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Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2012-2015


Vermilion Campus 5707 College Drive Vermilion, Alberta T9X 1K5

Lloydminster Campus 2602 59 Avenue Lloydminster, Alberta S9V 1Z3

1 800 661 6490 www.lakelandcollege.ca


Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................................................................ 3 Accountability Statement ................................................................................................................. 4 Institutional Context Plan Development

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Environmental Scan

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Goals, Priority Initiatives, Expected Outcomes and Performance Measures ..................................................................................................................... 15 Financial and Budget Information........................................................................................... 25 Appendix A..................................................................................................................................................... 34 Appendix B

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Vermilion Campus

Lloydminster Campus

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Executive Summary As Lakeland College approaches its centenary year in 2013, it is solidly building on its strengths, addressing its weaknesses, opening up to new opportunities, and meeting external challenges. This 2012-15 Comprehensive Institutional Plan (CIP) captures many of the exciting developments at the College as it strives to excel to inspire learner success and community development. Strong fiscal management, healthy enrolment, a high-quality student experience, and the provision of flexible learning opportunities provide the foundation for the College to deal with both internal and external challenges. There is a pressing need to upgrade aging labs, equipment, and buildings as well as enhance student supports. External opportunities for growth and engagement can be found in the Aboriginal student base, Saskatchewan, Campus Alberta partnerships, regional stewardship, global ventures, and applied research and innovation initiatives. In the context of increased financial sustainability, Lakeland strives to maintain access and quality by seeking efficiencies. The College is also focused on the active retention of regional post-secondary learners. In this year’s CIP, Lakeland is proposing nine goals in total:

Access Goals • Maximize student recruitment and retention • Create supports for underrepresented learners • Enhance efficiency and effectiveness of program mix

Research Goals • Establish applied research and innovation at Lakeland College • Build applied research and innovation capacity in priority areas of programming strength

Sustainability Goals • Maintain program viability • Maintain financial sustainability

Community Goals • Unite College and community to meet learner needs • Advance innovation-based rural community economic development The College has tabled a deficit budget for 2012/13 to allow for residence renovations. Other than specific resource requests for research initiatives, information technology, and capital expenditures, all current goals will be met by utilizing current College resources or through cost-recovery budgeting.

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Accountability Statement This Comprehensive Institutional Plan was prepared under the Board’s direction in accordance with legislation and associated ministerial guidelines, and in consideration of all policy decisions and material, economic, or fiscal implications of which the Board is aware.

Milt Wakefield Chair, Board of Governors Lakeland College

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Institutional Context Lakeland College is a board-governed public college operating as a Comprehensive Community Institution under authority of the Post-secondary Learning Act of Alberta. The College prepares students to enter the workforce, advance their career, or further their education. Lakeland College offers credit programming in the areas of academic upgrading, agricultural sciences, apprenticeship and pre-employment trades training, business, emergency services and public safety, energy, environmental sciences, health and wellness, human services, interior design technology, tourism, and university transfer. The College awards certificates, diplomas, and applied degrees and may offer baccalaureate degrees primarily in collaboration with degree-granting institutions. Lakeland College’s commitment to the collaborative principles of Campus Alberta is demonstrated through partnerships within the post-secondary system that strengthen its programming and service capacity. Lakeland College provides integrated emergency response, prevention, and leadership training at the provincial, national, and international levels. Areas of specialty include fire service, emergency medical services, incident command, and emergency preparedness training for pre-employment, municipal, industrial, and public sector clients. To enhance the college experience for its students, the College provides a people-centred learning environment with access to a full range of services including advising, athletics, cafeteria, child care, clubs, financial aid, health, library, learning, recreation, residence, and student employment. As a Comprehensive Community Institution, Lakeland College works cooperatively with adult learning partners, school jurisdictions, organizations, business, industry, and other community stakeholders to respond to learning needs in its regional service area. Through a partnership agreement between the Alberta and Saskatchewan governments, the College provides training and educational opportunities for Saskatchewan residents. As an extension of mandated programs, Lakeland College offers continuing education credit and non-credit courses and customized workforce development training for business and industry in Alberta, in Canada, and internationally. By using face-to-face, blended, and distance learning technology delivery methods, the College is able to maximize learner access to high-quality and affordable lifelong learning opportunities. Lakeland College promotes community economic development by providing workforce training and development and by conducting applied research. The College participates in applied research and innovation activities that are relevant to its program areas, complement teaching and learning, and advance innovation-based rural community economic development. The focus of applied research is primarily in the agriculture, emergency services, energy, environment, and manufacturing sectors. Through its services and facilities at its campuses in Vermilion and Lloydminster, Lakeland College helps support the recreational, cultural, fitness, child care, and conferencing needs of the communities it serves. The College has numerous specialized facilities such as multiple music studios, two community theatres, two recreation centres, a swimming pool, and an indoor riding arena that are often the site of community events and activities. Approved by the Lakeland College Board of Governors, October 28, 2009 Approved by the Minister of Advanced Education & Technology, November 23, 2009

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Plan Development Internal and external consultation on the development of this CIP is ongoing. Internal discussions have taken place with key stakeholders including student groups as well as academic and support staff. Through open communication with Advanced Education and Technology, the College has been working to successfully integrate the planning processes from the past Institutional Access Plan (IAP), the Business Plan, and the Institutional Research Plan (IRP). Draft materials have been regularly reviewed by the College’s Executive team as well as relevant constituent departments (research, marketing, finance, registrar, deans, communities). A new, internal Accountability Systems Committee was created this year to steward the document through information gathering and reviewing processes. Following Board approval, the final CIP will be shared with the larger College community, and subsequent feedback will be built into future iterations of the plan. One consistent source for internal planning has been the student body. Several student advisory committee meetings are held each year. Students become engaged in long-term planning for Lakeland by discussing and providing feedback to the College on future programming, needs of future learners, Lakeland’s competitive edge, and recruitment and retention. In addition, an inaugural student satisfaction survey of College program and services was operationalized this year. This will be built on in the years to come. External consultations, in both Alberta and Saskatchewan, have taken place with key stakeholders including regional access advisory committees, community adult learning councils, business and industry, research organizations, other post-secondary institutions, government departments, and advisory committees. These discussions focus on identifying learner needs as well as creative, collaborative measures to meet these needs. Of note is the innovative opportunity with Saskatchewan’s Onion Lake Cree Nation in which the College is investigating the feasibility of building a residence to support grassroots programming initiatives. As well, the dual crediting collaboration with local high schools is proving instrumental in attracting local high school students to post-secondary education opportunities in the region and beyond. The College holds six annual Regional Access Advisory Council (RAAC) meetings where community adult learning councils are located: Lloydminster, Vermilion, Provost, Flagstaff, Wainwright, and Two Hills. In each of these six regions, several community stakeholders have been consulted: Community Adult Learning Councils (CALC), local chambers of commerce, Community Futures, school divisions, Alberta Employment & Immigration, economic development authorities, elected officials, and other special interest groups. These meetings have resulted in key Lakeland College outcomes for its service regions: • Development of College Access Points as formal points of contact between the College and regions • Development of one blended learning course (first year of Business Administration) to be delivered in the regions • Development of Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) for all six regions to address partnership expectations • Access of Lakeland’s in-house professional development courses at no charge for all CALC staff in the regions Collaboration opportunities with other Alberta and Saskatchewan post-secondary institutions are also influencing the direction of this CIP. Current discussions focus on the following collaborative opportunities:

Curriculum Sharing

• Esthetician with Grande Prairie Regional College • Hair Stylist with Olds College • Practical Nurse with Portage College • Business with Mount Royal University, Portage College, and Medicine Hat College to facilitate regional delivery Degree Completion • Science with Grant MacEwan University • Education with Concordia University College of Alberta • Elementary education • Program delivery (Paramedics) and Camrose partnership with NorQuest College • Degree development (Interior Design) with Mount Royal University • Environmental Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), sharing of regional advisory committee information, potential fire training opportunities, work on Regional Innovation Network application, sharing of a common link at HUB, and partnership on some Wainwright projects (e.g. Wainwright Business Partnership Breakfast Series) with Portage College • Sharing of regional stewardship model with Olds College Page 6

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Environmental Scan Strengths Resources, Capabilities, and Competitive Advantage Despite the need for funding to maintain existing services and to replace aging facilities and equipment, Lakeland College continues to exercise strong financial management. Over the past six years, the Board has continued to address and set aside additional funds for key infrastructure needs. Its information technology infrastructure is perhaps the best in the province for a small or medium sized college. Significant upgrades have been made to the Vermilion campus residence in response to changing student demands. The College also continues to focus on maximizing capacity at both campuses. In addition, Lakeland prides itself on the following resources and capabilities that give the College a distinct competitive advantage: high staff morale; experienced executive team; hands-on learning immersion, emergency training school; student-managed farm; superior health and science labs in Lloydminster; renewed trades centre; social networking innovations in marketing and student services; applied research and learning; and a strong athletics program. Lakeland’s resource initiatives support one of four priority directions in the Campus Alberta Planning Resource (CAPR) 2011 in which post-secondary institutions are challenged to “maintain a quality advanced education system” with innovation and entrepreneurship across programs. The College’s strong fiscal management also aligns with the fourth goal in the Government of Alberta (GOA) Strategic Plan 2011-14 that directs Albertans to join in the building of a culture of “learning, innovation, and entrepreneurial excellence” to improve Alberta’s economic sustainability.

