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Lakeland College Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2013 -2016


Vermilion Campus 5707 College Drive Vermilion, Alberta T9X 1K5

Lloydminster Campus 2602 59 Avenue Lloydminster, Alberta T9V 3N7

1 800 661 6490 www.lakelandcollege.ca


Table of Contents Executive Summary.................................................................................................................... 2 Accountability Statement ...................................................................................................... 3 Institutional Context Plan Development

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Environmental Scan

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Goals, Priority Initiatives, Expected Outcomes and Performance Measures .......................................................................................................... 18 Financial and Budget Information................................................................................... 28

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Executive Summary As Lakeland College celebrates its centenary year in 2013, it is solidly building on its strengths, addressing its weaknesses, opening up to new opportunities, and meeting external challenges. This 2013-16 Comprehensive Institutional Plan (CIP) captures many of the exciting developments at the College as it strives to inspire learner success and community development through innovative learning in an inclusive and diverse environment. Providing a competitive advantage, responding to industry, managing financial responsibilities, satisfying students, and retaining learners establish the foundation for the College to deal with both internal and external challenges. There is a pressing need to upgrade aging and inflexible academic and residential facilities as well as a desire to enhance employee recruitment and retention. External opportunities for growth and engagement can be found in dual credit / distance learning, the immigrant population base, applied research and innovation initiatives, regional stewardship outreach, and globalization projects. Lakeland is also proactively facing challenges with a focus on manageable growth, technological advancements, and increased support for students in rural centres. A new strategic plan with four central outcomes is detailed in this year’s CIP:

Optimize Learner Success • Optimize graduate employment • Improve student retention • Increase student financial support • Increase alumni engagement

Strategically Provide Programs to Meet Student, Government, and Industry Needs • Satisfy students • Maintain enrolment • Align with government • Engage in applied research • Specialize core programs • Respond to market with new programs • Globalize

Connect with Stakeholders • Involve the community • Secure financial contributions from the region • Develop corporate training

Achieve Sustainable Operations • Achieve economic sustainability • Achieve environmental sustainability • Achieve social sustainability The College has tabled a deficit budget for 2013/14 to allow for residence renovations. Other than specific resource requests for research initiatives, information technology, and capital expenditures, all current goals will be met by utilizing current College resources or through cost-recovery budgeting. Lakeland has made significant adjustments to operations in order to balance the 2013/14 operating budget and accommodate the Campus Alberta base grant reduction. Adjustments include program suspensions, reduction in administration, and organizational restructuring in order to capitalize on resource efficiencies. Lakeland College strives to ensure it can adapt to the current economic environment in a way that still enables achievement of Lakeland’s key strategies and outcomes as well as alignment to the Government of Alberta and the ministry of Enterprise and Advanced Education’s key priorities. Page 2 Lakeland College 2013-2016

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Accountability Statement This Comprehensive Institutional Plan was prepared under the Board’s direction in accordance with legislation and associated ministerial guidelines, and in consideration of all policy decisions and material, economic, or fiscal implications of which the Board is aware.

Milt Wakefield Chair, Board of Governors Lakeland College

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Institutional Context Lakeland College is a board-governed public college operating as a Comprehensive Community Institution under authority of the Post-secondary Learning Act of Alberta. The College prepares students to enter the workforce, advance their career, or further their education. Lakeland College offers credit programming in the areas of academic upgrading, agricultural sciences, apprenticeship and pre-employment trades training, business, emergency services and public safety, energy, environmental sciences, health and wellness, human services, interior design technology, tourism, and university transfer. The College awards certificates, diplomas, and applied degrees and may offer baccalaureate degrees primarily in collaboration with degree-granting institutions. Lakeland College’s commitment to the collaborative principles of Campus Alberta is demonstrated through partnerships within the post-secondary system that strengthen its programming and service capacity. Lakeland College provides integrated emergency response, prevention, and leadership training at the provincial, national, and international levels. Areas of specialty include fire service, emergency medical services, incident command, and emergency preparedness training for pre-employment, municipal, industrial, and public sector clients. To enhance the college experience for its students, the College provides a people-centred learning environment with access to a full range of services including advising, athletics, cafeteria, child care, clubs, financial aid, health, library, learning, recreation, residence, and student employment. As a Comprehensive Community Institution, Lakeland College works cooperatively with adult learning partners, school jurisdictions, organizations, business, industry, and other community stakeholders to respond to learning needs in its regional service area. Through a partnership agreement between the Alberta and Saskatchewan governments, the College provides training and educational opportunities for Saskatchewan residents. As an extension of mandated programs, Lakeland College offers continuing education credit and non-credit courses and customized workforce development training for business and industry in Alberta, in Canada, and internationally. By using face-to-face, blended, and distance learning technology delivery methods, the College is able to maximize learner access to high-quality and affordable lifelong learning opportunities. Lakeland College promotes community economic development by providing workforce training and development and by conducting applied research. The College participates in applied research and innovation activities that are relevant to its program areas, complement teaching and learning, and advance innovation-based rural community economic development. The focus of applied research is primarily in the agriculture, emergency services, energy, environment, and manufacturing sectors. Through its services and facilities at its campuses in Vermilion and Lloydminster, Lakeland College helps support the recreational, cultural, fitness, child care, and conferencing needs of the communities it serves. The College has numerous specialized facilities such as multiple music studios, two community theatres, two recreation centres, a swimming pool, and an indoor riding arena that are often the site of community events and activities. Approved by the Lakeland College Board of Governors, October 28, 2009 Approved by the Minister of Advanced Education & Technology, November 23, 2009

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Plan Development Internal and external consultation on the development of this CIP is ongoing. Internal discussions have taken place with key stakeholders including student groups as well as academic and support staff. Students and staff are engaged in long-term planning for Lakeland by discussing and providing feedback to the College on future programming, needs of future learners, Lakeland’s competitive edge, and recruitment and retention. In light of major changes to post-secondary funding, as tabled in the March 2013 provincial budget, the College has been focused on open communication with Alberta Enterprise and Advanced Education to ensure that all expectations are met while still addressing access and quality needs for Lakeland learners. Lakeland’s Accountability Systems Committee stewards the document through information gathering and reviewing processes. Draft materials have been regularly reviewed by the College’s Executive team as well as relevant constituent departments (research, marketing, finance, registrar, deans, communities). Following Board approval, the final CIP will be shared with the larger College community, and subsequent feedback will be built into future iterations of the plan. External consultations, in both Alberta and Saskatchewan, have taken place with key stakeholders including regional access advisory committees, community adult learning councils, business and industry, research organizations, regional high schools, other post-secondary institutions, government departments, and advisory committees. These discussions focus on identifying learner needs as well as creative, collaborative measures to meet these needs.

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Environmental Scan Strengths Competitive Advantage Lakeland prides itself on the following resources and capabilities that give the College a distinct competitive advantage: staff innovation and creativity; experienced executive team; hands-on learning immersion; social networking innovations in marketing and student services; applied research and learning; and a strong athletics program. Two distinct campuses allow Lakeland to service unique, local post-secondary markets. The Vermilion campus features a student-managed farm, specialized and popular programming initiatives in Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Sciences, and Emergency Training, and a renewed trades centre. The Lloydminster campus features superior health and science labs as well as a potential increase in capacity and flexibility through the Petroleum Centre. In the Campus Alberta Planning Resource (CAPR) 2012, the government has challenged post-secondary institutions to help Alberta stay competitive in an uncertain worldwide economic environment. CAPR 2012 points to the following competitive strengths for the Lakeland region (based on 2010/11 data): • Highest high school completion rate in the province at 83.8% • Highest FLE enrolment growth at 7.2% • Highest regional service rate of 18- to 34-year-olds at 36.3% • Highest high school transition rate at 65.6% Lakeland College is an active partner in working towards the fulfillment of EAE’s priority direction of supporting Alberta’s economic and social progress, so Albertans can achieve their full potential.

Industry Responsiveness Lakeland College consistently demonstrates its responsiveness to industry through regular communication with its advisory committees, proactive responses to labour market skill shortages, and synergistic programming initiatives. CAPR 2012 invites post-secondary institutions to “respond to labour market and learner demand for programming.” Lakeland is addressing skill shortages in the Alberta economy through active alignment with industry and learner needs. Geographically, Lakeland’s Lloydminster campus is at the centre of an oil and gas boom. An increased need for skilled tradespeople has led to a dramatic increase in the number of apprenticeship seats at the College. In response to learners and industry, Lakeland has found it necessary to extend access to apprenticeship training: 2010/11

FLE 253

Final Headcount of 919

2011/12

FLE 263

Final Headcount of 952

2012/13

FLE TBA

January 2013 Headcount is 1087

2013/14

FLE TBA

Predicted Headcount of 1300

Increased apprenticeship numbers has had a significant impact on such student and learning services as the Learning Centre, Financial Aid, Health Services, and residential accommodation.

