “things” will include message boards, chat rooms, and more group pages. Webmaster Neal Grosskopf is working on the additions. The appearance of my.Lakeland will be quite similar to www. lakeland. My.Lakeland will prove

Lori Sass Editor-in-Chief

Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor

Becky Meyer Sandy Sternitzky Copy Editor

Jennifer Duenk Opinions Editor

Above: A screenshot from my.Lakeland. The Lakeland community will be able to be connected through this Web site.

to be helpful once it is up and running. All Lakeland graduates, students, and employees will have a profile with their name and graduation year or title. From there, it will be up to the individual person to log in and update his or her profile. Transcripts of students starting in the 1980’s will be available on the Web site. There will also be event information. Alumni will be able to look up their giving history and payment schedule to the Annual Fund. Often times the alumni rela-

tions department receives phone calls from an alum asking for information about another alum. “The college can’t give out that information for privacy reasons,” Thomas said. “But, if people update their profile, it’s there for everyone.” My.Lakeland will allow for reconnecting with friends from Lakeland College in years to come. With the addition of my.Lakeland, Lakeland joins the likes of Cardinal Stritch, Mount Mary, Carroll College, and Ripon College, all of which already have the Web site.

Myspace and Facebook become important campaigning techniques

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PHOTO/MYSPACE.COM

he 2008 presidential election is creeping up, and the candidates are beginning their campaigns. This election the Internet has become a popular technique to target voters, especially the younger generation. Social networking Web sites such as Facebook and Myspace are becoming popular sites for campaigning. Thousands of young adults use these Web sites daily to connect with friends, compare interests, and meet new people. Candidates of the presidential election have realized this, and as a result have posted their

names on these Web sites. Both Myspace and Facebook allow their users to join various groups to relate interests and hobbies. Candidates, Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, John McCain, and Rudy Giuliani have used this technique to their advantage and have created groups which highlight their platforms for members to join. On Facebook there are dozens of groups that have been created in favor of the candidates. One Million Strong for Obama, America Unite for John McCain, Hillary Clinton for President, and A Vote for Rudy Giuliani is A Vote to Save America are just a few. Several of these candidates even have their own

Facebook profile where members can add them as friends. On the other hand, there are groups which oppose the candidates. Facebook members have created groups such as Against Barack Obama (One Million Strong), ABC Equals Anyone but Hillary, Americans Against Rudy Giuliani, and Anybody But John McCain for 2008. Myspace has also joined the politcal debate and has formed groups supporting the candidates. Under the groups column there is a section dedicated for specifically government and politics, which includes over 3,000 groups. There is a search column where members can find a particular group which matches their interets. Like Facebook, groups such as Hillary 08, and Teens for Obama 2008 are very common. Not only is campaigning through these sites beneficial for the candidates, as it gets their name known across the nation, it is also beneficial for voters. Many of these voters are college students and do not have time to watch the

Beau Markut Sports Editor

John Sieglaff Fun House Editor

Mariah Tess Online Editor

Kelly Conard Advertising Manager

Adriana Coopman Shaun Forsyth Nicole Holland Dawn Hughes Rhea Pirch Rob Pockat Brittney Sandberg Anna Schumacher Mariah Tess Emily Wachel John Wagner Staff Reporters

Pratikshya Bhandari Contributing Writer

Jennifer Duenk Erik Hyrkas Beau Markut Lori Sass John Sieglaff Layout Staff

Martha Schott Faculty Advisor The Lakeland College Mirror is printed by Wisconsin Newspress, Inc. The Mirror is published every two weeks during the first and second semesters while classes are in session and is distributed free of charge to students, faculty, and staff on the Lakeland College campus.

PHOTO/FACEBOOK.COM

Staff Reporter coopmana@lakeland.edu

M I R R O R STAFFLIST

Presidential candidates target voters via Internet

By Adriana Coopman

The Lakeland College

news or read the newspaper. By projecting the candidate’s platforms on the Internet, it is easier for young adults to make a decision about which person to vote for. These groups enable members to debate amongst themselves and create bulletin boards to discuss the candidate’s platforms. As the 2008 presidential election comes closer, members from both sites will see more candidate groups appear. Using the Internet to target voters is not only extremely beneficial, it is free. The candidates can create profiles and groups to support their campaign without paying a dime, just like other members can create groups of anything of their choice. Without a doubt, candidates will continue to use this method of campaining in the future.

The Mirror is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, University Wire, College Media Advisers, College Publisher, and Wisconsin Newspaper Association.

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R 2007 Best of the Midwest Best Overall Newspaper printed less than weekly at a four-year college 2005 Best of the Midwest Best Overall Newspaper printed less than weekly at a four-year college 2005 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award First Place in Region 6 for newspapers published not more than once per week


News

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 2, October 4, 2007

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Olympic boycott discussed 2008 Summer Olympics overshadowed by claims of genocide By Rob Pockat Staff Reporter pockatr@lakeland.edu

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urning, electric shock, sexual abuse, psychiatric abuse, force-feeding with human feces, savage beatings, exposure to extreme conditions, water dungeons, and forced organ harvesting; all of these are methods allegedly employed by the Chinese government in an attempt to quell the practice of Falun Gong, a religious practice that promotes truthfulness, compassion and tolerance. China has been trying to eliminate Falun Gong, which in 1999 had an estimated 70 million practitioners in China, for more than eight years. On August 8, 2008, tens

of thousands of journalists, fans, and athletes will gather in Beijing for the start of the Summer Olympic Games. A House Resolution to boycott these games was introduced by Congressman Dana Rohrbacher early last month. Rohrbacher explained that, “The Olympics represent the noblest elements of humanity and the Chinese regime represents the opposite. The Olympic torch is supposed to be a beacon of light shining upon mankind’s higher aspirations in the world, and it’s a travesty to have that torch hosted by a regime that is the world’s worst human rights abuser.” China lost its original bid for the 2000 Olympics due to its horrific human rights violations. To procure their 2008

bid for the Olympic Games, China promised to improve human rights. This promise went unfulfilled; human rights in China have, in fact, deteriorated even more. According to Amnesty International, China continually holds thousands of political prisoners without charge or trial and is responsible for over 80 percent of all executions documented in the world. Reporters Without Borders, an organization dedicated to maintaining international press freedoms, feels that many of the human rights horrors happening in China are going undocumented due to strict media restrictions. They claim that at least 30 journalists and 50 Internet users are currently

detained in China; some since the 1980s. An e-mail to Reporters Without Borders elicited this response, “Sign the petitions on our website calling for the release of reporters and cyberdissidents and write to the IOC [International Olympic Committee] in Beijing to ask them to put pressure on China to meet the promises it made when awarded the Games…” E-mails to the Mayor of Beijing and to the International Olympic Committee went unanswered. The U.S. boycotted the 1980 Moscow Olympics after Soviet tanks rolled into Afghanistan in 1979. With the Summer Olympics only one year off, only time will tell if boycotting of the Games comes to fruition.

in brief

Information to let people know what's going on goes here!! Information to let people know what's going on goes here!! Information toin Participants let people the second know what's going annual Homecoming on goes run/walk here!! will depart from the Wehr Center at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 6. To participate, sign up at the campus center desk or on the day of the race at the Wehr Center. Registration is Saturday morning at Wehr.

Homecoming 5K

GPA Challenge

APA's in Krueger, Brotz, Muehlmeier, and Grosshuesch Halls have organized a GPA Challenge for residents in those halls. For mid-terms, floors in the participating halls will compete. Floors with students having the highest average GPAs will get to have an ice cream social.

Above: Reporters Without Borders has released this version of the Olympic rings made out of hand cuffs. Some countries have thought about boycotting the 2008 Summer Olympics due to China's human rights policies and involvement in the genocide in Darfur.

For finals the halls battle each other. The hall of residents with the highest average GPA will get to have a pizza party.

Student Association election Lakeland focuses on making a to be held Oct. 9 - 11 difference Entire executive board to be voted on, one candidate for each position By Rhea Pirch Staff Reporter rockie0909@sbcglobal.net

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ominations for the Executive Board of the Student Association (SA) were recently announced. Those nominated are: Rob Pockat for president, Heather Gayton for vice president, Kim Nygard for secretary and Yurixa Cruz for treasurer. The elections, normally held in the spring, were postponed until fall this year due to the lack of qualified students interested in running for the offices. “According to our constitution,” said Sandy Gibbons-Vollbrecht, vice president of student affairs and dean of students, “anybody applying for an Executive Board position needs to have been a member of Student Association. We had one person who applied for each position; then elections never happened.” Candidate for president, Rob Pockat, has plans for SA, if elected. “I have many ideas that I personally think could benefit SA in the future. I feel that this semester will be dedicated to building student interest in SA for the future

stability of the organization,” said Pockat. “I would like to see an intern-type program that would place select underclass. SA members with Executive Board members and experienced cabinet members. This shadowing program would allow new SA members to gain experience in leadership, event planning, and organization which they could then use when they become leaders in SA. This would lead to consistency and experience in the association. Participation in SA can prove to be one of the most valuable and meaningful experiences of a student’s college career,” Pockat said. The Student Association is “the voice of the student” according to Gibbons-Vollbrecht. Any group of students or one student can come to them with requests or questions. Since the Student Association Executive Board does not normally meet until the second or third week of classes, the lack of one does not seem to be affecting anything right now. One request student organizations approach the Student Association with is funding, to use for support of

different projects or activities. There are some groups that the Director of Student Activities, Talia Profitt, is aware of that are seeking money to fund some of their projects, “but since the SA doesn’t normally listen to requests until this time of the year, this hasn’t put anything terribly behind,” she said. “Also, just because a group may request funds from SA, it does not mean they will receive funds. So I have always

10% that

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pushed the groups to fundraise on their own and not necessarily plan on receiving SA funds,” Proffitt said. The money Student Association disburses to the various groups is funded by the student activity fee that all full-time students pay to the college. All students are encouraged to vote at the election, which will be held on Oct. 9, 10, and 11 during the lunch hour in Bossard Hall.

with this coupon and Lakeland College student ID

SCRAPBOOKING

place

A guilty pleasure only smiles can measure

Hours:

Monday-Friday 9-7 Saturday 9-4 Sunday 12-4

The Girls~ Cyndi & Kathy

Plymouth Crossings 542 Walton Drive, Plymouth, WI 53073 www.thatscrapbookingplace.com 920.892.2919

Do not forget to sign up for Lakeland College's Make a Difference Day. The event will run from 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 13. "This is an opportunity to show our neighbors that we care about them," committee member, Martha Schott said. Participants are able to select at which location they would like to volunteer. There are volunteer opportunities at the Howards Grove Community Center, Camp Anokijig, Maywood, and Money Smart. Participants are invited to breakfast and lunch in the DVB room in the Laun Center. Volunteers will receive the official Make a Difference Day t-shirt. The shirt has been designed by senior Jared Petrie. Transportation to and from volunteer locations will be provided. To participate, pick up a registration sheet from Campus Chaplain Kelly Stone in Laun 100.