Strength in Numbers Lakeland continues to recruit record numbers of students. From 2006/07 to 2010/11, the College full-load equivalent count grew from 1,778 to 2,250. Current institutional headcount numbers point to a Septemberend enrolment increase from 2,097 in 2009 to 2,364 in 2011. Lakeland College is one of only six Alberta postsecondary institutions to experience growth in each of the last five years with an increase of 26.5% over that period. A marketing culture, with a strong social media focus, complements Lakeland’s quality programming and student service ethos. A marketing message that highlights individualized, personal interaction, a family atmosphere in class and residence, and seamless transferability to urban institutions is effectively positioning Lakeland College as the institution of choice in the region. Lakeland’s 2011 Student Survey identifies “word of mouth” as the single most important factor in creating a positive awareness about Lakeland College (at 50%) followed by online contact (16%). The top reason for coming to Lakeland is the program offered (45%) followed by the College’s proximity to home (16%). 65% of Lakeland’s students don’t apply to any other school. College statistics show that five programs were oversubscribed in 2010/11: Heavy Oil Operations Technology (40 accepted/52 applications); Practical Nurse (48 accepted/110 applications); Environmental Sciences (80 accepted/103 applications); Animal Health Technology (42 accepted/91 applications); and Firefighter Training (187 accepted/315 applications). In addition, the Lakeland region continues to enjoy the highest school completion rate in Alberta with its 5-year rate at 84.5% (CAPR 2011). The region also has the highest high-school transition rate to post-secondary; in 2009/10, the 4-year rate was 41.5%, and the 6-year rate was 63.6% (CAPR 2011). This is supportive of the GOA Strategic Plan 2011-14 goal to create opportunity in a culture of learning; a skilled and educated workforce stems from a strong high school completion rate as well as a healthy post-secondary attainment rate. Lakeland is paying special attention to high school recruitment to encourage completers to transition to the College. Lakeland will continue to build on the strength of secondary educational attainment in the region to bolster enrolment further.

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Although many students in the region seek post-secondary education elsewhere, the College, as a true partner in Campus Alberta, can take some credit as a regional advocate and conduit for post-secondary education in general. One positive trend is Lakeland’s regional service rate of post-secondary participation: 33.9% of the 18 to 34-yearold population in the Lakeland region attends post-secondary education in the region (CAPR 2011). This group is considered the prime post-secondary-attending cohort; the Lakeland region has the largest projected increase in the province for this cohort from 2010 to 2020 at 9.6% (CAPR 2011). Although not indicative of the published high-school transition rate, the University Transfer program at the Lloydminster campus recruits many Lloydminster students who are not captured in the Alberta statistics as Saskatchewan claims all high school students in Canada’s Border City. For 2011/12, 44% of new students to the UT program came from Lloydminster, with 21% from other Saskatchewan locations; 48% of returning students came from Lloydminster with 30% from other Saskatchewan locations. Due to its unique location, Lakeland College has a considerable impact on the adjoining Saskatchewan region.

A Quality Student Experience Lakeland is known for working with each applicant to find an appropriate place in its programs. The region enjoys the second lowest turnaway rate in the province (CAPR 2011). A maintenance of a low turnaway rate supports provincial access requirements as one of four priority directions in CAPR 2011. Enhancing learner pathways, supporting system mobility, and building on transfer opportunities throughout the system support both the learner and Advanced Education and Technology’s (AET) priority direction that Alberta’s post-secondary institutions “respond to access demands” (CAPR 2011) as well as AET’s third goal in its 2011-13 Business Plan to enhance learner mobility and create a seamless learning system that enhances learner pathways and lifelong learning. In addition to fall Student Success workshops, staff and faculty work with each student to ensure academic success. This personal touch is key to recruitment and retention efforts. The quality Lakeland student experience centres on a hands-on, live-the-learning immersion; it is community based with a high degree of individualized access to instruction. Diversity in learning opportunities is also focused on meeting student needs in flexible, creative ways. The College is currently developing blended learning programs in the Energy, Human Services, and Health and Wellness departments. Power Engineering courses are being offered through a unique combination of online, virtual classroom and physical classroom settings. The Health Care Aide certificate program is being delivered through a weekend and home learning setting. The College’s continuous, comprehensive program evaluation process also supports another one of AET’s priority directions to “maintain a quality advanced education system” based on learner and employer needs (CAPR 2011). As another sign of quality, program completion is high; among all Comprehensive Community Institutions (CCIs), Lakeland has the 4th highest number of graduates of parchment programs awarded (769) in 2009/10 (CAPR 2011) Lakeland College students continue to be very pleased with their college experience. Lakeland’s 2011 Student Survey indicates high levels of student satisfaction with many College services: over 80% are very or somewhat satisfied with College facilities and equipment, the Learning Centre, Student Services, the Library, and Finance. When asked what is Lakeland’s greatest strength, the #1 response is “personal interaction with instructor,” and the #2 response is “small class size.” The top four reasons why students stay at Lakeland are #1 - “great instructors;” #2 - “proximity to home;” #3 - “small class sizes;” and #4 - “program I want to be in.” The 2010 Student Satisfaction Inventory further supports the findings of the 2011 Student Survey. When asked if they would enroll in Lakeland again, 84% said that they would. 76% indicated that the College was their institution of first choice. Access to quality instruction in a rural setting helps Lakeland College support and enhance rural life as rural learners are more likely to be recruited and retained for work in a rural setting.

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Synergy through Integration In CAPR 2011, AET challenges post-secondary institutions in Alberta to “maintain a quality advanced education system” by meeting the demand for flexible learning opportunities. Unique to Lakeland, synergistic programming between Emergency Training, Agriculture, Environment, and Trades is occurring. The College’s strength lies in its ability to integrate the various programming areas into cohesive learning experiences. For example, heavy oil operation students are engaged in fire training using the College’s world-class firefighting training facilities. As well, renewable energy research is connecting students and faculty in energy, electrical, and interior design. Such integrated and interactive opportunities provide a more rounded student experience, develop collaborations that transcend traditional programming boundaries, and produce students who are flexible thinkers and aware of the challenges faced in other facets of industry. Employers are able to access highly qualified and skilled personnel that they cannot recruit from anywhere but Lakeland College. Lakeland is helping to develop a new generation of innovative workers who are well positioned to engage with the evolving knowledge economy.

Weaknesses

Technological Expectations Lakeland students have high expectations with regards to academic technologies as they are seeing technological integration in their lives and schooling up until the time that they enter college. From individual technologies, such as smart phones, texting, social networking, tablets, laptops, and eBooks, to classroom technologies, such as multimedia, interactive white boards, computer use, and wireless access for students, Lakeland needs to keep current. As well, the existing information technology infrastructure, although solid in terms of security and network, utilizes an end-user interface that is weak and below standards set by student expectations. Although the College is improving in this area, it risks losing students to institutions that focus on the active, ongoing integration of technology into programming and services. Funding is needed to further invest in information technology as well as E-learning, mobile applications, alternative delivery supports, and faculty training. In Lakeland’s 2011 Student Survey, students see the “utilization of technology” as the College’s second greatest challenge (after “offering a wide range of programs”). However, 89% are satisfied with access to computer labs, IT technical support, and computer resources. The #1 choice for specific technology is access to industry equipment and technology in labs followed by wireless Internet. The Student Survey has identified that students are less concerned about computing technology and more concerned about the aging of lab and field equipment. Lakeland is shifting from a full emphasis on the updating of computing technology to a balanced approach that also incorporates lab and field equipment technological needs.

Student Pressures As student numbers increase, pressures grow on a variety of services: library, information technology, and learner assistance. Many students are unprepared for the academic rigour required of post-secondary learning, and programs are responding on an ad hoc basis with refresher/preparatory courses, individual tutoring, and learning centre referrals. In addition, more and more students are starting to require support on a 12-month basis. With room for only 560 students in the Vermilion campus residence buildings, as well as limited apartments and basement suites in town, accommodation issues affect Lakeland’s ability to increase enrolment at the Vermilion campus. Currently, each residential space on campus at Vermilion is in use. The Lloydminster residence’s occupancy rate is now at 90% - the highest rate ever recorded. However, it is only 80% full of students as staff and community members take some of the current residential spaces. The College plans to secure these spaces in order to provide the remaining 20% of space to new students as preparation for expansion at the Lloydminster campus. A new student pressure is emerging in the area of transportation. The relative isolation of the Vermilion campus and the lack of public transportation in both Vermilion and Lloydminster place pressure on students without vehicles as they attempt to access College programs and services from off campus; students who live on campus also find it difficult to access off-campus services. As well, with larger program cohorts, the College has outgrown the current mix of classrooms and labs which, in turn, has placed increased pressure on scheduling. Most classrooms and labs were designed for 17 to 21 students, but there are currently few cohorts that size. In the 2011 Student Survey, students say that the top challenge facing Lakeland today is that there are “too many students” with the corresponding “loss of small class sizes.” The third challenge identified is the need to “update buildings, labs, and facilities.” Comprehensive Institutional Plan

