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Lakeland College Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2014-2017


Vermilion Campus 5707 College Drive Vermilion, Alberta T9X 1K5

Lloydminster Campus 2602 59 Avenue Lloydminster, Alberta T9V 3N7 1 800 661 6490 www.lakelandcollege.ca


Table of Contents Executive Summary..................................................................................... 3 Accountability Statement............................................................................ 4 Institutional Context.................................................................................... 5 Plan Development........................................................................................ 6 Environmental Scan..................................................................................... 7 Goals, Priority Initiatives, Expected Outcomes, and Performance Measures....................................................................... 15 Plan for Financial Sustainability............................................................... 24 Internationalization.................................................................................... 28 Information Technology............................................................................. 29 Capital Plan.................................................................................................. 30 Appendix A: Applied Research and Innovation at Lakeland College................................................................ 33 Appendix B: Lakeland College’s Risk Assessment Report................... 35

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Vermilion Campus

Lloydminster Campus 2

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Executive Summary As Alberta post-secondary institutions refocus after the fiscal shifts of the last year, Lakeland College is solidly building on its strengths, addressing its weaknesses, opening up to new opportunities, and meeting external challenges. This 2014-17 Comprehensive Institutional Plan (CIP) captures many of the exciting developments at the College as it strives to inspire learner success and community development through innovative learning in an inclusive and diverse environment. Engaging with learners, responding to industry, and managing financial responsibilities establish the foundation for the College to deal with both internal and external challenges. There is a pressing need to upgrade aging and inflexible academic facilities as well as a desire to enhance employee recruitment and retention. External opportunities for growth and engagement can be found in the immigrant population base and enterprise initiatives. Lakeland is also proactively facing the challenges of balancing growth, providing stewardship, and supporting students in rural centres. The College’s strategic plan centres around four central outcomes:

Optimize Learner Success • Align with industry • Improve student retention • Increase alumni engagement

Strategically Provide Programs to Meet Student, Government, and Industry Needs • Increase student satisfaction through program specialization • Maintain enrolment through accountability and efficiency measures • Align with government • Engage in responsive applied research • Respond to market with new programs through accountability and efficiency measures • Increase globalization activities through program specialization

Connect with Stakeholders • Engage the community • Engage industry through financial contributions • Engage industry through corporate training

Achieve Sustainable Operations • Achieve economic sustainability • Achieve environmental sustainability • Achieve social sustainability The College has tabled a deficit budget for 2014/15 to allow for residence renovations. Other than specific resource requests for information technology and capital expenditures, all current goals will be met by utilizing current College resources or through cost-recovery initiatives. Lakeland College strives to ensure it can adapt to the current economic environment in a way that still enables achievement of Lakeland’s key strategies and outcomes as well as alignment to the Government of Alberta and the ministry of Innovation and Advanced Education’s key priorities.

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Accountability Statement This Comprehensive Institutional Plan was prepared under the Board’s direction in accordance with legislation and associated ministerial guidelines, and in consideration of all policy decisions and material, economic, or fiscal implications of which the Board is aware.

Milt Wakefield Chair, Board of Governors Lakeland College

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Institutional Context Letter of Expectation The Letter of Expectation is an agreement between the Board of Governors of Lakeland College and the Minister regarding high-level outcomes and responsibilities for both parties. Lakeland College agrees to work with the Minister to support and promote Campus Alberta and its goals of a learner-centred, accessible, affordable, quality, and sustainable post-secondary system in Alberta that fosters innovation, entrepreneurship, and collaboration. The Government of Alberta and its post-secondary institutions are expected to achieve focused outcomes valuable to Albertans that support and encourage engagement, economic, social, and cultural prosperity. Comprehensive Community Institutions (CCIs), one of the six sectors represented within Campus Alberta, are responsible for stewardship of adult learning opportunities within their defined region of Alberta. As a CCI, Lakeland plays a strategic role in the region and province’s economic growth by providing relevant programming as well as applied research and maximizing learner access to programs and courses. The College works closely with Campus Alberta partners and various stakeholders throughout Lakeland’s region to promote economic development and to provide learning opportunities that meet the needs of individuals, organizations and industry. This letter will be reviewed and updated annually through collaboration between the Minister and the Board Chair that builds upon the collegial working relationships between the government and the institution.

Mandate Statement Lakeland College is a board-governed public college operating as a Comprehensive Community Institution under authority of the Post-secondary Learning Act of Alberta. The College prepares

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students to enter the workforce, advance their career, or further their education. Lakeland College offers credit programming in the areas of academic upgrading, agricultural sciences, apprenticeship and pre-employment trades training, business, emergency services and public safety, energy, environmental sciences, health and wellness, human services, interior design technology, tourism, and university transfer. The College awards certificates, diplomas, and applied degrees and may offer baccalaureate degrees primarily in collaboration with degree-granting institutions. Lakeland College’s commitment to the collaborative principles of Campus Alberta is demonstrated through partnerships within the post-secondary system that strengthen its programming and service capacity. Lakeland College provides integrated emergency response, prevention, and leadership training at the provincial, national, and international levels. Areas of specialty include fire service, emergency medical services, incident command, and emergency preparedness training for pre-employment, municipal, industrial, and public sector clients. To enhance the college experience for its students, the College provides a people-centred learning environment with access to a full range of services including advising, athletics, cafeteria, child care, clubs, financial aid, health, library, learning, recreation, residence, and student employment.

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Institutional Context continued...

Plan Development

As a Comprehensive Community Institution, Lakeland College works cooperatively with adult learning partners, school jurisdictions, organizations, business, industry, and other community stakeholders to respond to learning needs in its regional service area. Through a partnership agreement between the Alberta and Saskatchewan governments, the College provides training and educational opportunities for Saskatchewan residents.

Internal and external consultation on the development of this CIP is ongoing. Internal discussions have taken place with key stakeholders including student groups as well as academic and support staff. Students and staff are engaged in long-term planning for Lakeland by discussing and providing feedback to the College on future programming, needs of future learners, Lakeland’s competitive edge, and recruitment and retention.

As an extension of mandated programs, Lakeland College offers continuing education credit and non-credit courses and customized workforce development training for business and industry in Alberta, in Canada, and internationally. By using face-to-face, blended, and distance learning technology delivery methods, the College is able to maximize learner access to high-quality and affordable lifelong learning opportunities. Lakeland College promotes community economic development by providing workforce training and development and by conducting applied research. The College participates in applied research and innovation activities that are relevant to its program areas, complement teaching and learning, and advance innovation-based rural community economic development. The focus of applied research is primarily in the agriculture, emergency services, energy, environment, and manufacturing sectors. Through its services and facilities at its campuses in Vermilion and Lloydminster, Lakeland College helps support the recreational, cultural, fitness, child care, and conferencing needs of the communities it serves. The College has numerous specialized facilities such as multiple music studios, two community theatres, two recreation centres, a swimming pool, and an indoor riding arena that are often the site of community events and activities.

The College is committed to open communication with Alberta Innovation and Advanced Education to ensure that all provincial expectations are met while still addressing access and quality needs for Lakeland learners. Lakeland’s Accountability Systems Committee stewards the document through information gathering and reviewing processes. Draft materials have been regularly reviewed by the College’s Executive team as well as relevant constituent departments (research, marketing, finance, registrar, deans, communities). Following Board approval, the final CIP will be shared with the larger College community, and subsequent feedback will be built into future iterations of the plan. External consultations, in both Alberta and Saskatchewan, have taken place with key stakeholders including regional access advisory committees, community adult learning councils, business and industry, research organizations, regional high schools, other post-secondary institutions, government departments, and advisory committees. These discussions focus on identifying learner needs as well as creative, collaborative measures to meet these needs.

Approved by the Lakeland College Board of Governors, October 28, 2009 Approved by the Minister of Advanced Education & Technology, November 23, 2009 Update currently in progress.