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Issue 2, October 4, 2007

Ad

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M I R R O R


Opinions

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 2, October 4, 2007

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Celebs invade New carpet, happy Celebrities in the news too much? people

By Becky Meyer

Copy Editor meyerb@lakeland.edu

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n this grand country of the United States, there appears to be a horrifying invasion of celebrities. People who were completely anonymous yesterday are famous today for simply being rich and beautiful. Citizens are eating up tabloids like crazy. And now even the usually reliable news channels such as CNN are reporting the “breaking updates” concerning Britney Spears’ latest scandal. As time wears on, celebrities are in the news more and more, and sadly, talentless heiresses such as Paris Hilton are household names. Our country is being brainwashed by the media. We are being told that celebrities are the most important thing in the world, and their affairs are the only things worth reading or watching. Concerning the idea of celebrities being over-publicized, Junior Carlos Millan said, “I don’t like it really. I don’t like how it takes the focus away from important things.” I make the assumption that if I were to watch CNN, I would see news concerning the war in Iraq, upcoming elections, crime, and things of that nature. I am shocked to see that even serious news channels are being sucked into this celebrity obsession! I do not care which celebrity decided to shave her head, who’s having whose baby, or who broke whose neck. If I were to watch a celebrity gossip show, my brain cells would begin to deplete at such an alarming rate that my brain would turn into fluff. In some cases, many of us can be hypocritical of the issue. Someone may state that she does not like hearing about the rich and famous all the time, and yet an hour later she is hiding behind a copy of “OK!,” so engrossed that her nose is about a millimeter away from the page. I do not quite understand how we can be so utterly fascinated by the lives of the well-known when we cannot possibly relate to them in any way. Freshman Jie Zhu said, “It has nothing to do with our lives.” The celebrity world is completely different than the real world, the world in which we students at Lakeland live. Celebrities are not at all relatable. We are unable to realistically put ourselves into their shoes; we can only

dream. We are also becoming confused as to what celebrities are supposed to be famous for. Junior Kelly Broeren said, “I think their private lives should be left alone. They’re actors; it’s a job, not a lifestyle. And plus, I’m sick of that s**t.” Not only is the celebrity world taking our focus away from things in life that actually matter, but they can, in some cases, cause the public to have a lower self esteem. Girls are given mixed messages of what society tells them they must look like. Celebrities are slammed for either being too fat or too skinny. Even when someone is at a healthy weight, they are seen as “needing to lose a few pounds.” In Hollywood, no one is ever satisfied. Celebrities are made fun of no matter how much they weigh, and there is no one who is seen as “just fine.” The only thing that seems to matter to the rich and famous is image, and there is always room for improving one’s appearance. They will go to ridiculous lengths to achieve an imaginary and impossible perfection. This is starting to become a lifestyle of average American citizens as well. Some average Americans are so desperate to look the way the famous and beautiful do that they are willing to spend thousands of dollars for plastic surgery. Plastic surgery is steadily becoming more popular, and not only is it used to fix “flaws,” but it is not uncommon for the patient to have surgery in order to gain a feature similar to that of a celebrity. In the past few years, the invasion of celebrities and random people who become famous for having money is getting completely out of control. They are inescapable— even though I do not read tabloids, and even if I wouldn’t watch TV, there is still word of mouth. It has become a nation-wide obsession, and it is sickening. Maybe there is such an obsession because the average citizens have lame, boring lives, and when they read tabloids and watch “Showbiz Tonight,” they are entertained by the lives others are living. All I know is that celebrities are not the most important thing in the world, and that we should focus on our own lives and try to contribute something worthwhile.

By Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor hyrkase@lakeland.edu

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his may only be me, but Lakeland College is changing things around here, and I am not sure how I feel about it. So for the sake of those reading, this is what I think about them. There is new furniture, new carpeting, new sod, and new students. The students, furniture, and Pledging sod, I’m all for, Musko but the carpeting? Granted, no one has sentimental value in the old vomit, blood, urine, and you don’t even want to know about stained carpeting, but what is this new pattern? They put it in the Campus Center, they put it in the pub, Meuhlmeieir and Grosshuesch. However, it looks to me like someone regurgitated old lottery winning confetti on navy carpet and steamrolled over it. It really is not the most aesthetically pleasing.

I originally wondered if residence life just slapped down the cheapest carpeting they could buy in bulk. But then I thought, maybe that’s exactly the point. If students continue (and we will) to leave undigested remains and other bodily fluids on the carpets around here, why not have a pattern to make those common, “oops, I was chemically inebriated,” moments seem less noticeable? Hell, we might as well get a black carpet, so that nothing sees the light of day! Though, that’s a bit of a damper to our spirits isn’t it? They say, (and by “they,” I mean some psychologists) that bright colors are mood boosting. So maybe this random colorful mess lain below our feet was a necessary alteration, to deter such moments of expulsion. Genius, a ploy to keep the floors clean! One fun fact I learned on CSI a few weeks ago is: If you’re gagging from say, a scent of a dead body at a crime scene, or rather, from being a youth, over your limit and out too late partying; if you grin from ear to ear, the reflex subsides. Now, with the latest color

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Copper Cable is the pattern which now graces the pub floor. BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Carribean Hurricane is the carpet design in Meuhlmeier Grosshuesch

wheel of steamrolled confetti below you, as soon as you bend over to give back to the world you own colorful concoction, the happiness from the site of this carpet may overwhelm you with a far-gone grin, giving just enough time to get yourself to the proper depository! All joking aside, my initial thought when I saw the carpet was, “How long has the carpeting before this been around?” After a bit of investigation, speaking to the Director of Facility Management, Lewis Apel, and Director of

SEE HAPPY PEOPLE/PAGE 8

PHOTOOPINION What’s your favorite part of Homecoming?

Jeremy Schmidt Junior Music Performance “I don’t see the point of Homecoming; it’s just a football game and another excuse to get wasted.”

Lorenda Collins Freshman Undecided “Being apart of the Homecoming teams because we all get to show our school spirit.”

Jim Bajczyk Director of Residence Life “I dig the fireworks.”

Erica Brown Freshman Sociology “Dressing up like a movie star!”

Sally Bork Assistant Director of Student Activities/ Brotz Hall Director “Mr. Muskie because it’s the ultimate man compitition!”

Mark Sujanani Freshman Business Management “I like how the whole school seems to get involved. It really brings the students together.”


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Issue 2, October 4, 2007

Opinions

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Four words and the four letter word Colorado State University’s newspaper prints four word editorial

By Lori Sass

Editor-in-Cheif sassl@lakeland.edu

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olorado State University’s student newspaper, The Rocky Mountain Collegian, ran a staff editorial with only four words on Sept. 21. It seems simple enough, but when those four words are “Taser this FUCK BUSH”, there are bound to be some critics. Inspired by freedom of speech debates, Editor-inChief, J. David McSwane said, in an interview with CNN, “We felt that maybe four words were, umm, maybe more impactful than 250.” Was it powerful? Yes! Was it right? That’s debatable. Instead of simply writing about free speech and why students should care, The Collegian’s editorial staff exercised it. Isn’t this what newspapers and journalism are about? Yes, but there should be some tact. According to McSwane, he

and the staff had no intention of offending anyone. It turns out “Taser this…” was The Rocky Mountain Collegian’s classic apathy editorial, “… we felt that, ahh, students were largely apathetic,” McSwane said. As a self-funded newspaper receiving no funding from student fees, Colorado State University holds no power over the newspaper to censor articles or content. However, according to The Collegian’s Code of Ethics, “Profane and vulgar words are not acceptable for opinion writing.” Despite the code, the seven student-editor editorial board voted to print it anyway. There was a split vote, but overall the board decided to stand behind the editorial regardless. Now McSwane needs to defend himself. The Board of Student Communication held a hearing on Tuesday, Sept. 23. McSwane’s job is in jeopardy. There seems to be an equal number of people for and against him.

One very positive thing that McSwane and his fellow editors should be proud of is this, the school, and the country for that matter, are all talking about freedom of speech now. This is what the goal was from the start. A negative on a larger scale is funding. The Collegian has lost many advertising deals already. University officials fear that the school as a whole might lose state funding sometime in the future. While an independent student newspaper should have no effect on state budgets, this issue might stay in the minds of politicians for quite some time. The Mirror, as a paper for a private college, has always been under prior-review. However, to the best of my knowledge, President Gould, nor any past president, has ever enacted that rule of censoring our paper. Do we have a Code of Ethics? Yes! As The Mirror’s Editorin-Chief, it is up to me to de-

cide what will be published whether it be an expletive or anything else that may turn out to be controversial. We have our own version of an apathy editorial. Take a look; it’s on page 10. While it is far more than four words, hopefully students will take a closer look at the nation and world as a whole. Before I finish, let me say this: Just because I think The Rocky Mountain Collegian’s editorial was less than tactful, I do respect the staff. The editorial board held fast their opinion on the taser incident at the University of Florida. University of Florida student, Andrew Meyer, was tasered and arrested during a speech by U.S. Senator John Kerry. On video of the event, Kerry’s voice is audible and is beginning to answer Meyer’s questions. Many believe the police officer was taking away Meyer’s and maybe even Kerry’s freedom of speech. People are talking about freedom of speech. Students, faculty, staff, alumni, and

the community near the university and around the world are mesmerized by the editorial. Reviews in The Mirror are not going to be candycoated. As reporters, we are going to be honest. We’re probably not going to make everyone happy. Controversial and lessthan-great things are happening around us everyday, even at Lakeland College. It would be a shame if The Mirror staff did not report on these issues. We are not looking around for people, groups, or teams to bash. However, we are going to be honest – with tact. I promise you all of our articles will be more than four words and have quotations, facts, and or statistics to back us up. E-mail us at lakelandmirror@yahoo.com or send a letter to the editor via www. lakelandmirror.com. We want to be your source of Lakeland news.

To wear or not to wear, that is the question Superficial appearances and people’s perceptions

By Nicole Holland

Staff Reporter hollandn@lakeland.edu

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t can be agreed that everyone is different. Each individual has different interest, beliefs and style. Style is hard to define, because different styles are as diverse as personalities. There are an infinite number of styles, but for sakes purpose I will classify them into perception groups. The perception groups will consist of the bad impression group, the average impression, and then the good impression group. The groups’ names are self explanitory. I will start with the bad impression group, I will break down the style or lack thereof and how people perceive each class. Most people have heard the saying, “If you got it flaunt it.” But when it comes to wearing clothes that a Barbie doll could fit into, I would prefer you keep all that you “got,” to yourself. I have a grievance against the students at Lakeland who use outrageous attire to attract attention. By outrageous, I do not mean specific style such as punk or gothic. By outrageous I mean that this class lacks

any style whatsoever. This class consists of wardrobe malfunctions, wearing clothes that do not fit, and an overall apathetic attitude towards their appearance. It is common knowledge that a wardrobe malfunction is when your clothes do not cover some part of your body when they should. Not only do small sized clothes reveal way too much, but it gives the person wearing that outfit a bad image. Most people know that first impressions are important. I believe that making impressions in general is important. There are certain articles of clothing that should not be worn and then there are outfits that should just not be worn together. An example of a ‘throw away piece’ is the skimpy tank top I saw a girl wearing the other day. The piece itself was not ugly, but the student wearing it was not “supported” enough by the tiny spaghetti straps. The rest of her ensemble was fine, but her overall appearance was destroyed. The one malfunction made her look downright bad. Other students gave each other glances, and smirks while looking in her direction, which

is an example of the unwanted negative attention. Another example which attracts negative attention are outfits that are not cohesive. They do not flatter the person wearing them at all. One of the reasons that prompted me to write this article was a student’s outfit two weeks ago. She was wearing sweat pants with on leg up and one leg down. Her top did not match the sweat pants color wise. Her shirt was three or four sizes too small, and her mid-drift, using the euphemism for gut, was hanging out. I doubt she was wearing a bra. She happened to be wearing tennis shoes that were as white and clean as perfection. However, her overall look was hideous. She looked downright trashy. I did not see the shoes and think to myself “wow what good style,” I thought “Oh my goodness, that girl stole someone’s shoes.” No one wakes up in the morning and thinks, “I would love to look really trashy today.” That is not the perception people want to give off to their teachers and peers. However, there are students who do not dress to impress and others will continues to perceive

them in a negative manor. So what should people around the campus wear? Great question! Granted there are days that there is not time for hair and makeup and maybe resorting to sweats is not a bad idea. Most of the time putting minimum effort into an outfit will save you from the dreaded “bad impression group.” The next classification is the average perception group. Average in this case is not supposed to have a negative connotation, because the overall perception of the students in this class is good. A more politically correct group would be called ‘the authentic college student.’ This is where most of the general population on this campus is classified. This is the jean wearing, hoodie addicted; flip flopping around the campus group. While just thinking of this style, “college student” jumps to mind. Of course there is some variance between everyone’s style. Sometimes sweats or gym clothes can be a substitute in an authentic college student’s wardrobe, but this loophole should not be mistaken as the basis of this look. Then, of course, there are the shining stars of style here

at Lakeland. The good im-B pression group has high style.S These people look good, theyh are perceived as smart. Who wouldn’t want that? Going to class does not seem to be an inconvenience to these students’ days, but an occasion to present themselves in a positive manor. Wardrobes, in this collegiate version of high fashion, usually consist of button down shirts, polo shirts, paired with nice slacks. The outfit flatters the person, no matter what their body type. The look is finished with very svelte high heels, or “dressy” shoe. If this is your go to option, kudos. College may be a relaxed atmosphere, but some parameters must be set. Not only in the last two years, but also in the last few months have I seen wardrobe atrocities. The college wardrobe does not have to consist of designer jeans, purses, or suits. The average college student is in debt when they graduate, so it is expected for the typical college student to be frugal. However, wearing clothes that make you an eyesore to this campus should not be tolerated. If you feel the same way, speak out and dress up!