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In addition, the College has been working closely with the oil and gas industry to meet specific labour market requirements. Lakeland launched a Heavy Oil Power Engineering Diploma program, in the fall of 2012, and upgraded the Husky Energy Power Engineering lab to a 3rd-Class lab, in order to address industry’s request for more 3rd-Class power engineers. The objective was to develop a unique program that would give students training in heavy oil operations, 3rd-Class power engineering, steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), heavy oil upgrading, and industrial fire training. As a result of Advisory Committee input, the College has also created an Introduction to Heavy Oil and Gas program for Aboriginal students to be offered on reserve, at Onion Lake Cree Nation, to prepare students to immediately enter the oilfield workforce with entry-level operator education or to ladder into Lakeland’s Heavy Oil Operations Technician (HOOT) Program. The first cohort completed this program in the spring of 2012; of the 11 enrolled students, 5 secured immediate employment, 5 laddered into the HOOT Program, and 1 entered Lakeland’s Academic Upgrading program. As well, a partnership with the Husky Upgrader, ADM, and Alan Markin of CNRL has led to the enrolment of 94 students in online or evening Power Engineering courses. The College’s applied research and innovation initiatives are geared towards supporting Alberta’s future economy by helping industry partners find solutions to their current challenges. This helps faculty stay well connected with industry’s changing needs and gives Lakeland students opportunities to work closely with prospective employers. “All 30 students in our feedlot class participated in the development of the 2012-13 GrowSafe residual feed intake beef feeding trial. The data collection phase allowed students to experience the research process in a very tangible way,” says Geoff Brown, Lakeland agricultural sciences instructor and beef lead researcher. “Interacting with our industry partners and discussing the importance of trial design and expected outcomes really excited students about research and how they can contribute to the project.” Lakeland continues to be a strong champion of the Lloydminster-based Regional Business Accelerator supporting the startup and growth of regional businesses. College staff and faculty participate as experts and coaches in industry training and mentoring programs building the region’s entrepreneur and innovator support network. Recent regulatory changes in Alberta has resulted in new credentialing requirements for professionals working in early learning and child care fields and has resulted in a demand from several agencies in our region for access to post-secondary courses and training for their employees. Lakeland College’s Human Services department has responded to these needs by developing a series of online courses from the Early Learning and Child Care and the Educational Assistant programs. For the 2012/13 academic year, seven courses have been offered to a total of 120 students with the spring session still to go. Course development will continue until both of these credentials are available online to part-time students in their entirety. This format has allowed working professionals to stay in their communities, continue with their employment, and at the same time start working towards their academic credential. Through synergistic programming initiatives between Emergency Training, Agriculture, Environment, and Trades, employers are accessing highly qualified and skilled personnel that they cannot recruit from anywhere but Lakeland College. Heavy oil operation students engage in fire training using the College’s world-class firefighting training facilities. Renewable energy research connects students and faculty in energy, electrical, and interior design. Such integrated and interactive opportunities provide a more rounded student experience, develop collaborations that transcend traditional programming boundaries, and produce students who are flexible thinkers and well positioned to engage with the evolving knowledge economy.

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Strong Fiscal Management Lakeland’s senior leadership team remains committed to financial sustainability in alignment with the Government of Alberta’s second policy priority of “securing Alberta’s economic future” (CAPR 2012) and the 2013 government budget that challenges Albertans to live within their means. A collaborative budget process enables key leadership within the College to help set budget priorities. 2011/12 financial results show a surplus of $2.3 million that has enabled the College to focus funds in high priority areas such as continued residence maintenance and the building of the Petroleum Centre. The College also continues to focus on maximizing capacity at both campuses. The executive team is taking decisive steps towards imbedding process improvement within the College. Starting from the grassroots level of defining the infrastructure to support process improvement, there is a tangible demonstration of the steadfast commitment to Lakeland College’s success now and into the future. Sustainability will be built on greater organizational efficiency resulting in improved quality, smarter resource allocation, and an innovative learning environment. Faced with the key challenge of maintaining access and quality during this time of extreme fiscal restraint, Lakeland continues to closely examine all programming and service offerings to ensure efficiencies. Within one month of learning that the College’s Campus Alberta Grant will decrease 7.3 percent in 2013/14, the Lakeland College Board of Governors has approved a plan to balance the budget for the next fiscal year. Facing a debt of almost $4 million for the 2013/14 fiscal year, the Board has approved program intake suspensions, employee reductions, administrative group salary rollback, and reductions in travel, maintenance, and professional development budgets to reduce expenses. Additional revenue is expected to be generated by some ancillary services as well as increased international and trades enrolment. Decisions have been made based on focusing College resources on its core programming areas, that include agricultural sciences, environmental sciences, energy, and trades and technology, as well as applied research that supports many of these areas. Maintaining financial sustainability and rationalizing current and future operations are critical for the survival of the College. In addition to an increased emphasis on deriving revenue from alternate sources, new research and innovation opportunities are aligned with existing and future programming and facilities. Lakeland is committed to supporting the government as it faces the realities of today while focusing on the road ahead. Demographic pressures as presented by Alberta’s population may affect post-secondary funding in years to come. As the population ages, other sectors (e.g. health care) may demand more funding, and Lakeland may face a dwindling share of provincial resources especially in light of uncertain oil revenues. The modest projected growth in post-secondary enrolment may not be able to withstand these demands for increased spending in other sectors. Strong fiscal management is positioning the College for such future developments.

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Graduate Student Satisfaction Lakeland College contracted Insightrix Research Inc. to conduct a 2012 follow-up research study with students who graduated from the College during the 2009/10 school year. Graduate overall satisfaction with the quality of teaching, programs and the quality of educational experience at the College is high. A vast majority are satisfied or very satisfied with the quality of teaching (95%), their program (94%), and the quality of their educational experience (95%). More than ninety percent of respondents would recommend their program (92%) and the College itself (94%) to someone else. Overall, Lakeland College graduates have strong positive perceptions of the benefits of their education. Nine in ten (89%) respondents agree or strongly agree that the benefits of their education outweigh the relative financial costs. Two thirds (64%) of respondents relocated to attend Lakeland College. Six in ten (60%) graduates relocated upon graduation from their programs half of whom moved outside of Alberta. Those over the age of 30 are less likely than the younger groups to relocate. Nine in ten (88%) respondents are currently employed most of whom (71%) have one paying job. Most of those who are currently employed have been working for over one year in their main job (64%) and work between 35 and 40 hours per week (46%). The reported salary for Lakeland College graduates has increased. The average annual income before tax and deductions rose from $48,102 in 2009 to $52,298 in 2012. Graduate job satisfaction is high. Those whose job is related to their education at the College are more satisfied with their current job than those whose employment is not. Nine in ten (92%) respondents who are currently employed are satisfied with their job including half (49%) being very satisfied.

Learner Retention Retention at Lakeland College continues to be a strength. The graduating class of the 2011/12 academic year had an 86% retention rate between year one and two and an 88% retention rate between the beginning of second year and graduation. Retention rates for Agricultural diplomas, in particular, were high ranging from 89% to 98%. Certificate programs enjoyed an 85% retention rate from the start of the year to graduation. In addition to an overall renewed emphasis on the measurement and tracking of key retention indicators, such as student progression and student persistence, the College is introducing a number of different retention strategies at the program level. Lakeland’s apprenticeship training programs employ strategic, intentional student assessments at the beginning of each intake to identify at-risk students; program instructors monitor the progress of these atrisk students and help them to access College resources and supports. Human Services’ programs also utilize an early intervention strategy; faculty meet regularly to discuss student progress and regularly connect with students to offer support. In Agricultural Sciences, each student is matched with a faculty mentor who meets regularly with the student and discusses all elements of student life. In Environmental Sciences, a chemistry preparation course is now being offered to helps students transition to effectively meet program requirements. Many of Lakeland’s retention initiatives are implemented at an institutional level. The College has a Teaching and Learning Commons where any student can access free support from learning strategists, content strategists, and/ or peer tutors in study skills, exam preparation, and many other topics relating to academic success. Academic advisors have been added to most schools, and much of their work is focused on student retention activities. New for the 2012/13 academic year, Lakeland College now has a Wellness Coordinator on campus. The Wellness Coordinator, in partnership with Alberta Health Services, works with students from all programs on issues relating to mental health including homesickness and anxiety as well as social, physical, and emotional wellness. As these programs and resources continue to evolve, it is expected that retention rates will continue to improve particularly for programs that are at or below the institutional averages.

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Weaknesses Aging and Inflexible Academic Facilities Lakeland College is faced with the challenges of both aging and inflexible academic facilities. The average age of campus buildings is 35 years. Aging buildings require increased maintenance. Top redesign priorities include reconfiguring the existing W.H.T. Mead Animal Science building as well as expanding and modernizing the Small Animal Health Clinic and Horticulture Greenhouse. Maintenance staffing needs may increase as the College implements a preventative maintenance program. Effective redesign of learning space and modernization of existing facilities needs to be a focus in the years to come. College space needs to become more responsive, inclusive, and supportive to meet changing learner expectations. Classrooms that were originally built for 20 students/class are too small for today’s larger program cohorts. Each building should be modernized with flexible space to accommodate evolving pedagogies and future proofing. Lakeland seeks to provide a more personalized and inclusive learning environment with more lightinfused environments that are pleasurable to work in, flexible furniture and wider doorways to meet a variety of learner needs, and wireless connectivity and open-plan social areas to promote engaged learning. Lakeland College needs to re-allocate and reconfigure existing learning spaces into “new” learning spaces that motivate learners, promote learning activities, and support both collaborative and formal practices. “Adult learning providers that can provide flexible, accessible learner pathways, expand on best practices, and engage in new thinking” (CAPR 2012) will ensure that today’s learners are supported in an evolving, innovative approach to study.

Aging and Inflexible Residential Facilities Currently, residential space on both campuses is occupied to full capacity. Lack of a centralized transportation system within both communities suggests Lakeland may need to look at flexible living accommodations for students. Developing engaging residential micro-communities may enhance student interaction and collaborative learning. With residential space for only 560 students on the Vermilion campus, along with limited apartments and basement suites in town, accommodation issues affect Lakeland’s ability to increase enrolment. Currently, all residential space on the Vermilion campus is in use. The Lloydminster residence’s occupancy rate of 100% is at its highest rate ever recorded. Of these residential spaces, students occupy 91% - 94% which is up significantly over prior years as more spaces have been made available to students in order to meet demand. The College is anticipating that new housing may need to be created in Lloydminster in order to meet increased demand. The City of Lloydminster is less able to accommodate these needs as many of the available rental spaces are quickly being purchased or leased to businesses that are attempting to fill their employment needs by importing foreign workers. A low rental vacancy rate in Lloydminster means that rental units are going to the preferred 12-month rental versus the 8-month rentals that students would access making it very difficult for students to compete for these vacancies. The lack of public transportation also restricts the distance that students can look for off-campus accommodations unless a further expense of a car purchase occurs. In short, Lakeland College will not be able to fill the needs or able to accommodate any increase in growth or demand for academic programming at the Lloydminster campus without a further increase in campus residential accommodations.