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Environmental Scan Strengths Learner Engagement As Alberta faces labour market shortages and an aging population, it is increasingly critical for post-secondary institutions to find innovative and responsive measures to ensure student access and success. The Government of Alberta’s Strategic Plan for 2013-16 challenges all stakeholders to participate in the building of “the Alberta of tomorrow.” At Lakeland College, the Alberta of tomorrow can be found in its learners. After three years of enrolment increases, the College has experienced a slight decrease in both FLE and HC enrolment for 2011/12 (Campus Alberta Planning Resource 2013). Despite this shift, the Lakeland region still has the highest post-secondary regional service rate, at 30.9%, for Alberta’s prime post-secondary cohort of 18- to 34-year-olds. Lakeland is supporting the foundation of Alberta’s future workforce. In a recent student focus group (Fall 2013), Lakeland students have identified several factors as important in highlighting Lakeland’s competitive advantage over other post-secondary institutions. Hands-on learning is a distinguishing characteristic of the Lakeland experience. As one student states, “The experience that you learn working on the farm will follow me, along with my classmates, Comprehensive Institutional Plan

back to the farm and into the industry.” Repeatedly, students point out the fact that they are perceived as individuals at Lakeland – not just numbers. They are receiving a “big-school” quality education in a “tight-knit community” that makes them “feel at home.” Lakeland instructors are also highly commended for their knowledge, availability, and caring. This feedback from Lakeland students correlates with the provincial student-led Ignite initiative in which students identify their highest priorities as access, cost, and quality teaching (ignitealberta.ca, 2014). Learner engagement is also reflected in Lakeland College’s consistently high retention rates. In 2012/13, full-time certificate programs experienced an 81.5% retention rate whereas full-time diploma programs experienced a 79.6% retention rate. Diploma programs also experienced an 88% retention rate between the beginning of second year and graduation. Learner engagement initiatives at Lakeland College support Innovation and Advanced Education’s Goal One, as outlined in the IAE Business Plan 201316, that Albertans need to be engaged in lifelong learning through the enhancement of learner pathways, the increase in participation of the prime post-secondary-attending cohort, and the increase in satisfaction of learners.

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Industry Responsiveness Lakeland College consistently demonstrates its responsiveness to industry through regular communication with its advisory committees, proactive responses to labour market skill shortages, and synergistic programming initiatives. Goal Four in the IAE Business Plan 2013-16 calls for a competitive and sustainable Alberta with “strong and collaborative regional economies,” and CAPR 2013 stresses the central role of post-secondary institutions to meet rising labour market demand. Lakeland is addressing skill shortages in the Alberta economy through active alignment with industry and learner needs. Within the trades, farming, health, energy, environment, and emergency sectors, Lakeland continues to expand its interaction with industry in both an advisory and action capacity. An Industry Satisfaction Survey will be conducted in the spring of 2014. Goal Two in the IAE Business Plan 2013-16 envisions an Albertan workforce that is “skilled and productive.” One measure to achieve this is an increase in tradespeople supply through apprenticeship programming. Geographically, Lakeland’s Lloydminster campus is in the heart of oil and gas country. An increased need for skilled tradespeople has led to a dramatic increase in the number of apprenticeship seats at the College. In response to learners and industry, Lakeland has found it necessary to extend access to apprenticeship training: 2010/11

FLE 253 Final Headcount of 919

2011/12

FLE 263 Final Headcount of 952

2012/13

FLE 308 Final Headcount of 1049

2013/14

Predicted FLE of 352 Predicted Headcount of 1200

According to CAPR 2013, Lakeland College has the third highest number of technical training seats in the province after only Edmonton and Calgary. The College has been working closely with the oil and gas industry to meet specific labour market requirements. Lakeland’s Heavy Oil Power

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Engineering diploma program and an upgraded 3rd-Class Husky Energy Power Engineering lab are addressing an industry shortage of 3rd-Class power engineers. The on-reserve offering of the Introduction to Heavy Oil Program at Onion Lake Cree Nation has aligned industry need with Aboriginal engagement and employment skills. A new hub of oil and gas training in western Canada, the Energy Centre, is now under construction in Lloydminster. The addition of a combined Power Engineering/Heavy Oil lab and computer simulation lab will enable Lakeland to upgrade programming and increase current student numbers. The annual training capacity will allow the College to meet current demand and prepare for future expansion. As well, a partnership with the Husky Upgrader, ADM, and Allan Markin, former chair of CNRL, has led to the enrolment of 236 students in online or evening Power Engineering courses in 2012/13. This is an increase of 150% over previous years. Through synergistic programming initiatives between Energy, Emergency Training, Agriculture, Environment, and Trades, employers are accessing uniquely qualified and skilled personnel. Heavy oil power engineering students engage in fire training using the College’s world-class firefighting training facilities. The 7-storey structural tower now has piped-in propane, fire-retardant paneling, and custom-made props to reflect realistic scenarios students will encounter in the workplace.

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Renewable energy research connects students and faculty in energy, electrical, and interior design. Such integrated and interactive opportunities provide a more robust student experience, develop collaborations that transcend traditional programming boundaries, and encourage students to be flexible thinkers. Lakeland students are well positioned to engage with the evolving knowledge economy.

Fiscal Management Lakeland’s senior leadership team remains committed to financial sustainability in alignment with the Government of Alberta’s second policy priority of “securing Alberta’s economic future” (GOA Strategic Plan 2013-16). As in past years, the College has demonstrated fiscal prudence, has focused on identifying sustainable solutions, and has worked towards creating new revenue streams and sourcing operating efficiencies. Lakeland is committed to sustaining its operating position to create both exceptional learning experiences for students and exciting employment opportunities for staff and will continue to work with government to develop and implement long-term strategies that will address the financial challenges facing the post-secondary system. Lakeland College is focusing on responsible entrepreneurship and business enterprise development in order to fund strategically prioritized areas.

all departments, and identify projects for targeted process improvement. With a strong focus on improving the educational experience of learners and aligning the improvements with core outcomes, Lakeland welcomes the opportunity to capitalize on found efficiencies that will ensure the College is focused on value-added, student-centred activities. Maintaining financial sustainability and rationalizing current and future operations are critical for the survival of the College. In addition to an increased emphasis on deriving revenue from alternate sources, new research and innovation opportunities are aligned with existing and future programming and facilities. Lakeland is committed to supporting the government as it faces the realities of today while focusing on the road ahead. Demographic pressures presented by Alberta’s population may affect post-secondary funding in years to come. As the population ages, other sectors (e.g. health care) may demand more funding, and Lakeland may face a dwindling share of provincial resources especially in light of uncertain oil revenues. The modest projected growth in postsecondary enrolment may not be able to withstand these demands for increased spending in other sectors. Strong fiscal management is positioning the College for such future developments.

Employing a collaborative budget process enables key leadership within the College to set budget priorities and ensures the College as a whole works towards a common goal. 2012/13 financial results show a surplus of just over $2 million that has been strategically invested into the completion of the Energy Centre and the initiation of the critical Small Animal Clinic facility upgrade. Lakeland is committed to investing funds towards updating facilities to ensure students have access to modern and functional buildings and equipment. The College also continues to focus on maximizing capacity at both campuses through new program development as well as expansion of current offerings The executive team is moving forward with the development of the Sustainable Improvement Toolkit process enhancement initiative that was introduced in 2012/13. An investment and commitment have been made to train staff, engage

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Weaknesses Aging and Inflexible Academic Facilities Lakeland College continues to explore possible solutions for its aging and inflexible academic facilities. Fall 2013 student focus group feedback repeatedly focuses on the limitations of Lakeland’s classrooms and labs. In particular, students are concerned that it is difficult for the College to keep up with changes in industry when they are trying to support new equipment and technology in aging buildings. Keeping in mind the expansive infrastructure that the government of Alberta supports, the College is providing creative alternatives to building new facilities and is demonstrating commitment to these projects by self funding several aspects of these initiatives. Existing buildings need to be retrofitted to accommodate regulatory expectations. The existing animal health clinic is outdated; investigation is underway to relocate, expand, and modernize this facility to accommodate licensing recommendations. The space currently utilized by Agricultural and Environmental Sciences programming is also in need of modernization and redesign to accommodate larger classroom and lab sizes as well as reflect current practices and required workplace equipment. In addition, there are plans for Lakeland’s learning commons that include retrofitting the space to create a second floor to function as a student space for learning and teaching. Lakeland College needs to re-allocate and reconfigure existing learning spaces into “new” learning spaces that motivate learners, promote learning activities, and support both collaborative and formal practices. College space needs to become more responsive, inclusive, and supportive to meet changing learner expectations. Classrooms that were originally built for 20 students/class are too small for today’s larger program cohorts. Each building should be modernized with flexible space to accommodate evolving pedagogies and future programming. Lakeland seeks to provide a more personalized and inclusive learning atmosphere with more light-infused environments, flexible furniture, wider doorways, wireless connectivity, and open-plan social areas.

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The 50% reduction of the IMP grant funding in 2013/14 has caused significant challenges in the College’s ability to perform basic maintenance on the current facilities. Funding received is used almost solely to respond to emergency fixes as opposed to proactive and preventative maintenance that can be more cost effective and efficient. Roofs are leaking, lighting is becoming obsolete, and flooring is wearing and potentially becoming a safety hazard. The College is updating its deferred maintenance assessment plan and will prioritize emergency, 1-year, 3-year, and 10-year needs.

Employee Recruitment and Retention Lakeland College continues to look for new and creative ways to recruit employees. The market is very competitive as the College not only competes with businesses and post-secondary institutions within the area but also on a provincial and national level. In addition to the use of market adjustment for some hard-to-fill areas, Lakeland College has embarked on a new recruitment strategy using technology to promote hiring opportunities. The College accesses an electronic-based networking account on a regular basis for recruiting employees and has been very successful in hiring for some key positions. Social media and other web-based electronic avenues have also been used to advertise faculty openings.