Opinions

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 2, October 4, 2007

7

Muskie Mailbox

September 25, 2007 Dear Mirror: I would like to comment briefly on Incommunicado by Erik Hyrkas (Mirror, Volume Fall, and Issue 1, dated September 20, 2007) First of all I am in complete and total agreement with the article’s fundamental point Lakeland should have a communications major. Secondly, most of his arguments in support of this change are solid, well thought out and articulately presented. Now I am forced to take issue with his comments on the necessity of cutting other majors in order to make room if you will for the communications major. Fundamentally, to argue that we have too many majors, let’s add one more is questionable. Secondly, as Erik points out, Lakeland plans a substantial increase in its student body. I would add that this is the

continuation of a general trend that, with only minor bumps, has persisted for at least the fifteen plus years that I have been here. Due to this increase we are currently adding two fulltime faculty members per year; surely one could be a tenure track communications professor. So the answer to Mr. Hyrkas’s call is present in his presentation; though expansion the communications major could be readily accommodated. Further, I think that Erik is correct in his suggestion that implementing such a major would accelerate that process of increased enrollment. I must say that I was both mildly amused and somewhat chagrined by his comment, “It’s time to start cutting the fat. Out with the old and in with the new.” Mr. Hyrkas may not be aware that we went through a painful process of reducing the number of majors a few years back. Secondly, those that remained are integral part of the fiber of the college, its heritage and tradition. We might be able to increase our efficiency by allowing faculty who wish to do so to teach more courses but

that is a small consideration. To wantonly throw out what has been built would be analogous to smashing the Sistine Chapel to build a new McDonald’s with lots of parking. Certainly at times a treasured past evolved; Pope Julius II demolished the original St. Peters to build the new basilica, which is one of the greatest cultural and artistic achievements of man. But the current structure should always endure even if a new building were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. I can only attribute the advocacy of summarily scrapping majors, a rash approach so alien to this otherwise well thought out opinion piece, to the necessary but at times misguided impetuous enthusiasm of youth. Erik Hyrkas’s dedication to the new major is admirable but his approach is misguided. In conclusion, I would suggest that we “grow” the college while maintaining a long, proud history, and that we meet the challenge of the future with new and vibrant majors while holding fast that which sets our institution apart.

Hang up your cell phone and drive To the Editor: Wisconsin needs to pass a law forbidding the use of cell phones while driving for all ages! It is very clear: people using their cell phones while driving are usually distracted and do dangerous things like not stopping when a school bus has stopped with its lights on and sign out! A child was almost hit by a motorist talking on his cell phone and did not stop for a bus stop in Howards Grove last week! Does a child have to be injured or killed to get the state’s attention on this? It needs to be stopped now and would be all for a bill banning drivers using their cells while driving! It is a law in other states! Wisconsin should be next to do it! Betty Hirte Sheboygan

Cheerleading: Sport or Not?

editorials The Mirror’s staff editorial topics are agreed upon by the entire staff. The editorial board collaborates ideas and writes the editorials. All individual columns, cartoons, and letters are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial staff or The Mirror’s beliefs, or that of Lakeland’s administration, its faculty, or its student body.

LetterPolicy Lakeland’s students, faculty, and staff are welcomed to write letters to the editor to express their opinions on public issues or in response to editorials printed in The Mirror. Letters can be typed or handwritten and should be limited to 700 words. Letters should be signed by the author, although the author’s name can be withheld if he/she chooses. The Mirror reserves the right to edit all submissions for clarity and length and will be printed as space allows. They may be held for publication at a later date. mail: Lakeland College 607 P.O. Box 359 Sheboygan, WI 53082-0359 email: lakelandmirror@yahoo.com fax: (920) 565-1344 Phone: (920) 565-1316

Cheerleading should be considered a real sport

By Nicole Holland

Staff Reporter hollandn@lakeland.edu

T

he NCAA does not consider cheerleading a sport. However, there are rules and regulations that collegiate cheerleaders must adhere by. How can there be restrictions on cheerleading ‘teams’ when most people still believe that cheerleading is not a sport? That is a good question. Is this a NCAA loophole? Kathy Schwem, the Lakeland Cheerleading coach thought this was an interesting point. Schwem has been coaching the cheerleading team at Lakeland for a few years now. In her own cheerleading days in New York, Schwem’s varsity squad always took state at competition. She believes that cheerleading is a sport. Cheerleaders have long been given strife about not being athletes. When I dropped in on a cheerleading practice last week, I was not surprised to find some defensive attitudes. The squad had no idea that I am biased in favor of this issue. I think some assumed I was a skeptic who would

discredit the reputation of their sport. However, I was a cheerleader all four years of high school. I was actually the captain, and probably the peppiest student you could find at my relatively large high school. Our squad never won competition, and we may have not been “Cheerleader Nation” worthy, but we were athletes. By my sophomore year our team had difficult stunts, high jumps and, most importantly, confidence. I never had difficulty disputing the fact that my squad was a team. We were athletes. Most who argue on the side of cheerleading not being a sport will now concede the fact the cheerleaders are athletes. The fact is that these competitors have strength, flexibility, coordination and mental control. However, skeptics will still hold their ground on cheerleading not being an actual sport. But it is my opinion that most skeptics ‘argue blindly,’ because they do not know what the sport entails. The rules in place by the NCAA were put in place because cheerleading is dangerous. It has more injuries each year than any other sport, including football and hockey.

Many of these are serious injuries and even deaths have occurred in cheerleading, because of difficult stunts. An example of the rules is the regulation to have a mat on the floor during basketball games in order to do basket tosses. “I’m not gunna under-mind [the rules] in any way, [they] are important,” Schwem said. Competitions and games are a full contact, athletic display of ability. There are parameters the squad must adhere by, and everything about cheerleading is competitive. Even games used as practices escalate and a competitive nature is exposed at opposite end of the field or court. In actual competitions, there is no question whether the squads ‘compete.’ The cheerleading squad here at Lakeland is now considered a sport. The squad is under the control of Athletic Director Jane Bouche. The squad had to have physicals and insurance like all the other sports. They practice like the other sports. Roseamber Thompson, a co-captain of the Lakeland college cheerleaders is an avid believer that cheerleading is a sport. Thompson was

a dance major and a four year cheerleader at the Milwaukee High School of the Arts. “Our squad is coming together,” she said. She believes that the Lakeland squad will be ready for competition relatively soon. Schwem also believes our program is moving in the right direction. She described the squad as “very focused girls.” She is not sure when, but she said that in the future she too hopes the squad will go to competition. The focus now should be that Lakeland cheerleading is a sport, and there is no arguing that fact. The squad will need to improve, so it can recruit athletic, gymnastically capable cheerleaders from high schools. I have no doubt in my mind that this can happen. Once gymnastics, solid stunts, and competitions come into the picture, the Lakeland cheerleaders will no longer have to de-

NICOLE HOLLAND/HOLLANDN@LAKELAND.EDU

fend their sport. Competitive cheering will bring with it respect from everyone. This program has the potential, so show us why you are a sport. The NCAA should have the regulations it does. However, I think they should back cheerleading as a sport as well.


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Issue 2, October 4, 2007

Opinions

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Stop ignorance show intelligence Discriminating phrases all around By Jennifer Duenk Opinions Editor jenglbta@yahoo.com

L

ately around campus I have witnessed a couple of disturbing occurrences. As I was walking through the cafeteria doors, I couldn’t help but overhear a young fellow Musky say to one of his friends, “Hey there’s that fag!” I regret not saying anything to him at the time, but what was uttered had stunned me to the point of paralysis. All I could do was watch while the guy and his, known to be heterosexual, male friend laugh as they continued to bash each other and walk away. Also just a few nights ago, as I was smoking a cigarette outside, I happened to overhear another young man walking with two females on their way towards Muehlmeier after a party in the apartments. He was complaining about how he couldn’t handle the sight of

two male individuals flirting with each other. As he continued to gay bash all I could think about was how sorry I was for him. To think that a grown man over the age of twenty was so insecure with his own sexuality that he had to comment on someone else’s. If you know you’re straight then why would you care what anyone else is doing? Are public displays of affection only alright if you’re straight? Or are these the same people that think if the couple is not white, skinny, blue-eyed, blonde, and heterosexual then it’s just plain disgusting? I didn’t know we had modern-day Nazis on campus. Don’t get me wrong, this problem has been going on ever since I can remember. It doesn’t matter where you come from, what race you are, or even what religion you claim to follow. Almost everyone has heard an offensive term, especially the

term “fag”, or the phrase, “that’s so gay”, at least once in their lifetime. Even I must admit when I was younger, I have said it before, but I grew up and realized how offensive those terms can be. I grew out of that juvenile speech pattern. As we grow older, we are supposed to grow wiser. It’s time we all grew up and start to recognize and respect each other’s differences. How is it that we, as educated college students, can write ten page essays with skill and a professional writing style, but when we talk with our friends and peers that sense of intelligence goes straight out the window? You might think that I am overreacting, or you might not care because the word doesn’t offend you. But it wasn’t too long ago that homosexuals were persecuted so badly that they were murdered. They were called heretics by the Christian church.

Down in the dumps Dear Cary and Sherry, I’ve been feeling really tired and “down.” I want to sleep all the time but wake up early. I am not hungry at all. I just don’t feel like myself and am Fishing for always on an Answer edge with others, and sometimes I even cry when I get upset. What is wrong?? --“Down in the Dumps” Dear Down in the Dumps, Is there a new situation in your life? Have you had any losses or other occurrences

that may cause these feelings? If not, you could have symptoms of depression. Common symptoms include the following: • Prolonged sadness or unexplained crying spells • Significant changes in appetite and sleep patterns • Irritability, anger, worry, agitation, anxiety Pessimism, indifference • Loss of energy, persistent exhaustion • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness • Inability to concentrate, indecisiveness • Lack of interest; social withdrawal • Unexplained aches and pains • Recurring thoughts of

death or suicide It might be a good idea for you to get more information about depression and how to treat it. October is National Depression Awareness Month. Cary Knier, campus counselor, will be offering depression screening on Thursday, October 11, 10:30a.m. to 1:30p.m. in the Campus Center. You can complete a short questionnaire to determine whether you might be suffering from depression. If these times do not work or you have more questions, please call Cary at x1527 to schedule an appointment.

ora of carpeting samples this summer. Caribbean Hurricane (in my opinion, the steamrolled confetti on navy) as well as Copper Cable (more of a vomit color) were the design patterns chosen. The carpet is made by Milliken under their Quattra Carpet Tile Systems, in Lakeland’s case under two different subtitles of Aruba, and Fibre Optix. More about carpet than you ever wanted to know, right? To conclude, carpeting is clearly a long term investment, which is why I was trying to figure out if Lake-

land has made a good choice. Clearly it smells fresher than the recently deceased, decadeold carpet, and was definitely needed as a replacement. I think I was just looking for something a bit tackier, like blue and gold colored carpet with the LC logo and Muskies on it. Maybe I’m better off designing pajamas. Patent pending.

Some were tortured, some were hung and some were burned alive. The so called “heretics” were forced to gather their own fire wood for their death traps. Look up the term faggot in the dictionary and it will say “a bundle of sticks” The word faggot refers to the term “fry a faggot.” Another negative connotation for the word “faggot” is that it can be traced back to the French and Italian term baggage meaning “slut, whore”. So next time, think twice before spewing out that word like it means nothing. Everyone knows these terms are offensive, and target a single group of people, but they still use them to describe their dislike of something or someone. This is supposed to be college, not middle school. I thought by now in the year 2007 that our generation should know better than to yell blatantly offensive terms at one anoth-

er in public. Yelling obscene phrases just to capture a friend’s attention is not just offensive it’s pathetic and annoying. It’s up to you as the reader to stop the discrimination. If you are offended by any word that is said around you, make it known. Say something so the one who has spoken the degrading term knows it will not be tolerated around you. Show ignorance is not something to be celebrated. If you want to be homophobic and politically incorrect, that’s your own personal decision. I can’t make you open your mind, but please do it in your own home. At least that way you can save yourself some embarrassment by not proving your ignorance and social awkwardness to everyone. For more information on how to stop the discrimination contact Jennifer Duenk at jenglbta@yahoo.com.

