Page 1

2015-2016

ANNUAL

REPORT


2 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Table of Contents 5

Mission, Vision, Values & Outcomes

6 Board Accountability Statement • Board of Governors 7

Management’s Responsibility for Reporting

8

Message from the President

10 Year • • • •

in Review Learner Success Relevant Programming and Research Connectivity Sustainability

16 Public Interest Disclosure (Whistleblower Protection) Act 17 Operational Overview 18 Goals, Priority Initiatives, Expected Outcomes and Performance Measures • Strategic Outcomes • Access and Quality • Working with Stakeholders and Removing Barriers • Enrolment Plan • Research, Applied Research and Scholarly Activities • Community 34 Internationalization 36 Information Technology 37 Capital Plan 39 Financial and Budget Information 46 Financial Statements • Auditor’s Report • Statement of Management’s Responsibility • Statement of Financial Position • Statement of Operations • Statement of Change in Net Financial Assets • Statement of Cash Flows • Statement of Remeasurement Gains and Losses • Notes to the Financial Statements 69 Appendix • Program Full-load Equivalents • Donors

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4 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Mission To inspire learner success and community development through innovative learning in an inclusive and diverse environment.

Vision Ever to excel in a global society.

Values We value learner achievement, academic excellence and personal growth founded on our longstanding principles of: • People-centred and respect

• Continuous self-improvement

• Accountability and integrity

• Innovation

• Inclusiveness and collaboration

• Pride

Outcomes • Learner success

• Connectivity

• Relevant programming and research

• Sustainability

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Board Accountability Statement The Lakeland College Annual Report for the year ended June 30, 2016 was prepared under the Board’s direction in accordance with the Fiscal Planning and Transparency Act and ministerial guidelines established pursuant to the Post-Secondary Learning Act. All material economic, environmental or fiscal implications of which we are aware have been considered in the preparation of this report.

[Original signed by Darrel Howell] Chair Lakeland College Board of Governors December 2016

Board of Govenors 2015-2016 Chair Darrel Howell Vice Chair Gary Moses President & CEO Alice Wainwright-Stewart

6 | Annual Report 2015-2016

Student Members Don Shaw Greg Sutherland Academic Staff Member Wanjiku Kaai Non-academic Staff Member Debbie Maddex

Public Members Ken Baker Jason Bazinet Linnea Goodhand Michael Kotelko Bryan Perkins Scott Webb


Management’s Responsibility for Reporting Lakeland College’s management is responsible for the preparation, accuracy, objectivity and integrity of the information contained in the Annual Report including the financial statements, performance results and supporting management information. Systems of internal control are designed and maintained by management to produce reliable information to meet reporting requirements. The system is designed to provide management with reasonable assurance that transactions are properly authorized, are executed in accordance with all relevant legislation, regulations and policies, reliable financial records are maintained and assets are properly accounted for and safeguarded. The Annual Report has been developed under the oversight of the institution audit and risk committee, as well as approved by the Board of Governors and is prepared in accordance with the Fiscal Planning and Transparency Act and the Post-secondary Learning Act. The Auditor General of Alberta, the institution’s external auditor appointed under the Auditor General Act, performs an annual independent audit of the financial statements which are prepared in accordance with Canadian public sector accounting standards.

[Original signed by Heather Nanninga] Chief Financial Officer Lakeland College

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Message from the President On behalf of the Board of Governors and my colleagues, I am pleased to present Lakeland College’s annual report for the year ended June 30, 2016. It highlights the achievements of our students and staff, and our work towards achieving the goals set forth in our 2015-2018 Comprehensive Institutional Plan. Our mission at the college is to inspire learner success and community development through innovative learning in an inclusive and diverse environment. With two campuses and a wide range of online and blended delivery programming, plus applied research and international projects, Lakeland staff, faculty and students are excelling, focused on the future and fulfilling this mission. Overall, enrolment increased in 2015-2016 from the previous year and our students made headlines with their achievements. Lakeland apprentice Mason Mehl was recognized as Alberta’s top parts technician when he received a 2015 Top Apprentice Award. Our business case competition team earned second place at the 2016 Alberta Deans of Business college case competition. Several of our interior design technology students placed in National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) design competitions, including Sydney Melnyk who was first in two of the NKBA competitions. Their achievements bring Lakeland’s winning streak in design competitions to 13 consecutive years. Carpentry apprentice Kaleb Bosch earned silver at the 2016 Alberta Skills Competition. Lakeland’s Rustlers Athletics program also had reason to celebrate. Medals were earned at rowing, futsal and rodeo championships, while our coaches and student-athletes were recognized for their achievements as well. Rob Baron, our renewable energy and conservation program head, was also lauded for his leadership. He was one of four people in Canada to receive a gold level Award of Excellence from Colleges and Institutes Canada.

8 | Annual Report 2015 - 2016


The 2015-2016 academic year was one of innovation and growth for Lakeland. We celebrated the official opening of the Energy Centre at the Lloydminster campus. As an integrated power plant featuring a once-through steam generator for heavy oil training, the Energy Centre provides incredible opportunities for our students to gain valuable hands-on experience. The opening of this impressive facility coincided with the 25th anniversary of our Lloydminster campus. At the Vermilion campus, our Student-Managed Farm (SMF) – Powered by New Holland continued to evolve. Two new SMF teams were established – Sustainability and Stewardship, and Livestock Research – to enhance the SMF and accommodate increased interest and enrolment in agricultural sciences. Both teams mirror the advancements and needs of the agricultural industry. We also celebrated growing donor support, as more than $1.3 million in awards, scholarships and bursaries was awarded to our students. The 2016 President’s Gala raised more than $30,000 for our student awards program. And we celebrated our third consecutive year of making the list of Canada’s Top 50 Research Colleges. Lakeland moved to 38th place in the 2015 rankings compiled by Research Infosource Inc. While we made great progress in achieving our goals and had much to celebrate, Lakeland was not immune to challenges. A steep drop in resource revenues and its effect on the provincial economy impacted our Targeted Enrolment Grant. As a result, we suspended intakes into the heavy oil operations technician and international development programs for 2015-2016. But, remaining focused on collaboration, quality, accountability and fiscal responsibility enabled Lakeland to finish the year with increased student-led learning opportunities, enhanced learner success and a surplus.