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Lakeland is currently in negotiations with the AUPE group as well as the Faculty Association. The Administration group accepted a wage freeze in the past year with the vice presidents, the deans, and the directors taking a 3% wage rollback on July 1, 2013. Negotiations are challenging in light of the provincial government’s urging for wage freezes in the postsecondary system for the next several years while other government groups are reaching settlements outside of these parameters. The College remains committed to staff and faculty and will continue negotiating toward settlements with these groups. A generous benefits package, access to the College’s fitness/recreation centre, and a positive and engaged workplace environment enhance employee recruitment and retention efforts. Employee retention and development will be a key focus at Lakeland over the next 18 to 24 months as a new human resources strategy focusing on onboarding, talent management, workforce development, and succession planning will be developed. Employee engagement will continue to be a priority of Lakeland’s culture as demonstrated through celebrations welcoming new staff and recognizing career milestones. Lakeland College faces the same challenge as many post-secondary institutions regarding an aging workforce. A significant number of Lakeland’s workforce will be eligible for retirement over the next 10 years. Of the College’s current continuing and permanent employees, 31% are of retirement age (55 years of age or older). The average employee age is 47, and the median age is 50. These numbers are significantly up from 6 years ago when potential retirees numbered at 16.2%. In 2012, the College experienced its highest annual number of retirees. Potential changes from the LAPP “85 Factor” to a “90 Factor” in 2016 could also trigger a higher than typical number of retirements as individuals want to maximize the payout of their pension plans in relation to years of service. Despite this demographic shift, Lakeland College is embracing the opportunity that retirement can bring. New hires bring new ideas and energy into the institution. However, retired individuals are an excellent pool of knowledgeable workers for which a flexible work arrangement can be organized. Part-time and/ or part-year work schedules are being discussed and considered as a method to gain access to the skills and experience these individuals have while enabling them to enjoy their retirement. Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Opportunities Immigrant Population In an attempt to close the participation gap of under-represented groups in post-secondary education, as per CAPR 2013 direction, Lakeland is developing opportunities to work with a growing immigrant population in Lloydminster. According to Statistics Canada’s ethnocultural analysis based on Canada’s 2011 Census, almost 7% of Lloydminster’s population has immigrant status. 33% of these immigrants moved to Canada between 2006 and 2011. The most common countries of birth are the Philippines (15.6% of immigrant population) and the United Kingdom (at 14.8%). 63.7% speak English and/or French most often at home. The three top non-official languages spoken at home are Spanish, Tagalog (Filipino), and Afrikaans. Many foreign workers in Lloydminster are also pursuing educational opportunities at the College to improve their efforts at becoming permanent Canadian residents. Early in 2013 Jeff Mulligan, business owner and then Lloydminster mayor, estimated that there were “more than 2,300 temporary foreign workers in Lloydminster” (lloydminstersource.com). The College seeks to enhance programs and activities that will attract immigrants. Lakeland’s Health Care Aide (HCA) program is popular for immigrant students as they are able to work and complete courses at the same time. The two practicums, over a total of five weeks, also provide hands-on learning for immigrants. There is currently high demand for health care aides in Lloydminster as there is a new long-term care facility scheduled to open in Lloydminster in 2014. The Prairie North Health Region (PNHR) has made presentations to current students regarding available positions upon graduation. Lakeland College 2014-2017

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As Lakeland’s regional immigrant population continues to expand, fewer young Albertans are available to participate in the labour force. In particular, the farming industry in the Lakeland region indicates there is a labour market need for more farming-related workers as the current population is aging. The GOA 2009 report Alberta’s Aging Labour Force and Skill Shortages states that 47.1% of employed farmers and farm managers are over the age of 55, and for every four individuals employed in farming-related activities, there is only one worker between the ages of 15 to 34. The opportunity exists for Lakeland College to link the growing immigrant population to farming labour market needs through retraining. From 2013 to 2041, it is expected that 67.8% of Alberta’s population growth will stem from interprovincial and international migration (CAPR 2013). IAE is looking for a “new Alberta immigration approach to meet labour challenges” (IAE Business Plan 2013-16). Even though Alberta’s large urban centres, Calgary and Edmonton, receive the majority of immigrants, Lakeland College is supporting the growing immigrant population in Lloydminster. Helping immigrants negotiate such labour market barriers such as lack of Canadian work experience, lack of recognition for foreign credentials, and language barriers are possible methods to connect immigrants with labour market needs (CAPR 2013).

Enterprise

generation facilities. These projects will provide year-round sustainable revenue, sustainable land use practices, and, in some areas, self-sufficiency. The combination of projects will create a natural on-campus gathering place and spin off revenue generation. The trilogy of Home-Away-From-Home projects not only provides the College with significant revenue generation capabilities, but in cooperation with the local communities, also designates Lakeland College and the surrounding area as a destination. Creation of a highway-accessible travel plaza, a campground, and new dormitories will allow Lakeland to generate revenue, welcome visitors, and increase the student population. Closely tied to the College’s expanded emphasis on enterprise will be the solidification of Lakeland as a gathering place for its community. There is much to build on as students already see the College as a natural community gathering space (Fall 2013 focus group). By building on a unified vision of what Lakeland College’s role is in the community, enterprise activities will naturally evolve from this brand. The Lakeland College brand will be an umbrella with a thriving community under it. By focusing on community growth instead of single, marketable products, the College will attract employees and students while supporting local economic development. Each product is a story, and Lakeland has many stories to tell. The sum of all the stories is the Lakeland brand.

The second theme of the GOA Strategic Plan for 2013-16 invites stakeholders to secure “Alberta’s economic future” through “strategic relationships” between government, education, and business. The goal of the newly formed Lakeland Enterprises is to establish strategic partnerships that achieve maximum mutual benefit for students, employees, partner companies and the College. All enterpriselevel projects will conform to and advance the mission, vision and values of the College moving towards the fulfillment of the outcomes set by the Board of Governors. Lakeland’s proposed Lifecycle Projects are three interrelated projects that will provide direct student employment, integrate research and management, and involve a number of academic faculties: the corporate-sponsored agricultural research farm; the market gardens; and the energy research and

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Challenges Balancing Growth While Lakeland College is committed to fiscal prudence and sustainable operations, the recent volatility in government funding presents a significant risk. CAPR 2013 projects moderate economic growth of 2.9% in Alberta’s GDP for 2013. This growth will need to be tempered with other economic pressures the GOA is facing: global economic trends, resource revenue changes, and impact of natural disasters. “In a primarily resource-based economy such as Alberta’s, it is important to have an advanced learning system that is as resilient and responsive to changing economic conditions as possible” (CAPR 2013). With indications that operating grants will remain static and the direction that tuition and fees may be increased by only 1%, it will be difficult for Lakeland to maintain a balanced budget. In the 2013-2014 budget, Lakeland College made the decision to suspend seven programs: Academic Upgrading; Event Management; Practical Nurse; Office Administration; Transitional Vocational; Bachelor of Applied Business: Emergency Services; and Paramedic. These program reductions resulted in 229 fewer FLEs for the 2013/14 year. Staff reductions took place, and functional areas were reorganized and redesigned to achieve operational efficiency. Lakeland is committed to sustaining its operating position to create exceptional learning experiences for students and will continue to work with government to develop and implement long-term strategies that will address the financial challenges facing the post-secondary system. To address growth demands, the College has expanded its enterprise activities in the 2013/14 fiscal year. Enterprise activities will generate profits for prioritized areas of need throughout the College. Right sizing will also continue to occur as a result of outcomes-based performance. Throughout this process, the College will continue to align itself with government expectations thus matching a vision that prepares Albertans for global competition. Lakeland’s outcomes-based strategy is aligned with the GOA’s second policy priority of “securing Alberta’s economic future” as well as IAE’s challenge to find “collaborative and innovative solutions to support a more globallyfocused knowledge-based economy” (CAPR 2013).

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The College is preparing and planning to accommodate change in an uncertain future economic environment.