MAY TERM Introduction to Hospitality Open to all students, faculty & staff!! 4-day Bahamas Cruise May 11 – 15, 2008 • $800 all-inclusive with round trip air, transfers, all meals and soft drinks. • Depart Milwaukee (early AM), arrive in Orlando and shuttle to Port Canaveral. • Depart Port Canaveral to Freeport (day trip) to Nassau (day trip) and one full day at sea and return to Port Canaveral.

HAPPY PEOPLE FROM PAGE 5

Residence Life, Jim Bajczyk , I found the Campus Center hasn’t been redone since ’99, and the carpet in Meuhlmeieir and Grosshuesch has not been redone for at least 5 years. “The intention was to put down better quality carpet with a better life cycle,” said Apel. According to Bajczyk, the carpeting just installed is actually squares made of vinyl which can be switched out if need be. As for the patterns, Apel said a committee of students and faculty looked at a pleth-

PASSPORTS REQUIRED!! For more information, contact Tom Padron x-1392, Laun 217, padrontc@lakeland.edu


M I R R O R

STAFFEDITORIAL Apathetic attitudes need rectifying

e d d n our nation, there seems to . be a growing problem of citiezens being oblivious to current -events and basic information. e The Mirror conducted a wsurvey to study the awaregness of current events and knowledge of basic geogra-phy, amongst Lakeland Col-lege students. The survey -questioned students on the u2008 presidential candidates, ein which they were to check tnames from a list. They were ethen asked to locate two -states. Some of the results -were quite disappointing. In the portion concerning presidential candidates, the nmore widely known candi-dates were easily recognized kby the students participating in the survey. Although, some survey takers were not as informed. Nearly 19 percent of the students checked Tommy Thompson, Wisconsin’s former governor, who dropped out of the race two weeks ago. Some students were, surprisingly, even less informed. Over eleven percent of the students surveyed thought that George W. Bush was running for president again, which is impossible. Some students did not take the survey seriously. One of the apathetic individuals marked that Arnold Schwarzenegger was in the running, and also pointed out the fact that we forgot to list Chuck Norris as one of the possible candidates. Apathy is no joking matter. It is horrifying that ignorant and uninformed citizens are voting in elections. Do they know what the main candidates stand for? If it was up

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Issue 2, October 4, 2007

The results are in and they are quite disapointing

Statistics

to the students based on this survey, would Chuck Norris be our president? The second section seemed simple enough. The students were asked to draw a circle in the state of Kansas, an X on the state of Virginia, and a star indicating Washington D.C., our nation’s capitol. Only 39.7 percent of the traditional students were able to correctly locate the states on a blank map. One hundred percent of the nontraditional students correctly labeled these locations. The results from the traditional students were completely outrageous. By this point in one’s education, a student should at least be aware that Washington D.C.

is not in Washington state. Although, each individual’s location coincides with what he or she knows, college students should have expanded their awareness of our nation. It is a possibility that nontraditional students have more motivation than traditional students to succeed and study hard in classes because they need to acquire higher paying jobs and they may have a family to support. How can we get the motivation of the nortraditional students to rub off on the traditional students? Although, the data can support the fact that traditional students need to be better informed, the sample size of the nontraditional data was somewhat skewed. By

sampling more nontraditional students, sacrificing the random smaple, we could have had more accurate results for our population. A National Geographic survey involving 510 Americans had similar results to ours. Men and women between ages of 18 and 24 were to identify New York and Ohio states and 50 percent of men and 43 percent of women could identify them correctly. Other media outlets, including CNN and MSNBC have done similar studies on the apathy and ignorance of our younger generation. This supports the fact that there is indeed a problem, and it need to be rectified. Action needs to replace apathy. We as a student body must become more politically involved in order to further our awareness of our nation and the issues the country is currently facing. The results of the National Geographic and Mirror surveys shows just how oblivious our nation is to fifth-gradelevel concepts such as where Washington D.C. is on the map, and even more important issues concerning who could be governing America in the future. We as citizens should be more educated, so that we can form intelligent opinions as a precursor to taking much needed action.

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Issue 2, October 4, 2007

Opinions

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R


Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 2, October 4, 2007

11

Lakeland student’s fiancé returns from eleven month term in Iraq Wendi Kulas overjoyed at the homecoming of Andrew Ludwig

By Nicole Holland

Staff Reporter hollandn@lakeland.edu

A

s I walked into Wendi Kulas’ room last week, she was cuddled in her comfy bed intently watching the end of the television show, The Hills. After the show ended, she gave a sigh of relief. I don’t think she gasped at the show’s ending, but because she knew I was there to talk about her fiancé, Andy. Wendi is extremely relieved. “He’s finally home, he’s finally

safe,” she said. Wendi, a senior writing major, had been separated from her fiancé, Andrew Ludwig, for over a year. Andy and Wendi have been engaged since Christmas Eve 2005. He was mobilized on July 17, 2006 and deployed to Iraq Sept. 19, 2006. Specialist and Combat Engineer Ludwig returned home one day shy of a year in Iraq. On Sept. 18 the C-Company 397 Engineering Battalion flew into Volkfield, Wis. to greet their families. Wendi SUBMITTED BY KULAS FAMILY

Above: Andrew Ludwig, of C-Company 397 Engineering Battalion arrives home in Wisconsin from Iraq on Sept. 18.

was right there to fulfill her promise to Andy, and “jump on him” when they were reunited. Other members of Andy’s family were also there to welcome him home. His dad wore a shirt saying, “My Son, My Hero.” All but one returned home that day. Corporal Stephen Shannon was killed in Iraq. There was a special plaque at the ceremony in Volkfeild, giving tribute to Corp. Shannon. It was placed alongside his boots, gun, and dog tags; it read, “never forgotten.” It is no surprise that Wendi, along with so many others ,are relieved that Andy arrived safely home that day. Andy’s job overseas was to search for improvised explosive devices and roadside bombs while in Iraq. Just thinking about having someone you love in that situation is enough to make anyone quiver. During his time overseas they tried to keep in close contact. He would call her whenever he had a chance. Wendi had a special ring tone so she could sprint to the phone

SUBMITTED BY KULAS FAMILY

Above: Lakeland student Wendi Kulas fulfills her promise, jumping at the sight of her fiancé Specialist and Combat Engineer, Andrew Ludwig.

whenever Andy called. They also used the Internet to stay in touch, but it can be agreed that in person is much better. “You never really know how long fourteen months is until you are apart,” Wendi said. A new leaf has turned now that Andy is back on American soil. As Wendi finishes her last year at Lakeland, Andy will be setting up a place for them to call home. “We can finally start being us again, which I’m so excited for,” Andy said

in an interview with a local news station. Wendi is really excited for the new apartment in Dorchester, not to mention the wedding to plan for Sept. 8, 2008. But more than anything, she is excited to have her fiancé back, “I missed him a lot because of the stupid little things,” she said. There are no more worries for Wendi, because now she gets to look forward to her and Andy’s future together.

International expectations SIFE is back in 2007 Student’s first experiences at Lakeland College

By Pratikshya Bhandari

Contributing Writer bhandarip@lakeland.edu

I

t is not easy to leave home, family and friends; nor is it easy to hop on a plane and travel around the world and twenty hours later, land in an unknown destination where a stranger is waiting to take you to the place that will be your home for a while. Sound scary? That is how the first days in Lakeland began for almost all the international students. We do not have the privilege of visiting the college beforehand. It is not because the school does not allow it. It just does not seem sensible to spend an estimated $2,000 for airline tickets for a visit. Only seeing pictures from the Internet, we came to Lakeland, not knowing what was in store for us. Janeth Diaz, 25, came all the way from Peru in hopes of improving her English and receiving a US degree. A lawyer by profession in her country, Janeth was not expecting a large number of

international students, here at Lakeland. She thought that it would be easy for her to study here having attended college in Peru, but soon after the classes began, she found out that she would have to work really hard to catch up with the rest of the class. “Four years in Lakeland College is going to be a life changing experience. I am going to learn about new cultures, as there are so many international students. It is a beginning of better things ahead,” said Grace Akinyi Jairo, 19, from Kenya. She believes that a degree from the United States will open doors to an ocean of opportunities. Grace was expecting a bigger college campus but feels that she likes it better this way because she can walk to all her classes within a few minutes. “I sure did not expect to have two roommates,” said Swe Swe Htay, 24, laughing. She found the housing shortage at Lakeland disappointing. Like Grace, she was expecting a bigger campus

,but is happy that Lakeland is small because she sees her professors all the time and is getting to know them better. “It is boring sometimes because I don’t have a car, and even if I did have one, there aren’t many places to go around here,” said HyeJin Kim. Having lived in Seoul her whole life, she finds Wisconsin less than exciting. There are 59 new international students representing 12 countries who became a part of the Lakeland community this fall. We knew that adjusting here and getting to know people would be difficult but surprisingly, it has not been as strenuous as anticipated. Most people have been accepting, and their smiles make us feel wanted. No one said that this journey would be easy, but with each passing day, it is getting better. In no time, Lakeland will begin to feel like a home away from home.

their focus on educating others on the principles of free enterprise. The SIFE year culminates with a regional ur SIFE column has competition at the McCorreturned this year and mick Center in Chicago. will once again be Student teams appearing regumake professional larly in The Mirror presentations in this academic front of a panel of year. Written by corporate executive the Lakeland SIFE judges. Last year’s (Students in Free Lakeland SIFE Sife Says Enterprise) team, it team just missed will focus a spotlight advancing to the on issues related to business, second round of competition economics and finance – with in Dallas, Texas. particular attention paid to This column will constihow these subjects affect col- tute one of our projects this lege students. year. We will make an effort The Lakeland chapter of to educate the Lakeland comSIFE is entering its third year munity, through this column, on campus. SIFE is among on economic and financial the largest student clubs in issues of importance to them. existence with teams on over For example, we envision 1,700 colleges and university articles on the current state campuses worldwide. of the economy, investments, SIFE teams complete the stock market, interviewcommunity service-based ing tips, spotlights on local projects throughout the year businesses, and financial adfocused in five distinct areas: vice on issues important to market economics, entrepre- college students. neurship, business ethics, Our SIFE team also success skills, and personal intends to bring dynamic financial literacy. business speakers to campus The common theme this academic year and comamong all SIFE projects is SEE SIFE/PAGE 14

By Dr. Scott Niederjohn SIFE Team Advisor niederjohns@lakeland.edu

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Issue 2, October 4, 2007

Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

International students meet American pass time By Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor hyrkase@lakeland.edu

E

leven English Learning Institute (ELI) students played football last week thanks to Suzanne House and Ryan Maiuri. House, a professor of the ELI program contacted Maiuri, a Lakeland alumnus and new defensive back coach, asked if he could help teach the students in the program. “I was watching football and I was thinking, it’s an easier sport to learn if people teach you, and to them [international students] football is the mystery sport,” said House. After pitching the idea, Maiuri got together six others, some players, and some coaches to help teach the students. House went over football terms and rules in class the day before. The session began with Maiuri and the others showing the ELI students how to throw the football inside Founders Gymnasium. Most of the students caught on quickly, and were throwing spirals in five minutes’ time.

After throwing, the players and coaches explained the pads worn in football. The girls “oohed” and “ahhed,” as Hirokazu Katoh of Japan tried on the pants, James Trazile of Haiti, the football helmet, and Zhen Yu Wu of China, the shoulder pads and Lakeland jersey. Following the pads, the students were introduced to the kicking tee, and several successfully kicked the football 20 yards. Later, Maiuri and Defensive Coordinator Colin Bruton helped teach the premise of offense and defense, thereby moving the game outside, where they could teach them yard measurements, touchdowns, and kicking off and doing field goals. The girls had a particularly awkward time learning how the ball is hiked to the quarterback. In their uncomfortable laughter, they eventually found the courage to do it themselves. After the basics were learned, a few downs were played by the group, and at least one successful touchdown was made by Trazile. Wu commented, “It’s hard to play, but very fun.” Wu and many of the students

had never seen or played the sport before. “I play basketball and sometimes soccer,” said Wu. Field goals were the most exciting to the students. Coach Bruton held the ball as Wu, Trazile, Katoh and several others attempted to kick the ball between the uprights. Trazile and Katoh both succeeded on their third attempts, as the group cheered wildly for them. Maiuri and the other coaches concluded the event in encouraging any of the students to come to practice to watch, or even try out. “I liked it. I thought it was a good idea, they seemed to enjoy it,” said Offensive Lineman Tom Kelly. Maiuri was a quarterback for Lakeland for his entire undergraduate career, as well as working for the ELI program for two of those years. The ELI program currently has 20 students enrolled; one of the highest numbers ever according to House. The program helps teach international students English, and about American culture. This semester 59 new international students have come to Lakeland.