Going forward, infrastructure maintenance and renewal remains a key priority for the college. With the completion of the Energy Centre at the Lloydminster campus, we’re focused on renewing classroom spaces at the Vermilion campus and creating two stateof-the-art facilities: the Dairy Learning Facility and a new Animal Health Clinic. It’s an exciting time for Lakeland. As the third-oldest postsecondary institution in Alberta, we understand the value and importance of innovation and growth. Hands-on learning is still an important part of what we do, but we have taken it to the next level by putting our students in the lead. From running a profitable agribusiness on the SMF to generating heat and power in the Energy Centre, leading a team as battalion chief or teaching local elementary students math skills, Lakeland offers a dynamic range of in-demand programs that prepare students to transition from our campus to their careers with success. You’ll often hear that other colleges say they are educating the leaders of tomorrow. At Lakeland, our students are leading today. And they will continue to as we grow our student-managed learning opportunities and provide essential training for students to succeed. On behalf of Lakeland College, I assure you we will continue to drive innovation and learning forward. We will continue to achieve learner success, relevant programming and research, connectivity and sustainability. And we will never stop striving to Ever to Excel.

[Original signed by Alice Wainwright-Stewart] President and CEO Lakeland College

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Year in Review Learner Success 2015 Top Apprentice Award Lakeland apprentice Mason Mehl was recognized as Alberta’s top parts technician. He was one of 58 apprentices to receive a 2015 Top Apprentice Award. This marks the eighth time a Lakeland parts apprentice has won this provincial award.

Business students excel at case competition Five Lakeland students were each $500 richer after competing in the 2016 Alberta Deans of Business college case competition. The business case team – Erin O’Neill, Don Shaw, Tony Gray, Tessa Lay and Michael Wirachowsky – earned second place in the competition, which featured teams from 14 Alberta postsecondary institutions.

13 proves lucky for interior design program For the 13th consecutive year, Lakeland’s interior design technology students earned top place finishes in student design competitions. Coming in first place in the National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) 2015-16 Charette Design Competition was Sydney Melnyk and in second place was Sara Downing. Rebecca Kurczaba received honourable mention. Melnyk also took first place in the kitchen portion of the 2015-16 Schoolhouse Charm Student Design Competition. In second place was Brittany McQueen, with honourable mention going to Downing. In the bath portion of the competition Naomi Mason received honourable mention. All of these students graduated in June.

Reaching the podium at Skills Canada Lakeland’s competitors in the steamfitter-pipefitter and carpentry categories at the 2016 Alberta Skills Competition made the podium. Carpentry apprentice Kaleb Bosch earned silver and Hunter Weatherly received bronze for steamfitter-pipefitter.

Top marks Class of 2016 animal health technology graduates earned top marks on the Veterinary Technician National Examination. They achieved a 95% success rate on the exam and were well above the Canadian average in every question category.

Student-Managed Enterprise launched Lakeland launched the Student-Managed Enterprise (SME) as part of the agribusiness program. Students involved in the inaugural year of the SME had the opportunity to manage all aspects of a business during their final year of study, including a retail venture, online store and pop-up shop.

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New SMF teams

Rustlers Athletics 2015-2016 recap

The Student-Managed Farm (SMF) – Powered by New Holland expanded to include a new crop technology SMF team: Sustainability and Stewardship. The new team represents a paradigm shift for the SMF as representatives from each SMF unit comprise the team: crops, commercial beef, dairy, purebred beef and sheep. The team’s mandate is to achieve a symbiotic relationship between themselves, the animals and the land to benefit the future of each while working toward an ecological profitability by making sustainable environmental choices.

Lakeland’s Rustlers Athletics program achieved great success in 2015-2016. The Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference (ACAC) recognized Stefan Cukovic as the 2015-2016 ACAC Men’s Futsal Player of the Year. Cameo McKerlie was selected as the 2015-2016 ACAC Women’s Basketball Player of the Year and was named All-Canadian. Chris King was the 2015-2016 Women’s Basketball North Division Coach of the Year. Austin Dyer was the 2015-2016 ACAC Women’s Volleyball North Division Coach of the Year. Sam Tu’ivau was selected as the 2015-2016 ACAC Men’s Volleyball North Division Player of the Year. Other highlights include:

Increased enrolment in the animal science technology program, combined with the desire to increase Lakeland’s capacity in applied and practical research for the livestock industry, resulted in the creation of a new SMF team: Livestock Research. The team’s mandate is to manage Lakeland’s livestock research projects, as well as a new herd of cattle that will be used by the college for research projects and demonstrations. Students will manage the timing of projects at the Livestock Research Facility and will also establish relationships with producers, industry stakeholders and other applied research organizations to determine which research trials will most benefit the industry.

Student leaders share SMF concept Presenting at the Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan) 2016 Applied Research Symposium was an opportunity for two Lakeland students to share their crop management intensities research. Austin Vavrek and Taylor Carson, second-year animal science technology students, also participated in a workshop panel on integrating diploma students into the college’s applied research and the SMF.

2015 top instructor nominations Three Lakeland College instructors were among 40 people nominated for Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Board’s 2015 Top Instructor Award. Aidan Grinde, Don Henry and Angus MacLean were nominated by registered apprentices who took technical training at Lakeland College’s Vermilion campus.

Lakeland students go global In 2015-2016, Lakeland students took international learning field trips for their program, practicum and clubs. Destinations include:

• Ag Tour Club: Costa Rica

• Animal health technology students: Las Vegas, Nevada

• University transfer students: Mexico

• Human services students: Hawaii

• Real estate appraisal and assessment students: Brazil

• Interior design technology students: Las Vegas, Nevada

• 1 silver medal at Western Canadian University Rowing Championships

• 2 bronze medals at the ACAC futsal championships

• 1 championship buckle at the Canadian College Finals Rodeo

• 2 Academic All-Canadians

Alumni achievement Colin Starkevich, Class of 2010 wildlife and fisheries conservation, held his first exhibit – Glimpses of the Grasslands: The Artistic Vision of Colin Starkevich – at the Royal Alberta Museum. More than 60 of his original paintings were on display. Ryan Konynenbelt, Class of 2015 general agriculture, placed third and was named Rookie of the Year at the 2015 Calgary Stampede’s International Livestock Auctioneer Competition.