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Aging Facilities Students expect to be taught in modern labs with current equipment. Prospective environmental sciences and

agricultural sciences students have commented during tours that they are not impressed with the quality of some of the labs and farm facilities at the Vermilion campus. As well, the heavy oil lab in Lloydminster is awaiting imminent, necessary upgrades. The older facilities could result in fewer students choosing these Lakeland programs. Conversely, the state-of-the-art science labs in the new Bill Kondro Wing at the Lloydminster campus have attracted students who previously wouldn’t consider attending Lakeland. The average age of Lakeland buildings is 35 years. Three buildings, the W.H.T. Mead Animal Science Building, the Horticulture and Greenhouse, and the Small Animal Health Clinic, all need full replacement at costs of $6 million, $2 million, and $5.2 million respectively. The Colonel Cormack Recreation Centre (Vermilion) needs a major upgrade at a cost of $1 million. Although the Board has recently approved an appropriation of $1 million to address small academic equipment upgrades, and the College has entered into an arrangement with New Holland in which it will have access to current farm equipment for at least the next ten years, it is estimated that 27 of Lakeland’s 67 programs are now working with a substantial amount of equipment that is unacceptably below industry standards. Another issue with aging facilities is that they require more maintenance. While Lakeland wants to implement a preventative maintenance program, such a program requires more staff, and Lakeland has difficulty attracting and retaining tradespeople because salaries offered in the private sector are higher. As a result, more of the maintenance work being completed is reactive instead of proactive. The overall deferred maintenance backlog is valued at over $100 million. Residence maintenance has significantly been improved in Vermilion but is still a critical area of need. The family housing units will ultimately require full replacement as they are now beyond the critical repair stage. The College had planned on spending $500,000 in each of the next 5 years on these housing units but found it necessary to reallocate these funds to Phase One of the HOOT expansion. While these reallocated funds will ensure program health, the lack of residence repairs will now endanger Lakeland’s ability to attract and retain students. The College wishes to align with the priority direction to “maintain a quality advanced education system” in CAPR 2011 by leveraging its own resources as the government attempts to maintain its current level of investment in

uncertain economic times. Workforce Uncertainty

It is estimated that 50% of Lakeland’s workforce will retire in the next 10 years. Of the College’s current continuing and permanent employees, 27.1% are of retirement age (55 years of age or older). These numbers are significantly up from five years ago when the same group numbered at 16.2%. In 2011, the College experienced its highest annual number of retirees. There has also been anecdotal speculation that some individuals may plan their retirement to coincide with the College’s centennial year in 2013. Despite the opportunity to strengthen Lakeland’s workforce with the energy that new employees can bring, such a loss of experienced, skilled workers may lead to an interim lack of productivity and perhaps even a change in the College’s hiring processes as it looks to expanding part-time staffing in order to diminish the “brain drain” that may result from such a shift. Lakeland is in the process of negotiating salaries with its Faculty Association and AUPE employee groups. AUPE has a wage re-opener for 2012-13, and the Faculty Association is currently without a contract and has requested arbitration for the current year. Wage costs are, as a result, uncertain. Although the College is optimistic that acceptable settlements will be reached, agreements are not finalized.

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Opportunities Unique Learner Groups As Alberta starts regaining economic ground, there are three distinct learner groups that need increased support in order to be active players in Alberta’s global competitiveness strategy: Aboriginal learners; socio-economically disadvantaged learners; and, students with learning disabilities. One key provincial priority is that post-secondary institutions “respond to access demands” by continuing to respond to the needs of underrepresented learners (CAPR 2011). Lakeland is continuing to strengthen its provision of the customized support that these unique learner groups require. In particular, Aboriginal learners, a growing segment of Alberta’s population, may be encouraged to learn in a post-secondary environment that promotes student success in relationship to cultural differences and learning preferences. The GOA Strategic Plan 2011-14, in the fourth goal focused on creating opportunity, discusses the need for a skilled and educated workforce and the corresponding potential of the younger and growing Aboriginal population as a promising source of skilled and competitive workforce for the province. The AET Business Plan 2011-14 develops this even further by asking stakeholders to strengthen Aboriginal learner support programs and services in order to support the development of a “learner-centred, affordable advanced learning system accessible to Albertans.” Lakeland College continues to engage with its Aboriginal learners and community stakeholders to honour and respect cultural traditions and meet learning needs. College data reveals that just over 200 First Nations and Métis learners were enrolled in the fall of 2011. The College has a strong offering of First Nations programming on campus with the very successful Tourism and Employment Skills Enhancement programs. Onion Lake Cree Nation in Saskatchewan continues to be an important partner in the College’s Aboriginal learning efforts with on-site truck operator training and Introduction to the Heavy Oil and Gas program as well as possible foundational learning programming opportunities. Lakeland’s School of Agriculture has been working with a number of partners in Saskatchewan to develop First Nations’ agricultural training and education, and Environment Sciences is brokering a program to Aboriginal learners at Northlands College in Saskatchewan. As for other underrepresented groups, Lakeland actively supports students with learning disabilities who need specialized support as they progress on their post-secondary learning pathways. Exam accommodation continues to be one of the most accessed supports at Lakeland’s Learning Centre. There may also be opportunities to work with a growing immigrant population in Lloydminster. According to the 2011 Census, almost 7% of Lloydminster’s population has immigrant status.

Saskatchewan Potential Lakeland enjoys a unique market niche as a bi-provincial post-secondary institution serving both Alberta and Saskatchewan. This is opening doors to partnerships with Saskatchewan communities, educational providers, organizations, and industry as well as enhancing student recruitment on an interprovincial basis. CAPR 2011 emphasizes the need for increased provincial in-migration as part of its access priority direction. The Lakeland region has the highest high school completion rate in Alberta, but this does not account for the number of Lloydminster high school students who also select Lakeland College for their post-secondary studies. According to CAPR 2011, 19.5% of Lakeland’s students apply from Saskatchewan whereas College statistics show that over 50% of Lakeland’s credit students at the Lloydminster campus are Saskatchewan residents. Recognition of prior learning credentials and transfer credit will be critical as Lakeland works to strengthen interprovincial student migration from Saskatchewan. Lakeland College has an advantage in Saskatchewan as it doesn’t fit their typical post-secondary model. The College can offer a viable alternative to the system in place with University transfer and other diploma programs. In Lakeland’s current Heavy Oil Operations Technician program, 60% of students are from Saskatchewan.

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Collaboration and Community Lakeland supports the province with its two-pronged approach to facilitating collaboration between postsecondary institutions and communities: eCampus Alberta and regional stewardship. These two collaborative processes are emphasized in both the AET Business Plan 2011-14 and CAPR 2011: “A globally recognized, quality advanced learning system that meets the needs of Alberta” is achieved through “an affordable and sustainable advanced education system.” Lakeland College is an active partner in eCampus Alberta and seeks out opportunities to work with other postsecondary institutions to achieve efficiencies and increase cost savings as well as enhance student experiences and outcomes. The College also continues to explore opportunities to increase learner access to eCampusAlberta as part of this collaborative network. As well, Lakeland currently has more than 800 formal transfer agreements to support transfer of Lakeland College courses and programs to universities, technical institutes, and other public colleges. The Alberta Council on Admissions and Transfer (ACAT) recently commended Lakeland College on its achievement of developing transfer agreements. As a regional steward, Lakeland College works closely with its six regions, Killam, Lloydminster, Provost, Two Hills, Vermilion, and Wainwright, as well as their constituent Community Adult Learning Councils (CALCs). As the working relationship strengthens between the College and the regions, many program and service opportunities are arising as all stakeholders collaborate to increase access and meet the educational needs of learners and industry. Lakeland has been a key supporter of the development of a Regional Business Accelerator (business incubator) for the Lloydminster region. This activity has helped bring Lakeland to the forefront for supporting regional business innovation. Building on the research supporting this initiative, Lakeland is also partnering with Portage College and other regional economic development agencies to explore the development of an East Central Alberta Regional Innovation Network. There is a significant opportunity for Lakeland College to be a regional leader for innovation-based economic development and entrepreneurial success. Other collaborative opportunities include business and industry training as well as applied research, economic development, and innovation activities. One project is a possible co-generation operation with the Town of Vermilion in order to reduce costs and increase environmental responsibility that could also lead to future partnerships with the Town. Lakeland is also active in developing dual crediting initiatives with the K-12 sector. For example, the College offers a pre-employment hairstylist program that aligns with high school Career and Technology Studies (CTS in Alberta) and Practical Applied Arts (PAA in Saskatchewan). At the end of the preemployment training, all students are able to challenge their first year apprenticeship. Excitement is building at the College and in the community as Lakeland prepares for its centennial in 2013. There is optimism that many alumni, corporations, and community members will contribute to Lakeland’s centennial campaign. Globalization Lakeland believes there is an opportunity to not only increase its international enrolment but to also enrich campus life and broaden perspectives by becoming more active in international recruitment and partnerships. The GOA Strategic Plan 2011-14 and the AET Business Plan 2011-14 both stress the importance of global positioning and competitiveness for Alberta. On the international stage, with such developments as the Bologna Accord in Europe, there is greater product, labour, and student mobility. Lakeland has established two successful Education for Employment Projects in Tanzania, works closely with the South West TAFE in Warrnambool, Australia, and has partnerships with agricultural colleges in the United States, Denmark, and the Netherlands. There are also opportunities to recruit more students from Asia and to provide heavy oil, power engineering, and fire rescue programming in the Middle East. There is great potential for growth in international enrolment at Lakeland. Although CCIs have only 2.5% of Alberta’s visa student population in the system, likely because most international students in Alberta study at the graduate level in urban centres, some rural institutions have started to actively capture this student market; Lakeland had few international students until 2007/08, but in 2011/12, it enrolled 17 visa students. Page 12

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Possible global ventures includes expansion in the Middle East and the CARICOM region with emergency management programming, expansion of the current Tanzania project, developing partnerships with colleges in Norway and the Netherlands, tapping into international development bank projects by working with select American international development companies, increasing the number of school-specific study abroad offerings, and increasing the number of international exchange opportunities, as well as scholarship support, for Lakeland and international students. The College continues to build international experiences that reflect potential growth areas within its programming pillars and will continue to seek specific opportunities that will enable long-term sustainability.