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Residence maintenance has significantly improved in Vermilion but is still a critical area of need. The Vermilion family housing units are in need of repair, and the College plans to spend $500,000 in each of the next 5 years on these housing units. As well, the College has committed to spending approximately $800,000 per year over the next three years on the Lloydminster campus residences to complete some of the necessary repairs and maintenance on these units. A relatively slow speed of residence repairs may endanger Lakeland’s ability to attract and retain students.

Employee Recruitment and Retention Lakeland College continues to look for new and creative ways to recruit employees. The market is very competitive as the College not only competes with businesses and colleges within the area but also on a provincial and national level. Lakeland College has embarked on a new recruitment strategy using technology to promote hiring opportunities. The College accesses an electronic-based networking account on a regular basis for recruiting employees and has been very successful in hiring some key positions. Social media and other webbased electronic avenues have also been used to advertise faculty openings. Lakeland is continuing negotiations with both the Faculty Association and the AUPE employee group. Within this past year, market adjustments had to be applied to some of the hard-to-fill areas in order for the College to be successful in its recruitment efforts. An increased pressure has been added by recent provincial urging for wage freezes at all post-secondary institutions for the next three years. While money is important to individuals when looking for new employment opportunities, it is not the only factor that is considered. To encourage new employees and to retain current employees, Lakeland continues to enhance the benefit packages being offered. Access to the College’s fitness/recreation centre is made easy with either free or minimal charges for employees and their immediate family members. Celebrations welcoming new staff and celebrations recognizing those who have achieved career milestones are also part of the culture at Lakeland College. Not surprisingly, College employees continue to get older. There is a high probability that a significant number of Lakeland’s workforce will retire during the next 10 years. Of the College’s current continuing and permanent employees, 30.1% are of retirement age (55 years of age or older). The average employee age is 47, and the median age is 50. These numbers are significantly up from five years ago when potential retirees numbered at 16.2%. In 2011, the College experienced its highest annual number of retirees. Despite the opportunity to strengthen Lakeland’s workforce with the energy that new employees can bring, such a loss of experienced, skilled workers may lead to an interim lack of productivity and perhaps even a change in the College’s hiring processes as it looks to expanding part-time staffing in order to diminish the “brain drain” that may result from such a shift.

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Opportunities Dual Credit/Distance Learning The dual credit innovation project at Lakeland College is now entering its third year. The project allows high school students to enroll in college courses and earn credit towards a college program and their high school diploma at the same time. These courses are offered online and delivered to students synchronously, asynchronously and in a blended format. The program started with one course being offered in the winter of 2011 to a total of three students in the East Central Alberta School Division. For the fall of 2012, 51 students are taking four courses. To date, Lakeland College has offered 10 dual credit courses to 75 high school students. The program is poised to expand again with additional course offerings being made available to increasing numbers of students, increasing numbers of schools, and increasing numbers of school divisions. Dual credit expansion aligns with EAE’s third priority direction to “enhance system collaboration and partnerships” (CAPR 2012). This project has provided Lakeland with an opportunity to re-engineer a number of its traditional, face-to-face courses for an online delivery format. Having these courses online for dual credit has also enabled the College to offer these courses to other learner groups including those who aren’t able to attend college full-time for traditional face-to-face delivery. Nine of these dual credit courses have now been offered to these other learner groups and have resulted in a combined enrolment of an additional 71 students. These offerings will continue to expand with the dual credit program.

Immigrant Population In an attempt to close the participation gap of under-represented groups in post-secondary education, as per CAPR 2012 direction, Lakeland is developing opportunities to work with a growing immigrant population in Lloydminster. According to the 2011 Census, almost 7% of Lloydminster’s population has immigrant status. Local data points to estimates of over 2500 immigrants from the Philippines, 250 from India, over 350 from Mexico and South America, and 250 from European nations with the largest group from Ireland. Many foreign workers in Lloydminster are also pursuing educational opportunities at the College so that they can eventually stay and become Canadian residents. The College seeks to enhance programs and activities that will attract immigrants. Health programs at Lakeland, such as Health Care Aide, are increasingly sought after by both Canadian and immigrant students. For immigrants wishing to stay in Canada, securing long-term employment is critical. A blended learning format in the Health Care Aide program allows immigrant students to both work and attend school. CAPR 2012 sees Alberta as a “top destination for immigrants,” and that post-secondary support for immigrant training will help alleviate “the decline in Alberta’s working-age population.” Even though Alberta’s large urban centres, Calgary and Edmonton, receive the majority of immigrants, Lakeland College is supporting the growing immigrant population in Lloydminster.

Applied Research and Innovation Lakeland College is committed to pursuing research and development initiatives that complement the College’s teaching and learning activities as well as advance innovation-based rural community economic development. Lakeland has actively participated in applied research and innovation activities since 2005 with various projects in renewable energy, agriculture and environmental studies. The College sees engaging in applied research, innovation, and commercialization as valuable in its primary mission to inspire learner success and community development through innovative learning and thereby building Alberta’s skilled workforce and supporting the growth of its future economy. In addition, the College views working with companies as a way to increase regional opportunities and competitiveness by developing new technologies and helping industry connect with other partners while creating employment opportunities for students

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In alignment with provincial priorities as outlined in the Government of Alberta’s Research and Innovation Plan (ARIP) 2012, Lakeland’s applied research and innovation strategy focuses on a key overarching goal to enhance the pre-commercialization and knowledge transfer capacity at the College. Lakeland College has built unique research capacity in East Central Alberta to help the region compete in developing a skilled and talented workforce. The most recent investments from Western Economic Diversification Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, Alberta’s Research Capacity Program, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and Alberta Innovates Bio Solutions will help round out Lakeland’s research capacity and infrastructure to support research and training excellence. As well, the College is demonstrating innovative practices in collaboration with other post-secondary institutions and Innovation Corporations as exemplified by a partnership with Alberta Innovates Technology Futures in the organization and management of the pan-provincial Alberta Biochar Initiative. Lakeland College draws on its diverse portfolio of expertise to provide an integrated value chain approach to research in partnership with other research institutions and industry partners. This ensures that resources are maximized through enhanced collaboration and partnerships within Alberta’s dynamic and aligned learning, research, and innovation system. Lakeland College is focusing on opportunities in the College’s programming strengths of agriculture, sustainable environments, energy entrepreneurship, and fire and emergency training to build its research capacity in order to develop an engaging and innovative learning and research experience for students. A key thematic element driving all areas is enhancing entrepreneurialism through the College’s partnership with the Regional Business Accelerator in Lloydminster and the development of the East Central Alberta Regional Innovation Network in partnership with Portage College. Through these collaborations, Lakeland College has facilitated direct outreach and support to over 150 regional entrepreneurs and innovators some of whom have connected with and received support from the Alberta Innovation Voucher Program and other Regional Innovation Network partners.

Stewardship Lakeland College is an active partner in Campus Alberta and seeks out opportunities to work with other postsecondary institutions to achieve efficiencies and increase cost savings as well as enhance student experiences and outcomes. The College also continues to explore opportunities to increase learner access to eCampusAlberta, with a focus on enhancing pathways for the rural learner, as part of this collaborative network. As well, Lakeland currently has more than 600 formal transfer agreements to support transfer of Lakeland College courses and programs to universities, technical institutes, and other public colleges. The Alberta Council on Admissions and Transfer (ACAT) has commended Lakeland College on its achievement of developing transfer agreements. As a regional steward, Lakeland College works closely with its six regions, Killam, Lloydminster, Provost, Two Hills, Vermilion, and Wainwright, as well as their constituent Community Adult Learning Councils (CALCs). In a recent redesign of the stewardship model, Lakeland’s academic deans and directors will be taking on a more active role with the six regions. As the working relationship strengthens between the College and the regions, many program and service opportunities are arising as all stakeholders collaborate to increase access and meet the educational needs of learners and industry. There is a good opportunity right now for collaboration and working with eCampusAlberta to improve the accessibility and information provided to learners throughout both the rural and urban regions. Lakeland has been a key supporter of the development of a Regional Business Accelerator (business incubator) for the Lloydminster and surrounding region. This activity has helped bring Lakeland to the forefront for supporting regional business innovation. Building on the research supporting this initiative, Lakeland is also partnering with Portage College and other regional economic development agencies to explore the development of an East Central Alberta Regional Innovation Network. There is a significant opportunity for Lakeland College to be a regional leader for innovation-based economic development and entrepreneurial success and support the development and success of similar rural initiatives across Alberta.