Distinguished alumni Edmund Lefsrud, Class of 1965, was honoured with the Distinguished Alumni Award (Vermilion campus) for his professional accomplishments and community service. For almost 50 years, Edmund and his wife Ellen worked together to expand their farm to 5,000 acres and several companies, including Lefsrud Seed and Processors Ltd., and 6 King Genetics. Lefsrud dedicated his time to the Alberta and Canadian Seed Growers’ Association for more than 30 years. From 4-H to the local Lions Club, Lefsrud is also a committed volunteer. Laryssa Whittaker, Class of 1991, was honoured with the Distinguished Alumni Award (Lloydminster campus). Whittaker completed Lakeland’s university transfer program and then earned a bachelor’s degree in church music at the Canadian Bible College. She also obtained a bachelor of arts and master degree in ethnomusicology at the University of Alberta. In 2015, Whittaker earned a PhD from Royal Holloway, University of London – a culmination of four years of research and travel in South Africa, analysis and writing. She now shares her expertise as a teaching fellow and visiting lecturer at Royal Holloway.

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Relevant Programming and Research Energy Centre opens for learning Lakeland’s Energy Centre officially opened at the Lloydminster campus on Wednesday, Aug. 26. As the only post-secondary institution in Western Canada to create an integrated power plant featuring a once-through steam generator (OTSG) for heavy oil training, Lakeland’s students produce functional energy in the new facility. Construction of the Energy Centre began in 2013. Instrumental partners who helped make the Energy Centre a reality include the Government of Alberta, Canadian Natural Resources Limited, Cenovus Energy, and Husky Energy.

National leadership award for instructor Lakeland’s Rob Baron is one of four people in Canada to receive a gold level Award of Excellence from Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan). For his innovation and achievements at Lakeland, Baron was awarded the gold CICan Leadership Excellence Award during the organization’s annual conference on May 31. CICan’s 2016 Awards of Excellence recognize best practices from institutions across the country. The Leadership Excellence Award recognizes that although the entire post-secondary institution plays a learning leadership role in the communities they serve, inevitably, one individual makes an outstanding contribution each year.

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NKBA reaccreditation

Emergency services MOU

Lakeland’s interior design technology program met the stringent standards for National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA) reaccreditation. Interior design instructors were notified in January that the program’s kitchen and bath curriculum met the educational standards established by the NKBA.

Lakeland President and CEO Alice Wainwright-Stewart and GPRC President and CEO Don Gnatiuk signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) in October that enables the colleges to build a partnership to enhance their capacity to meet the lifelong learning and educational needs of the emergency services sector. Lakeland and GPRC jointly offered the NFPA 472 Hazardous Materials Awareness Level course to high school students in Grande Prairie earlier in October. Under the terms of the MOU, Lakeland and GPRC will share information regarding industry trends, seek opportunities to contribute to each other’s planning initiatives and work to identify programming opportunities that increase access to emergency services training and professional development in northwestern Alberta.

Top research college Lakeland made the list of Canada’s Top 50 Research Colleges. Lakeland moved to 38th place in the 2015 rankings compiled by Research Infosource Inc. The college was 20th in 2014 and 46th overall in 2013. Using data from the 2014 fiscal year, Research Infosource Inc. analyzed research income and the number of faculty involved in research to create the list.

New program for military transition Lakeland piloted The Way Forward – Transitional Life Skills for Military Members and their Families. The program is an online resource that is free to members, spouses and dependents. Students complete modules on communication, organization, goals, transition challenges, emotions, mental health and resources. There’s no limit to the number of times a student can access the content online through Desire2Learn, the learning management system Lakeland uses. The pilot program was offered to military in Cold Lake, Wainwright and Edmonton.

Mental health program approved for credential The community mental health certificate program was approved for credential by Alberta Advanced Education. Formerly named mental health practitioner, the program was introduced as a non-credit program in 2014 to educate helping professionals and increase their knowledge, skill and ability to support those experiencing mental health challenges. Alberta Advanced Education approved the new name and as of July 1, 2016, students will receive credit for completing this online certificate program.

Pre-technology training in Tanzania Creating opportunities for disadvantaged learners in Tanzania to access pre-technology training is the focus of a new partnership between Lakeland, NorQuest College and the Vocational Education and Training Centre in Tanzania. Four representatives from Lakeland and NorQuest travelled to Tanzania in March to begin the three-year project which is part of Colleges and Institutes Canada’s Improving Skills Training for Employment Program (ISTEP) in the African country. ISTEP is funded by the Government of Canada.

Firefighter training expands Twelve students began Lakeland’s 12-week blended learning firefighter NFPA 1001 pilot program in May. Throughout the first eight weeks of the program, students studied theory online. The final four weeks of training are completed at Lakeland’s Emergency Training Centre in Vermilion.

New enviro major More accurately reflecting a program’s primary focus is the reason behind a name change for an environmental sciences major at Lakeland. The water conservation and management (WCM) major provides students with enhanced opportunities to develop in-demand skills and become champions of water, an essential natural resource. The program was formerly known as environmental monitoring and protection. Officially approved by Alberta Advanced Education, the name change to WCM will take effect July 1, 2016.

Speakers’ Corner launched Speakers’ Corner – a new Lloydminster campus initiative – was launched in September to help students master the art of public speaking. This extracurricular initiative was held twice a month and featured opportunities for students to develop presentation skills through debates, workshops, guest speakers and other interactive sessions.

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Connectivity Growing donor support

Distinguished citizens

In 2015-2016, $1,371,033 in awards, scholarships and bursaries was distributed among 1,456 Lakeland students, thanks in large part to the generosity of longstanding donors and firsttime donors. Fifteen new awards were presented for the first time at the donor award celebrations in March.

Jean Paré and Ross Ulmer were each presented with an honorary bachelor of applied business degree as the 2016 Distinguished Citizens for the Vermilion and Lloydminster campuses, respectively. Paré is a top-selling cookbook author. Her career in the kitchen began in the 1960s when she opened a café in Vermilion, Alta. Her first catering job was in 1963 for 1,000 guests at the 50th anniversary of the Vermilion School of Agriculture, now Lakeland. She ran a home-based catering service for more than 18 years. In 1981, Paré wrote and published her first cookbook, which proved to be the first of many cookbooks in the Company’s Coming series. More than 30 million Company’s Coming cookbooks were sold before her retirement in 2010. As one of the top-selling cookbook authors in the world, Paré’s name appears on more than 200 cookbooks. In 2003, Paré was awarded the Queen Elizabeth Golden Jubilee Medal, and in 2004 she was made a Member of the Order of Canada.

Viterra Scholarship for Excellence established Viterra made a significant investment – $75,000 – in Lakeland students by creating the Viterra Scholarship for Excellence. The scholarship will be available over a 10-year term to students enrolled full-time in second-year agricultural sciences and business administration diploma programs, the general agriculture certificate program, and the pre-employment electrical certificate program. The Viterra Scholarship for Excellence will be awarded based on academic achievement and special consideration will be given to students of Indigenous ancestry.