Applied Research and Innovation Lakeland College is committed to pursuing research and development initiatives that complement the College’s teaching and learning activities as well as advance innovation-based rural community economic development. Lakeland has actively participated in applied research and innovation activities since 2005 with various projects in renewable energy, agriculture and environmental studies. The College sees engaging in applied research, innovation, and commercialization as valuable in its primary mission to inspire learners to realize their individual potential and thereby building Alberta’s skilled workforce and supporting the growth of its knowledge economy. In addition, the College views working with companies as a way to increase regional opportunities and competitiveness by developing new technologies and helping industry connect with other partners while creating employment opportunities for students. In alignment with provincial priorities as outlined in the Government of Alberta’s Research and Innovation Plan (ARIP) 2011, Lakeland’s applied research and innovation strategy focuses on a key overarching goal to enhance the pre-commercialization and knowledge transfer capacity at the College to enable value capture and transfer. Lakeland College is building unique research capacity in East Central Alberta to help the region compete in developing a skilled and talented workforce. As well, the College is demonstrating innovative practices by integrating student learning opportunities in applied research projects, by supporting collaboration with other post-secondary institutions and Innovation Corporations, and by developing a culture of entrepreneurialism through the support of the Regional Business Accelerator in Lloydminster and the East Central Alberta Regional Innovation Network in partnership with Portage College. Lakeland College is focusing on opportunities in the College’s programming strengths of agriculture, sustainable environments and buildings, energy entrepreneurship, and fire and emergency medicine to build its research capacity in order to develop a dynamic and integrated learning and research experience for our students.

Challenges Economic Realities and Financial Sustainability Faced with the key challenge of maintaining access and quality during this time of fiscal restraint, Lakeland continues to closely examine all programming and service offerings to ensure efficiencies. In light of recent discussions around the need for a smaller post-secondary system in Alberta with possible mergers as an outcome, maintaining financial sustainability and rationalizing current and future operations are critical for the survival of the College. In addition to an increased emphasis on deriving revenue from alternate sources, new research and innovation opportunities need to be aligned with existing programming and facilities. In the Alberta 2011 budget, it was announced that expenditures from the Access to the Future Fund will be suspended for 2 years. This provides another challenge for Lakeland as it had hoped to match dollars from this fund to contributions from individuals and the private sector to increase the value of endowed funds that are restricted for student scholarships and bursaries. One of the four priority directions in CAPR 2011 is a commitment to “ensure an affordable and sustainable advanced education system,” and the GOA Strategic Plan 2011-14 addresses infrastructure spending to “position Alberta for a return to prosperity.” Lakeland will do its part to ensure the affordability and sustainability of its own operations, but it faces many pressures as it attempts to meet access, quality, and innovation demands.

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Shifting Governance and Increased Regulation At every level of governance, Lakeland is experiencing change. The Board of Governors has recently undergone a major turnover in membership. The provincial political climate is settling after the recent election; despite the government’s commitment to three years of predictable post-secondary funding, it is not known what the future political and economic climate will be for post-secondary institutions in Alberta as other sectors are starting to require increasing government support. In addition, there has been an increase in requirements for compliance with legislative, fiduciary, and environmental regulations. Legal regulations in the area of copyright fees and health and safety legislation have also tightened. The movement to greater and greater degrees of regulation hampers the board’s ability to make decisions and restricts Lakeland’s ability to respond to issues. Provincial auditors are now focusing on risk management and compliance to all forms of regulatory and legislative changes; this implies increases in overhead and expenditure on non-academic issues. Demographic Shifts CAPR 2011 has highlighted several key demographic challenges for Lakeland. Alberta’s population growth is expected to remain positive but moderate with an increase in diversity in the upcoming years. The Lakeland region is expected to experience a population growth increase of 6.5% from 2010 to 2020. This is the lowest of all 10 regions in Alberta; however, the Lakeland region is expected to have the highest provincial growth of the 18 to 34 year-old prime post-secondary-attending cohort, during this same period, at 9.6%. The challenge continues to be in the retention of these learners in the region as the College retains only 8.9% of local Alberta high school students, and there is a lack of concrete data on the retention of Saskatchewan high school students in the Lakeland region. The fastest, and one of the few, growing segments of the Canadian population is the Aboriginal population. Consistent with the general provincial growth trend, the proportion of Aboriginal Albertans with post-secondary education, in the Lakeland region, grew from 30.9% in 2001 to 34.2% in 2006 (CAPR 2011). There is great potential here, especially at the Lloydminster campus, for the College to continue its work on creating a more inclusive learning environment to recruit and retain the region’s Aboriginal learner. Demographic pressures as presented by Alberta’s population may also affect post-secondary funding in years to come. As our population ages, other sectors (for example health care) may demand more funding, and Lakeland may face a dwindling share of provincial resources. The baby boom generation is aging, but is also helping create a new, smaller boom of grandchildren that might also need a larger of share of funding for elementary education in years to come. The modest projected growth in post-secondary enrolment may not be able to withstand these demands for increased spending in other sectors.

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Lakeland College 2012-2015

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Goals, Priority Initiatives, Expected Outcomes, and Performance Measures A. Access Access Goal 1 – Maximize student recruitment and retention

Strategies

Objectives for 2012/13

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Enhance face-to-face recruitment strategies

Revise existing strategies Review recruitment that focus on regional high strategies and modify as school students and their necessary parents and modify as necessary

Review recruitment strategies and modify as necessary

Enhance marketing strategies to support recruitment

Review existing social Review existing strategies media marketing strategies and modify as necessary as well as scholarship and promotion and modify as necessary

Research emerging marketing strategies to support recruitment

Promote the importance of student retention for college sustainability

Pilot the new student retention for college sustainability focus into current faculty orientation process

Review new retention focus in faculty orientation process and modify as necessary

Examine other opportunities to promote student retention for college sustainability

Measure and evaluate admission and graduation trends by school and by program

Establish benchmarks and targets for admissions/ graduate outcomes for each school at the diploma and certificate levels for full-time programming

Develop measurement techniques and evaluative processes to review admission and graduate trends over time

Review admission and graduate trending processes

Evaluate if PLAR process is working for students

Review and modify the PLAR process where necessary

Review the early-alert/ intervention system for each school.

Modify the early/alert/ intervention system for each school as necessary

Recover dropout students Pilot the program to bring (students who leave early back drop-out students often just two courses short of graduation)

Review the dropout program

Modify the dropout program as necessary

Increase international recruitment efforts

Review international recruitment strategies and modify as necessary

Review international recruitment strategies and modify as necessary

Establish benchmarks and targets for course enrolment in programs delivered on a part-time basis Implement the Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition process where opportunities arise

Create program pathways.

Utilize an early-alert/ intervention system for each school system

Pilot the early-alert/ intervention system for each school

Clarify PLAR process and status criteria

Evaluate and enhance current international recruitment strategies

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Page 15


Access Goal 1 – Performance Measures • Maintenance of Vermilion campus enrolment numbers based on facility/lab restrictions, program seats, and accommodation availability • 2% annual increase of first-year students at the Lloydminster campus for business and university transfer programs (other programs at Lloydminster campus are at capacity) • 85% target for overall retention (with differences among schools) • Maintenance of system that tracks PLAR • Early alert and early intervention system operationalized as soon as academic difficulties are recognized • 70% contact with drop-out students to develop a strategy to assist in program completion • Interactive first day/experience and returning student orientation for all programs • 33% annual target growth in international student enrolment

Access Goal 1 – Outcomes • Prospective and admitted students will be engaged with Lakeland from the first moment of contact. • Regional residents will want to know what is happening at Lakeland. • Lakeland will be a post-secondary leader in student retention. • Lakeland will actively support Alberta’s goal of competitiveness and global marketability through its efforts to improve student mobility and success. • Each school will possess an early-alert and early-intervention system customized to the unique needs of their students. • Students and faculty will be supported in their efforts to improve retention. • Students will feel like an integral part of the Lakeland learning environment. • Lakeland will see an increase in international student and staff numbers, international student exchanges, and international entrepreneurial opportunities.

Access Goal 2 – Create supports for underrepresentd learners

Strategies

Recruit and retain Aboriginal learners

Objectives for 2012/13 Finalize the development of the Aboriginal learner retention plan at both campuses

Objectives for 2013/14 Pilot the Aboriginal learner retention plan Invest in Aboriginal support personnel to promote and retain more Aboriginal learners

Objectives for 2014/15 Review and revise the Aboriginal learner retention plan as necessary Target skills training funding to further support Aboriginal learners

Provide foundational learning opportunities to develop Alberta workforce to access postsecondary education

Assess regional needs for foundational learning opportunities

Explore expansion of foundational learning opportunities as needed (and as funding permits)

Evaluate foundational learning offerings and restructure as necessary

Focus on Albertans with low literacy skills, lack of English fluency, or socio-economical disadvantages

Connect with communities to assess Lakeland’s possible role

Seek development of a plan with targeted communities to focus on enhancing the competitiveness of Albertans

Pilot the community plan to enhance the competitiveness of Albertans.

Evaluate supports for learners with learning disabilities

Improve the current learning Apply modifications in disability support plan: the enhanced learning • Identify the learning group disability support plan in more detail • Survey existing resources • Identify any gaps between needs and resources

Page 16

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Review the enhanced learning disability support plan

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Access Goal 2 – Performance Measures • Maintenance of current service levels for underrepresented learners • Establishment of baseline data and tracking methods for Aboriginal learners • Completion of regional assessment of current and possible foundational learning opportunities • Maintenance of supports for underrepresented learners • Analysis of needs and resources for learners with learning disabilities

Access Goal 2 – Outcomes • Lakeland will be an inclusive learning community that supports each learner to achieve his/her post-secondary goals.