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Other collaborative opportunities include business and industry training as well as applied research, economic development, and innovation activities. One project is a possible co-generation operation with the Town of Vermilion in order to reduce costs and increase environmental responsibility that could also lead to future partnerships with the Town. As mentioned previously, Lakeland is active in developing dual crediting initiatives with the K-12 sector. The College is also working on a one-year business certificate to be delivered in collaboration with eCampus and Lakeland’s Learning Councils. As well, Lakeland is working on a trades laddering program with the Lloydminster Learning Council that would prepare learners for their apprenticeship programs. Campus Alberta collaboration, regional stewardship, economic development, and creative programming initiatives support EAE’s third priority direction to “enhance system collaboration and partnership” as well as the GOA’s first policy priority of “investing in family and communities” (CAPR 2012). The College is actively supporting the province’s “cultural shift to collaboration among adult learning providers in order to better serve learners, achieve efficiencies, leverage expertise, and maximize resources” (CAPR 2012). Lakeland College’s year-long 2013 centennial celebrations kicked off in the fall of 2012. Lakeland’s journey from demonstration farm to school of agriculture to vocational college to Lakeland College is being celebrated with fifteen signature events. Activities include galas, mattress dominoes, The Great Toboggan Ride, homecoming events, and a golf tournament. Celebrations conclude in November of 2013 with a four-day finale in Vermilion. As part of the centennial celebrations, Lakeland is revealing its Century Club – a collection of memorable people, places, and things that have a special place in the College’s history. The centennial has also served as the theme for a fundraising campaign. The Centennial Campaign is off to a great start. As of Dec. 31, 2012, more than $2.2 million has been raised. The response from donors, including businesses, external organizations, community members, staff, alumni, students, and friends of the College, has been extremely strong.

Globalization Lakeland believes there is an opportunity to not only increase its international enrolment but to also enrich campus life and broaden perspectives by becoming more active in international recruitment and partnerships. “Alberta’s future prosperity requires that learners enrolled in Campus Alberta have broad knowledge and expertise, flexible and adaptable skill sets, cross-cultural skills, and a global perspective. International education is a key building block in developing a more diverse, knowledge-based economy and, with its strong ties to research, is key to fulfilling Alberta’s innovation potential” (CAPR 2012). At the College level, the impact of globalization is very positive; when instructors who teach internationally return to Lakeland, they bring back with them renewed energy and expertise that benefits students in Alberta. On the international stage, Lakeland has established two successful Education for Employment Projects in Tanzania, works closely with the South West TAFE in Warrnambool, Australia, and has partnerships with agricultural colleges in the United States, Denmark, and the Netherlands. In addition, the College is leading a high-profile project in Tanzania, in which key performance indicators are being developed for use in all colleges and technical institutions, in partnership with the national Ministry of Education, the International Labour Office, and the UN. There are also opportunities to recruit more students from Asia and to provide Heavy Oil, Power Engineering, and fire rescue programming in the Middle East.

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There is great potential for further growth in international enrolment at Lakeland. Although CCIs have only 2.3% of Alberta’s visa student population in the system (CAPR 2012), likely because most international students in Alberta study at the graduate level in urban centres, some rural institutions have started to actively capture this student market; Lakeland had few international students until 2007/08, but in 2011/12, it enrolled 17 visa students. The College continues to examine literacy skills of international students and immigrants and is working towards a pathway solution that will bridge the education and skills gap that hampers the ability of these groups from entering Lakeland and/or being successful once their studies commence. Two options being investigated are a fulltime English as a Second Language program and an English for Academic Purposes course to be offered through the secondary school system as well as at Lakeland. Current globalization plans include expansion of the Education for Employment (EFE) project initiatives into the CARICOM region, further development of current EFE projects in Tanzania, and investigation of expansion of current EFE projects to other regions of the world based upon ACCC/CIDA designation. The College is also planning to develop partnerships with other top-of-class, internationally focused Canadian institutions for brokerage of programs overseas, recruitment of international students, and partnerships for international development projects. Lakeland entered into such a brokerage agreement with Lambton College in 2011. Lakeland is brokering Lambton’s Post-Graduate Management Certificate program for attraction of international students who have already competed some form of post-secondary business management program. Lakeland is accepting a cohort of students from India beginning in January 2013 through this agreement. With Agriculture, University Transfer, Environment, and Human Services students participating in 2011/12, Lakeland hopes to increase opportunities for Lakeland students to participate in study abroad and student exchange opportunities. There is increased demand around the world for technical and vocational education training in Agriculture, Environment, Trades, and Teacher Training sectors. Lakeland is looking into opportunities to provide training in these areas either unilaterally or through a partnership model. The College continues to build international experiences that reflect potential growth areas within its programming pillars and will continue to seek specific opportunities that will enable long-term sustainability.

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Challenges Manageable Growth Budgetary planning continues to be a challenge. Before the province announced its budgetary cutbacks, Lakeland College had started the first of a three-year right-sizing plan. The College plan was to look for efficiencies within the first year. Data from seven years of comprehensive program annual reviews would inform rightsizing decisions; programs that had been consistently low in student numbers or had no opportunity for future growth would have been eliminated. In years two and three, the College would have continued to target areas for efficiency and growth opportunity. Growth would have been targeted when need and opportunity exist. The approach remains but has been accelerated in order to meet the government’s cutbacks. As mentioned earlier, the College needs to cut $4 million from the 2013/14 budget. New students will not be accepted into the following programs: Academic Upgrading; Event Management; Practical Nurse; Office Administration; Transitional Vocational; Bachelor of Applied Business: Emergency Services; Paramedic. These programs were chosen based on the needs of the region and province, program cost, cost/FLE, graduation rates, enrolment trends, and availability of similar programming in the province or online. More than 40 permanent staff positions, including administration, faculty, and staff, will be eliminated during the next two years. Mitigation plans are under development for two programs: Sign Language Interpretation may be moved to an alternate location after June 2014; Paramedic refresher programming may be introduced after June 2014 in conjunction with the investigation of location and operations collaboration with NorQuest College. The child development centres at the Vermilion and Lloydminster campuses will no longer be operated by the College, but they have been put out to tender as they are critical components of learner access and community connection. For-profit opportunities will be embraced. A new committee has been developed to economize for-profit policies and procedures with the expectation of encouraging collaborative ventures that optimize the College’s mission, vision, and values. All for-profit ventures will be monitored to adhere to audited expectations. Lakeland College’s Board of Governors has developed a new outcomes-based strategy which includes the creation of key performance indicators. All programs and services will be monitored for efficiencies. Right sizing will continue to occur as a result of outcomes-based performance. Throughout this process, the College will continue to align itself with government expectations thus matching a vision that prepares Albertans for global competition. Lakeland’s outcomes-based strategy is aligned with the GOA’s second policy priory of “securing Alberta’s economic future” as well as EAE’s second priority direction to “focus on outcomes” (CAPR 2012). Such a strategy will allow the College to flexibly prepare and plan for the future in an uncertain economic environment.

Technology Technology use at Lakeland College has made significant strides in recent years. Virtually every classroom in the College is now equipped with either a Smart Board, Brightlink projector, or Touchscreen computers. Tablets are being piloted for teaching applications in the classroom, and Lakeland’s Learning Management System, Desire2Learn, continues to experience increasing usage rates among faculty and students. The College is also investigating single student sign-on for network and other applications as well as an institutional email system. The Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) Project will give Lakeland the ability to deploy and maintain multiple computers simultaneously with ease. Despite these technological advances, challenges still exist with regards to bandwidth, life expectancy, and moveable targets. Usage reports show that the College is currently hitting the bandwidth limits for both wired and wireless Internet usage, and the link between campuses (WAN) is also saturated with traffic. User expectations are such that the service should be instantaneous. With more people bringing their own mobile devices to campus, external resources and bandwidth will be increasing in demand.

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As well, the technology changes so fast that new technology purchased has a life expectancy of only 3 to 5 years. Even if a product is not End of Life (EOL), it may not accommodate the College’s needs or requirements in a 3-year timeframe. To accommodate new technological changes and user requirements, Lakeland will need funding to replace equipment that is EOL and update infrastructure that does not meet the changing direction of technology. Technological changes need to be done proactively to provide users the flexibility amongst devices or programs that utilize the network infrastructure. Performance and success of an institution relies heavily on information technology and infrastructure to be able to accommodate new technology. Classroom technologies, such as interactive whiteboards, personal learning environments, wireless networks, mobile devices, Internet, and high-quality digital learning resources, are just a few of Lakeland students’ expectations. Lakeland is working towards a flexible network infrastructure with the ability to accommodate new technology in light of the ongoing challenge “to increase access for learners given increasing demand and potentially limited resources” (CAPR 2012). Student Support in Rural Centres Post-secondary students in rural centres face unique challenges. Rural students often move to larger urban centres for post-secondary education because they are seeking a big-city experience. CAPR 2012 data indicates that “most Albertans applying to a publicly funded post-secondary institution in Alberta apply to the region they are from….This is the case for every service region except the Lakeland region, where 51.9% of applicants apply to institutions in the Edmonton region.” With such a strong regional high-school to post-secondary transition rate, at 65.6% (CAPR 2012), the College is working towards keeping students in the region by addressing such rural issues as access to services, transportation, and the need for an active local social community. Lakeland College strives to support students at both its Vermilion and Lloydminster campuses. The relative isolation of the Vermilion campus and the lack of public transportation in both Vermilion and Lloydminster place pressure on students without vehicles as they attempt to access College programs and services from off campus; students who live on campus also find it difficult to access off-campus services. To battle the perception that “there’s nothing to do here,” the College is proactively working towards enhancing the student experience through a focus on community. As Lloydminster faces challenges related to its rapid economic growth, such as increased demand for services, increased crime, and lack of affordable housing, the College offers a safe social place for its students. As well, neither Vermilion nor Lloydminster has the breadth of services that postsecondary students might need, such as psychological services, so it falls on the College to support students in creative ways. For example, half of a recent trades class was diagnosed with learning disabilities, and the College had to help. No student is left behind. Lakeland is committed to the support of the rural student community and the GOA’s first policy priority of “investing in family and communities.”