Specialized fire truck donated Thanks to the generosity and support of NOVA Chemicals, Lakeland is the proud owner of a specialized industrial pumper fire truck. Measuring 36-feet in length, the vehicle has a 1,000-gallon foam tank capacity, Williams Hot Shot foam system and a 2,000 gallon per minute deck gun, among other features. The donated fire truck will be used for live industrial scenario training, including skills maintenance courses and fire fundamentals, by a wide range of students and clients.

Fillmore Construction supports Lakeland Fillmore Construction, a long-time collaborator with Lakeland on many capital projects, donated $250,000 to the college. In recognition of the donation, the student lounge in the Energy Centre was named the Fillmore Construction Student Lounge. The donation will go towards future capital projects at Lakeland.

2016 President’s Gala a success Friends of Lakeland united in celebration of student success and helped to raise more than $30,000 for awards, scholarships and bursaries at the 2016 President’s Gala. Students exercised their skills by providing live and silent auction items. Stephanie Wakefield, a university transfer pre-veterinary medicine student, and Lucas Tetreault, a heavy oil power engineering student, emceed the program. Students also welcomed guests, served the meal and assisted with the overall program, which featured a musical performance by Michelle Wright. Joining nearly 400 gala guests were numerous Lakeland alumni, including Eric Rosendahl, MLA for the West Yellowhead constituency, Daryl Watt, reeve of the County of Vermilion River, and Rob Saunders, mayor of the City of Lloydminster. Dr. Richard Starke, MLA for the Vermilion-Lloydminster constituency, and Bruce MacDuff, mayor of the Town of Vermilion, also attended. 14 | Annual Report 2015-2016

For nearly four decades Ross Ulmer has excelled in the business community. He joined the family business as a service manager at Ulmer Chev, after which he became a partner with his brother Doug and father Joe in 1984. By the time they expanded their business to Lloydminster in 1987, they had three dealerships. The Ulmer Auto Group currently numbers 12 automotive dealerships and one RV business. The Ulmer Auto Group has received a number of accolades including a CADA Laureate Award, Lloydminster Chamber of Commerce Business of the Year Award, Mayor’s Award for Sustained Support of the Arts, Motor Dealer Association of Alberta – Rural Dealer of the Year, and fourtime winner of the GM Triple Crown award. Ulmer has been an instrumental supporter of numerous organizations including the Lloydminster Regional Theatre Foundation, local Rotary Clubs, Lloydminster Region Health Foundation, Lakeland and First Baptist Church, among many others.

Lloydminster campus turns 25 2015 marked the 25th anniversary of the opening of Lakeland’s Lloydminster campus. Since opening in 1990, the Lloydminster campus has grown with three additional features: Vic Juba Community Theatre (2002), Bill Kondro Wing (2008) and Energy Centre (2015). The Lloydminster campus is home to university transfer, business, energy and petroleum technology, and health and wellness programs and courses. It’s also the site of music and drama lessons, concerts, sports events, weddings, conferences and more.


Sustainability Green Energy Doors Open Lakeland’s Centre for Sustainable Innovation (CSI) held Applied Research Day 2015 – Green Energy Doors Open on Oct. 3. Industry partners and members of the public participated in the event, which featured site tours of the CSI. Renewable energy and conservation, passive solar greenhouse concepts and the economics of solar photovoltaic micro generation systems were among the presentation topics. The CSI is a test-bed for innovations in energy, agriculture, and environmental sciences. Encompassing the Renewable Energy Learning Centre, standard and novel crop trials, environmental monitoring and wetlands research, animal feeding trials, and other research, the CSI offers realistic applied research results of interest to many.

Enviro Club campaign Members of Lakeland’s Enviro Club launched a new campaign in support of bats and bees. Their goal is to combat misconceptions about both creatures and raise awareness about their plight. The Enviro Club constructed 12 bat houses as part of their project and donated several to Dillberry Lakeland Provincial Park.

Environmental Farm Plan Lakeland College is the first postsecondary institution in Alberta to complete an Environmental Farm Plan. The students in Lakeland’s agricultural sciences programs who learn on the Student-Managed Farm (SMF) – Powered by New Holland at the Vermilion campus are now using the Alberta Environmental Farm Plan (AEFP) online webbook to selfassess their farming practices.

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Public Interest Disclosure (Whistleblower Protection) Act Under the Public Interest Disclosure (Whistleblower Protection) Act, Lakeland employees can report in good faith when they believe a “wrongdoing� has occurred. This Act protects employees from any reprisal as a result of a good faith disclosure. Lakeland has a detailed procedure that explains the whistleblower process that is followed. A requirement of the Act is that Lakeland reports on all disclosures made during the year. 2015-2016 Disclosures received: 0 Disclosures acted on: 0 Investigations: 0

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Operational Overview Lakeland is a place of possibility that continually provides high quality, affordable and accessible post-secondary education for students with a focus on leadership opportunities. Throughout the 2015-2016 academic year, Lakeland strived to achieve its strategic goals – learner success, relevant programming and research, connectivity, and sustainability – while addressing economic conditions, workforce trends and changing demographics.

Economic conditions The downturn in Alberta’s economy led to a $358,259 reduction in the Targeted Enrolment Grant that Lakeland received from Advanced Education in 2015-2016. The funding decrease resulted in the suspension of the 2015-2016 intakes for the heavy oil operations technician and international development programs. Lakeland’s long-term fiscal responsibility and strategic work to manage expenses and increase revenue opportunities enabled the college to live within its means while making significant contributions to the regional and provincial work force.

Workforce trends Demand for renewable energy professionals is increasing in Alberta. Large wind totals 8.9% of Alberta’s installed electricity capacity but other renewable energy sources such as solar photovoltaic (PV) generation comprise only 0.05 % of Alberta’s electrical generation capacity. While it might seem small, there are an increasing number of people interested in using these renewable energy sources. Enrolment in Lakeland’s renewable energy and conservation (REC) program doubled from 2014-2015 to 2015-2016: from 14 full load equivalent students to 29. In response to this growing interest, Lakeland provided a second offering of REC pre-requisite courses in April. During 2015-2016, Lakeland worked with the Town of Wainwright Economic Development and Wainwright Adult Learning to plan the delivery of the health care aide program in Wainwright, Alta., in the 2016-2017 academic year. Located in Lakeland’s regional stewardship area, the demand for health care aide training in Wainwright and neighbouring communities is increasing for employers in need of trained professionals and students interested in a career in health care.