Tourism lunches

Students from the Caribbean studying at Lakeland

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Interior Design

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Page 17


Access Goal 3 – Enhance efficiency and effectiveness of program mix

Strategies

Objectives for 2012/13

Provide programs that meet learner and industry needs within the framework of Board program priorities (subject to available resources): 1. Fire & Emergency 2. Agriculture 3. Environment 4. Energy

1. Continue development of the cost-resources online Emergency Service diploma 2. Continue to work on the CMA accreditation process for Paramedics 3. Explore degree completion for Agriculture with U of A 4. Explore Environmental degree completion. 5. Offer second year Heavy Oil Technology 6. Introduction to Heavy Oil delivered at Onion Lake 7. Offer online Power Engineering, Class 4, 3, 2 8. Explore adding 3rd and 4th years of Instrumentation as well as Instrument Technician certificate. 9. Develop Photovolatic Installer certificate 10.Continue collaboration on the Aboriginal Native Arts degree with ACAD 11. Deliver Practical Nurse (PN) diploma Program rather than brokering 12. Deliver Business COOP internship 13.Collaborate on degree completion in BSc, BA and BEd 14. Offer programming within study centre 15. Readjust programming as per Comprehensive Program Evaluation process 16.Work with regional areas to address programming needs 17. Explore collaborative opportunities with Onion Lake 18.Revamp the continuing education model and offerings 19.Integrate research into the classroom where appropriate

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Lakeland College 2012-2015

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

1. Continue development of the cost-recovery, online Emergency Services diploma 2. Expand Animal Health Technology (additional one year and diploma programs) 3. Add two post-certificate Equine programs 4. Explore adding a Solar Technician program. 5. D  evelop pre-training for HOOT 6. Develop online Gas Processor Operator 7. Develop online Production Field Operator 8. Develop online 2nd class Power Engineering: Part B 9. O  ffer Petroleum Management diploma in Lloydminster area 10. Develop Petroleum Management Skills training 11. O  ffer 3rd year of Instrumentation as well as Instrumentation Technician certificate 12. O  ffer Photovolatic Installer certificate 13. C  ontinue collaboration the Aboriginal Native Arts degree with ACAD 14. Explore applied degree completion for Interior Design 15. Explore new UT courses 16. Offer SAGD training, streaming time, and customized training for the energy industry 17. C  ontinue to offer study centre programming 18. R  eadjust programming as per Comprehensive Program Evaluation process 19. O  ffer degree completion opportunities 20. C  ontinue to work with regional areas to address programming needs 21. Continue to explore integrated research opportunities in the classroom

1. Expand energy industry training 2. Continue development of Gas Processor certificate 3. Expand HOOT pre-training into Saskatchewan 4. Explore apprenticeship Hair Styling 5. Explore Auto Preservation/ Performance Technician 6. Explore International Education certificate 7. Explore Critical Care programming 8. Collaborate with Mount Royal University for Aboriginal Nursing opportunities 9. Collaborate with Onion Lake for Health programming 10. Explore an Entrepreneurial certificate for industry 11. Continue to offer study centre programming 12. Readjust programming as per Comprehensive Program Evaluation process 13. Explore more degree completion opportunities 14. Continue to explore integrated research opportunities in the classroom

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Access Goal 3 – Performance Measures • Assurance that all program initiatives and changes are made in an effective and efficient fashion • Maintenance of access in light of College priorities and funding constraints

Access Goal 3 – Outcomes • Lakeland programs will be relevant to learner and industry needs.

Enrolment Plan – FLE Projections by Program Band

2011/12 2012/13 2013/14

Agricultural Sciences Business Human Services Energy Environmental Sciences Health and Wellness Academic Upgrading University Transfer Trades Emergency Training Centre Totals

2014/15 Growth/Decline

280 280 280 280 230 235 235 235 +5 170 140 140 140 -30 65 75 75 75 +10 265 265 265 265 110 110 110 110 85 90 90 90 +5 230 230 230 230 370 375 375 375 +5 470 475 475 475 +5 2,275 2,275 2,275 2,275

-

by Credential Band

2011/12 2012/13 2013/14

Apprenticeship Certificate Diploma Applied Degree University Transfer No Credential Totals

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

2014/15 Growth/Decline

270 270 270 270 510 510 510 510 900 900 900 900 90 90 90 90 230 230 230 230 275 275 275 275 2,275 2,275 2,275 2,275

Lakeland College 2012-2015

-

Page 19


B. Research Detailed information on Applied Research and Innovation activities at Lakeland College may be found in Appendix A: Applied Research and Innovation at Lakeland College - page 34.

Research Goal 1 – Establish applied research and innovation at Lakeland College

Strategies

Objectives for 2012/13

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Establish a clear vision, mission and priorities for applied research and innovation within Lakeland College

Annual review of vision and mission

Annual review of vision and mission

Annual review of vision and mission

Develop and update relevant applied research and innovation procedures

Develop and finalize key procedures

Review procedures and modify as necessary

Review procedures and modify as necessary

Launch a comprehensive communication strategy

Communicate with stakeholders

Communicate with stakeholders

Communicate with stakeholders

Review communication strategy

Review communication strategy

Review communication strategy

Research Goal 1 – Performance Measures • Establishment of a clear policy framework for applied research and innovation at Lakeland College • Increase awareness of Lakeland applied research and innovation activities by increasing communication activities • Support growth of applied research and innovation activities in light of College priorities and funding constraints

Research Goal 1 – Outcomes

• Lakeland College will be recognized by internal and external stakeholders for engaging in applied research and innovation that enables students to Live the Learning at Lakeland College • The process for engaging in applied research and innovation activities at Lakeland College will be clear

Grand opening of the Centre for Sustainable Innovation - May 31, 2012 Page 20

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Research Goal 2 - Build applied research and innovation capacity in prior areas of programming strength

Strategies

Objectives for 2012/13

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Establish the Centre for Sustainable Innovation (CSI)

Complete renovations to research facilities

Broaden use of the CSI facility for additional research priority areas

Fully utilize the CSI facility for all research priority areas

Develop capacity in priority areas of programming strength: 1. Energy Entrepreneurship 2. Agriculture 3. Sustainable Environments and Buildings 4. Fire & Emergency 5. Construction, Manufacturing and Business

Explore opportunities for applied research and innovation in priority areas

Explore opportunities for applied research and innovation in priority areas

Explore opportunities for applied research and innovation in priority areas

Build relationships with stakeholders

Build relationships with stakeholders

Build relationships with stakeholders

Develop infrastructure and equipment capacity in priority areas

Develop infrastructure and equipment capacity in priority areas

Develop infrastructure and equipment capacity in priority areas

Identify new opportunities Identify new opportunities to integrate research into to integrate research into the classroom the classroom

Identify new opportunities to integrate research into the classroom

Support innovation continuum in the region

Support implementation of business incubation and regional innovation network

Support implementation of business incubation and regional innovation network

Support implementation of business incubation and regional innovation network

Collaborate for success

Identify and build research linkages with other PSIs, companies, and other organizations

Identify and build research linkages with other PSIs, companies, and other organizations

Identify and build research linkages with other PSIs, companies, and other organizations

Broaden College-wide faculty participation in NSERC-funded renewable energy research

Research Goal 2 – Performance Measures • Commence research activities at the Centre for Sustainable Innovation • Increase College and community engagement in the NSERC-funded renewable energy applied research project • Development of the East-Central Regional Innovation Network • Collaborate with other PSIs, companies, and other organizations to maximize research and learning outcomes • Support growth of applied research and innovation activities in the areas of the College’s programming strengths in support of the learner’s experience

Research Goal 2 – Outcomes

• Lakeland College’s Centre for Sustainable Innovation will be recognized as a regional hub for energy, agriculture, and environmental research • Lakeland will maximize integrated research and learning opportunities to the benefit of our learners and industry

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Page 21


C. Sustainability Sustainability Goal 1 – Maintain program viability \\

Strategies

Objectives for 2012/13

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Review programs on an ongoing basis keeping in mind Board program priorities: 1. Fire & Emergency 2. Agriculture 3. Environment 4. Energy

Continue using successful annual program review process: • Use comprehensive list to identify programs to review • Use annual program review to identify areas of concern • Use worksheet to rate programs • Continue to alter, restructure, redefine, downsize, or suspend programs as process indicates Suspend Adventure Tourism and Outdoor Recreation program

Continue using successful annual program review process

Continue using successful annual program review process

Encourage use of eCampusAlberta

Utilize opportunities for eCampusAlberta usage

Utilize opportunities for eCampusAlberta usage

Utilize opportunities for eCampusAlberta usage

Sustainability Goal 1 – Performance Measures • Continued use of successful program review process with subsequent program decisions • Maintenance of current usage of eCampusAlberta

Sustainability Goal 1 – Outcomes • The Lakeland program mix will meet the needs of learners and industry and will ensure the long-term viability of programs and services at the College.

Sustainability Goal 2 – Maintain financial sustainability \\

Strategies

Objectives for 2012/13

Plan for reduced funding as a % of the College budget

Devise several scenarios to deal with possible reduction in funding. Facilitate revenue generation from other sources to support College sustainability.