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Goals, Priority Initiatives, Expected Outcomes, and Performance Measures Over the last year, the Board undertook a comprehensive review of the College’s mission, vision, values, outcomes, and performance measures. Results from this review and a new strategic plan are reflected in this year’s CIP. Mission To inspire learner success and community development through innovative learning in an inclusive and diverse environment Vision Ever to excel in a global society Values Lakeland College values learner achievement, academic excellence and personal growth founded on the College’s longstanding principles:

• People-Centred and Respect • Accountability and Integrity • Inclusiveness and Collaboration • Continuous Self-Improvement • Innovation • Pride

Outcomes Four outcomes emerged from the Board review: 1. Learner Success Lakeland College will optimize learner success. 2. Relevant Programming and Research Lakeland College, in conjunction with post-secondary partners, will strategically provide programming that meets student, government, and industry expectations. 3. Connectivity Lakeland College will be connected to its multiple stakeholders. 4. Sustainability Lakeland College will achieve sustainable operations.

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Outcome 1 – Optimize learner success

Strategies

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Objectives for 2015/16

Optimize graduate employment

(1) 1% increase in students employed in their field within 12 months of graduation (2) Create and give survey to measure industry satisfaction with graduates

(1) 1% increase in students employed in their field within 12 months of graduation (2a) Implement one improvement from prior year survey result (2b) Measure change in year two of survey

(1) 1% increase in students employed in their field within 12 months of graduation (2a) Implement one improvement from prior year survey result (2b) Measure change in survey result

Improve student retention

(3) 1% increase in retention from semester to semester (4) Ensure 80% of schools have mentoring programs in place

(3) 1% increase in retention from semester to semester (4) Ensure 90% of schools have mentoring programs in place

(3) 1% increase in retention from semester to semester (4) Ensure 100% of schools have mentoring programs in place

Increase student financial support

(5) 5% increase in total dollar value of student awards (6) 2% decrease in student withdrawals due to financial reasons

(5) 5% increase in total dollar value of student awards (6) 2% decrease in student withdrawals due to financial reasons

(5) 5% increase in total dollar value of student awards (6) 2% decrease in student withdrawals due to financial reasons

Increase alumni engagement

(7) 2% increase in number of alumni donations

(7) 2% increase in number of alumni donations

(7) 2% increase in number of alumni donations

Outcome 1 – Performance Measures • Graduate Employment E (1) Increase in percentage employed within their field 12 months after graduation  E (2) Increase in industry satisfaction with Lakeland College graduates (survey administered at advisory committee meetings) • Student Retention E (3) Increase in percentage of students returning from semester to semester E (4) Increase in percentage of programs providing student mentoring • Student Financial Support E (5) Increase in total dollar value of all scholarships awarded to students E (6) Decrease in number of student withdrawals due to financial reasons • Alumni Engagement E (7) Increase in alumni donations

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FOCUS on Student Success Each year, 40 students are accepted into Lakeland College’s popular Heavy Oil Operations Technician (HOOT) certificate program. Due to factors such as limited oilfield knowledge and difficulties with academic prerequisites, Aboriginal students in the HOOT program have had minimal success. Lakeland College is committed to eliminating persistent gaps in the education and employment outcomes of First Nations and MÊtis people. Recognizing the need for both trained entry-level operators in the oilfield, specifically for on-reserve companies, and the need for certified power engineers, Lakeland College combined existing programming to create the Introduction to Heavy Oil and Gas program. This program prepares prospective Aboriginal students to continue their education in the HOOT certificate program, which leads to certification as a Fourth-Class Power Engineer, or immediately enter the oilfield workforce with entry-level operator education. In 2012, this 21-week program was offered on reserve at Onion Lake Cree Nation. Admission requirements included a Grade 12 diploma with 50% or higher in Math, English, and Physics. A total of 11 qualified applicants were accepted. The program consisted of Academic Upgrading (Math, Communications, and Physics), Life Skills, Introduction to Heavy Oil & Gas, Gas Process Operations (Parts A, B, C, & D), and Safety Courses (TDG, WHMIS, H2S, First Aid, and Confined Space). At the successful completion of the course, students received a Certificate of Completion from Lakeland College. Students then had the opportunity to continue their education by applying to the HOOT certificate program. Lakeland College reserved five spaces in the oversubscribed program for these graduates. Eight students applied for the five spots. The top five candidates were selected and began their course studies in the HOOT program in the Fall 2012. One of the unsuccessful applicants decided to continue their Lakeland experience by enrolling in the Academic Upgrading program. College faculty have commented on the difference between these five Aboriginal students and others from previous years. These students sit in the front of the class, are engaged in the learning process, and support each other. Past students sat in the back, segregated themselves from classmates, and dropped out instead of asking for help. As a result, all five successfully completed the first semester and passed their first provincial examination. In fact, two students are in the top 5% of the class. The other 5 students gained the confidence and the knowledge they needed and secured employment in the oilfield. They attribute this success to their Lakeland College experience.

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Outcome 2 – Strategically provide programs to meet student, government, and industry needs

Strategies

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Objectives for 2015/16

Satisfy students

(8) One action taken in response to student satisfaction survey

(8a) One action taken in response to student satisfaction survey (8b) 1 point increase in overall satisfaction

(8a) One action taken in response to student satisfaction survey (8b) 1 point increase in overall satisfaction

Maintain enrolment

(9) 2% increase in number of applicants converted to registrants (10) Maintain FLE level in remaining programs

(9) 2% increase in number of applicants converted to registrants (10) Maintain FLE level in remaining programs

(9) 2% increase in number of applicants converted to registrants (10) Maintain FLE level in remaining programs

Align with government (11) 2% increase in enrolment in governmentidentified target groups

(11) 2% increase in enrolment in governmentidentified target groups

(11) 2% increase in enrolment in governmentidentified target groups

Engage in applied research

(12) 5% increase in funding received for research (13) 1.5 FTE increase in faculty involved in funded applied research

(12) 5% increase in funding received for research (13) 2.0 FTE increase in faculty involved in funded applied research

(12) 5% increase in funding received for research (13) 2.5 FTE increase faculty involved in funded applied research

Specialize core programs

(14a) Implement one change identified in graduate satisfaction survey (14b) 2-point increase in graduate survey results

(14a) Implement one change identified in graduate satisfaction survey (14b) 2-point increase in graduate survey results

(14a) Implement one change identified in graduate satisfaction survey (14b) 2-point increase in graduate survey results

Respond to market with new programs

(15a) Perform comprehensive program reviews on a rotational basis and/or if annual review performance indicators suggest an issue (15b) Implement 2 changes in response to program reviews (15c) Measure enrolment increases in programs 2 years post review

(15a) Perform comprehensive program reviews on a rotational basis and/or if annual review performance indicators suggest an issue (15b) Implement 2 changes in response to program reviews (15c) Measure enrolment increases in programs 2 years post review

(15a) Perform comprehensive program reviews on a rotational basis and/or if annual review performance indicators suggest an issue (15b) Implement 2 changes in response to program reviews (15c) Measure enrolment increases in programs 2 years post review

Globalize

(16) 10% increase in number of international students on campus (17) $50,000 increase in profit from international activities

(16) 10% increase in number of international students on campus (17) $50,000 increase in profit from international activities

(16) 10% increase in number of international students on campus (17) $50,000 increase in profit from international activities

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Outcome 2 – Performance Measures • Student Satisfaction E (8) Increase in percentage of students satisfied with their program • Enrolment E (9) Increase in percentage of applicants who convert to registrants E (10) Maintenance in FLE levels of remaining programs • Government Alignment E (11) Increase in percentage of students in government-identified target groups (university transfer, trades, heavy oil, agriculture, and environmental) • Applied Research E (12) Increase in funds received for research over the 2009/10 year baseline year (cumulative) E (13) Increase in number of faculty involved in funded applied research • Core Program Specialization E (14) Increase in graduate satisfaction in core programs • New Programming and Market Responsiveness E (15a) Maintenance of Comprehensive Program Review and Annual Program Review processes E (15b) Increase in number of changes to programs as result of program reviews E (15c) Increase in enrolment 2 years post review • Globalization E (16) Increase in number of international students registered on campus E (17) Increase in total profit generated from international activities

FOCUS on Applied Research and Innovation Over the past three years, Lakeland College has strategically grown its applied research and innovation capacity and infrastructure to enable the College to be a contributing partner in Alberta’s dynamic and aligned learning, research, and innovation system. This has been achieved through targeted strategic research initiatives that add value to the College’s programming pillars and through a series of investments that total over $8 million dollars. This includes the College’s most recent awards from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and Alberta’s Research Capacity Program as well as the new 5-year, $2.3 million dollar commercial agriculture-focused Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada (NSERC) College and Community Innovation-Innovation Enhancement (CCI-IE) grant. Without these investments, the College would not have developed the Centre for Sustainable Innovation - a pioneering research centre that enables agriculture, energy and environmental sciences to coexist and build upon each other to create integrated research, learning, and collaboration opportunities. Lakeland’s original NSERC CCI-IE grant, focused on combining multiple renewable energy systems, has greatly increased the College’s capacity to undertake large-scale multi-partner research projects. Innovative devices and technologies developed through this research are now implemented at sites throughout the province. The most recent investments from Western Economic Diversification Canada, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and Alberta Innovates Bio Solutions have grown the College’s capacity to engage in bioenergy research. This directly links Lakeland’s energy research with its agriculture and environmental sciences research opportunities as biochar has significant applications in both commercial agriculture and land reclamation as well as remediation in the oil and gas sector.

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Lakeland College is currently working on a new project in collaboration with Alberta Innovates Technology Futures in Vegreville, Nova Green (a company looking to build a plant to extract neutraceuticals from artichokes), and a group of agricultural producers from Viking looking to produce the artichokes. This collaboration has developed from the new working relationship that has developed with the Innovates corporations and industry. Moving forward, the investments from CFI, RCP and NSERC will enable the development of research capacity that bridges both the existing research and the new thus increasing the College’s capacity to undertake integrated research studies that encompass agriculture, energy, and environmental sciences. Lakeland College is poised to build out its capacity investments in a manner that will enable the College’s full participation in the Alberta Innovation System and will be shifting the focus of applied research and innovation from infrastructure development to building capacity to leverage these investments through partnerships and collaborations for the benefit of Lakeland’s learners.