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Top: Brent Miller talks to the students of the uses and benefits of wearing football pads and the uniform during gameplay. Middle: Defensive coordinator Colin Bruton holds the ball while Yung-Ming Wu (Rex) of Taiwan kicks a field goal successfully. Bottom: James Trazile from Haiti, Ryu Kyung Won from Korea, and another student listen to learn now to kick a football.


Features

The Lakeland College

Issue 2, October 4, 2007

13

M•U•S•K•I•E M I R R O R

It’s Homecoming Week, and now is the time to show your Muskie Spirit! All of these great fashions are available in the Campus Shop in the Laun Center. You can find sport-specific apparel like the Lakeland Football shirt Kasey is wearing below. Lakeland College Alumni sweatshirts are also available. Mens, womens, and childrens sizes and styles are available. Show your pride and cheer on those Muskies! Homecoming Hours: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Regular Hours: Mon-Th: 7:45 a.m. - 6 p.m. Fri: 7:45 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sat: 12 p.m. - 4 p .m.

Rob Pockat, Staff Reporter

p

Nicole Holland, Staff Reporter Kasey Gussert, Mirror Contributor

p Women’s Lakeland Sweatshirt (Left): $46

p Fleece LC Sweatshirt: $34.95 Lakeland Pennant: $12

u Lakeland Alumni Sweatshirt: $28

p Lakeland Sweatshirt (Right): $36.95

u Women’s Lakeland T-shirt: $16.95

LORI SASS/SASSL@LAKELAND.EDU

p Lakeland College Flag: $48 u Women’s Lakeland Football T-shirt: $22 t Lakeland College Sweatshirt: $52 t Lakeland College Baseball Cap: $20

John Sieglaff, Fun House Editor

S•P•I•R•I•T


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Issue 2, October 4, 2007

Features

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Colleges Against Cancer comes to campus Kelly Hopfinger introduces an American Cancer Society organization to Lakeland

By Rob Pockat

Staff Reporter pockatr@lakeland.edu

A

ccording to the American Cancer Society (ACS), about 559,650 Americans are expected to die of cancer this year. That is more than 1,500 people per day. Lakeland College senior,

Kelly Hopfinger, wants to help fight this deadly disease. She is organizing a new student group, Colleges Against Cancer (CAC), to help wage the war. CAC is a program created to help eliminate cancer by initiating and supporting the programs of the ACS on college campuses. It is run by

college students and is supported by the ACS. Colleges Against Cancer works through four strategic directions, which are advocacy, cancer education, Relay for Life, and survivorship. One of the goals for this group is to organize a Relay for Life event in the spring of 2008. The relay will be an overnight event in which teams of people take turns walking or running around a track. The event will not only raise money to help research, prevent, treat, and cure cancer and save lives, but also to remember survivors and those affected by cancer. “This will be a great opportunity for students to par-

ticipate and help fight against cancer,” Hopfinger said. The National Institutes of Health estimate overall costs for cancer in 2006 at $206.3 billion: $78.2 billion for direct medical costs; $17.9 billion for indirect morbidity costs (cost of lost productivity due to illness); and $110.2 billion for indirect mortality costs (cost of lost productivity due to premature death). About 1,444,920 new cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed this year alone. “Cancer takes more than just lives,” said Hopfinger. She added that, “Unhealthy lifestyle choices coupled with a lack of health insurance by many Americans is leading to

a national crisis. This group will address all of the issues associated with cancer.” The Lakeland chapter of CAC is currently in the process of drafting a constitution, acquiring a faculty advisor, and planning future meetings and events. To learn more about Colleges Against Cancer, or to join the group, contact Kelly Hopfinger at hopfingerl@ lakeland.edu. The American Cancer Society, the parent group of Colleges Against Cancer, provides many patient and survivor services. They can be reached 24 hours a day via 1-800-ACS-2345 and www. cancer.org.

Graphic: www.cancer.org

Lakeland’s dance team gets moving Co-captains compliment team members’ dance abilities By Emily Wachel Staff Reporter Wachele@lakeland.edu

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s students take on another new year, many organizations are building onto previous years to improve. One organization that really stands out this year is the Lakeland Dance Team. “It is unusual that the dance team starts out the year with every girl on the team having past dance experience and already having great technique of skills, but this year it’s true,” Jen Hoffman, co-captain of the team, said. With every girl on the team having such advanced skills, it is easier for this team

to further their performance. The dance team’s co-captains, Hoffman and Ashley England, are both very proud to be leaders of such an outstanding team. Their leadership consists of great organization, skill, and pride, which reflects as great motivation to all eleven girls on the team. Their two hour long practices, three days a week, are paying off. The dance team is performing at football, basketball, and soccer games. Along with this, they also support Lakeland by performing at the Homecoming pep rally this Friday. Hoffman said, “A future goal for this team is to someday be able to perform at

baseball games.” The dance team is focusing on supporting Lakeland sporting events and not on competing themselves. The dance team is fundraising to acquire new apparel such as warm-ups, tshirts, sweatshirts, and new uniforms. They have not been able to unify themselves with these until this year. “This team is different from all past years because we all experience such unforgettable bonds that create comfortable support systems for all of us. This inspires us to improve our capability as a team and everyday we accomplish more,” England said. Freshman member Laura

Schnelle said, “Being new to Lakeland, I felt confident in this atmosphere because the girls on this team really support me. I am proud to be a part of such an amazing team.” As an outcome of this year, Hoffman wants to gain more respect and support from Lakeland as a whole, and also increase the number of members on the team. Anyone is interested in joining the dance team, tryouts for basketball season will be held Oct. 14 - 16. Anyone needing more information should contact Hoffman at ext. 6535. Below: The dance team performs at a Lakeland football game in Fall of 2006. BRIAN MOSER/IMOSER_ME@YAHOO.COM

SIFE FROM PAGE 11

plete other projects with the goal of bettering our campus and local communities. We hope you will watch for this new feature and read it with interest. If this club sounds like something you would be interested in, contact Ashley Eick, our recruitment director eicka@ lakeland.edu. We are looking for new members interested in making a contribution to this mission. Membership is open to students of all majors, and we welcome diversity outside of the business division.

Join the Lakeland Mirror ______________ Meet new people Express your creativity Conduct interviews Report news and win awards.


The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Features

Issue 2, October 4, 2007

15

HOMECOMING SPIRIT IN 2007 Far left: The Women’s basketball homecoming team placed in the window painting contest, with this mural Monday.

Left: During the relay race night, one of the games involved moving a lifesaver from one teammate to the next using only toothpicks in their mouths.

Below: Tracy Bins runs back to her team during the ball relay, in which teams were timed in their a total of ten balls back and forth starting with one.

2007 Homecoming Court Ricardo Brown Kempton Freeman Kevin Hildebrand

Left: Casey Schaetz poses for the audience to be bid on at the Homecoming Date Auction Tuesday.

Tom Kelly Ahkeim McKnight John Wagner Tracy Bins

Below: A homecoming team re-enacts an Emimem music video in the pub on a green screen.

Ashley England Kasey Gussert Jennifer Hoffman Britini Parker Kenya Ward

Left: Kayla Moffat and her friends get messy during Pass the Muck relay. The game required teams to pass corn syrup, pudding, rice, oatmeal, and flour over their heads and into a tub with their hands.The team with the most muck won.


16

A&E

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 2, October 4, 2007

MOVIEREVIEWS

3:10 to Yuma runs wild By Erik Hyrkas Managing Editor hyrkase@lakeland.edu

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hristian Bale and Russell Crowe star in this resurrection of the American classic Western/Gun-slinging film genre. The story revolves around the capture of the mass murdering, bank robbing, gun-slinging

outlaw Ben Wade, played by Crowe. Meanwhile an indebted rancher, Bale, is thrown into the mix, offering to keep his gun to Wade’s head for payment as a group of volunteers journey across the desert to get the outlaw on the 3:10 train to Yuma. Unfortunately for the group, Wade’s quick gun marksman crew is still on

the loose determined to take out anyone and everything to free their gang’s leader. That is when the bullets start to fly. If you’re a diehard fan of old Westerns, this film is definitely a tribute. The dynamics and choreography of the gun fights are amazing, the dialogue is brilliant, and the characters have depth. Crowe and Bale have a unique chemistry in the film. Wade attempts to escape through-

Music

out, and the rancher Dan Evans, has to fight and in some cases help the outlaw, to keep both of them alive on the dangerous trek. This flick will keep you on the edge of your seat the entire time, as the tension rises, and the climax explodes in your face. See this movie.

3:10 to Yuma Lions Gate Films Directed by James Mangold



1) “Crank That” 2) “Beautiful Girls” 3) “Big Girls Don’t Cry” 4) “Wall to Wall” 5) “Potential Break-up Song” www.yahoo.com

books 1) “The Age of Turbulence” 2) “You’ve Been Warned” 3) “Eat, Pray, Love” 4) “Into the Wild” 5) “If I did It” Confessions of the Killer”

www.usatoday.com

Xbox 360 1) Halo 3 2) NHL ‘08 3) Skate 4) Eternal Sonata 5) Stranglehold www.yahoo.com

movies to see 1) "The Game Plan” 2) "The Kingdom" 3) "Resident Evil: Extinction" 4) "Good Luck Chuck" 5) "3:10 to Yuma"

t a h c t a HOME w o t e i v o Am By Nicole Holland Staff Reporter hollandn@lakeland.edu

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ecently released on DVD, “Unknown” slipped under the mega blockbuster radar. However, this film was one of the best movies I have watched this year. Reviews of this movie classify it as a cross between “Memento” and “The Usual Suspects.” I could not agree more. This is a well written thriller, with thoughtful direction. My hat’s off to both, writer, Matthew Waynee and,

director, Simon Brand. The all-star cast knocks this film out of the park, as well. The Academy Award nominee Greg Kinnear, as usual, plays the guy the audience loves to hate. Jim Caviezel’s brilliance as an actor shines through as the plot points cannot be pre-conceived. Both Barry Pepper and Joe Pantoliano also delivered above par performances. The movie begins with five characters, who wake up from unconsciousness, locked in a warehouse. It is quite obvious that something is not

right. The characters are all either injured, immobilized, or both. All are suffering from temporary memory loss. They realize that they are in a friend versus foe situation, but they do not know who is on which side. As they slowly regain their memory, they must figure out who they can trust. Unlocking their “unknown” pasts and how they got there, will determine who will get to live. “Unknown” is a movie I could watch over and over, despite a few corny moments. I recommend it to anyone.