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Continue to facilitate revenue organization strategies

Continue to facilitate revenue organization strategies

Sustainability Goal 2 – Performance Measures • Maintenance of College program and service offerings during budget reductions • Reallocation of resources to support new or expanded initiatives

Sustainability Goal 2 – Outcomes • Lakeland College will continue to meet the needs of learners and industry and ensure the long-term viability of programs and services at the College Page 22

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


D. Community Community Goal 1 – Unite College and community to meet learner needs \\

Strategies

Objectives for 2012/13

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Bring the College and the community together to assist the learner to overcome accessibility barriers

Continue to work with Regional Access Advisor Councils (RAAC) to meet community learner needs: • Develop a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with all CALCs • Operationalize College access points in all 6 regions • Explore a regional credit program through alternative learning methods • Offer adult education in the trades (non credit) in Vermilion • Conduct a needs assessment in Two Hills • Collaborate with the Battle River Training Foundation in Killam • Facilitate business retention and expansion in Wainwright

Continue to work with RAACs to meet community learner needs: •F  oster trades pathways in Lloydminster • I mplement a life skills literacy project in Provost

Continue to work with RAACs to meet community learner needs: •C  ontinue regional credit delivery • Expand eCampus delivery options

Encourage use of eCampusAlberta

Promote usage of eCampusAlberta in 6 regions

Promote usage of eCampus Alberta in 6 regions

Promote usage of eCampus Alberta in 6 regions

Utilize community resources (e.g. videoconferencing) to maximize regional learning opportunities

Expand community Investigate further Evaluate community resource usage in 6 regions resource usage in 6 regions expansion of community resource usage in 6 regions

Community Goal 1 – Performance Measures • Completion of MOU with all CALCs • Solid working relationship between the College and all RAACs • College access points in all six regions • Exploration of a regional credit program through alternative learning methods in all six regions • Specific training initiatives customized for each of the six regions • Maintenance of current usage of eCampusAlberta in six regions • Expansion of usage of community resources

Community Goal 1 – Outcomes • Lakeland will have a working and productive relationship with all regional stakeholders • Regional learners will have multiple learning pathways to meet their needs

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Page 23


Community Goal 2 – Advance innovation-based rural community economic development \\

Strategies

Objectives for 2012/13

Objectives for 2013/14

Objectives for 2014/15

Strengthen relationships with regional business support and economic development agencies

Evaluate support strategies Continue to support and modify as necessary BRAED, HUB, the Lloydminster Economic Development Corporation, and Chambers through Board membership and other collaborations Assist in business retention and expansion research, community outreach and education, and trade missions

Evaluate support strategies and modify as necessary

Engage with the regional business community to support business innovation

Continue to support the development of the Regional Business Accelerator Centre. Complete research on the feasibility of an East Central Regional Innovation Network in partnership with Portage College and other agencies.

Continue to support the development of the Regional Business Accelerator Centre Support development of an East Central Regional Innovation Network (if found feasible in 2012/13)

Continue to support the development of the Regional Business Accelerator Centre Support development of an East Central Regional Innovation Network (if found feasible in 2012/13)

Connect learners with innovative regional business

Encourage practicum and co-op placements for Lakeland students with regional business

Continue to support practicum and co-op placements for Lakeland students with regional business

Continue to support practicum and co-op placements for Lakeland students with regional business

Community Goal 2 – Performance Measures • Creation of the Regional Business Accelerator as an independent entity • Completion of feasibility research on the East-Central Regional Innovation Network • Support for regional development of business growth and maintenance strategies (as supported by Mount Royal University research collaboration regarding business retention and expansion) • Increase of students participating in practicum or co-op placements to enhance their Live the Learning experience

Community Goal 2 – Outcomes • Lakeland will have a working and productive relationship with all regional business support and economic development stakeholders. • The regional business community will have an increased awareness of Lakeland College • Lakeland will directly support Alberta’s competitiveness and productivity by being a regional leader supporting innovative businesses

E. Other Lakeland College is in its final year of its most current strategic plan: Future Directions: A Road Map Towards Our Next Century (2008-2013). There are six strategic goals that have guided Lakeland as it has worked to fulfilling its mission of inspiring learners to realize their individual potential since 2008: ensuring sustainable growth; investing in infrastructure; fostering a people-centred environment; engaging our community; funding our future; and providing innovative programs. These are considered as governing principles for the goals in this year’s CIP. The Board is currently undergoing a comprehensive review of the College’s mission, vision, values, outcomes, and performance measures. Results from this review and a new strategic plan will be reflected in the next version of the CIP after a complete internal vetting process. Details on the current draft of the College’s new vision and strategy may be found in Appendix B: Draft Revisions to College Values, Vision, Mission, and Outcomes (see page 36). Page 24

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Financial and Budget Information Budget Assumptions All financial projections are based upon status quo programming and funding conditions known at the time of writing. • The Alberta government grant will increase by 2% for 2013/14 and 2014/15. • Additional seat purchases in Apprenticeship training will decline in Alberta. • Tuition will increase by 1.5% for 2013/14 and 2014/15. • Residence rates will increase by 2%. • Full-load equivalents will remain the same. • Revenue from fundraising will remain the same. • Base funding to support ancillary operations will remain the same.

Statements of Expected Revenues and Expenses Lakeland College Operating Budget

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Revenue Government Grants 35,933,482 36,570,812 37,220,888 Contract Services 1,941,100 1,941,100 1,941,100 Tuition and Other Fees 11,733,418 11,909,419 12,088,061 Sales, Rentals and Services 5,354,687 5,354,687 5,354,687 Donations 157,032 157,032 157,032 Investment Income 432,000 432,000 432,000 Other Revenue 2,248,107 2,248,107 2,248,107 Amortization - Deferred Capital Contributions 3,600,000 3,600,000 3,600,000 Total Revenue 61,399,826 62,213,157 63,041,875 Expenses Professional Development 715,736 715,736 715,736 Scholarship Expense 419,160 419,160 419,160 Salary and Benefits 39,244,481 41,402,927 43,680,088 Supplies and Services 7,467,826 7,617,182 7,769,526 Supply of Goods and Services 1,705,147 1,705,147 1,705,147 Consulting Fees 1,548,500 1,548,500 1,548,500 Insurance 350,665 357,678 364,832 Interest Expense 193,277 193,277 193,277 Facility Costs 1,581,349 1,594,176 1,642,959 Utilities 1,988,472 2,028,241 2,068,806 Amortization 6,185,213 6,185,213 6,185,213 Total Expenses 61,399,826 63,767,238 66,293,245 Excess or (Deficiency) of Revenue 0 (1,554,081) (3,251,370) over Expenses on Regular Operations Residence Renovation Expenses 810,000 845,000 845,000 Excess or (Deficiency) of Revenue over Expenses Total (810,000) (2,399,081) (4,096,370) Note: In future years the College will be required to meet the new Public Sector Accounting Standards format which requires the expenses to be disclosed “by function” as opposed to the current “by type” format.

Deficit Budget Approval Lakeland is awaiting ministerial approval for its deficit budget in the amount of $810,000 for 2012/13 to work towards the completion of residence renovations at the Vermilion campus. Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Page 25


Revenues and Expenses by Source

Revenue By Source

Amounts

%

Grants 35,933,482 58.52% Contract Fees 1,941,100 3.16% Tuition and Other Fees 11,733,418 19.11% Sales, Rentals and Services 5,354,687 8.72% Investment, Donations and Other Income 2,837,139 4.62% Amortization of Deferred Capital Contributions 3,600,000 5.86% 61,399,826 100.00% Expenses Salaries (Salaries, Benefits and Professional Development) 39,960,217 Amortization 6,185,213 Facilities (Facilities, Utilities, Insurance and Interest) 4,113,763 Scholarships 419,160 Supplies and Services 10,721,473 61,399,826 Excess or (Deficiency) of Revenue over Expenses (0)

65.08% 10.07% 6.70% 0.68% 17.46% 100.00%

Residence Renovation Expenses 810,000

Excess or (Deficiency) of Revenue over Expense Total

(810,000)

Revenue by Source Amortization of Deferred Capital Contributions 6%

Investment, Donations and Other Income 5% Sales, Rentals and Services 9%

Grants 58% Contract Fees 3% Tuition and Other Fees 19%

Expense by Source Scholarships 1%

Supplies and Services 17%

Salaries (Salaries, Benefits and Professional Development) 65%

Facilities (Facilities, Utilities, Insurance & Interest) 7% Amortization 10%

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Lakeland College 2012-2015

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Budgeted Statement of Cash Flows for the year ending June 30, 2012

Budget 2011/12

Cash generated from Revenues Grants - Operating Contract Services Tuition and Related Fees Other Revenues Grants - Capital

34,458,511 2,023,915 11,191,726 7,704,764 5,650,000 61,028,016

Cash used in Operations Salaries and Benefits Supplies and Services Cost of Goods Sold Insurance Interest Facility Costs Utilities Residence Renovations Repayments of Long Term Debt

(37,030,895) (9,841,712) (1,629,603 (366,946) (315,411) (1,596,049) (1,988,472) (500,000) (607,462) (53,876,550)

Capital Acquisitions*

(4,939,205)

Net Change in Cash Flows

2,213,162

* Excludes major capital projects

Tuition and Mandatory Fees Lakeland College’s tuition fees are managed within the provincial tuition fee policy. This policy states tuition fees for programs subject to the policy must not exceed 30% of net operating expenditures for programs. The College’s tuition fees that fall under this policy continue to remain below the 30% level prescribed by the policy. In addition, the policy outlines the total maximum increase in tuition fees. Tuition increase for future years will be equivalent to the Alberta CPI.

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Tuition Fees*

$4,290 $4,350 $4,440 $4,520

Fee Increases

0.35%

FLE Increases For Credit Tuition Revenue

1.5%

1.5%

1.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% $9,709,289

Continuing Education Tuition Revenue Total Budgeted Revenue

1.45% $10,271,801

$10,425,877

$10,582,263

$749,510 $743,330 $754,480 $765,797 $10,458,799

$11,015,131

$11,180,357

$11,348,060

* Includes tuition and comprehensive fee ($3,900 tuition + $390 comprehensive fee in 2011/12).

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2012-2015

Page 27


Resource Implications A. Access and Quality In the current climate of fiscal restraint, the College will meet all identified access and quality goals by utilizing current College resources or through cost-recovery budgeting.