Stewardship This year marks the transition of stewardship from the College’s list of opportunities to its list of challenges. With the decrease in provincial funding, Lakeland is working to seek cost-effective approaches for both delivery and services in the region. As the College focuses on targeted outcomes, collaboration becomes paramount so that cost-saving objectives can be met. Lakeland has transitioned from a centralized operating structure to a decentralized model where Regional Access Advisory Councils (RAACs) will have opportunities to meet with school deans who then report back to Deans’ Council on regional needs and learning gaps. Each dean has been assigned one of the six regions: Killam, Lloydminster, Provost, Two Hills, Vermilion, and Wainwright. The RAACs are accountable to the College for the purpose of leveraging resources and building capacity for learner pathways. Each dean is also working with its constituent Community Adult Learning Council (CALC) to solidify written agreements to aide in removing barriers for learner transitions. Regional coordinators are provided the opportunity to engage in College professional development where applicable. As Lakeland College is viewed as an integral part of academic pursuit in the region, collaborative partnerships will continue to be the avenue for future growth in regional academic programming. Potential partners include FCSS, libraries, career and employment services, Community Futures, friendship centres, industry, literacy programs, human service agencies, municipalities, economic development agencies, Business Link, local health regions, Alberta rural development, and chambers of commerce. The College has partnered with the Town of Vermilion to build rural Alberta leaders in the “Becoming a Community Builder” program launched in 56 communities. As experienced within the Regional Business Accelerator, the College is an active partner in regional economic development. Lakeland is keen to form innovative networks to further the entrepreneurial spirit of learners. Collaborating with communities, such as the Onion Lake energy sector programming, allows the College to connect regional learners with both educational and workforce opportunities.

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Campus Alberta will continue to be an integral part of providing opportunities for regional stewardship. As rural learners continue to seek pathways, the College will help them find comfortable transition options through over 600 formal transfer agreements. Lakeland’s work with the Alberta Council on Admissions and Transfer (ACAT) will be maintained as the College demonstrates its positive commitment to developing and expanding pathways for students. As a regional steward, Lakeland College strives to work with stakeholders, involve its communities, increase engagement of learners, and become the key supporter of learner success. Maintaining a fiscally effective model, Lakeland strives to support regional learner access and successful transitions.

Student Support in Rural Centres Post-secondary students in rural centres face unique challenges. Rural students often move to larger urban centres for post-secondary education because they are seeking a big-city experience. CAPR 2013 data indicates that most Albertans attend a postsecondary institution near where they graduate from high school. In the Lakeland region, however, only 12.2% of post-secondary students remain in the region. 48.9% apply to institutions in the Edmonton region. However, with the highest regional high-school to post-secondary transition rate in the province, at 64.7% (CAPR 2013), the College is working towards keeping students in the region by addressing such rural issues as access to services, transportation, and the need for an active local social community. Goal One in the IAE Business Plan 2013-16 points to the need to “engage rural learners” as part of the Alberta lifelong learning context. The prime post-secondary-attending cohort (18- to 34-yearolds) will see the greatest growth in Alberta’s rural regions. Between 2012 and 2022, Alberta’s projected population growth for this cohort is 7.2%; the Lakeland region surpasses this with a projected 8.2% growth rate. Lakeland College strives to support students at both its Vermilion and Lloydminster campuses. College statistics show that an estimated 60% of students come to Lakeland from over 200 kilometres away. This puts added pressure on the College to provide on-campus housing that is currently at capacity. Combined with low rental vacancy rates in both 14

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Vermilion and Lloydminster, students may not be able to attend Lakeland College due to the lack of available accommodation. In the Fall 2013 student focus groups, Lakeland students were asked, “How could Lakeland better support you as a rural student?” Most indicated that they specifically chose a rural location for two main reasons: short commute and easy, direct access to hands-on training. “I wouldn’t be able to walk to the farm if I lived in the city.” They appreciate the on-campus supports but desire greater community amenities. If students are successful in accessing accommodation, the relative isolation of the Vermilion campus and the lack of public transportation in both Vermilion and Lloydminster place pressure on students without vehicles as they attempt to access College programs and services from off campus; students who live on campus also find it difficult to access off-campus services. To battle the perception that “there’s nothing to do here,” the College is proactively working towards enhancing the student experience through a focus on community. As Lloydminster faces challenges related to its rapid economic growth, such as increased demand for services, increased crime, and lack of affordable housing, the College offers a safe social place for its students. Lakeland is committed to the support of the rural student community and the GOA’s first policy priority of “investing in family and communities.” Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Goals, Priority Initiatives, Expected Outcomes, and Performance Measures Mission To inspire learner success and community development through innovative learning in an inclusive and diverse environment

Vision Ever to excel in a global society

Values Lakeland College values learner achievement, academic excellence and personal growth founded on the College’s longstanding principles: • People-Centred and Respect • Accountability and Integrity • Inclusiveness and Collaboration • Continuous Self-Improvement • Innovation • Pride

Outcomes Four outcomes emerged from the Board review: 1. Learner Success Lakeland College will optimize learner success. 2. Relevant Programming and Research Lakeland College, in conjunction with post-secondary partners, will strategically provide programming that meets student, government, and industry expectations. 3. Connectivity Lakeland College will be connected to its multiple stakeholders. 4. Sustainability Lakeland College will achieve sustainable operations.

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Outcome 1 – Optimize learner success

Objectives

1.1 Align with industry

Goals for 2014/15

Goals for 2015/16

Goals for 2016/17

Implement one action in response to 2013/14 industry satisfaction survey

Implement one action in response to 2013/14 student satisfaction survey (program specific)

Implement one action in response to 2015/16 student satisfaction survey Show improvement in student satisfaction survey

1.2 Improve student retention

1% increase in retention from semester to semester

1% increase in retention from semester to semester in programs below College’s 2014/15 results

Maintain retention from semester to semester OR 1% increase in retention from semester to semester in programs below College’s 2014/15 results

1.3 Increase alumni engagement

5% increase in total value of all student awards

5% increase in total value of all student awards

5% increase in total value of all student awards

FOCUS on Student Retention In addition to a renewed emphasis on the measurement and tracking of key retention indicators, such as student progression and student persistence, the College is introducing a number of different retention strategies at the program level.

Program

Trades & Technology

2012-13 Retention Rate 2012/13 Retention Rate 95% (final-year intakes)

Retention Strategies Screens apprenticeship students at beginning of each intake to identify at-risk students Monitors performance of at-risk students and directs them to available academic supports as needed

16

Human Services

91.4%

Utilizes early-alert assignments at the beginning of each course to identify at-risk students

Agricultural Sciences

89.5%

Matches each student with a faculty mentor for regular meetings

Environmental Sciences

91.9%

Offers a chemistry preparation course to help students avoid a common barrier to higher retention – success in college chemistry

Lakeland College 2014-2017

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Many of Lakeland’s retention initiatives are implemented at an institutional level. Each campus has a Teaching and Learning Commons, where any student can access free academic support, as well as a full-time wellness advisor who is available to support students in social, physical, mental, and emotional wellness. In addition, the Registrar’s office is working closely with department chairs to provide opportunities for students who have previously dropped out of a program, and are one or two courses short of meeting graduation requirements, to find learning options that will enable them to meet those requirements and earn their credentials. Students are directed to other post-secondary institutions close to home that offer similar courses, to online learning opportunities through eCampus, to special projects or independent studies with Lakeland College instructors, or to a special Lakeland College online course offering for small groups of students who are missing a particular course. In every case, these initiatives have created pathways for students to complete program requirements and graduate.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

To illustrate how successful these efforts have been, the College has tracked a cohort of 361 students who were in their final term of study in the 2012/13 academic year across 20 different certificate and diploma programs on the Vermilion campus. Of these 361 students, 294 met all of the requirements for graduation and graduated on schedule. Each of the 67 students that were ineligible for graduation were contacted and provided with the various options described above. Only 16 of the 67 students declined the opportunity to participate. Of the 51 participating students, 27 have already completed their requirements, and 24 have a plan to do so at some point during the 2013/14 academic year. The initial graduation rate for students in this cohort of 361 students was 81.4%. Including the 27 students that have already completed the extra work required for graduation increases that rate to 88.9%. And if the remaining 24 students complete planned work, the graduation rate for this cohort will increase to 95.6%.

Lakeland College 2014-2017

17


Outcome 2 – Strategically provide programs to meet student, government, and industry needs

18

Objectives

Goals for 2014/15

Goals for 2015/16

2.1 Increase student satisfaction through program specialization

Implement one action in response to 2013/14 student satisfaction survey (program specific)

Implement one action in response to 2013/14 student satisfaction survey (program specific)

2.2 Maintain enrolment through accountability and efficiency measures

2% increase in number of applicants who convert to registrants (where seats available)

1% increase in number of applicants who convert to registrants (where seats available)

1% increase in number of applicants who convert to registrants (where seats available)

2.3 Align with government

2% increase in enrolment in governmentidentified target groups (International; Aboriginal)

2% increase in enrolment in government-identified target groups

2% increase in enrolment in government-identified target groups

2.4 Engage in responsive applied research

2.0 FTE increase in faculty involved in funded applied research

2.5 FTE increase in faculty involved in funded applied research

3.0 FTE increase in faculty involved in funded applied research

2.5 Respond to market with new programs through accountability and efficiency measures

Perform comprehensive program review process

Perform comprehensive program review process

Perform comprehensive program review process

2.6 Increase globalization activities through program specialization

10% increase in number of international students on campus

5% increase in number of international students on campus

5% increase in number of international students on campus

Lakeland College 2014-2017

Goals for 2016/17 Implement one action in response to 2015/16 student satisfaction survey Show improvement in student satisfaction survey

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


FOCUS on Applied Research and Innovation Lakeland College is pursuing research and development projects that align with the College’s identified strengths in the Schools of Energy and Entrepreneurship, Agricultural Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and the Emergency Training Centre. The College is also working collaboratively with regional industry and the Alberta Innovates corporations to advance rural community economic development. Engaging in applied research projects will enhance the knowledge transfer and pre-commercialization opportunities for companies located in northeast Alberta and create opportunities to further develop new technologies.