Enrolment Plan – FLE Projections By Program Band

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Growth/Decline

Agricultural Sciences

295

290

290

290

-5

Business

240

227

227

227

-13

Human Services Energy

140 125

110 135

102 146

102 161

-38 +36

Environmental Sciences Health Academic Upgrading/Preparation University Transfer

258 110 85 210

260 70 45 215

260 30 45 220

260 30 45 220

+2 -80 -40 +10

Trades Emergency Training Centre

354 398

360 344

360 320

360 305

+6 -93

TOTALS

2215 2056 2000 2000 -215

By Credential Band

2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 Growth/Decline

Apprenticeship

288

295

295

295

+7

Certificate

476

436

468

483

+7

Diploma

866

805

732

732

-134

80

75

55

40

-40

University Transfer

210

215

220

220

+10

No Credential

295

230

230

230

-65

Applied Degree

TOTALS

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

2215 2056 2000 2000 -215

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FOCUS on the Program Mix Lakeland College is introducing two new processes during the 2012/2013 academic year that will transform the way the College’s academic programs are approved and suspended. The first process is designed to provide a more coordinated and strategic approach to new program development and will ensure that all newly approved programs are designed to meet the needs of students and the labour market. All new program proposals must be supported by significant, documented evidence of student and industry demand, linkages to governmental priorities, and long-term financial viability. In addition, there is a thorough internal notification process that solicits the input of all key internal College stakeholders to promote a more coordinated and supportive atmosphere within which new programs can thrive. The internal approval process has also been revised in that all new program proposals require an endorsement from Academic Council, Dean’s Council, and the Board of Governors before the program is submitted to EAE for approval. The process and mechanisms for program suspension are also being revised so that all decisions relating to program suspension will be made more consistently and will be based on transparent and objective criteria. A new data-driven, outcomes-based model is being developed to track the performance of all programs on an annual basis. Student demand, enrolment levels, completion rates, student satisfaction, employment rates, and financial viability will be scored against minimum performance standards or targets for each program offered at the College. Programs that are consistently underachieving will be placed on probation for a defined length of time and will be required to demonstrate some level of improvement. Programs that are able to reach their improvement targets, and eventually reach and exceed the minimum performance standards, will come off of probation. If program performance continues to deteriorate, or if the required improvements are not realized within the given time frame, the program will be at risk of suspension. Through these two new processes, Lakeland College will continue to offer a suite of programming that is evolving with the realities and needs of our region and sustainable over the long term. The College anticipates that decisions relating to new program development/approval and program suspension will be outcomes-based and will depend on evidence of student and industry demand, performance, and long-term viability.

Lakeland College identifies 3 new program opportunities: 1. The Street Rod Technologies Certificate Program would be an 8-month, cost-recovery program that would prepare tradespeople for work in the custom vehicle sector. Proposed start date would be September 2013. 2. The Mental Health Practitioner Certificate Program would be an 8-month, post-diploma/degree, online, cost-recovery program that would support working professionals who work with individuals with mental health concerns. Proposed start state would be September 2014. 3. The International Development Certificate Program would be an 8-month, post-diploma/degree program that would allow students who have already completed a diploma or degree in health, education, agriculture, business, economics, human services, and other disciplines to study international development and deploy for a four-week mission to a developing nation. Proposed start date would be September 2014. In addition, the College is investigating the following program modifications to Agriculture: 1. The Animal Health Technology program is starting to collaborate with the Alberta Veterinary Medical Association and Canadian Veterinary Medical Association to investigate the addition of para-professional training to the program (e.g. ultrasound, physiotherapy, chiropractic). 2. The Western Ranch and Cow Horse Program is exploring additional cost-recovery certificate programming for graduates (e.g. feedlot and pasture work, working cow horse, reining).

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Outcome 3 – Connect with stakeholders

Strategies

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Objectives for 2015/16

Involve the community

(18) 2% increase in market share of regional high school graduates (19) 2-event increase in number of on-campus community events

(18) 2% increase in market share of regional high school graduates (19) 2-event increase in number of on-campus community events

(18) 2% increase in market share of regional high school graduates (19) 2-event increase in number of on-campus community events

Secure financial contributions from region

(20) $20,000 increase in total regional dollars donated to College

(20) $20,000 increase in total regional dollars donated to College

(20) $20,000 increase in total regional dollars donated to College

Develop corporate training

(21) 10% increase in profit generated by corporate training

(21) 10% increase in profit generated by corporate training

(21) 10% increase in profit generated by corporate training

Outcome 3 – Performance Measures • Community Involvement E (18) Increase market share of high school graduates within region E (19) Increase number of community events taking place on campus • Financial Contributions from Region E (20) Increase in total dollars donated from within the College region • Business Development E (21) Increase in profit from corporate training

FOCUS on Stewardship Lakeland College continues to foster a strong relationship with local communities by contributing to the economic development strength of the local businesses and organizations that support business growth such as the Chambers of Commerce. Taking a lead role in a “Business Retention and Expansion” research project in partnership with Mount Royal University, the Vermilion River Region Alliance, and The Town of Wainwright, the College has been instrumental in surveying, and subsequently educating, local businesses in retention and expansion initiatives. The College is also committed to supporting a number of groups that have a significant impact on the social fabric of our local communities. Through membership in local Rotary clubs, executive leadership on local chambers, and hosting a number of community groups on campus for events and board development, the College continues to enhance the wellbeing of the regions it serves. From the Lakeland student perspective, these partnerships provide significant opportunities to “Live the learning.” In hosting the Lloydminster Chamber Connect, where business students network with local business people, many successful employment matches have been made.

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Lakeland College is also proud to partner in other community-based projects. In collaboration with local agencies, the College offers The Business Partnership Breakfast Program in Vermilion and Wainwright in which nationally acclaimed speakers present to the region’s employees. Lakeland supports the Battle River Training Hub as it brings a number of excellent projects to the region such as the Tri-County Job and Career Fair in Killam. In partnership with the Lloydminster Construction Association and the Alberta and Saskatchewan governments, the College supports Lloydminster’s Try-a-Trade Expo; this is an annual trade show that provides students with a first-hand opportunity to see and try different trades under one roof. Lakeland is also proud to support the local Women’s Conference events, in both Lloydminster and Vermilion, in their professional and personal development offerings. Lakeland has been a key supporter of the development of a Regional Business Accelerator for Lloydminster and its surrounding region. Building on the research supporting this initiative, Lakeland is also partnering with Portage College and other regional economic development agencies to explore the development of an East Central Alberta Regional Innovation Network. Lakeland College is a regional leader in the support of innovation-based economic development and entrepreneurial success.

Outcome 4 – Achieve sustainable operations

Strategies

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Objectives for 2015/16 (22) Achieve “Satisfactory Progress” or “Implemented” on previous year’s audit (23) Ensure 95% of funded new initiatives directly align with strategic plan (24a) 5% increase in new revenue generation areas (enterprise) (24b) 5% increase in new revenue generation (fundraising) (25) 0.5% decrease in percentage of total costs (26) Introduce 1 new environmental initiative as a result of Environmental Committee recommendations (27) 1-point increase in “job satisfaction” section of Employee Feedback survey (28a) Maintain percentage of staff members attending professional development (28b) Increase number of area and department inhouse PD sessions by 1 (29) Move forward with 4 major process improvement initiatives

Achieve economic sustainability

(22) Achieve “Satisfactory Progress” or “Implemented” on previous year’s audit (23) Evaluate all new initiatives in relation to four outcomes (24a) 5% increase in new revenue generation (enterprise) (24b) 5% increase in new revenue generation (fundraising) (25) 1% decrease in administration costs as percentage of total costs

(22) Achieve “Satisfactory Progress” or “Implemented” on previous year’s audit (23) Ensure 90% of funded new initiatives directly align with strategic plan (24a) 5% increase in new revenue generation (enterprise) (24b) 5% increase in new revenue generation (fundraising) (25) 1% decrease in administration costs as percentage of total costs

Achieve environmental sustainability

(26) Introduce 1 new environmental initiative as a result of Environmental Committee recommendations

(26) Introduce 1 new environmental initiative as a result of Environmental Committee recommendations

Achieve social sustainability

(27) 1-point increase in “job satisfaction” section of Employee Feedback survey (28a) Maintain percentage of staff members attending professional development (28b) Increase number of area and department inhouse PD sessions by 1 (29) Move forward with 2 major process improvement initiatives

(27) 1-point increase in “job satisfaction” section of Employee Feedback survey (28a) Maintain percentage of staff members attending professional development (28b) Increase number of area and department inhouse PD sessions by 1 (29) Move forward with 3 major process improvement initiatives

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Outcome 4 – Performance Measures • Economic Sustainability E (22) Implement or make significant progress on audits E (23) Percent of new budget initiatives linked to the strategic plan E (24a) Increase in total dollar returns from entrepreneurial activity E (24b) Increase in total dollars raised through fundraising E (25) Decrease in percentage of budget spent on administration • Environmental Sustainability E (26) Increase in number of new environmental initiatives • Social Sustainability E (27) Increase in percentage of staff satisfied with their jobs E (28a) Maintain percentage of staff attending professional development E (28b) Increase in number of in-house staff professional development offerings E (29) Increase in number of process improvement initiatives

FOCUS on the Environment The Lakeland College Environmental Club has undertaken the project of creating an annual environmental report card for the College. This student-driven project is aimed at assessing the sustainability of environmental practices on campus and allows for students to collaborate with College staff on the improvement of campus sustainability. The first report card was issued in January 2013 with the establishment of measurement parameters. Current categories of analysis, centred at the Vermilion campus, include the cafeteria, grounds maintenance, transportation (campus vehicles), water, energy, cleaning, material use and disposal, governance/policies, and knowledge. In the upcoming year, the club will establish a complete contact list, obtain a full year of data to compare to future data, identify potential future categories for the report card, and implement no-cost sustainable initiatives. In year two, the club will also include linkages to the College’s environmental farm plan, develop a website/Facebook page, start annual reporting of data, begin to establish contacts with the Lloydminster campus, continue to implement no-cost sustainable initiatives, and establish measurement parameters for new categories. In the long term, the club will establish contact with other schools to create a universal environmental report card, begin tracking trends to make decisions regarding the College’s environmental impact, work closely with the College to raise awareness of environmental impacts, continually monitor each category to ensure improvements are being made, and expand to cover the Lloydminster campus.