Demographics Talent management is a priority for Lakeland. To address the impact of an aging workforce, the college developed and implemented a leadership development and succession planning framework for deans, directors and vice presidents. At the 2015 employee recognition ceremony, close to 800 years of service were recognized. Eleven employees were recognized for more than 20 years of service, while 10 celebrated their retirement. An essential partner in post-secondary learning since 1913, Lakeland is committed to identifying and responding to areas of regional, provincial and national concern, in a manner that complements the college’s strengths and provides innovative student-led learning opportunities.

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Goals, Priority Initiatives, Expected Outcomes and Performance Measures In the 2015-2018 Comprehensive Institutional Plan, Lakeland outlined four strategic goals: 1. Learner Success

• Expand and enhance Live the Learning

• Improve retention

2. Relevant Programming and Research

• Optimize enrolment and programming

• Build research capacity

3. Connectivity

• Create or enhance strategic partnerships

4. Sustainability

• Develop our people

• Achieve operational excellence

In the following pages, Lakeland reports on the progress made towards achieving these goals.

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Strategic Goal 1 – Learner Success Objective

Goal

Status

Introduce an initiative in each school

Achieved

1.1a Expand and enhance Live the Learning

Progress made in last 12 months: Lakeland’s School of Trades & Technology expanded its dual credit programming to include welding, in addition to carpentry. B pressure testing booths were added to the welding lab. Work began to move the pre-employment hairstylist program to the Lloydminster campus. When on campus, it will provide the setting for a student-managed enterprise for the program. The dean and chair met with a representative from Alberta’s Apprenticeship and Industry Training (AIT) to work on the application to move the program from a pre-employment to an apprenticeship program. The application will be submitted in the next fiscal year. The School of Fire & Emergency Services enhanced the fire hall training concept to provide each emergency services technology student the opportunity to serve as captain of a company within the platoon. Apparatus bays with dedicated trucks and equipment were assigned to the program to simulate a functioning fire hall. The School of Agricultural Sciences formed a student-managed beef research team and a research herd was acquired. The school also developed a sustainability and stewardship SMF team.

University transfer introduced Drama 247, providing students with the opportunity to improve their public speaking and presentation skills through dramatic exercises and activities. Environmental sciences students planned and hosted “Be an Environmental Scientist Day” for elementary students. The Learning Commons made 236 peer tutor matches out of the 244 requests received. They also accommodated 1,207 exams for students needing support services.

Objective

Goal

Status

Conduct industry satisfaction survey for credit programming

In progress

1.1b Expand and enhance Live the Learning

Progress made in last 12 months: The Advancement & External Relations department was allocated funds for an employer (industry satisfaction) survey in 20152016 and a grad/transfer survey in 2016-2017. On the advice of Insightrix, the order of these surveys was reversed so graduates could provide their employer names. By June 30, 2016 the grad/ transfer survey was almost complete. The employer survey will be conducted in summer 2016.

Objective

Goal

Status

Maintain > 90% retention rate

Achieved

1.2a Improve student retention by focusing on student support

A total of 43 children participated in the School of Human Services’ student-managed play program. A new course – HS202 Leadership Activities – was introduced in the early learning and child care and child and youth care programs during the winter semester to help students develop leadership and group management skills.

Progress made in last 12 months:

The business department expanded student-led experiences through Speakers’ Corner – an extracurricular opportunity for students to master public speaking and presentations – and the Fashion on a Budget Show, which was organized by the Business Club.

The university transfer department created an early alert selfidentifying risk assessment tool for students to use in evaluating their risk potential for poor academic performance over the semester. The UT retention rate from fall to winter semester was 100%, an increase from the previous academic year.

The interior design technology department continued its work to create a bridging program with Mount Royal University. The aim is to align the programs and enable Lakeland interior design technology students to transfer into Mount Royal’s degree program.

In 2015-2016 The Learning Commons hired a counsellor and learner success coordinator to focus on student support, including: peer and group tutoring, academic prep, college prep, study skills workshops, one-on-one counseling support and accessibility supports.

Second-year interior design technology students redesigned the Vermilion campus pub, Spurs. Initially asked by the Vermilion campus Students’ Association to create plans to revitalize the pub and make it more inviting, the project expanded to include agribusiness students involved in the Student-Managed Enterprise. Renovations will be completed before September 2016.

A learner success outreach supper was held in April to promote student-centered and responsive strategy that is collaborative and connected across Lakeland’s two campuses. Forty-five students attended and provided feedback to The Learning Commons team on ways to improve learner success at the college.

Every academic school had a retention rate above 90%. School retention rates ranged between 94% to 100%.

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Objective

Goal

Status

1.2b Improve student retention by focusing on student support

Objective

Goal

Status

Implement strategy in response to 2014-2015 student satisfaction survey

Achieved

1.3 Increase endowments to support student awards by 5%

Not achieved

Improve student retention by reviewing student survey

Progress made in last 12 months: Total endowments grew by 3% in the last fiscal year. More than $1.3 million in student awards, scholarships and bursaries was awarded to 1,440 students, including 15 new student awards. In 2014-2015, $1.2 million was awarded through the student awards program to 1,330 students.

Objective

Goal

Status

Conduct root analysis of student withdrawals

Achieved

1.2c Improve student retention by focusing on student support

Progress made in last 12 months: Lakeland initiated a policy to meet with withdrawing students to determine if remedies exist, on a case-by-case basis. The college has kept track of why each student leaves.

Objective

Goal

Status

Review student support services

In progress

1.2d Improve student retention by focusing on student support

Progress made in last 12 months: The learner success coordinator supported at risk students in the School of Energy and Environmental Sciences. This coordinator also visited instructors in their classrooms to speak with students about help available to them. An academic advisor was added to the School of Agricultural Sciences. Two academic advisor positions were added to the School of Human Services for online students.

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Progress made in last 12 months: The area that Lakeland chose to work on was ensuring students received feedback in a timely manner. At the end of June 2016, 96% of trades apprentice students reported they received feedback in a timely manner. Throughout the year, student surveys were continually received and reviewed. About to Graduate surveys were completed on all programs and included in the annual reviews for each program. The feedback from students was included as goals for subsequent years.


Strategic Goal 2 – Relevant Programming and Research Objective

Goal

Status

Pilot curriculum unbundling and competency-based education initiatives

In progress

2.1a Optimize enrolment and programming through academic strategy based on post-secondary trends

Objective

Lakeland explored the competency-based education model with the animal health technology program curriculum within the second year. Investigation into a new double major diploma program in environmental and agricultural sciences began. Reactivation of the office administration program passed at Academic Council, along with analysis of courses in the program with anticipated changes/additional courses. Nine of the 10 courses in the office administration certificate program have updated outlines completed. It’s expected the program will be offered in 2017-2018.