Alberta’s Research Capacity Program has resulted in completion of the Renewable Energy Learning Centre (RELC) - a net zero training centre using solar thermal and geothermal for heating with power from solar photovoltaic and wind. This funding has also allowed for creation of the Fabrication and Electronic Centre with associated equipment, and groundwork is underway for the Bio-energy Centre building. These new facilities will create unique research capacity and infrastructure to support research and training excellence. Alberta Innovates Bio-solutions has transferred a gasification unit, that uses biomass to create electricity and heat, to Lakeland College.

Lakeland College, in partnership with Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (AI-TF) and industry, along with funding from Western Economic Diversification Canada, is fully engaged in developing the Alberta Biochar Initiative (ABI). The ABI is bringing together parties interested in biochar to collectively work on solving some of the knowledge gaps necessary to further develop a biochar industry.

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) funding for agriculturalbased applied research will further develop Lakeland’s research in livestock, crops, and the bio-economy. A project was started last year with AACTI funding, working with AI-TF Vegreville and a local company, to work on developing the agronomic practices of Jerusalem Artichoke production as a new crop. This work will continue with the new NSERC funding. Lakeland College is building applied research capacity that will provide an engaging and innovative learning and research experience for students, and by working collaboratively with partners, the College can help develop an effective applied research network.

Lakeland College is further expanding the unique Centre for Sustainable Innovation (CSI) research site at Vermilion. This site focuses on bringing together research in agriculture, environment, and energy. Funding from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) with matching funds from

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2014-2017

19


Enrolment Plan – FLE Projections By Program Band

2013/14

2014/15

304

Business

182 180 180 180 -2

Human Services

148

Energy

121 161 181 181 +60

Environmental Sciences

210

Health

103 48 33 33 -70

University Transfer

220

Trades

374 400 400 400 +26

Emergency Training Centre

152

152 210 220 180

324

2016/17 Growth/Decline

Agricultural Sciences

TOTALS

314

2015/16

162 210 220 180

324

+20

162

+14

210

-

220

-

180

+28

1814 1865 1890 1890 +76

By Credential Band

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17 Growth/Decline

Apprenticeship

326 326 326 326

Certificate

219 285 305 305 +86

Diploma

836 846 851 851 +15

Applied Degree

65

40

40

40

-25

University Transfer

220

220

220

220

-

No Credential

148

148

148

148

-

TOTALS

20

2013/14

Lakeland College 2014-2017

-

1814 1865 1890 1890 +76

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


FOCUS on the Program Mix New academic program development at Lakeland College is strategic and coordinated in order to meet the needs of students and the labour market. All new program proposals must be supported by significant, documented evidence of student and industry demand, linkages to governmental priorities, and long-term financial viability. In addition, there is a thorough internal notification process that solicits the input of all key internal College stakeholders to promote a more coordinated and supportive atmosphere within which new programs can thrive. The internal approval process stipulates that all new program proposals require an endorsement from Academic Council, Deans’ Council, and the Board of Governors before the program is submitted to IAE for approval. The process and mechanisms for program suspension are based on transparent and objective criteria. A new data-driven, outcomes-based model is being used to track the performance of all programs on an annual basis. Student demand, enrolment levels, completion rates, student satisfaction, employment rates, and financial viability are scored against minimum performance standards or targets for each program offered at the College. Programs that are consistently underachieving will be placed on probation for a defined length of time and will be required to demonstrate some level of improvement. Programs that are able to reach their improvement targets, and eventually reach and exceed the minimum performance standards, will come off of probation. If program performance continues to deteriorate, or if the required improvements are not realized within the given time frame, the program will be at risk of suspension. Through these two processes, Lakeland College will continue to offer a suite of programming that is evolving with the realities and needs of our region and sustainable over the long term. The College anticipates that decisions relating to new program development/approval and program suspension will be outcomes-based and will depend on evidence of student and industry demand, performance, and long-term viability. Lakeland College identifies 4 new program opportunities: 1. The Introduction to Heavy Oil & Gas Certificate Program would be a 22-week basefunded program that is specifically designed Comprehensive Institutional Plan

for individuals who are interested in pursuing a career in the oil and gas industry. Upon completion of this certificate program, students would either enter the full-time Heavy Oil Operations Technician certificate program at the College or gain access to entry-level employment in the oil and gas sector. Upon completion of this program, students would also receive an additional certificate in Gas Process Operator as all four parts are included in this program. Proposed start date would be Fall 2015. It is currently run on the reserve at Onion Lake Cree Nation as a Lakeland College certificate program. 2. The Production Field Operator Certificate Program would be a revenue-generating program that would prepare students for work in the field production of heavy oil. This is particularly relevant to the type of production that is typical in the Lloydminster region. Proposed start date would be Fall 2014. 3. The Large Animal Post-Certificate Program would be an 8-month base-funded blended delivery program that would prepare animal health technologists for advanced specialization in large animal treatment. Proposed start date would be Fall 2014. 4. The Urban Agriculture Certificate Program would be an 8-month base-funded blended delivery program that would prepare students for work in urban food production as well as the urban-rural interface of agricultural food systems. As interest in urban agriculture is growing in North America, so is the need for education programming that addresses all aspects of urban food production. Proposed start date would be Fall 2015. Lakeland is also investigating a new for-profit training initiative in Service Rig Drilling. Energy advisory committees, industry, and Aboriginal communities have approached the College regarding collaboration towards significant training in this area. The College currently has two introductory rig training courses: Introduction to Service Rigs and Introduction to Service Rig Drilling. There is a need to build upon this introductory foundation for more advanced training. In addition, the College is exploring program redesign of Office Administration as well as Degree Completion in Agriculture, Environment, and Education. Lakeland College 2014-2017

21


Outcome 3 – Connect with stakeholders

Objectives

Goals for 2014/15

Goals for 2015/16

3.1 Engage the community

20 faculty and staff participating in community groups

3.2 Engage industry through financial contributions

$20,000 increase in total $20,000 increase in total regional dollars raised by regional dollars raised by College College

10% increase in profit 3.3 Engage industry through corporate generated by corporate training training

25 faculty and staff participating in community groups

10% increase in profit generated by corporate training

Goals for 2016/17 25 faculty and staff participating in community groups $20,000 increase in total regional dollars raised by College 10% increase in profit generated by corporate training

FOCUS on Dual Credit In 2010, Lakeland College, in partnership with East Central Alberta Catholic Schools (ECACS), embarked on a dual credit project with a mandate to improve high-school completion rates and the rates of students entering post-secondary education. The project targeted students who had not identified a university or college education as their first option and, in particular, was aimed at engaging students who were at risk of not completing high school let alone going on to college. Courses are delivered using current synchronous and asynchronous online technology combined with face-to-face, hands-on learning in subject areas relevant to college curriculum. To participate, students need an Internet connection, a computer and a headset with a microphone. This allows students who attend small rural schools with the opportunity to participate in a college-level course. Students are also able to interact with students from other schools whom they would not have met otherwise. Course completion results in both high school credits and Lakeland College course credits.

22

Lakeland College 2014-2017

In the past three years, the dual credit partnership has created five dual credit courses and facilitated 18 separate course intakes involving over 200 students in a total of five school districts. Dual credit courses have been developed with several Lakeland College departments and programs including Human Services, Esthetics, Environmental Sciences, Agriculture, and Oil and Gas. Currently, courses are available to students in 25 communities in Alberta, and requests from other schools and other school districts continue to come in. According to both students and principals, dual credit courses have increased levels of learner engagement and interest in completing high school. This is leading to improved high school performance, increased high school graduation rates, and higher rates of transition to postsecondary training. These benefits are particularly relevant to learners who are at risk of not completing high school. Alberta’s Provincial Dual Credit Strategy highlights the need to strengthen learner pathways between high school and postsecondary education (CAPR 2013).