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Financial and Budget Information Financial Challenges and Strategies Lakeland College strives to ensure it can adapt to the current economic environment in a way that still enables achievement of Lakeland’s key strategies and outcomes as well as alignment to the Government of Alberta and the ministry of Enterprise and Advanced Education’s key priorities. Lakeland will continue to work closely with the post-secondary education sector and representatives within the ministry. The budget plan has been built with a focus on Lakeland’s four key objectives of learner success, relevant programming and research, connectivity, and sustainability. Budget adjustments, new initiative commitments, and future development areas have all been undertaken keeping these outcomes in mind. As a key effort to level budget fluctuations, Lakeland is committed to sourcing new revenue streams through new business development opportunities and responsible entrepreneurship. The financial plan presents a balanced budget based on regular operations for the 2013/14 year. The College is awaiting ministerial approval to forecast a deficit budget of $777,000 to enable the College to continue to invest in the repair and maintenance of the Lloydminster residences. Lakeland College has a proven track record of quality budget management and will continue on this path. Schools and sections build budgets with the assistance of the financial services department. Variance analysis meetings take place several times throughout the year to ensure budget targets are adhered to; as well, the institution is able to make adjustments to spending in order to ensure a positive budget outcome at year end. Lakeland College has made significant adjustments to operations in order to balance the 2013/14 budget. The initial 2012/13 budget has been adjusted to accommodate the 7.3% reduction in the Campus Alberta base grant that equates to an adjustment of around $3 million. Adjustments include program suspensions, reduction in administration, and organizational restructuring in order to capitalize on resource efficiencies. The College is actively engaged with other Alberta post-secondary institutions to discuss potential opportunities to share resources, knowledge, policies, and best practices thereby identifying and capitalizing on efficiencies. Lakeland’s primary source of revenue continues to be government grants and regulated credit and apprenticeship tuition and fees which make up over 75% of the operating budget. Campus Alberta Grants have been budgeted for a zero % increase for the term of the CIP plan through to 2015/16. Tuition fees for 2013/14 have been frozen at the 2012/13 rates and, following the 2013/14 year, have been estimated to increase by a 1% COLA amount. This lack of growth in Lakeland’s key revenue areas presents a challenge as costs in many sections continue to rise. Page 28 Lakeland College 2013-2016

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Institutional Risks Lakeland College is committed to establishing an institution that ensures risk management is well understood and managed through an Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) system. The ERM is a coordinated activity that exists to direct and control internal and external risks that threaten institutional goals. The following is Lakeland’s most recent risk assessment document: Risk Rating Description High • Government funding fluctuations Change in • No new capital funding available policy and • New mandates drafted funding by GOA High • Hampers student attraction and Aging retention infrastructure • Government cuts in annual infrastructure funding • Limits education currency and excellence • Student perception of College as antiquated High • Failure to meet client expectations Client (programs/services; mode of satisfaction delivery; tools/technology) and change • Unable to effectively respond to management change agility High • Decline in graduating high Changing school-aged students client • Reduction in “traditional” market demographics for next 10-15 years by up to 20% Labour Medium • Uncertainty over future settlements negotiations •P  ossible layoffs and increased and employee workloads affect employee engagement morale and morale Responsiveness to market

Employee recruitment and attraction Change and IT

Service quality

Trend Action • Continued liaison with Increasing stakeholders • Enhanced fundraising efforts • Seeking alternative revenue streams Increasing

• Continued reinvestment in residence • Focus on renovation and maintenance projects vs. new facility projects • Monitor facility condition index • Effective project management

Neutral

• Monitor student, employer, and advisory committee feedback • Benchmarking with other PSIs • Change management system

Decreasing

• Marketing and enrolment strategies • Student retention and customer service • New markets • First Nations programming

Increasing

• Employee involvement in centennial celebrations • Open dialogue with employee groups • Improve employee satisfaction results

Medium • Need to offer desired programs Decreasing •C  an others replicate Lakeland’s successful niche programs? • Slow speed of change • Issues with communicating change Neutral Medium • Ability to attract and retain key employees and skill sets • Ability to train and develop staff

• Respond for governmentidentified target groups • Rotational comprehensive performance reviews • Support core/niche programs

Decreasing Medium • System effectiveness • Speed of change and cost of implementing new technologies • Possibility of business interruption or failure • C  hallenge to achieve desired levels Neutral Low of service quality with recent growth and stretching of resources

• Short-term, midterm, and longterm IT planning • One learning management system • Collaboration with other colleges on administration system • Process improvement program deployment • Cross-functional teams to encourage resource sharing

Emergency Low response to health & safety issues Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Neutral • College response to major catastrophes (e.g. pandemic flu, shooter on campus, tornado, etc.)

• Professional development support • Staff awareness and involvement in centennial celebrations

• Emergency notification system • Review of emergency procedures

Lakeland College 2013-2016 Page 29


Budget Assumptions All financial projections are based upon funding conditions known at the time of writing. This plan, as well as the following two years of forecasting ending in 2015, is based on the following assumptions: Revenues: • The Campus Alberta grant will remain at the 2013/14 level through to 2015/16. • Additional seat purchases in Apprenticeship training will remain stable over the term of the plan. • Tuition and mandatory fees will remain at the 2012/13 level as per the ministry-directed tuition freeze for 2013/14. In 2014/15 and subsequent years, it is anticipated that there will be a return to the legislated COLA tuition fee adjustments. • The full-load equivalent number decrease, due to program suspensions, will be softened by the increase in students in new programs and by an increased focus on student retention. • Investment income will remain stable. • Residence rates will increase by 3% per annum. Expenses: • Collective agreement compensation is a significant variable as contracts are open for negotiation. • Cost minimization, process improvement, and efficiency identification will become priorities to offset any inflationary increase in expenses. Reallocation of limited resources will become the focus for cost control in the coming years.

Statements of Expected Revenues and Expenses Lakeland College Operating Budget

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Revenue Government of Alberta Grants 33,175,045 32,877,657 32,877,657 Federal and Other Government Grants 1,634,143 1,634,143 1,634,143 Student Tuition and Fees 11,050,982 10,828,952 10,860,240 Sales of Services and Products 5,993,058 5,993,058 5,993,058 Contract and Other Revenue 4,712,448 4,709,948 4,709,948 Investment Income 432,000 432,000 432,000 Donations and Other Grants 157,032 157,032 157,032 Amortization of Deferred Capital Contributions 3,600,000 3,600,000 3,600,000 Gain on Disposal of Other Assets 0 0 0 Total Revenue 60,754,708 60,232,790 60,264,078 Expenses Instruction and Training 25,944,470 25,261,359 25,346,145 Academic and Student Support 9,329,070 9,479,684 9,652,646 Facilities Operation and Maintenance 10,291,735 10,304,739 10,324,439 Institutional Support 8,595,586 8,732,789 8,894,191 Ancillary Services 5,854,748 5,843,120 5,842,557 Sponsored Research 671,099 671,099 671,099 Total Expenses 60,686,708 60,292,790 60,731,078 Excess or (Deficiency) of Revenue 68,000 (60,000) (467,000) over Expenses on Regular Operations Residence Renovation Expenses 845,000 845,000 0 Excess or (Deficiency) of Revenue over Expenses Total $(777,000) $(905,000)

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$(467,000)

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Deficit Budget Approval Lakeland is awaiting ministerial approval to forecast a deficit budget of $777,000 in 2013/14 to enable the College to continue to invest in the repair and maintenance of the Lloydminster residences.