Goal

Status

Identify educational technologies to enhance classroom learning and learner access

Achieved

2.1b Optimize enrolment and programming through academic strategy based on post-secondary trends

Goal

Status

2.1c

Progress made in last 12 months:

Objective

Tablets were used with great success in human services courses. A human services classroom was remodeled to allow instructors to employ a flipped model of instruction.

Progress made in last 12 months: Through a grant, Lakeland purchased the original manufacturing software and laptops for the automotive service technician shop students. Use of Desire2Learn (D2L) – Lakeland’s learning management system – was expanded to include exam/test delivery and marking. Two new tools were added to Lakeland’s D2L package: Insights and Capture. Insights is a data mining and reporting service that was piloted with the competency-based Well Site Supervisor program. The software can create and customize a range of reports to monitor user progress, course access and engagement. Capture is a recording tool that allows presenters to upload and add videos directly to course content. The Emergency Training Centre launched a pilot “blended” learning delivery of the firefighter training program. As of June 30, 2016, students were in the online learning phase of the program. Information technology implemented a new internet service provider that increased bandwidth by 50%.

Optimize enrolment and programming through academic strategy based on post-secondary trends

Develop enrolment Achieved goals for each program

Progress made in last 12 months: An enrolment plan including full-load equivalent (FLE) projections was developed and published in the 2016-2019 Comprehensive Institutional Plan.

Objective

Goal

Status

Increase applicant conversion rate by 2% (where seats available)

Not achieved

2.1d Optimize enrolment and programming through academic strategy based on post-secondary trends

Progress made in last 12 months: The applicant conversion rate for Alberta applicants decreased by 3% from the previous year.

Objective

Goal

Status

Increase governmentidentified target group enrolment by 2%

Not achieved

2.1e Optimize enrolment and programming through academic strategy based on post-secondary trends

Progress made in last 12 months: The number of self-identified Aboriginal students decreased from 186 students in 2014-2015 to 133 in 2015-2016. Lakeland provided an “introduction to trades” week-long program in June to six people from Beaver Lake Cree Nation. The college sat on the steering committee for the North East Alberta Apprenticeship Initiative (NEAAI), with the main focus of supporting Aboriginal students in completing their apprenticeship training.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 21


Objective

Goal

Status

2.1f Optimize enrolment and programming through academic strategy based on post-secondary trends

Objective

Goal

Status

Conduct gap analysis on regional needs

Achieved

2.1h Plan to increase international enrolment

Not achieved

Optimize enrolment and programming through academic strategy based on post-secondary trends

Progress made in last 12 months:

Progress made in last 12 months:

The number of international full-load equivalents decreased from 55 in 2014-2015 to 36 in 2015-2016. The international headcount decreased from 76 in 2014-2015 to 57 in 20152016. The reason for the decrease was the conclusion of the partnership with Lambton College.

This analysis was completed prior to the start of the 2015-2016 fiscal year. In February 2015, Economic Modeling Specialists Int. submitted their final report on Lakeland’s regional economic overview and program gap analysis. Lakeland’s senior executive team met with the researchers to discuss their findings and recommendations. The report was circulated to the deans and was one source of information used to develop Lakeland’s three-year programming outlook.

Objective

Goal

Status

Ensure 80% of programs have updated course outlines

In progress

2.1g Optimize enrolment and programming through academic strategy based on post-secondary trends

Progress made in last 12 months: Course outlines were reviewed for applicable programs in the School of Trades & Technology. For apprentice programs, ILMs are reviewed by the provincial advisory committees (PAC) and updated as needed. The PAC also requests changes from faculty employed by provincial post-secondary institutions that provide the specific trade training to review the ILMs as well. All course outlines for the School of Fire & Emergency Services on ICO DEV are up-to-date and revisions will be ongoing, as necessary. Course outlines have been updated as needed in all School of Human Services programs. Over 90% of course outlines have updated content for the School of Energy & Environmental Sciences. There are still some schools that need to update course outlines.

22 | Annual Report 2015-2016

Objective

Goal

Status

Conduct comprehensive review as per schedule

Achieved

2.1i Optimize enrolment and programming through academic strategy based on post-secondary trends

Progress made in last 12 months: Comprehensive program evaluations were completed as scheduled.


Objective

Goal

Status

2.2a Build research capacity by focusing on sustainable research

Create operational Achieved research model to guide faculty and student engagement in research

Progress made in last 12 months: Variants of operational models are in place throughout Lakeland to match the needs and resources available in each area, and the interests of the faculty involved.

Objective

Goal

Status

Create innovation fund to support new research initiatives

Achieved

2.2b Build research capacity by focusing on sustainable research

Progress made in last 12 months: This fund supported numerous projects throughout Lakeland. For example: • The School of Arts, Science and Business used funds to host Her4Directions. The trio of Indigenous entrepreneurs spoke to students about their experiences in business. They also presented at the Lloydminster Chamber Connect event at the Lloydminster campus. • People were encouraged to flex their creativity and problem solving during DesignJAM, an event organized by Ben Harrison of The Learning Commons and Rinde Johansson of the Regional Business Accelerator. Held in January 2016, DesignJam was well attended by students and staff at the Lloydminster campus. • Street rod technologies accessed $10,000 to support faculty release time to restore a 1969 Pontiac Firebird. The restoration project provides practical experience for students. The sale of the car will help fund a scholarship for the program. • Online resources for The Way Forward – Transitional Life Skills for Military Members and Their Families were converted so the online modules can be accessed as a Massive Open Online Course.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 23


Strategic Goal 3 – Connectivity Objective

Goal

Status

Create alumni engagement strategy

Achieved

3.1 Create or enhance strategic partnerships with alumni

Development of a responsive website that reflects the brand also began. It will be launched during the 2016-2017 fiscal year.

Progress made in last 12 months:

Objective

The Advancement team focused on two areas of alumni engagement: communications and alumni events. A new content strategy was created for the alumni magazine with a focus on more feature stories highlighting the achievements of younger alumni. Additional work was done on an email communications sequence, with 12 email blasts sent to targeted alumni groups during the year. More alumni events were held in areas where alumni live. Socials were held in Arizona, Saskatoon, Sherwood Park, Kelowna, Grande Prairie, Westlock, and Lloydminster. The annual homecoming at the Vermilion campus was well attended with a 30% increase in attendance from the previous year. In total, almost 600 people attended alumni events throughout the year.