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Outcome 4 – Achieve sustainable operations

Objectives

4.1 Achieve economic sustainability

Goals for 2014/15

Goals for 2015/16

Goals for 2016/17

Achieve “Satisfactory Progress” or “Implemented” on previous year’s audit

Achieve “Satisfactory Progress” or “Implemented” on previous year’s audit

Achieve “Satisfactory Progress” or “Implemented” on previous year’s audit

Ensure 90% of funded new initiatives directly align with strategic plan

Ensure 95% of funded new initiatives directly align with strategic plan

Ensure 100% of funded new initiatives directly align with strategic plan

4.2 Achieve environmental sustainability

Introduce 2 new environmental initiatives as a result of Environmental Committee recommendations

Introduce 2 new environmental initiatives as a result of Environmental Committee recommendations

Introduce 2 new environmental initiatives as a result of Environmental Committee recommendations

4.3 Achieve social sustainability

1-point increase in “job satisfaction” section of Employee Feedback survey

1-point increase in “job satisfaction” section of Employee Feedback survey

1-point increase in “job satisfaction” section of Employee Feedback survey

FOCUS on Environmental Sustainability Lakeland College students at both the Lloydminster and Vermilion campuses have initiated a recycling program. With the use of Quik Pic bins, all waste that is disposed within the recyclable bins is removed. The Residence Assistant (RA) for each dorm oversees the recycling of student waste materials. In addition, the student family residence in Vermilion has implemented a composting plan. Students are taking on environmental responsibilities at the College and want to do what they can to help. Lakeland looks forward to supporting further student-generated environmental initiatives.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2014-2017

23


Plan for Financial Sustainability Financial Challenges and Strategies Lakeland College is committed to demonstrating adaptability to a changing economic environment while still achieving strategic goals and alignment with mandates from the Government of Alberta and the ministry of Innovation and Advanced Education. Lakeland will continue to work closely with the post-secondary education sector and representatives within the ministry. The budget plan has been built to further Lakeland’s four key objectives of learner success, relevant programming and research, connectivity, and sustainability. Budget adjustments, new initiative commitments, and future development areas have all been undertaken keeping these outcomes in mind. In order to minimize the impact of budget fluctuations on students, Lakeland is committed to sourcing new revenue streams through new business development opportunities and responsible entrepreneurship. The financial plan presents a balanced budget based on regular operations for the 2014/15 year. Lakeland is awaiting ministerial approval to forecast a deficit budget of $845,000 which will see the College through to the completion of renovations of the Lloydminster residences. Lakeland College has a proven track record of fiscal prudence and will continue to build its reputation for quality budget management. Schools and sections build budgets with the assistance of the financial services department. Variance analysis meetings take place several times throughout the year to ensure budget targets are adhered to; as well, the institution is able to make adjustments to spending in order to ensure a positive budget outcome at year end. The College is actively engaged in collaborative initiatives with other Alberta post-secondary institutions to discuss potential opportunities to share resources, knowledge, policies, and best practices thereby identifying and capitalizing on efficiencies. Lakeland’s primary sources of revenue continue to be government grants and regulated credit and apprenticeship tuition and fees that make up over 75% of all College revenues. The 2014/15 Campus Alberta Grants recovered 2.3% over the 24

Lakeland College 2014-2017

original 2013/14 commitment level which are funds that have been targeted to offset enrollment cost pressures. No additional base grant funding increases are anticipated in the 2014/15 year, and therefore, a zero percent increase has been budgeted in the current CIP through the full term to 2016/17. Tuition fees for 2014/15 have been increased by the tuition fee policy compliant amount of 1% over the 2013/14 rates which were equal to the 2012/13 rates due to the tuition freeze employed by the Government of Alberta last spring. This lack of growth in Lakeland’s key revenue sources presents a challenge as costs in many areas continue to rise.

Budget Assumptions All financial projections are based upon funding conditions known at the time of writing. This plan, as well as the following two years of forecasting ending in 2017, is based on the following assumptions:

Revenues: • The Campus Alberta grant will remain at the 2014/15 level through to 2016/17. • Additional seat purchases in Apprenticeship training will remain stable over the term of the plan. • Tuition and mandatory fees were increased by 1% in 2014/15. In subsequent years, it is anticipated that there will be a return to the legislated COLA tuition fee adjustments. • The full-load equivalent number increase is attributed to the increase in heavy oil programming as well as other new programs being offered. • Investment income will remain stable. • Residence rates, as well as other contract and sales revenue projections, have been increased by 3% per annum.

Expenses: • Collective agreement compensation is a significant variable as contracts are open for negotiation. • Cost minimization, process improvement, and efficiency identification will become priorities to offset any inflationary increase in expenses. Reallocation of limited resources will become the focus for cost control in the coming years.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Statements of Expected Revenues and Expenses Lakeland College Operating Budget

2014/15 2015/16 2016/17

Revenue (by Object and By Function)

Government Grants Contract Services Tuition and Other Fees Sales, Rentals, and Services Donations Investment Income

Total Revenue (By Object and By Function)

41,092,555 2,555,590 11,876,210 8,022,904 164,032 506,000

41,174,967 2,632,258 12,351,258 8,263,591 185,000 518,944

41,174,967 2,711,225 12,845,309 8,511,499 185,000 518,944

64,217,291

65,126,018

65,946,944

39,825,370 6,966,884 12,560,200 2,270,157 2,175,528 419,152

40,621,878 6,900,000 12,679,346 2,297,481 2,208,161 419,152

42,246,753 6,900,000 12,799,683 2,314,640 2,241,283 419,152

64,217,291

65,126,018

66,921,512

29,625,117 11,401,214 7,098,067 8,957,041 5,783,352 1,352,501

30,044,336 11,562,550 7,198,510 9,083,790 5,865,191 1,371,640

29,678,779 11,421,866 7,110,924 8,973,266 5,793,828 1,354,951

64,217,291

65,126,018

66,921,512

Expenses (by Object)

Salary and Benefits Amortization Materials, Supplies, and Services Facility Costs Utilities Scholarship Expense

Total Expenses (By Object)

Expenses (by Function)

Instruction and Training Academic and Student Support Facility Operations and Maintenance Institutional Support Ancillary Operations Sponsored Research

Total Expenses (By Function) Excess (or Deficiency) of Revenue over Expenses on Regular Operations Residence Renovation Expenses Targeted Infrastructure Maintenance Projects Excess (or Deficiency) of Revenue over Expenses Total

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

0 845,000 0 (845,000)

0 (974,568) 0 755,000

0 755,000

(755,000) (1,729,568)

Lakeland College 2014-2017

25


Revenues By Object and By Function 0.26% 12.49

%

0.79% n Grants

18.49

%

63.99%

3.98%

n Contract services n Tuition & other fees n Sales, rentals & services n Donations n Investment income

Expenses By Object 3.34%

0.64%

4.79% n Salary and benefits n Amortization

19.30% 61.23%

10.71%

n Materials, supplies & services n Facility costs n Utilities n Scholarship expense

Expenses by Function 8.89% 2.08% n Instruction & training

13.77% %% 45.53 45.53

12.21% 17.52%

n Academic and student support n Facility operations and maintenance n Institutional support n Ancillary operations n Sponsored research

26

Lakeland College 2014-2017

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Budgeted Statement of Cash Flows for the year ending June 30, 2014

2013/14

Operating Transactions

Deficiency of revenue over expense $ (845,000) Add (Deduct) non-cash items: Amortization of tangible capital assets 6,966,884 Amortization of deferred capital contributions (3,617,588) Total non-cash items 3,349,296 Cash Provided by Operating Transactions 2,504,296

Capital Transactions Acquisition of tangible capital assets Cash Applied to Capital Transactions

(4,752,444) (4,752,444)

Investing Transactions Purchases of investments, net of sales Proceeds on sale of portfolio investments Cash Provided by (Applied to) Investing Transactions

(506,000) 506,000 -

Financing Transactions Payment on long-term debt Cash Provided by (Applied to) Financing Cash Transactions

(120,000) (120,000)

Increase (Decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents

$

(2,368,148)

Tuition and Mandatory Fees Lakeland College’s tuition fees are managed within the provincial tuition fee policy. As per this regulation, the maximum allowable weighted average tuition fee increase across the entire institution for the 2014/15 academic year shall not exceed 1%. This allowable increase is based on the change of the average monthly Alberta Consumer Price Index for the 12-month period ending June 30, 2013.