PHOTO/ROTTENTOMATOES.COM

www.yahoo.com

B

C c

a d o h a i t

HER Unknown Weinstein Company Directed by Simon Brand

 Above: Barry Pepper from the movie “Unknown.”

o a d t t c v v n

B S


a&e

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 2, October 4, 2007

17

Graduation best time and cd By Jennifer Duenk Opinions Editor dlduenk@aol.com

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n Sept. 11, Kanye West released his third CD titled Graduation. For those of you who have been living under a rock for the past seven years, Kanye West is a rapper that broke out onto the scene with his first single, “Through the Wire” in 2002. Kanye, meaning “the only one” in Swahili, was made notorious not only for his rapping ability, but also for his producing skills and controversial political statements such as the infamous “George W. Bush hates black people” incident and his MTV boycott. He gained fame by producing hit singles for major hip hop/R&B artists, including Jay-Z, Cam’ron, Paul Wall, Common, Mobb Deep, Jermaine Dupri, The Game, Alicia Keys, Janet Jackson, Eminem and many others. West’s style of production often uses pitched-up vocal samples, usually from soul songs, with his own drums and instruments. West seemed to have saved the best beats for himself. Graduation is the long overdue album where you can actually listen to it for longer than two weeks without being completely sick of it. I knew when I heard his

first single that was released that I had to own the CD. In a world full of bootlegs and illegal downloads I chose to actually purchase the album. Unfortunately I no longer own the CD. After only two plays on my stereo speakers the CD was stolen from me. I guess that should speak for itself, the CD is so good that people are willing to do anything for it. But even though I only had it for a limited amount of time that didn’t stop me from falling in love. The CD is magnificent. Some say that West has built one of the strongest reputations in music. Graduation was one of the most anticipated and important albums of the year. I, for one, completely agree. It was not about whether the album would be good, but whether it would be his best. With songs like “Stronger,” “Can’t Tell Me Nothing,” “Barry Bonds,” “Drunk and Hot Girls” and “Champion” the CD seems to have a song for everyone. His songs and his talent in my opinion are unrivaled by anyone in the rapping industry so far this year. “I wanted to make songs that are people’s theme songs,” West said in an interview. He also described Graduation as being “whiter” than his last two projects and “blacker” than his other works. Not only is it great mu-

PHOTO/AMAZON.COM

Kanye does it again!

sic but the purchase is well worth it if you’re an art fan. In a 106 and park interview West talked about the artwork that comes with his newest album and said that “in a few years the artwork will be worth more than the

at HOME h c t a w o t e i A mov

By David Copp

Contributing Writer coppd@lakeland.edu

“U

nknown” is a movie that captures your attention right away, and doesn’t skip a beat throughout. The twists and subtle hints along the way create an abundance of suspense. Who is who and what happened to these five men? Jim Caviezel shows, once again, his strength as an actor. He plays a borderline unethical character that the audience is unsure to trust. Greg Kinnear’s character appears to be a victim, but also strikes the viewer as devious, and manipulative. I agree with Nicole that Barry Pepper and Peter Stormare also give strong

album.” The cartoonish drawing was done by, contemporary Japanese artist, Takashi Murakami. Murakami is well known for his application of the Japanese art form of Superflat which is inspired by manga and anime and cri-

tiques the downfalls of Japanese society. This is the best CD that I have heard in a very long time. Thank you Kanye for your contribution to my generation’s history and for making some kick-a** music.

Upcoming Convocations Monday, Oct. 8 - Andrew Bird, 7:30 p.m. *Tickets required!

performances. The director does a great job of not giving anything away too soon and simultaneously keeps the audience glued to the screen. The main point of psychological thrillers is the conclusive ending. In this case the ending is perfect. It not only a wrapped up the story, but was an outlet for the writer to throw in one last twist. Needless to say, I was more than surprised by the quality of this film. I am surprised it didn’t get much hype, considering how good this movie was. “Unknown has it all, including big name actors, a creepy setting, action, and a good plot with plenty of twists.

HIS Unknown Weinstein Company Directed by Simon Brand



Tuesday, Oct. 9 - John Anderson, 11 a.m. ***Remember, students must attend convocations in order to graduate!


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Issue 2, October 4, 2007

Fun House

Chase and Eddie

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R By John Sieglaff Fun House Editor sieglaffj@lakeland.edu


Fun House

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

20

Issue 2, October 4, 2007

Man in Korea dies from playing video games By Mariah Tess Online Editor tessm@lakeland.edu

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ust about everybody knows how it feels when you do something you enjoy. Nobody ever wants to stop doing whatever makes them happy. Be it a gripping novel that you’re really into, an intense round of cards, or what have you—hopefully it is legal. You say, “Just one more chapter!” or “One more round, I swear to drunk I’m not God!” Usually, however, you eventually have to stop, whether you have to go to the bathroom, you have homework to do, or you just got arrested. Something necessitates that you stop the activity and do something else. Not so in the case of an unnamed, 30 year-old South Korean man who died after playing video games for three days straight at an Internet café in the city of Taegu. Witnesses say he would only take short breaks to go to the bathroom. If you ask me, there was his first mistake; he could’ve just used a plastic bottle. He also took short naps on a makeshift bed by pushing some tables together right in the middle of the café. He didn’t eat very much of anything, aside from some Crawlers and a few jelly doughnuts. It was reported that he

lost his job a few days earlier after not going to work because he was playing video games instead. Big surprise there! When he didn’t come home, his mother asked some of his former colleagues (that’s right, colleagues, not necessarily friends, because she probably couldn’t get a hold of 1337Master986 instead) to find him. When they found him, he told them he would finish the game. If he didn’t finish the game in three days, how would he finish it in a few minutes and then come home in time for dinner? He died a few minutes later—in real life, that is, not in the game. If he only died in the game, I wouldn’t be writing this. “We presume the cause of death was heart failure stemming from exhaustion,” a Taegu provincial police official told Reuters. South Korea has a highly developed gaming industry, very underdeveloped social skills and pale skin as a result. More than 30 million people (around 30 percent of South Korea’s population) are registered for online gaming. The country also hosts the annual “World Cyber Games,” which, according to the WCG Web site, is “a global tournament in which sport is conducted within the medium of cyberspace, also known as

e-sports.” It’s essentially like the Olympics, except instead of years of physical training for certain events, it’s a bunch of computer nerds competing against each other in various video games. And I’m sure they’re in comfy computer chairs and temperature controlled rooms. I don’t care that massive multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs) take a lot of time to play. At some point, you have to stop. Either your mom is yelling at you to take out the trash or you’re about to be late for your shift at McDonald’s. The virtual world is not where you live. What your character eats in the game does not satisfy your actual, physical body. Whatever healing powers you use on your character does not affect the real you. I too, play video games, but I do not involve myself in them so deeply that I ignore my actual existence. Besides, when would I have time to write about a guy dying playing video games if I were that involved in gaming? This guy died from exhaustion. Exhaustion from clicking a mouse with his right index finger so much that his heart just couldn’t handle the strain anymore. Hardly sleeping or eating didn’t help either. His stomach probably ate itself and his brain probably got bored and gave up.

Commercial slogans 1

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He could have done better than that. He could have died of exhaustion from staying up for three days trying to find a cure for cancer, trying to end world hunger, or stopping the violence in Darfur. Oh wait, I’m sorry, obviously this guy wasn’t smart enough to cure cancer, end world hunger, or stop violence. He wasn’t even smart enough to properly care for himself. Notice how there was no mention of a shower anywhere within these three days. Death by exhaustion from playing video games too long is the topper, but there were also two other factors that made this guy’s existence pretty sad. One: he lost his job from playing video games too much (however fulfilling and important that job probably was). Two: He still lived with his mom, and he was in his 30’s. So he was middleaged, unemployed, living with his mom, and a video game freak. He sounds like a winner! What woman wouldn’t want to marry him and raise his children? At what point did the café employees say, “Hey, this guy sure has been here a long time,”? I assume this café stayed open 24/7 for this guy to have been playing nonstop. And just where was this “makeshift bed” exactly? Where was the manager of

the café? I find it hard to believe that anyone would want someone living in their café for three days, especially without practicing good hygiene. Here in America people of the teenage demographic can’t even wander around in Wal-Mart at 1 a.m. without an employee stalking them or basically telling them to buy something or get out. Not that my friends and I have done that *cough*. How does a middle-aged man get away with living in an Internet café for three whole days, especially if he didn’t buy any coffee or food? Anyway, the lesson here is, you really do need to eat and sleep. Your game will still be there when you wake up. The odds of it magically disappearing overnight or growing legs and walking off are very low. If playing a video game is so important to you that you forget how to live your real life, you probably shouldn’t be playing at all. Another lesson: you don’t want to be ridiculed by writers/reporters on a college newspaper because you died in a somewhat amusing manner and your life happened to be quite pathetic and ripe for being made fun of.

Across

Down

Sources: http://us.world cybergames. com http://www.cnn.com

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800-588-2300 This product had a catchy jingle about a man obsessed with cleanliness A girl’s gotta eat Look who we’ve got our _____ on now I’m lovin’ it Hungry? Why wait?

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Fun House

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 2, October 4, 2007

The roommate who lost the TV Mi televisión, su televisión By John Sieglaff Fun House Editor sieglaffj@lakeland.edu

S

o, as I said last time, welcome, and welcome back, everybody. I hope everyone is starting to settle in, getting used to your schedules, burying any roommates who may have crossed you. It’s okay—your secret’s safe with me. Straight from That aside, the John I hope everyone is feeling welcome and safe here. Seriously, I don’t think Lakeland has ever had anyone who has killed his or her own roommate off. We don’t do that here. Here we just act like jerks until the roommate leaves. Then you might get your own room, which rocks. I once had my own room. It was last semester, my sophomore year. I was paired with this guy who basically adopted my television set and watched it every hour of the day. Honestly, if he wasn’t doing natural human functions (eating, sleeping, showering, going number one or two), or going to classes, he was watching TV.

He did leave on weekends, however, so that was nice, and I survived the first semester with him. There were few, but major, drawbacks and I finally became fed up with his mistreatment of my property. When I put the TV at the foot of my bed, he flipped out and moved back home. It is not that I enjoy being a grade A douche bag. But I began to not feel welcome in my own room and studying was not easy with game shows, sports games, and hit programs from the early 90’s blaring all the time. Most of the labels on the buttons had faded off of the remote due to his constant abuse. So, hopefully this has given you some good advice on how to handle your conflicts with your roommates in a mature fashion. Tune in next time. And enjoy the Chase and Eddie. …Oh, wait. I don’t think I have written nearly enough, yet. *Sigh* I guess I better keep on writing if you guys are still reading. Where was I? Ah, yes, having my own room. Having your own room is like being the only one in a theatre, except a theatre is a lot bigger and dorm rooms don’t commonly have projectors hung on the ceilings

http://teachnet.ie

pointed at a white, roll-up screen. Nor do they have elevated seating for maximum viewing comfort. But still, having your own room is sweet! Once I got my own room, the first thing I did was disassemble my roommate’s bed and open up my room. I was quite tired of the narrow walkway between the dividing desks and the beds next to the walls. After moving a few other things around, I started

offering tours of my room. “This corner is the kitchen,” I’d say, “and here’s the living room, and the bedroom. The study.” I charged people five bucks for every tour I gave. But sadly, there was only one person who was willing to pay the five dollars. And after the tour, the young man kicked me without mercy until I returned the his money. So, anyway, I suppose by now just about everyone has stopped reading this and

there’s no more point to me writing. Even so, I am going to at least finish my thoughts and give this whole thing a bit of closure. I am not quite sure what exactly you can pull from my tired, rambling, and incoherent babbling as far as any meaning goes. Honestly, I don’t think there is any. Sorry if you feel gypped. But, hey! At least I didn’t charge you five dollars to read this, you bunch of cheapskates. Pay up!

through has taught me the greatest lesson in my life… not to listen to myself. I may not have always been good at something when I started out, but I’ve always worked hard

and have been relatively successful. Life at Lakeland has been a blast. Now, if only I could write as good as that John Sieglaff guy does.