Objective

Goal

Status

a. Develop awareness of need for branding strategy

Achieved

3.2 Create or enhance strategic partnerships with a branding strategy

b. Develop plan for redevelopment

Progress made in last 12 months: The need for a branding strategy was confirmed in the spring of 2015. A consultant worked with the marketing and communications team to develop a brand strategy that was finalized in August 2015 and emailed to all staff in the fall. The five core attributes of the college’s brand strategy are: • Student-managed learning experiences; • A place to be heard; • Connected and relevant; • Future focused; and • Academic credibility In September the Marketing and Communications team met with representatives from academic schools to discuss the brand and learn more about projects/labs that depict the attributes.

24 | Annual Report 2015-2016

A design firm was hired in December 2015 to create a new visual identity that complements the brand. The visual identity will be unveiled in August 2016.

Goal

Status

Develop community engagement strategy and action plan

Achieved

3.3 Create or enhance strategic partnerships with community

Progress made in last 12 months: A community event inventory was developed to assist members of the board and the leadership team with attending key events. Lakeland increased its profile with senior representation at Rotary, chamber of commerce, local municipalities and community events. President Alice Wainwright-Stewart was the guest speaker at Rotary meetings in Vermilion in March and Lloydminster in May 2016. Lakeland joined the Colleges and Institutes Canada Government Relations Group and attended its inaugural meeting. Community reports were delivered at Vermilion and Lloydminster specific events. The reports were also published in Vermilion and Lloydminster newspapers in June 2016. Applied research also published a report in the local newspapers and distributed its magazine, Limitless. Lakeland continued its involvement in and support of the Regional Business Accelerator, Indigenous Economic Partnership Summit, Business Education Conference, Try-a-Trade Career Expo and many other events.


Strategic Goal 4 – Connectivity Objective

Goal

Status

4.1 Develop our people with staff engagement survey

Objective

Develop and implement action plan based on 2014-2015 staff engagement survey

Achieved

Develop our people with staff engagement survey

Progress made in last 12 months: An action plan was developed and rolled out within departments and schools. Sixty leaders participated in a two-day workshop on building high performance teams. Departments and schools discussed and implemented new engagement strategies. More than 250 staff completed the StrengthsFinder assessment. Strengths-based team development was completed in finance, human resources, teaching and learning, emergency training centre and the arts, science and business leadership team. Staff were surveyed and focus groups completed to gather input on what recognition practices employees would like developed. As a result of the research on staff recognition, long service awards will be extended to three- and five-year recipients, and casual staff will also be included.

Objective

Goal

Status

Develop and implement leadership development and succession planning framework

Achieved

4.2a Create a people plan

Develop strategy and communication plan for review and development of performance management framework

Achieved

A new simplified performance development program was launched across the organization.

Objective

Goal

Status

Develop and implement change model for college

Achieved

4.3a Achieve operational excellence in culture

Progress made in last 12 months: The Creating Change document was shared with the leadership team in November 2015 and with the Board of Governors in December 2015. Implementation was completed and positive feedback received.

Goal

Status

Identify continuous improvement projects per school/department

Achieved

4.3b Achieve operational excellence in culture

A succession planning framework was developed and maintained for deans, directors and vice presidents. Leadership development focused on engagement for 2015-2016. Training was provided to 60 leaders.

Goal

Status

Develop employee skills assessment framework

In progress

4.2b Create a people plan

Status

Progress made in last 12 months:

Objective

Progress made in last 12 months:

Objective

Goal

4.2c

Progress made in last 12 months: Work has started and is ongoing. It will be completed in 2016-2017.

Progress made in last 12 months: Information technology (IT) completed a three-year “roadmap” that encompasses the end of life replacement and the development of Lakeland’s IT systems. Facilities completed three classroom renovations in the summer of 2015, part of a renewal project to align classrooms with the teaching methods and technology of today. Five booths were added to the Applied Engineering building for B-pressure testing. Additional intakes of renewable energy and conservation courses (200 and 205) were offered from April 24 to June 17, 2016, due to increased interest. Lakeland collaborated with Ducks Unlimited to incorporate their wetlands management course into environmental sciences programming.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 25


The School of Environmental Sciences developed a new studentled initiative – the Student-Environmental Consulting Office (S-ECO). It will be launched in September 2016. Lakeland worked on a collaborative approach to increase philanthropic activity, including naming and recognition protocols for all departments. Marketing and Communications began using Dropbox to share design work with internal and external collaborators.

Objective

Goal

Status

4.3c Achieve operational excellence in culture

Objective

A sustainability/waste diversion coordinator position was requested as a new initiative but wasn’t approved due to the volume of requests received and the current priorities. The coordinator of landscape management will address sustainability plans and issues on a yearly basis.

Goal

Status

Ensure 100% of departments align staff-consulted plans with strategic goals of college

Achieved

Goal

Status

Develop initial revitalization plan for Vermilion campus (Dairy Learning Facility; Animal Health Clinic)

Achieved

4.4c Achieve operational excellence in planning

Develop environmental Not achieved sustainability plan

Progress made in last 12 months:

Objective

Gift impact reports were designed and delivered to Husky Energy and Cenovus. Reports were also designed for endowment fund donors and additional leadership donors. Prototypes were delivered and reviewed with donors for test purposes. These reports are expected to roll out as part of the comprehensive thanking program in 2016-2017.

Progress made in last 12 months: The Dairy Learning Facility and Animal Health Clinic cases were developed. An interim project manager was appointed and project management services for both projects were awarded. Both projects are on track for completion in the 2017-2018 year. Funding from the Strategic Investment Fund was applied for to support both projects.

4.4a Achieve operational excellence in planning

Achieve operational excellence in planning

This was achieved through department meetings but the plan is to increase staff involvement in future planning processes.

Goal

Status

Develop and implement fund development plan

Achieved

4.4b Achieve operational excellence in planning

Progress made in last 12 months: Major gift solicitation protocols were completed and integrated into the team’s work. Endowment and gift acceptance policies were completed. The preliminary capital campaign case document was written and designed. Tests were completed with the board and prospective donors. The document was then revised based on input from preliminary reviews. Significant research and development was completed regarding potential support for the capital campaign. 26 | Annual Report 2015-2016

Goal

Status

Create Vermilion redevelopment plan (Mead & Bentley buildings; Recreation Centre)

In progress

4.4d

Progress made in last 12 months:

Objective

Objective

Progress made in last 12 months: As of June 30, two classrooms in the Mead Building were being updated to align them with teaching methods and technology of today. Consultation with staff at the Vermilion campus will commence in the next fiscal year regarding the Vermilion campus revitalization plan.