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

Tuition Fees*

4,729

4,773

4,818

4,863

Fee Increases

0.00%

1.00%

1.00%

1.00%

* Includes tuition and comprehensive fee

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2014-2017

27


Internationalization Lakeland believes there is an opportunity to not only increase its international enrolment but to also enrich campus life and broaden perspectives by becoming more active in international recruitment and partnerships. CAPR 2013 encourages Alberta’s post-secondary institutions to take an “approach that prepares students for living, working, and lifelong learning in an increasingly interconnected and diverse global environment.” At the College level, the impact of globalization is very positive; when instructors who teach internationally return to Lakeland, they bring back with them renewed energy and expertise that benefits students in Alberta. On the international stage, Lakeland has built on past experience with Education for Employment Projects in Tanzania and is leading a similar CARICOM project. The emphasis of the project is to support economic development in the Caribbean region with a focus on agricultural training. There is great potential for further growth in international enrolment at Lakeland. Although CCIs have only 2.9% of Alberta’s visa student population in the system (CAPR 2013), likely because most international students in Alberta study at the graduate level in urban centres, some rural institutions have started to actively capture this student market. Although modest in comparison, Lakeland College has tripled its visa student enrolment from 2010/11 (HC of 6) to 2011/12 (HC of 21) (CAPR 2013). The College continues to examine literacy skills of international students and immigrants and is working towards a pathway solution that will bridge the education and skills gap that hampers the ability of these groups from entering Lakeland and/or being successful once their studies commence. Two options being investigated are a full-time English as a Second Language program and an English for Academic Purposes course to be offered through the secondary school system as well as at Lakeland. In 2011, Lakeland College commenced brokering Lambton College’s Management Certificate program for the attraction of international students who have already competed some form of postsecondary business management program. Lakeland has successfully engaged three cohorts of students from India with the most recent intake 28

Lakeland College 2014-2017

in January 2014. This program will grow into other academic areas with a maintainable student population from this partnership expected to reach 200 by Fall 2015. Partnerships are also being developed with international post-secondary institutes for the onsite delivery of Lakeland College programs. In the spring of 2014, Lakeland hopes to become an active participant in the Science Without Borders program, sponsored by both the governments of Canada and Brazil, to bring Brazilian students to Canada to study for one year. With Agriculture, University Transfer, Environment, and Human Services students participating in 2012/13, Lakeland hopes to increase opportunities for Lakeland students to participate in study abroad and student exchange opportunities. There is increased demand around the world for technical and vocational education training in Agriculture, Environment, Trades, and Teacher Training sectors. Lakeland is looking into opportunities to provide training in these areas either unilaterally or through a partnership model. As well, Lakeland is launching a new International Development post-credential certificate program in which students can apply previous post-secondary programming to the international development context. The College continues to build international experiences that reflect potential growth areas within its programming pillars and will continue to seek specific opportunities that will enable longterm sustainability. Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Information Technology Technology use at Lakeland College has made significant strides in recent years. All College classrooms are equipped with touch-screen computers and either a Smart Board or BrightLink projector. Tablets are being piloted for teaching applications in the classroom, and Lakeland’s Learning Management System, Desire2Learn, continues to experience increasing usage rates among faculty and students. Lakeland College completed the implementation of Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) for the Lloydminster labs last August and will be deploying the second phase of VDI for the Vermilion labs this summer. This architecture has provided Lakeland the ability to deploy a more flexible, scalable, and cost-efficient desktop solution in the student labs. Despite these technological advances, challenges still exist with regards to bandwidth, life expectancy, and moveable targets. Usage reports show that the College is currently hitting the bandwidth limits for both wired and wireless Internet usage, and the link between campuses (WAN) is also saturated with traffic. User expectations are such that the service should be instantaneous. With the Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) computing model and demand for both cloud computing and access to external resources, bandwidth resources will be increasing in demand. With new technologies changing so fast, life expectancy in some cases is only 3 to 5 years. Even if products are not obsolete, they may not accommodate the College’s needs or requirements in a 3-year timeframe. To accommodate these new

technological changes and user requirements, Lakeland will need appropriate funding to replace equipment that is no longer supported and replace infrastructure that does not meet the changing direction of technology. These technological changes need to be achieved in a timely manner in order to provide users the opportunity to utilize a wide variety of devices or programs on Lakeland’s networks. Performance and success of an institution relies heavily on information technology and infrastructure to be able to accommodate new technology. Classroom technologies, such as interactive whiteboards, personal learning environments, wireless networks, mobile devices, Internet, and high-quality digital learning resources, are just a few of Lakeland students’ expectations. Lakeland is working towards a flexible network infrastructure with the ability to accommodate new technology. CAPR 2013 observes that as “demand fluctuates with the provinces’ economic state and priorities, maintaining the right degree of flexibility in the system must be a priority.” The goal of Information Technology (IT) is to provide services to College students, staff, faculty and end users in a manner that is expected and productive for learner needs and requirements. IT capital and operating requirements are funded largely from Lakeland’s internal budgets. Lakeland College is exploring collaborative opportunities with other post-secondary institutions as a way to not only achieve financial efficiencies but to also share knowledge and resources.

The following table lists Information Technology initiatives. Most items are not single-year costs; rather, they will be spread out over several years as indicated. Priority

Item

Details

Source of funding

Cost

1

Network Infrastructure (EOL Technology)

To refresh and develop network infrastructure technologies that are End of Life (EOL), End of Support (EOS), or no longer viable

Capital Budget

$1,900,000

2

Mobility Technology Integration

To provide a flexible platform for the use and support of Mobile Technologies for all College users

Capital Budget

$450,000

3

Portal (SSO)

To provide all College users with a Single Sign-On (SSO) portal for logging on once to access all their resources

Capital Budget

$150,000 (over 1 year)

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2014-2017

29


Capital Plan A. Expansion Capital Priority

Project Name

1

Livestock Research Centre

Start Date Upon securing funding

Location

Budget

Vermilion

$280,000

Livestock Research Centre Expansion capital for livestock research will be needed for three phases. Phase 3 will focus on a new addition to the Livestock Research Centre to provide a teaching, research, and demonstration space. Phase 4 will provide insulation for the newly renovated research livestock handling area, and Phase 5 will accommodate the addition of GrowSafe equipment in the pens. B. New Capital Priority

Project Name

1

Sustainable Environment Centre

Start Date Upon securing funding

Location

Budget

Vermilion

$57,000,000

Sustainable Environment Centre The development of the new Sustainable Environment Centre will enhance training capacity by providing a facility with the latest and most up-to-date technology, equipment and labs. With programs and training in nearly all sectors of environmental sciences, Lakeland has earned the reputation of being a leader in environmental sciences education. This centre will provide the resources and infrastructure to showcase the future in environmental programming and management including a strong applied research component. The new centre will be a multi-purpose facility on the leading edge of building design incorporating the latest in energy conservation practices and smart building management systems. The building will house lecture theatres, classrooms, program lab facilities, applied research labs, administrative office space, specialized areas of instruction, online learning support, and videoconferencing access. Students and faculty in other program areas, such as agricultural sciences, will be able to access this building’s lab and other resources. The centre will become a recognizable community-friendly building capable of supporting many events. Lakeland is proud of its hands-on “live-the-learning� concept and its reputation for first-class learning opportunities. The Sustainable Environment Centre will be a learning resource in itself with the building showcasing many of the leading-edge technologies in sustainability and next-generation design efficiency. Students will benefit from an enhanced learning environment, and Lakeland will move forward with new applied research opportunities.

30

Lakeland College 2014-2017

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


C. Preservation Capital Priority 1

Project Name Animal Health Technology - Clinic Facility Repair - Clinic Expansion - Clinic Equipment

2

Trades Building Exterior and Roofing Repair

Start Date

Location

Six months after securing funding

Vermilion

Upon securing funding

Vermilion

$3,500,000 $2,300,000 $1,500,000

- Metal Cladding & Exterior - Glazing & Roofing 3

Agricultural/Environmental Sciences Renovations

Budget

$2,100,000 $1,900,000 One year after securing funding

Vermilion $3,000,000 $4,500,000

- Facility Repair - Classroom & Lab Upgrade 4

Trades Ventilation Upgrade

Upon securing funding

Vermilion

$1,500,000

5

Sidewalks, Walkways, Curbs, and Gutters

Upon securing funding

Both Campuses

$1,765,000

6

Lighting Retrofit

Upon securing funding

Both Campuses

- Vermilion - Lloydminster 7

Utilize Steam from Steam Lab - Utilize steam for heating - Utilize steam for hot water heating

Six months after securing funding

Lloydminster

$2,500,000 $2,500,000 $2,700,000 $1,500,000

8

Emergency Power District Upgrade

Upon securing funding

Vermilion

$900,000

9

Learner Commons Renovations

Six months after securing funding

Vermilion

$6,000,000

Animal Health Technology Lakeland’s animal health technology diploma program is one of the most popular programs at the College. In the fall of 2010, Lakeland launched a veterinary medical assistant certificate program, and numbers have been very strong. Students in both programs use the already crowded animal clinic. Originally designed as a dairy training facility, the building was converted to an animal clinic in 1989. Despite renovations in 2000, the space no longer meets the needs of the College, and an updated, redesigned, and retrofitted space is required that would enable efficient use of current space as well as ensure increased use of other College facility spaces to accommodate the larger animals that are included in the curriculum. In addition, industry has indicated that there are future opportunities to expand programming in the animal health field.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

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Trades Building Exterior and Roofing Repair The trades building is almost 30 years old, and although renovations of the inner workings have recently taken place, the siding and roof cladding on the building have never been replaced. The skylights and roofing are leaking and in need of renewal. The upgrade and restoration of the building exterior and roofing are required in order to allow the continued safe use of this building.