B. Research In the current climate of fiscal restraint, the College will focus on maximizing research and innovation capacity through current and future programs for the benefit of its learners. Priority

Item

Details

Source of Funding

1 Research Capacity Development Fund

Faculty research and student project funding

Unsecured: seeking external funding

$50,000

Research administration staff salaries

Short term funding by Alberta Innovates Technology Futures and NSERC

$100,000

Unsecured: seeking external funding

$125,000

2 Research Administration Base Funding

3 East Central Alberta Partner with regional agencies Regional Innovation to develop an innovation Network support network Total

Cost

$275,000

C. Information Technology

Priority 1

Item Increased Bandwith

Details

Source of Funding

Cost

To accommodate wired and wireless learning technology

College operating budget $60,000

2 Interactive White Boards

4 year plan to equip all classrooms

College capital budget

$200,000

3 Single sign-on

Students will log in once and be able to access all their resources

College capital budget

$400,000

4

VMware

Provide students with multiple systems

College capital budget

$900,000

5

Staff and Student Network Separation

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Network

College capital budget

$1,000,000

6

Academic IT facilitators

Two additional IT staff members

College operating budget $160,000

Total

Page 28

Lakeland College 2012-2015

$2,720,000

Comprehensive Institutional Plan


D. Capital Plan 1. Expansion Capital Priority

Project Name

Location

Budget

1

Equine Learning Centre

Vermilion

$3 million

2

Dangerous Goods and Technical Rescue Training

Vermilion

$4.9 million

3

Wellness Centre/Learning Commons/Maintenance Facility

Lloydminster

$10.5 million

4

Power Engineering Oil and Gas Expansion (Phase Two)

Lloydminster

$15 million

Equine Learning Centre One of the most utilized facilities on Lakeland’s Vermilion campus, the riding arena is open from 6 am to 11 pm daily and is home to the Western Ranch and Cow Horse (WRCH) diploma program as well as numerous campus and community events. 50% of the WRCH program courses are taught in the arena, and it is also used for equine and agriculture continuing education and short courses. Many student clubs on campus use the facility for various events and practices: the Stock Dog Club, the Stockman’s Club, the Stock Horse Club, the Rodeo Club and Intercollegiate Rodeo Team, and the Intercollegiate Judging Team. It is extensively used by the community for 4-H activities and for hosting horse and livestock events as it is the only such facility of its kind in the area. Lakeland would like to expand its WRCH programming and continuing education programs. The arena is approximately 27 years old and needs to be renovated to accommodate current activities and potential future program expansion.

Dangerous Goods and Technical Rescue Training To provide emergency services students with exposure to additional training scenarios that depict real-life situations, Lakeland will construct three-dimensional props. These props will be used to provide municipal/ industrial firefighters and specialist rescue team members with hands-on experience in scenarios involving structural collapse, bridge collapse, chemical/freight/truck transport/industrial plant/passenger train derailments involving hazardous materials and mass casualty incidents. The outcome of complex technical training on this equipment will improve responder capabilities and safety resulting in lives saved and reduced environmental impact.

Wellness Centre/Learning Commons/Maintenance Facility With the September 2008 opening of the Bill Kondro Wing, Lakeland can now accommodate as many as 900 additional learners at the Lloydminster campus. As student numbers increase, Lakeland will face challenges related to recreational and library space. A Wellness Centre/Learning Commons will address these challenges. Recreation is an important component of campus life and provides a setting for students, staff, and community members to pursue health and wellness goals. With Lakeland adding soccer and futsal to its athletics program, the Rustlers need additional space for locker rooms for teams and referees. To expand the facility, the nearby maintenance area will be converted into recreational space, a second floor will be constructed above the current recreation, storage, and maintenance areas, and the library will be expanded into a portion of this new floor. With the building of the new wellness centre and learning commons, the existing maintenance shop on the Lloydminster campus will be dislocated. A new, standalone building will be required for the maintenance facility.

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Lakeland College 2012-2015

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Power Engineering, Oil and Gas Expansion (Phase Two) To address the demand for oil and gas training in the Lakeland region and to make improvements to the Heavy Oil Operations Technician (HOOT) program, a new power lab with modern equipment is being built at the Lloydminster campus. In Phase One of this project, the building is being expanded to incorporate a power engineering lab that includes a water testing room and operations control room as well as a heavy oil operations lab that includes a maintenance section, simulation lab, and gas process lab. In Phase Two, the building expansion will also contain classrooms, lecture theatres, a computer lab, a student lounge, and faculty offices. This new power lab with modern equipment will strengthen Lakeland’s power engineering and oil and gas programs. It will open the door to offering more programming customized to the region’s vital oil and gas industry including a petroleum management diploma and oil and gas trades. It will also allow for the expansion of HOOT from a one-year certificate program to a two-year program that will enable students to graduate with both a diploma and a third-class power engineering certificate. It will also enable the College to explore opportunities for heavy oil and gas applied research.

2. New Capital Priority

Project Name

Location

Budget

1

Sustainable Environment Centre

Vermilion

$31 million

2

Thermal Storage and Bioenergy Lab

Vermilion

$1.43 million

3

Incident Command Simulator

Vermilion

$2.5 million

4

Dairy Barn

Vermilion

$5 million

5

Alberta Centre for Public Safety

Vermilion

$3 million

Sustainable Environment Centre The development of a new sustainable environment centre will enhance training capacity by providing a facility with the latest and most up-to-date technology, equipment and labs. With programs and training in nearly all sectors of environmental sciences, Lakeland has earned the reputation of being a leader in environmental sciences education. A sustainable environment centre will provide the resources and infrastructure to showcase the future in environmental programming and management including a strong applied research component. The new centre will be a multi-purpose facility on the leading edge of building design incorporating the latest in energy conservation practices and smart building management systems. The building will house lecture theatres, classrooms, program lab facilities, applied research labs, administrative offices, and specialized areas for instruction, online learning support, and videoconferencing. As a multi-purpose facility, the building will also provide access to leading-edge labs and other resources for students and faculty in other program areas, including agricultural sciences, and will become a recognizable community-friendly building capable of supporting many events. Lakeland is proud of its hands-on “live the learning” concept and its reputation for first-class learning opportunities. The sustainable environment centre will be a learning resource in itself with the building showcasing many of the leading edge technologies in sustainability and next-generation design efficiency. Students will benefit from an enhanced learning environment, and Lakeland will move forward with new applied research opportunities.

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Comprehensive Institutional Plan


Thermal Storage and Bioenergy Lab Lakeland has explored energy research in both traditional and non-traditional energy sectors for several years. Lakeland is currently expanding its Centre for Sustainable Innovation (CSI) which blends environmental, renewable energy, agriculture, and building and construction research. This builds on the College’s original investment in the Energy Cabin, an off-grid demonstration facility, and the wind anemometer, measuring wind speeds at various heights to assess the best distributed energy generation options for our micro-climate. This evolved into our current five-year NSERC College Community Innovation renewable energy project that is focused on developing technologies to bridge between distributed energy technologies (wind, solar, solar thermal, geothermal, cogeneration) to integrate them into systems that are cost effective and efficient for the rural, small urban and commercial user. The Centre, located on the new land acquired by the college, demonstrates many different technologies working together and provides a grid-connected workspace to explore how to balance energy conservation with generation. As Lakeland moves forward, the intent is to incorporate many bioenergy elements into the CSI. Lakeland’s partnership with Alberta Innovates Technology Futures on the Alberta Biochar Program builds on these themes and adds new capacity to the College’s teaching and research facilities. The Thermal Storage & Bioenergy Lab will integrate a passive solar collector (greenhouse) as part of the new space to enable the College to explore applications of passively collected thermal energy for space heating and bioenergy process optimization, in addition to current thermal storage research, including solar greenhouses and co-generation power plants. The lab will include a passive solar collector, an air-to-air heat exchange system, and sufficient workspace to incorporate biofuel research (biogas/syngas, pyrolysis oil, and biomass energy technologies) and thermal storage, priming, prototyping, and materials analysis technologies. This facility will also better accommodate the College’s 2012-13 $1.67 million investment in biochar production equipment through the support of Western Economic Diversification Canada and Alberta Innovates Technology Futures.

Incident Command Simulator Lakeland has an opportunity to make use of current technology to provide online incident command training to municipalities throughout Alberta. This project at the Vermilion campus will include a computer-based simulator where the field component is refined to a series of multi-station, coordinated command scenarios, conducted in real time, with an infinitely configurable series of variables for resolution. The system will be conducive to online training, so participants can take interactive command training from any high-speed Internet connection. A functional operations centre will need to be designed and equipped with a computer simulator for training scenarios for incident management training, fire ground command training, strategy and tactics training, multiagency managers, fire, police, EMS, municipal managers, elected officials and dangerous goods (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear, explosive) incidents. The system will coordinate with the new North American Incident Command System model up to the fourth level of training - ICS 400 (red card). Students will gain experience in the increasingly complex area of interdisciplinary command and control at an emergency site. The resulting reduction in delivery costs and related student travel and accommodation costs will be significant. Dairy Barn The dairy barn is approximately 30 years old and, while functional from both a teaching and production perspective, is no longer representative of industry standards relative to today’s barns, equipment and technology. The facility is aging and in a state of constant repair. Lakeland is the only post-secondary institution offering a dairy specialization, through its Animal Science Diploma, which allows students and faculty full access to its dairy as part of the curriculum. The dairy is managed by the students through Lakeland’s unique Student-Managed Farm - Powered by New Holland, and almost all of these students return to their own dairy operations or directly to the dairy industry for employment.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

Lakeland College 2012-2015

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Alberta Centre for Public Safety Lakeland College, with the guidance of the ACPS Cross-Ministry Project Steering Committee, is presenting to the Government of Alberta a proposal to create an Alberta Centre for Public Safety (ACPS). The ACPS is a direct response to the strategic goal of Alberta Municipal Affairs to “begin the establishment of an inter-disciplinary institute to support safety, security and environmental protection functions in Alberta,” pursued in response to Government of Alberta’s overarching goal of “(making) Alberta a safe place to live, work and raise families.” The province has sought to create a provincial centre for public safety since 2005 when the Environmental Protection Commission made a recommendation for the government to “develop a leading edge, world class, interdisciplinary institute to support the safety, environmental and security functions in Alberta.” This proposal builds on six years of effort of Alberta Municipal Affairs and many other government and nongovernment stakeholders to design and create such a centre. It represents the most up-to-date, comprehensive and concise business design and implementation plan for a provincial knowledge-sharing and leadership-development centre that would complement the efforts of the Alberta Emergency Management Agency and the proposed Alberta Public Safety Training System to coordinate and inform the efforts of Alberta’s public safety partners to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recovery from disasters and emergencies. The three-year cost of this project, including capital and operating, is $12.35 million.