Out of the Pockat Get ready, it’s all out now! By Rob Pockat Staff Reporter pockatr@lakeland.edu

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hat the @#$% am I doing here? I’m almost 35 years old, I have a wife and two kids, and I am a full-time Lakeland College student. This can’t be right. I should be stocking shelves at Wal-Mart or asking people if they would like fries with their McMeal. At the very least I could be doing something respectable like selling used cars or cleaning hotel rooms. But alas here I am, a non-traditional student just trying to fit in. Well, I’m here and all I have to do is coast through under the radar until I get my diploma…right? That was my initial plan. I just had to make it through. That plan went straight to the loo! I didn’t want to get involved on campus…I’m old

and I don’t have time, but somehow the Lakeland bug crept into my system. It started out innocently enough, some football players told me to join Student Association. I would have said no but, frankly, they were a lot bigger than me, so I didn’t feel that I had a choice. That turned out to be a pretty good experience. Next, I ended up in the honors program. Whoa, slow down! This is the last place that I should be. Pretending to be intelligent has been a 24-hour-a-day gig. Sometimes I think it would be easier to actually learn something than to just pretend that I learned it. I have learned, however, that wearing shirts with buttons makes a student seem smarter to professors. So, faking my way through honors has somehow evolved into me being a writing tutor. I ain’t real good at writing though. I had to pay some-

body on the Internet $49.95 to write this article for me. I think I overpaid! Now I’ve somehow ended up as a staff writer for this great publication. At $49.95 per article I’m going to have to get a part-time job to finance this semester on the MIRROR. Finally, I’m running, unopposed, for president of the Student Association. I’m not sure what my odds of winning are, but they have to be close to 50/50. This, I’m not too worried about because I know of at least one President who I can outintellectualize. Don’t worry, I won’t go there. Reflecting on my involvement at Lakeland and how I deviated from my plan to coast


Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R Issue 2, September 4, 2007

21

Doherty, Wilk and White fuel Muskies Lakeland sits comfortably undefeated in conference as homecoming finale approaches By Beau Markut Sports Editor markutb@lakeland.edu

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fter a rocky start in non-conference play, the Muskies have rolled to a 20 rout of conference foes. With a 36-21 victory over Greenville and a 21-7 victory over Benedictine, Lakeland sits undefeated on top of the IBFC. In every statistical category, Lakeland has improved tenfold after entering conference play on Sept. 22. Against nonconference juggernauts like UW-Oshkosh and UW-Whitewater the Muskies were unable to run the ball with any sense of efficiency or consistency. The combination of senior Paul Resop, sophomore Antonio Humphrey, and freshman Ben Lombardi only recorded an average of 46.7 yards per game and 1.9 yards per carry in nonconference competition. In the past two games, the trio averages 125 yards per game at an average of 2.95 yards per carry. Resop, the primary rusher and veteran of the rushing committee, has been sidelined

with knee problems since the season opener against Whitewater. The senior returned to action in the road victory against Benedictine where he received 17 carries in his return, gaining 64 yards on the ground and a touchdown. He is reportedly 100 percent healthy from his knee sprain although he still wears a knee brace. Humphrey is not practicing due to an apparent knee sprain. The sophomore sports a thigh-length brace while sidelined, which brings into question whether or not he will rush in the homecoming bout against Eureka. Coach Doherty has listed him as questionable for Saturday, as the staff still needs to ascertain how healthy Humphrey is. Lombardi has been a freshman surprise at tailback this season. The freshman has gained more rushing yards than any other Muskies this season. In 41 attempts, Lombardi has gained 164 yards at 4.0 yards per carry. Against Greenville, the freshman had a career-high 109 yards on SEE FOOTBALL/PAGE 22

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Coach Doherty, Brad Wilk and MacArthur White consult on the sideline in the home opener against Whitewater.

Women slip to 2-3 Women’s soccer loses to perfect Edgewood By Shawn Forsyth Staff Reporter forsyths@lakeland.edu

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

SEE WOMEN SOCCER/PAGE 23

Men’s Soccer has problems in conference By John Wagner Staff Reporter wagnerj@lakeland.edu

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he Lakeland women’s soccer team was recently unable to add to their brief two game winning streak as Edgewood College topped the Muskie’s 6-1 on Tuesday night. Amy Christensen punched in the only Lakeland goal, which easily tells the story of how the offense struggled throughout the game. Although Edgewood is currently the elite team in the NAC with a perfect conference record and an overall record on 9-1 after Tuesday’s win, head coach Dave Madsen believes his team did not play to their ability. “We lacked assertiveness,” said Madsen. “It seemed we were just too tentative to step up and face the challenge ahead of us. We let Edgewood off the hook right away in the first half by giving away the first goal.” Coach Madsen is, however, certain that the ladies will bounce back in the upcoming games against Wisconsin Lu-

0-3 in NAC T

Above: Gina Weiss hustles to win the ball against the Edgewood opponent. Lakeland would end up losing the contest 6-1.

he Lakeland College men’s soccer team fell to 0-3 in the Northern Athletics Conference after a 5-1 loss at Concordia University of Wisconsin. Even though the game was tied 1-1 by Kevin Fitchett’s goal at 22:12, Concordia came back and scored shortly after at 22:35. “As soon as we scored I told the guys we needed to concentrate on the next few minutes and build off the score, and right from the kick-off Concordia had a chance on offense that they put away,” said Head Coach Dave Madsen. “We sat back and let them take the initiative back to us right away. That was frustrating to watch because we had worked hard to get back in it, and I thought we definitely belonged in the game.” Concordia continued on after their 2-1 goal, scoring one more before the half and two more goals from Brian Nord in the second half, making the final score 5-1. Concordia was able to put 21 shots on goal and Lakeland’s freshman goalkeeper was able to stop

five of them. “We knew what we needed to do, but it was just a matter of carrying it out and being proactive with where we were positioned on the field,” said Madsen. “We have plenty of talent, but we need to keep our focus and sustain in keeping the pressure on the other team.” “We have the players to win, it’s just a matter of managing the game once we get the momentum going in our favor,” said Madsen. One of those players is Ryan Condon, a 6’1 senior from Madison, Wisconsin. “He’s a good leader on and off the field. He definitely has the experience here at Lakeland and he is one of our most vocal leaders on the field,” Madsen said. Condon actually played as the Muskie’s goalkeeper last season after they found they were without one. This forced Condon to play out of position, but he is back as a defenseman this year. Although he didn’t have any experience whatsoever, Condon developed quickly and became one of the better goalkeepers in the North American Conference. He finished second in the conference with a total of 140 saves.

SEE MEN’S SOCCER/PAGE 22


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Issue 2, September 4, 2007

Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Lakeland unbeaten in conference FOOTBALL FROM PAGE 21

the ground. Against Benedictine he was stuffed for only 14 yards on the day. “[Lombardi] plays like a freshman,” said Head Coach Kevin Doherty. “Freshmen are going to play like freshmen. One game they are doing great and that might not be the same the next. They are inconsistent. You just need to work with them.” Senior Brad Wilk may be the happiest to hear of the improvement in the rushing game. “The last two weeks we have had success running the ball,” said Doherty. “That added threat has taken pressure off our passing game. Teams are not always looking for the pass.” Wilk’s stats have spiked in conference competition. In non-conference, the quarterback was only averaging 173.7 yards per game. In conference he is averaging 233 yards per game with a 55.8 completion percentage. Against Greenville, the senior threw for 254 yards, four passing touch-

downs, and a touchdown with his feet. For this performance, the IBFC awarded Wilk Offensive Player of the Week honors. “One reason [Wilk’s] stats have jumped is because the level of competition,” said Doherty. “The level of competition was far superior earlier in the season than the teams that we are playing now.” Where once the Muskie defense was allowing an average of 47 points against per game, in the past two weeks they have only allowed 28 points total. The UW-Oshkosh Titans racked up 529 total yards against the Muskies. Benedictine only gained 138 yards in the 21-7 victory on Sept. 29. “[The defense] has had a lot of injuries, and we got some of those guys back,” said Doherty. “It is hard to win games when you have two or three of your starters out. Plus, that first win [against Greenville] has given them that fire that we need to win from now on.”

The Muskies end their four game road trip and return to home for the first time since Whitewater on Sept. 1. “Right now we are preparing to play at home,” said Doherty. “We have a lot to prove to people at home.” Eureka is 1-3 overall and 1-1 in conference. The Red Devils are coming off a win against conference foe Concordia University of Chicago. “We are going to be ready for Eureka,” said Doherty. “They just won a big game and we are not going to take them lightly. The Muskies battle the Red Devils Oct. 6 at home for the conclusion of the homecoming week. “There is nothing making me nervous [concerning the homecoming week]. There are a lot things going on this week that can serve as distractions, but they are less important than the work that we are doing right now, but I want my players to experience their college homecoming.”

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Brad Wilk takes snaps in a passing drill. The Muskies are gearing up for their homecoming bout against Eureka.

Football prevails over Eagles in conference win LCSI--The Lakeland College football team’s defense did not allow a touchdown and the Muskies stayed unbeaten in conference play with a 21-7 victory at Benedictine University in Lisle, Ill. The host Eagles (1-4, 0-2 Illini-Badger Football Conference) made things interesting when Bob McLearen returned an interception 45 yards for a touchdown to cut the score to 14-7 with 13:30 to play. But Lakeland’s offense delivered when it had to, sealing the win with a score with 7:43 to play to improve to 2-3 overall and 2-0 in league play. Lakeland’s defense limited Benedictine to 138 total yards. Senior Kempton Freeman and sophomores Joe Janisch and Dan Burrow all registered sacks as the Muskies pressured the Eagles throughout the game. “I’m so happy with our defense,” Lakeland head coach Kevin Doherty said. “We had

great discipline and or coaches called a smart game. Our defense won that game.” A pair of Lakeland’s starting defensive players factored into the game’s first score on special teams when junior Stephan Johnson blocked a Benedictine punt and senior Cleveland Pierce scooped up the loose ball and returned it 24 yards for a touchdown with 4:28 left in the opening quarter. “That was great to see,” Doherty said. “We work on those types of plays.” Lakeland made it 14-0 with 9:41 left in the first half when senior Paul Resop scored on a 2yard run. Resop, who was back in the lineup for the first time since suffering a knee injury in the season opener, was a bright spot offensively, rushing for 64 yards on 17 carries. Facing a third down with 16 yards to go with 4:30 to play, Res-

op ran for 15 of those yards to put the Muskies in a position to get the first down. Lakeland eventually scored on the play when senior QB Brad Wilk connected with senior MacArthur White on a 4-yard pass to seal the win. “I called that draw on third down to punt, and he nearly got us a first down,” Doherty said. Lakeland finished with 348 total yards, 136 on the ground. Wilk was 20 of 35 for 212 yards with one TD and two interceptions. The Muskies had 11 penalties for 105 yards, many coming from holding calls. “I don’t think we were focused on offense,” Doherty said. “Brad had some good throws, but he rushed some other decisions. We had some good drives where we got good yards, but we’ve got to sharpen up. When you don’t play particularly well and still win that’s the sign of a good team. This was a good win for us.”

MEN’S SOCCER FROM PAGE 21

IBFC STANDINGS Team

Conf. Ovr.

Lakeland

2-0 2-0 2-0 1-1 1-1 0-2 0-2 0-2

Concordia (WI) Aurora Eureka Concordia (IL) Greenville Benedictine MacMurray

2-3 3-2 2-2 1-3 2-3 1-3 1-4 0-4

The Muskies play Maranatha Baptist College this Saturday in Watertown, Wis. At 4:00 p.m. The Muskies also host Wisconsin Lutheran College for their homecoming game. The game is scheduled for 3:30 p.m. after the women’s soccer game. “These are teams that I feel we will have success against,” said Madsen. “We don’t focus on what the other teams are going to do or what some of their players are capable of. We are more concerned about what we have to do and what we have in our game plan. That will keep our intensity up and hopefully will help keep the pressure on the other team.”

Muskies get first victory of the year against conference opponent Greenville College LCSI--Everything came together for the Muskies on both sides of the ball as they rolled over Illini-Badger Football Conference foe Greenville 36-21 in the conference opener on Saturday in Greenville, Ill. After failing to pick up a win through a tough non-conference schedule, the Muskies (1-3, 1-0 IBFC) rebounded on Saturday when it mattered most to begin conference with a win over the Panthers (1-2, 0-1 IBFC). The Muskies are predicted to finish third in the IBFC final

standings according to a preseason coaches’ poll while the Panthers are expect to finish second. The Muskies offense combined for 368 total yards, including 254 yards passing and 114 rushing yards. “Our passing game really came together today,” said Doherty. “I think part of the reason for it was because our rushing effort was so effective. Senior quarterback Brad Wilk threw for all 254 yards completing 19-of-32 passes for

four touchdowns and just one interception. Wilk was also solid on the ground as he picked up a rushing TD of his own in the contest. Freshmen Ben Lombardi was also impressive. After being plagued by an injury since preseason camp, the freshman had a breakout day to get the Muskies’ running game going, carrying the ball 21 times for 105 yards. The Muskies’ receiving core also had a strong game. Senior wide receiver MacArthur White had four catches for 96 yards

and one touchdown, while junior wide receiver Matt Pawlyk had four catches for 37 yards and a TD. Sophomore wide receiver Jake Heinemeyer also had a great game with four catches for 91 yards. Freshman tight end Traves Robinson-Worthington and freshman running back Todd Guyette also had receptions for touchdowns in the contest. Also a big difference maker for the outcome of the contest was the Muskies completing 10of-18 third down conversions this week, which was something

that Muskies had struggled with in the last two contests. The Muskies’ defense was astounding, containing Panther’s quarterback Dominic Kegel to just 117 offensive yards. Junior linebacker Brent Miller intercepted one of Kegel’s passes late in the first quarter, which the Muskies’ offense was able to turn into a touchdown. Sophomore linebacker Jamie Schramm paced the Muskies with 10 total tackles, while junior linebacker John Wagner had nine tackles.


Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Issue 2, September 4, 2007

23

6-1 loss to Edgewood sinks Muskies WOMEN SOCCER FROM PAGE 21

theran, MSOE, and Alverno College. “The team is a lot better than what they showed against Edgewood,” said Madsen. “We have a tremendous defense on the squad. It appeared that we just became tired on the backside of the field, allowing the other team to get by us and get good looking shots at the net. We really need to work on the way we attack the opposition throughout the entire game, but especially early on so we don’t fall behind early and be forced to play catch up.” The Muskies currently stand at the number seven spot in the NAC with a 2-2 conference record and a 3-8 record overall this season. With the team right in the middle of the conference with seven games to go in the regular season before the first round of the playoffs begin on October 30, there is still plenty of time to get back to winning some more games and doing some damage in the second half of the 2007 season. The next opportunity

knocking at Lakeland’s door will be October 6 at 11:00 p.m. when Wisconsin Lutheran comes to town. The Warriors recently snapped their 7 game losing streak after defeating Alverno in dominating fashion with a final of 7-1 this last Tuesday. The Muskie’s will attempt to not allow the Warriors a chance at achieving their third win of the season. The team will then travel to Milwaukee to battle MSOE on October 10 before hosting Alverno College October 13 at 1:00 p.m.. With both Wisconsin Lutheran and Alverno College below Lakeland in the current standings, the chance of picking up two more wins right away is staring the team in the face. And if the ladies play up to their potential, which they are very capable of doing, there is no reason why they can’t arrive back from MSOE victorious as well. To achieve these victories, the leading goal scorers Maria Santelli, Maggie Short, Gina Weiss, Alicia Malmstadt, and the rest of the team will have to step it up.

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Above: Maggie Short evades Edgewood’s Elyse Clouthier in the home contest. The Muskies would drop the game 6-1.

The agonies of Brewer’s fandom cally tolling. I can assure you that it is; however, if one was to ask any other Brewer fan, they would report a similar t finally happened. I feeling of mind wrenching afexperienced the sensa- fliction. tion of despair, agony, and There is nothing out of depression that every the ordinary about Brewers’ fan is subthis anti-euphoria; jected to year after like I said before, I year. On Sunday, Sept. experience this once 23, at 5:06 p.m. I was a year. The only asin the car traveling pect that has changed back to school when this year is when. In I turned on ESPN years past, this event radio. The monotone has taken place in voice blathered out July, if I am lucky. the scores of the vari- Beau Knows This occurs shortly Sports ous games that had before Milwaukee is taken place that fatemathematically elimiful day. nated from the wild When I left for Lakeland, card chase. my Brewers were beating the This fact should bring imAtlanta Braves 4-1 through mense comfort that my team six innings. Two hours later, has improved, but it does not the radio personality reported in any form. This year seemed the final score as 7-4 in fa- to be more heartbreaking bevor of Atlanta. The Brewers’ cause I was so close. I looked bullpen gave up six runs in up and yelled, “God, why? only two innings! The Chi- Why have I waited the encago Cubs had won that day tire 20 years of my life for the and pushed the club to three Brewers to make the flippin’ and a half games ahead of playoffs?” Milwaukee. That is when the undoubtThat is when it happened. edly true events of the tale I gave up on the Brewers for became very doubtable. Readthe season. All the hope that ers I am asking for a leap of bounced around inside of me faith. By faith I mean divine the entire season depleted in faith. That is when someone a split second. Now readers, spoke back to me. I heard a do not be alarmed in any way. heavenly voice say, “Because This experience sounds hor- I am a Cubs fan, Beau.” The rible and possibly psychologi- unknown speaker’s voice By Beau Markut

Sports Editor markutb@lakeland.edu

I

resonated throughout the small car. Confused, scared, and skeptical I responded, “Who is a Cubs fan?” I frantically searched the entire car for the voice that was somehow projecting that they are a fan of a team that I have detested since I was walking. The mysterious voice continued, “I am, and that is why the Cubs’ will make the playoffs.” The voice had a hint of power in his voice that ceased all my questions. “But... but why?” I asked the heavenly voice, wondering why he would be a part of a fan group that is quite possibly the most aggravating group of people that Chicago could spew forth. I tried to validate my stance, “The Cubs just buy any player they want. The Brewers use their farm systems. Half of the lineup is under 25-years-old and was drafted by Milwaukee.” “I have an agreement with the Chicago Tribune,” responded the heavenly voice. “They own the Cubs and thus I favor their team.” Once again that extreme confusion set in. I quickly said, “The Chicago Tribune? The most biased piece of multimedia in the western hemisphere?” There was a pause as if the voice was deliberating on how to respond. Finally he

spoke, “Yeah, that one.” I took a huge sigh and just reveled in the moment. My Brewers will never make the playoffs because the Chicago Tribune has made a deal with... um, somebody. Then it hit me. I became very excited and asked, “That means my Bears are going to do well this year?” As soon as I had spit out

my question, the voice responded with a powerful and assured, “Nope.” “Oh come on!” I yelled, furious at the heavenly voice. “You are telling me you are a Packers fan too, and that is why the Bears are not going to win this year?” The voice calmly responded, “No, Rex Grossman is the reason why they are not going to win this year.”

LINDSAY STIENER

Above: Brewer’s head coach Ned Yost may lose his job after missing playoffs.


24

Issue 2, September 4, 2007

Sports

The Lakeland College

M I R R O R

Women’s soccer drops to 2-3 LCSI--The Lakeland College women’s soccer team fell to 2-3 in the Northern Athletics Conference following a 6-1 loss to Edgewood College on Tuesday, Oct. 2, at Lakeland. The Muskies (3-9 overall) were able to fend off the Eagles’ driving offensive attack early on, holding Edgewood to just one first half goal. However, Lakeland was unable to sustain the

effort, falling victim to a barrage of 14 total shot attempts from Edgewood while the Muskies had trouble getting their own offensive attack going forward. The Muskies did find success on one of their two shot attempts for the game, as junior forward Amy Christenson prevented the shutout with a goal in the 83rd minute to cap off the scoring for the game.

Brad Wilk, Quarterback, Football BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Women’s offense dominates Regents LCSI--The Lakeland College women’s soccer team (3-8, 2-2 NAC) snagged its second victory in a row this week with a 7-0 shutout over Northern Athletics Conference opponent Rockford College on Sunday, Sept. 30, in Rockford, Ill. Freshman forward/midfielder Alicia Malmstadt continued impressive efforts off the bench, knocking in two goals within roughly two minutes of each other to put the Muskies up, 6-0, late in the first half. She also recorded an assist on the Muskies’ second goal of the game by sophomore forward Gina Weiss. Malmstadt also kept the Regent’s goalkeeper and de-

fensive line on their toes with five of the Muskies’ 27 shot attempts for the game. Junior forward Amy Christenson, freshman forward Maria Santelli and junior defender Maggie Short also helped earn the Muskies a comfortable lead with a goal apiece in the first half. Junior midfielder Megan Stock capped off the Muskies’ scoring deluge for the game with a goal in the 86th minute on an assist by sophomore midfielder Jessica Hopfinger. Senior Savannah Johnson and freshman Whitney England shared time between the posts to pick up the shutout, with England tallying two saves.

Men’s soccer falls to Falcons LCSI--The Lakeland College men’s soccer team fell to 0-3 in the Northern Athletics Conference following a 5-1 loss to Concordia University, Wis., on Tuesday, Sept. 25, in Mequon. Although the Muskies (08 overall) were able to tie the game, 1-1, following a goal by junior midfielder Kevin Fitchett at the 22:12 mark, the Falcons answered right back with their second goal at 22:35. “As soon as we scored I told the guys we needed to concentrate on the next few minutes and build off the score, and right from the kick-off Concordia had a chance on offense that they put away,” said head coach Dave Madsen. “We sat back and let them take the initiative back to us right away. That was frustrating to watch because we had worked hard to get back in it, and I thought we definitely belonged in the game.” Concordia never looked back after going up 2-1, scoring one more goal before half, while

Brian Nord netted the final two goals in the second half. Lakeland endured the Falcons’ brutal offensive attack throughout that game, fighting off a total of 21 shot attempts, five of which the Muskies’ freshman goalkeeper, Brock Winkler, was able to secure. “We failed to make a lot of little adjustments, and they were just a step ahead of us the whole game,” Madsen said. “We knew what we needed to do, but it was just a matter of carrying it out and being proactive with where we were positioned on the field.” The Muskies will now rest up with a long layoff, as they will not play another game until Thursday, Oct. 4, when they face NAC opponent Maranatha Baptist. “We have a while to regroup and work on some things now,” Madsen said. “If we come out and we show that we’re focused and determined for the full 90 minutes, it should be our game to win.”

Brad Wilk is synonymous with the Lakeland’s passing game for better or worse. In the past two weeks, the passing game has undoubtedly been for the better. The senior has recorded 466 yards through the air. With a completion percentage of 57.4 from 39 completions out of a possible 68, Wilk has proven himself a dominant gunslinger in the IBFC. The Roselle, IL native has been a force on the scoreboard in conference play with four touchdown passes and one with his feet. This effectiveness earned Wilk the honor of IBFC Offensive Player of the Week for his performance against Greenville on Sept. 22. Congratulations to this issue’s MVP, Brad Wilk. Coaches who feel a member of their team deserves the MVP of the issue award can send an e-mail with the suggested player to lakelandmirror@yahoo.com.

Volleyball remains undefeated in conference LCSI--The Lakeland College women’s volleyball team moved improved to 11-8 and remains a perfect 6-0 in the Northern Athletics Conference following a pair of 3-0 wins over NAC rival Concordia University Chicago and nonconference Purdue North Central on Saturday at a triangular meet at Concordia in River Forest, Ill. “It was the best volleyball we have played all year,” said head coach Chad Schreiber of his team’s play. “We were firing on all cylinders, and no matter what Concordia did we had an answer for it.” The squad was indeed clicking on offense against Concordia, as the Muskies de-

feated the Cougars by comfortable margins of 30-20, 30-22, 30-16. Also, three Muskies hit .500, including senior outside hitter Ashley Domask, who knocked down a team high 16 kills and added 13 digs. Junior right side hitter Heidi Kramer and sophomore middle hitter Kim Linger were also solid on offense with nine kills apiece. Sophomore outside hitter Brittanie Paulus boosted the team on defense and topped the digs column with 21, while also adding eight kills, and sophomore defensive specialist Tonia Strebelinski tallied 17 digs. The Muskies continued their strong play against Purdue North Central, finishing off the match with scores of

30-19, 30-16 and 30-17. A few of Lakeland’s sophomore back-ups also got their time to shine on offense, as utility Kaylyn Kasper and middle hitter Jessica Keller led the team in kills with eight and seven, respectively, with Keller hitting .500. Kasper also tied for team digs leader at 14 with senior right side hitter Alayna Flynn, who also recorded six kills. The Muskies are currrently the only remaining undefeated team in the NAC, but will have to fight though three upcoming conference matches in a row to keep that claim, starting with Aurora University on Friday, Oct. 5. Match time is set for 7 p.m.

BEAU MARKUT/MARKUTB@LAKELAND.EDU

Men fall short against Stars LCSI--The Lakeland College men’s soccer team dropped to 0-2 in the Northern Athletics Conference following a 5-0 shutout loss to Dominican University on Saturday, Sept. 22, at Lakeland. Despite the end result, the Muskies (0-7 overall) took steps in the right direction in terms of team chemistry, communica-

tion and effort, as they prevented the Stars from finding the back of the net for the first time until the 32nd minute. “I’m very pleased with our guys,” Madsen said. “We came in with a good level of concentration, our organization in the back was excellent and we were able to frustrate Dominican for long periods of time.

Above: Amy Christensen shoves her defender over for the ball in the home contest against Edgewood. Christensen would score the lone goal in the contest.

Fall 2007, Issue 2  

Lakeland Mirror

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