Agricultural/Environmental Sciences Renovations Lakeland’s Agricultural and Environmental Sciences programs are spread out in many buildings at the Vermilion Campus. The distance between classrooms, labs, and instructor/lab technician office space provides challenges for staff and students as equipment and teaching resources often have to be moved for various classes. As well, the current science labs have a rated capacity of 20 students which does not help meet the increased student demand for these popular programs. To allow for program growth, current classrooms, labs, office space, storage space, and meeting space need to be adjusted to maximize student and staff usage. As well, current labs are antiquated and out of date. They need to be retrofitted to meet the needs of increased classroom size with up-to-date equipment.

Trades Ventilation Upgrade Due to the increase in trades seat numbers in recent years, a space that was originally built and designed for use as shop space in trades teaching has been converted into classrooms. The ventilation system that functioned well in the shop does not provide adequate air flow for heating and cooling of classroom space.

Sidewalks, Walkways, Curbs, and Gutters Both campuses are in need of repairs to sidewalks, walkways, curbs, gutters, and signage in order to provide students and the College community with a safe and secure campus.

Lighting Retrofit Required light bulbs are no longer available, and the College needs to replace affected fixtures and bulbs as well as responsibly dispose of the old bulbs. The Vermilion campus has updated approximately 30% of its old fixtures, and the Lloydminster campus needs to update all of its old fixtures.

Utilize Steam from Steam Lab With the completion and functioning of the petroleum facility inclusive of the steam labs, there is an opportunity to capture and utilize the excess steam generated by the boilers to heat the residential facility in Lloydminster. As well, the steam could also be used to provide hot water to the residence through a distribution pipeline.

Emergency Power District Upgrade The College requires an upgrade to the emergency power supply centre as the facility demands a more dependable, safer, and longer lasting system that is up to current electrical code requirements.

Learner Commons Renovations Lakeland undertook significant restructuring of one of its schools, the library, and the learning centre in order to create a new Learner Commons for better student support and services. The library area located in Alumni Hall will become the central point for the new Commons. Renovations to the current space, including the addition of a second floor above the library, will accommodate the service areas that will move to the Commons.

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Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Appendix A: Applied Research and Innovation at Lakeland College Lakeland College’s Applied Research and Innovation long-term focus remains on the four key themes of expertise within the College:

Lakeland, in partnership with AI-TF, is also leading the development of the Alberta Biochar Initiative. Two biochar units have been purchased providing capability for biochar production and strategies to enhance commercialization.

1. Energy and Entrepreneurship

As well, the new Energy Centre at the Lloydminster campus will provide opportunities for research related to the oil and gas sector.

2. Agriculture

Agriculture

3. Sustainable Environments and Buildings

The College’s acquisition of ten quarters of farmland is providing enhanced opportunities to undertake projects both independently and in partnership with regional and national/ international companies. Lakeland has continued to undertake crop trials and demonstration projects with industry partners. The partnership with New Holland Agriculture for agricultural equipment use has enhanced the capability of the College to further develop crop research projects.

4. Fire and Emergency Medicine The four themes are closely linked with the schools of Energy and Entrepreneurship, Agricultural Sciences, Environmental Sciences, and the Emergency Training Centre. The College is focused on working collaboratively to advance research activities that complement the academic focus and benefit all partners.

Energy and Entrepreneurship Lakeland College has explored energy research in biogas, biodiesel and other energy topics and has taken a significant leadership role in the development of the Regional Business Accelerator based in Lloydminster. The Business Accelerator forms part of the College’s strategy to increase collaboration with SMEs in the region. The College recently received a gasification unit from Alberta Innovates Bio-solutions (AI-Bio) and, with technical support from Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (AI-TF), will be commissioning the unit to enhance the research capability in wasteto-energy applied research.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

NSERC funding is further developing crop research with the acquisition of a new weigh wagon and 2014 research related to enhancing field crop management. New developments specific to Lakeland’s livestock research include applied research trials using the recently acquired Growsafe Feeding System technology. Lakeland has partnered with a local company to evaluate the use of high-moisture barley and distillers’ grains in the feed ration along with summer feed trials using sheep to validate the Sheepbytes ration balancing system.

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Sustainable Environments and Buildings Lakeland is currently expanding its Centre for Sustainable Innovation in Vermilion which blends environmental, energy, agriculture, and building and construction research. The newly constructed Renewable Energy Learning Centre (RELC) is fully operational as a net zero building for heat and electricity. This builds on the College’s original investment in the Energy Cabin which is an off-grid demonstration facility. The RELC serves not only as a learning centre but also as a research facility looking to optimize energy efficiency from multiple integrated systems and to store heat energy for later use when needed. A new Bio-energy Centre is slated for construction completion in fall 2014. This building will incorporate additional energy saving technologies for research and demonstration and will complement the RELC. A fully equipped fabrication centre has also been constructed. As Lakeland moves forward, the intent is to incorporate many bioenergy elements into the Centre for Sustainable Innovation.

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Lakeland’s partnership with Western Economic Diversification Canada and Alberta Innovates – Technology Futures (AI-TF), regarding biochar production and its applications, is an example of Lakeland’s commitment to broadening bioenergy research and strengthening research ties with the Alberta Innovates corporations and, in particular, the College’s regional partner of AI-TF-Vegreville. Lakeland recently purchased a small solar concentrator and is partnering with a company to determine the ability to capture concentrated solar energy for a processing operation.

Fire and Emergency Training Emergency services training is a significant area of opportunity for future applied research. Lakeland has been investigating opportunities related to simulation training, emergency response training, and testing of prototype devices. Future research in this area will evolve as funding becomes available.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Appendix B: Lakeland College’s Risk Assessment Report Lakeland College is committed to establishing an institution that ensures risk management is well understood and managed through an Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) system. The ERM is a coordinated activity that exists to direct and control internal and external risks that threaten institutional goals. The following is Lakeland’s most recent risk assessment document: Risk Change in policy and funding by GOA

Rating High

Description • Government funding fluctuations • No new capital funding available • New mandates drafted; new leadership

Trend Neutral

Action • Seek alternative revenue streams • Connect with all levels of government • Identify federal funding opportunities • Increase donor base and enhance fundraising efforts

Aging infrastructure High

• Hampers student attraction Neutral and retention • Government cuts in annual funding • Limits education currency and excellence • Student perception of College as antiquated

• Generate deferred maintenance plan • Invite GOA rep to campus • Effective project management • Clarify stakeholder expectations

Employee recruitment and attraction

High

• Ability to attract and retain Increasing key employees and skill sets • Ability to train and develop staff

• Improve marketing (base practices; attract quality vs. quantity) • Focus on employee engagement • Redefine professional development

Labour settlements, employee engagement and morale

Medium • Uncertainty over future negotiations • Possible layoffs and increased workloads affect employee morale

Responsiveness to market

Increasing Medium • Need to offer desired programs • Can others replicate Lakeland’s successful niche programs? • Slow speed of change

• Perform environmental scans • Execute comprehensive reviews • Respond to governmentidentified priority groups

Service quality

Medium • Challenge to achieve desired levels of service quality with recent growth and stretching of resources

Increasing

• Infrastructure assessment • Process improvement led by front-line people • Resource sharing through cross-functional teams

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Increasing

• Open forum meetings • Ensure staff is informed • Keep abreast of provincial/PSI negotiations • Meet communication needs of staff

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Risk

Rating

Trend

Action

Client satisfaction and change management agility

Low

• Failure to meet client expectations (programs/ services; mode of delivery; tools/technology) • Unable to effectively respond to change

Decreasing • Take action on client surveys and advisory committee recommendations and report back to surveyed • Benchmark with other PSIs • Clarify expectations with Saskatchewan

Change pace of IT infrastructure to adequately support the business

Low

• System effectiveness • Speed of change and cost of implementing new technologies • Possibility of business interruption or failure

Neutral

Changing client demographics

Low

• Decline in graduating high Decreasing • Include international and adult learners school-aged students • Engage potential learners • Reduction in “traditional” through marketing and market for next 10-15 years enrolment strategies by up to 20% • Focus on student retention and Learner Commons support • First Nations market

Emergency response Low to health and safety issues

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Description

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• C  ollege response to major catastrophes (e.g. pandemic flu, shooter on campus, tornado, etc.)

Neutral

• Short-term, midterm, and long-term IT planning • Collaborate with PSIs (framework and policy development; service offerings) • One learning management system

• Complete emergency response plan (and training for staff and students) • Perform a health and safety assessment

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


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Lakeland College Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2014-2017  
Lakeland College Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2014-2017