3. Preservation Capital Priority

Project Name

Location

Budget

1

Animal Health Clinic

Vermilion

$5.2 million

2

Interior Design Upgrade

Vermilion

$100,000

3

Lakeland Centre for Sustainable Innovation – Outreach Centre

Vermilion

$1.7 million

4

Site Upgrades

Both campuses

$765,000

5

Road Repairs

Both campuses

$763,000

6

Parking Lot Repairs

Both campuses

$1.53 million

7

Main Parking Lot Paving

Vermilion

$2.57 million

Animal Health Clinic Lakeland’s animal health technology diploma program is one of the most popular programs at the College. In the fall of 2010, Lakeland launched a veterinary medical assistant certificate program. Students in both programs use the already crowded animal clinic. Originally designed as a dairy training facility, the building was converted to an animal clinic in 1989. Despite renovations in 2000, the space no longer meets the needs of the College. A larger, modern facility located on the farm site for easier access to large animals would be ideal. As well, industry has indicated that there are future opportunities to expand programming in the animal health field. In addition to the $5.2 million building cost, $1.5 million will be needed for the specialized animal medical equipment required for the success of this clinic.

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Interior Design Upgrade Lakeland’s award-winning interior design technology program is in need of a suitable design studio to accommodate program growth and student design needs. Classrooms and studios are currently located on the second floor of the Bentley Building at the Vermilion campus. By upgrading the classrooms, there will be room for expansion of the first year of the program thus ensuring a higher fill rate for the second year. Students will use the upgrade as an opportunity to “live the learning� as they create a conceptual design as a class project. Updating the facilities would better reflect what students are studying and portray function design and aesthetically pleasing spaces.

Lakeland Centre for Sustainable Innovation - Outreach Centre The historic Red Barn may be renovated and utilized in the future to enhance the capacity of the Centre to host larger groups particularly for summer tours, field days, and activities. Over time, this site is also expected to be the centre for agricultural field research and related activities.

Site Upgrades Signage throughout Lakeland is out of date and does not accurately reflect the layout of the campuses. In addition, fencing and benches have deteriorated and need to be replaced.

Road Repairs Many campus roads have cracks and holes that need to be repaired.

Parking Lot Repairs In a March 2008 student satisfaction survey, students stated they are not satisfied with the parking space on campus. In an effort to address their concerns, Lakeland will repair and replace parking lots as required.

Main Parking Lot Paving Currently, the main parking lot at the Vermilion campus is gravel. Students use the lot and complain about having to walk in mud. An asphalt surface will help beautify the site.

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Appendix A: Applied Research and Innovation at Lakeland College Lakeland College is focused on developing research outcomes of value to industry and strengthening Lakeland’s core capacity areas (faculty, equipment and infrastructure) to the benefit of students, local industry, and the region the College serves. Lakeland College’s Applied Research and Innovation activities focus on the four key themes of expertise within the College: 1. Energy and Entrepreneurship 2. Agriculture 3. Sustainable Environments and Buildings 4. Fire and Emergency Medicine The four themes are closely linked with the schools of Energy and Entrepreneurship, Agriculture, Environmental Sciences, and the Emergency Training Centre. All of these areas are supported by significant strengths in construction, manufacturing, and business and are approached with an interdisciplinary mindset. Applied research activities have increased Lakeland’s ability to partner with other PSIs in Alberta and across Canada. The College is focused on identifying areas of research complementarity with other PSIs and working collaboratively to advance research activities to the benefit of all partners. An immediate example of this is the College’s participation in RENEW West – a conference on renewable energy in Alberta.

Energy and Entrepreneurship Lakeland College has explored energy research in both traditional and non-traditional energy sectors for several years. In the past, the College has explored biogas, biodiesel and other energy topics. Lakeland has taken a significant leadership role in the development of the Regional Business Accelerator based in Lloydminster. This grassroots-led organization forms part of the College’s strategy to increase collaboration with small to medium enterprises (SMEs) in the region. College faculty and staff provide support to regional businesses as mentors and coaches. This includes several energy companies focused on developing new tools and services for the heavy oil and gas industry in the region. Lakeland has acted as a conduit to advanced expertise available in intensive research organizations within the province for local SME partners. If resources permit, Lakeland would like to explore the development of skunkworks and incubation space for heavy oil and gas entrepreneurs within the proposed expansion of the Heavy Oil Operations Technology facilities (Lloydminster).

Agriculture Lakeland College is pursuing both crop and livestock research projects. The College’s recent acquisition of 10 quarters of farmland has increased its capacity to undertake projects both independently and in partnership with companies. Last year, Lakeland pursued several crop trial and demonstration projects with several industry partners. A new partnership with New Holland Agriculture and the availability of a plot seeder will allow the College to expand crop research projects in 2012. Crop research is focused on crop and forage varieties that are commonly grown in the region and the commercial scale demonstration of new varieties. New developments specific to Lakeland’s livestock research include the recent acquisition of Growsafe Feeding System technology. Funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), this made-in-Alberta innovation allows the College to become a part of the network of Alberta research organizations and feedlots using this technology to assess feed efficiencies in cattle. Lakeland’s faculty and staff have been building relationships with other research and industry organizations in Alberta and the United States that are using this technology to explore how to improve cattle and sheep genetics (by selective breeding to improve feed input to weight gain) and to increase real-time monitoring of single animal feed patterns (to proactively manage herd health). The College has actively partnered with Alberta Livestock Management Agency (ALMA), the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and SAIT to test and apply novel radio frequency identification (RFID) technologies in herd management. Future opportunities in agriculture research include precision crop management trials and building on the college’s capacity for beef, sheep, dairy, equine, and small animal research at the Vermilion campus. Page 34

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Sustainable Environments and Buildings Lakeland’s research in environmental sciences has included a broad base of ecology and land reclamation and restoration projects. The College will continue to partner with the Provincial Park, Alberta Environment and others to explore ways to enhance the stewardship of our region’s ecological resources. Lakeland is currently expanding its Centre for Sustainable Innovation (Vermilion) which blends environmental, energy, agriculture, and building and construction research. This builds on the College’s original investment in the Energy Cabin, an off-grid demonstration facility. This evolved into the current five-year NSERC College Community Innovation renewable energy project that is focused on developing technologies to bridge between distributed energy technologies (wind, solar, solar thermal, geothermal, cogeneration) to integrate them into systems that are cost effective and efficient for the rural, small urban and commercial user. This facility, located on the new land acquired by the College, demonstrates many different technologies working together and provides a grid-connected workspace to explore how to balance energy conservation with generation. As Lakeland moves forward, the intent is to incorporate many bioenergy elements into the Centre for Sustainable Innovation. Lakeland’s partnership with Western Economic Diversification Canada and Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (AITF), regarding biochar production and its applications, is an example of Lakeland’s commitment to broadening bioenergy research and strengthening research ties with the Alberta Innovates corporations and, in particular, the college’s regional partner AITF-Vegreville. Biochar, partially combusted biomaterial (wood, straw, manure, and others), has applications in agriculture, soil remediation and other industries bringing together many of Lakeland’s core areas of expertise. Lakeland’s role in the project is to facilitate the coordination of activities amongst all biochar researchers in the province to provide biochar raw materials, explore end-use applications and related technologies, and increase networking to explore the development of this industry for the benefit of Alberta.

Fire and Emergency Medicine Lakeland’s unique capacity in emergency services training is a significant area of opportunity for the college (Vermilion). While the College is not yet positioned to actively engage in large-scale research projects in this area at the moment, Lakeland is • exploring research opportunities related to the effectiveness and improvement of simulation training • expanding research projects on occupational health and safety issues and supportive technologies for emergency services personnel in partnership with the University of Alberta • testing prototype devices for emergency situations • expanding scholarship in all areas of emergency services to increase the development of evidence-based best practices to improve response capabilities and deployment strategies.

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Appendix B: Draft Revisions to College Values, Vision, Mission, and Outcomes The Board is currently revising Lakeland College’s values, vision, mission, and outcomes after a complete internal vetting process. The following draft reflects a renewed vision and strategy that will form the basis of next year’s Comprehensive Institutional Plan after a complete internal vetting process.

Values Lakeland College values learner achievement, academic excellence, and personal growth founded on its longstanding principles of: • Accountability • Innovation • Inclusiveness • Collaboration • Continuous Self-Improvement • Pride

Vision Ever to excel in a globalized society

Mission To inspire learner success and community development through innovative learning in an inclusive, diverse environment

Outcomes 1. Learner Success: Lakeland College will optimize learner success. 2. Relevant Programming and Research: Lakeland College, in conjunction with post-secondary partners, will strategically provide programming that meets student, government, and industry expectations. 3. Connectivity: Lakeland College will be connected to its multiple stakeholders. 4. Sustainability: Lakeland College will achieve sustainable operations.

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