Revenue by Source 4.90

%

5.93%

n Grants

9.86

%

n Contract fees n Tuition & other fees n Sales, rentals & services

18.19%

57.29

%

n Investment, donations and other income n Amortization of deferred capital contributions

3.82%

Expense by Source 1.11%

9.65%

n Instruction and training

14.16% 42.75% 16.96

%

n Academic and student support n Facility operations and maintenance n Institutional support

15.37

%

n Ancillary operations n Sponsored research

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Budgeted Statement of Cash Flows for the year ending June 30, 2013

2012/13

Operating Transactions Deficiency of revenue over expense Add (Deduct) non-cash items: Amortization of tangible capital assets Amortization of deferred capital contributions Total non-cash items Cash Provided by Operating Transactions

6,185,268 (3,600,000) 2,585,268 1,775,268

Capital Transactions

Acquisition of tangible capital assets Cash Applied to Capital Transactions

(6,050,547) (6,050,547)

Investing Transactions

Purchase of investments, net of sales Proceeds on sale of portfolio investments Cash Provided by (Applied to) Investing Transactions

(432,000) 432,000

Financing Transactions

Payment on long-term debt Cash Provided by (Applied to) Financing Transactions

(120,000)

(810,000)

(120,000)

Increase (Decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents $(4,395,279)

Tuition and Mandatory Fees Lakeland College’s tuition fees are managed within the provincial tuition fee policy. This policy states tuition fees for programs subject to the policy must not exceed 30% of net operating expenditures for programs. The College’s tuition fees that fall under this policy continue to remain below the 30% level prescribed by the policy. In addition, the policy outlines the total maximum increase in tuition fees. Tuition increase for future years will be equivalent to the Alberta CPI. Tuition Fees* Fee Increases

2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 4,719

4,719

4,766

4,814

1.45% 0.00% 1.00% 1.00%

* Includes tuition and comprehensive fee

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Resource Implications A. Access and Quality Although the current fiscal reality underpins each decision, Lakeland College prides itself on its academic quality, learner access, continuous improvement, and valuing of students, staff, and faculty. The Board, with input from the executive team, will continue to examine the overall operability of the College. Approximately twenty indicators will assist College members in focusing and strategically aligning program, services, and opportunities to benchmark and improve performance. Academic Quality Lakeland College continues to undergo review processes that include reviewing input from industry, students, and faculty to continue to provide cutting-edge programs. The College is pursuing technology integration to ensure students receive real-world learning experiences. Learner Access Learners continue to be the focus at Lakeland. Faculty and staff go the extra mile to encourage and assist students, and the College continues to open up new pathways for incoming students. Utilizing Campus Alberta and eCampus, Lakeland directs students to the most efficient solution. Industry continues to play an important role in working with the institution to forward curriculum development, clinical experiences, practicums, and workplace experiences. Continuous Improvement Although Lakeland has practiced improvement processes in the past, the College is now adopting the Lean 6 Sigma improvement process to leapfrog it operations to further efficiency. All College operations will undergo examination for efficiencies.

Valuing Students, Staff, and Faculty Lakeland College values its people. Students are the pulse of the College, and their issues, activities, and experiences are at the forefront of the decision-making process. Staff and faculty are the heart of the college. Lakeland aims to create an inclusive environment to meet the needs of all. Maintaining an atmosphere of fiscal responsiveness, the College remains committed to lifelong learning and overall wellbeing.

B. Research Lakeland College is poised to build out its recently received capacity investments in a manner that will enable the College’s full participation in the Alberta Innovation System. The focus of applied research and innovation will shift from infrastructure development to capacity building in order to leverage these investments through panAlberta partnerships and collaborations for the benefit of Lakeland’s learners. Requested resources will aid in developing linkages with industry and enhancing the region’s entrepreneurialism. Priority

Item

Details

Source of funding

Cost

1

Research Capacity Development Fund

Faculty research and student project funding

Alberta Innovates Technology Futures ARIA Program (applied)

$30,000

2

Applied Research and Innovation Activities (ARIA)

Business innovation support activities and research capacity development and outreach

Alberta Innovates Technology Futures ARIA Program (applied)

$70,000

3

East Central Alberta Partner with regional Unsecured (seeking funding) Regional Innovation agencies to develop and Network support innovation network

$125,000

TOTAL

$225,000

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Lakeland College 2013-2016 Page 33


C. Information Technology The goal of Information Technology (IT) is to provide services to College students, staff, faculty and end users in a manner that is expected and productive for learner needs and requirements. IT capital and operating requirements are funded largely from Lakeland’s internal budgets. Lakeland College is exploring collaborative opportunities with other post-secondary institutions as a way to not only achieve financial efficiencies but to also share knowledge and core capabilities. One example of this initiative is the Provincial Microsoft Licensing agreement with EAE along with other PSIs. The following table lists IT items and issues that the College is facing. Most items are not single-year costs; rather, they will be spread out over several years as indicated. Priority

Item

Details

Source of funding

Cost

1

Network Infrastructure (EOL Technology)

To upgrade technologies that are End of Life or End of Support (over 5 years)

College capital budget

$1,250,000

2

Bandwidth

To accommodate wired and wireless learning technology

College operating budget

$200,000

3

Virtual Desktop College capital budget To provide flexibility in Infrastructure (VDI) software and application deployment for student labs and staff (over 3 years)

$1,350,000

4

Bring Your Own Devices (BYOD)

To provide BYOD-network College capital budget support for College students/staff and guests (over 3 years)

$1,000,000

5

Academic Technology Integration

To provide and integrate new academic technology

College capital budget

$250,000

6

Single Sign-on

To provide students with a single logon to access all their resources

College capital budget

$400,000

7

One Card System

To provide a single card for College capital budget access, ID, and services

TOTAL

$50,000

$4,500,000

D. Capital Plan In 2013/14, Lakeland College will assemble a land use committee in order to build a comprehensive land use plan. This plan will focus on opportunities to prioritize our outcomes of ensuring learner success, sustainability (both economic and environmental), and connectivity. The committee will identify and prioritize the most appropriate use of land held by Lakeland including student space development, potential commercial development, and community partnership initiatives. Of the seven capital projects that follow, the top three priorities would be the first three projects listed under preservation capital: Agricultural/Environmental Sciences Renovations; Animal Health Technology; and Teaching and Learning Commons.

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1. Expansion Capital Priority

Project Name

1

Equine Learning Centre

Start Date Upon securing funding

Location Vermilion

Budget $3,507,000

Equine Learning Centre One of the most utilized facilities on Lakeland’s Vermilion campus, the riding arena is open from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily and is home to the Western Ranch and Cow Horse (WRCH) diploma program as well as numerous campus and community events. 50% of the WRCH program courses are taught in the arena, and it is also used for equine and agriculture continuing education and short courses. Many student clubs on campus use the facility for various events and practices: the Stock Dog Club, the Stockman’s Club, the Stock Horse Club, the Rodeo Club and Intercollegiate Rodeo Team, and the Intercollegiate Judging Team. It is extensively used by the community for 4-H activities and for hosting horse and livestock events as it is the only such facility of its kind in the area. Lakeland would like to expand its WRCH programming and continuing education programs. The arena is approximately 27 years old and needs to be renovated to accommodate current activities and potential future program expansion.

2. New Capital Priority

Project Name

Start Date

Location

Budget

1

Dairy Barn

Upon securing funding

Vermilion

$5,072,000

2

Incident Command Simulator

Upon securing funding

Vermilion

$2,575,000

Dairy Barn The dairy barn is approximately 30 years old and, while functional from both a teaching and production perspective, is no longer representative of industry standards relative to today’s barns, equipment and technology. The facility is aging and in a state of constant repair. Lakeland is the only post-secondary institution offering a dairy specialization, through its Animal Science Diploma, which allows students and faculty full access to its dairy as part of the curriculum. Students manage the dairy through Lakeland’s unique student-managed farm, and almost all of these students return to their own dairy operations or directly to the dairy industry for employment. Incident Command Simulator Lakeland has an opportunity to make use of current technology to provide online incident command training to municipalities throughout Alberta. This project at the Vermilion campus will include a computer-based simulator where the field component is refined to a series of multi-station, coordinated command scenarios, conducted in real time, with an infinitely configurable series of variables for resolution. The system will be conducive to online training, so participants can take interactive command training from any high-speed Internet connection. A functional operations centre will need to be designed and equipped with a computer simulator for training scenarios for incident management training, fire ground command training, strategy and tactics training, multiagency managers, fire, police, EMS, municipal managers, elected officials and dangerous goods (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear, explosive) incidents. The system will coordinate with the new North American Incident Command System model up to the fourth level of training - ICS 400 (red card). Students will gain experience in the increasingly complex area of interdisciplinary command and control at an emergency site. The resulting reduction in delivery costs and related student travel and accommodation costs will be significant. Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2013-2016 Page 35


3. Preservation Capital Priority

Project Name

1

Agricultural/ Environmental Sciences Renovations

One year after securing funding

Vermilion

$7,502,000

2

Animal Health Technology

Six months after securing funding

Vermilion

$2,575,000

3

Teaching and Learning Commons

Upon securing funding

Vermilion

$763,000

4

Lighting Retrofit

Upon securing funding

Both campuses

$1,500,000

Start Date

Location

Budget

Agricultural/Environmental Sciences Renovations Lakeland’s Agricultural and Environmental Sciences programs are spread out in many buildings at the Vermilion Campus. The distance between classrooms, labs, and instructor/lab technician office space provides challenges for staff and students as equipment and teaching resources often have to be moved for various classes. As well, the current science labs have a rated capacity of 20 students which does not help meet the increased student demand for these popular programs. To allow for program growth, current classrooms, labs, office space, storage space, and meeting space need to be adjusted to maximize student and staff usage. Animal Health Technology Lakeland’s animal health technology diploma program is one of the most popular programs at the College. In the fall of 2010, Lakeland launched a veterinary medical assistant certificate program. Students in both programs use the already crowded animal clinic. Originally designed as a dairy training facility, the building was converted to an animal clinic in 1989. Despite renovations in 2000, the space no longer meets the needs of the College. A larger, modern facility located on the farm site for easier access to large animals would be ideal. As well, industry has indicated that there are future opportunities to expand programming in the animal health field. The cost breakdown for animal health technology preservation capital is as follows: • Beef Sheep: $2,000,000 • Small Animal Clinic Facility: $2,350,000 • Small Animal Clinic Equipment: $1,500,000 • Bull Test: $1,500,000 Teaching and Learning Commons Lakeland College has undertaken a significant restructuring of one of its schools, the library, and the learning centre in order to create a new Teaching and Learning Commons area that will provide better support and service to students. The library area located in Alumni Hall will become the central point for the new Commons where students can gain access to all sorts of student assistance. Renovations to the current space will be necessary to accommodate the service areas that will move to the Teaching and Learning Commons. Lighting Retrofit Lakeland College’s lighting systems are out of date, and the College is unable to buy bulbs to run the current system.

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Lakeland College Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2013-2016  
Lakeland College Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2013-2016