Objective

Goal

Status

4.5a Achieve operational excellence in financial sustainability

Objective

Goal

Status

Identify and create sustainable business development opportunities

In progress

4.5d Ensure statement of operations is balanced or in surplus at fiscal year end

Achieved

Achieve operational excellence in financial sustainability

Progress made in last 12 months:

Progress made in last 12 months:

Lakeland ended the 2015-2016 fiscal year with a surplus.

Once complete, the Dairy Learning Facility and the Animal Health Clinic will provide for increased revenue opportunities. An agronomist was hired with Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) funds to build industryfunded crops research, with emphasis on small plots.

Objective

Goal

Status

Ensure 95% of new initiative funding aligns with strategic plan

Achieved

4.5b Achieve operational excellence in financial sustainability

Objective

Progress made in last 12 months: All corporate initiatives for 2016-2017 clearly align with the strategic plan priorities. This was achieved with Lakeland’s planning processes.

Objective

Goal

Status

Achieve “satisfactory progress” or “implemented” on all actions from 20142015 audit

In progress

4.5c Achieve operational excellence in financial sustainability

Goal

Status

4.5e Achieve operational excellence in financial sustainability

Create co-generation In progress and residence development strategies

Progress made in last 12 months: A draft proposal for co-generation was received. Options were reviewed with the energy and applied research departments. A cross-functional working group was formed and work is ongoing. A preliminary space review for the Vermilion campus residence was completed. A five-year major-maintenance plan was developed for both campuses. A draft business case for upgrades at the Vermilion and Lloydminster campus residences was completed.

Progress made in last 12 months: One outstanding recommendation was cleared during the year, while the other was repeated. Lakeland anticipates fully addressing the remaining outstanding recommendation in 2016-2017.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 27


Access and Quality Lakeland College offers programming in the following key areas: • Agricultural sciences • Business • Continuing education • Energy and environmental sciences • Fire and emergency services

• Health and wellness • Human services • Interior design technology • Trades and technology • University transfer

New academic program development at Lakeland is strategic and coordinated in order to meet the needs of students and the labour market. The 2015-2018 Comprehensive Institutional Plan (CIP) identified five new program proposals.

28 | Annual Report 2015-2016


The following is an update on the initiatives identified in the CIP document:

New program proposals

CIP Overview

Outcome

Apprenticeship

• In the planning stages for developing a 4th period of instrumentation technician. • Also identified regional training needs around plumbing, millwright and sheet metal.

• Planning continues for the development of a 4th period of instrumentation technician, however, it is dependent on funding. • Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training is reluctant to offer new trades to institutions during this economic downturn.

Office education

• Certificate program featuring unbundled curriculum delivered in an on-demand, blended format. • Combination of online and on-campus

• The professional administration program – formerly office administration – was approved at Academic Council. • Lakeland is planning to introduce this program in September 2017.

delivery will meet needs of full- or part-time learners and will be well suited for working professionals looking to upgrade/update skills. Large animal

• Post-certificate, 8-month, base-funded, blended delivery program. • Prepare animal health technologist for advanced specialization in large animal treatment.

• Curriculum planning is underway. • This program will be offered when the new Animal Health Clinic is completed.

Urban agriculture

• Certificate, 8-month, base-funded, blended delivery program. • Prepare students for work in urban food production as well as urban-rural interface of agricultural food systems. • Proposed start date fall 2015.

• Planning is underway to develop this program in an online format in partnership with the Continuing Education department.

Degree completion

• Investigating opportunities in agriculture, environment, and energy.

• Lakeland is exploring opportunities with other post-secondary institutions to offer degree completion programs for agriculture, environment and energy.

Other program updates for 2015-2016 include the approval of the community mental health certificate program. Formerly named mental health practitioner, the program was introduced as a non-credit program in 2014 to educate helping professionals and increase their knowledge, skill and ability to support those experiencing mental health challenges. Alberta Advanced Education approved the new name and as of July 1, 2016, students will receive credit for completing this online certificate program. The heavy oil operations technician (HOOT) and international development programs were suspended for the 2015-2016 academic year due to a decrease in grant funding. The HOOT program will be reinstated for the 2016-2017 academic year. The Emergency Training Centre began piloting a blended delivery version of the firefighter training program. Twelve students began online course work in May 2016. The final four weeks of the 12-week program will be spent onsite at the Emergency Training Centre. Due to increased demand, additional intakes of renewable energy and conservation courses (200 and 205) were offered in spring 2016. Lakeland piloted The Way Forward – Transitional Life Skills for Military Members and their Families. The program is an online resource that is free to members, spouses and dependents. Students complete modules on communication, organization, goals, transition challenges, emotions, mental health and resources. Lakeland’s School of Trades & Technology expanded its dual credit programming to include welding. Annual Report 2015-2016 | 29


Working with Stakeholders and Removing Barriers Lakeland offers academic prep through The Learning Commons as an option for students who do not meet entrance requirements in their program of choice. Prep modules are available at no cost to applicants in the areas of math, general science, English, biology, chemistry, and physics. In 2015-2016, 36 students completed modules and received entrance into a Lakeland program. These modules are available to the six adult learning councils in our region including Flagstaff, Provost, Lloydminster, Two Hills, Vermilion, and Wainwright. Three students attended Lakeland with support from the Inclusive Post-secondary Initiative.

30 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Enrolment Plan The 2015-2018 Comprehensive Institutional Plan included Lakeland’s enrolment projection plan for 2015-2016. Lakeland projected 1,902 full-load equivalents (FLEs) for 2015-2016. The actual FLEs totaled 1,957. See Appendix A – Enrolment for information on the FLEs per program. The 2015-2016 student body included students from every province and territory in Canada, as well as 20 other countries.

By Program Band

2015-2016 CIP Projection

2015-2016 Actual

Agricultural Sciences

332

380

Business

170

175

Energy

200

177

Environmental Sciences

200

189

Emergency Training Centre

88

99

Human Services

175

203

Health & Wellness

31

25

Trades*

472

468

University Transfer

164

161

ESE & Open Studies

70

80

Total

1,902

1,957

By Program Band

2015-2016 CIP Projection

2015-2016 Actual

Apprenticeship*

404

380

Certificate

326

386

Diploma

855

950

Applied Degree

59

41

University Transfer

164

161

No Credential

94

39

Total

1,902

1,957

*The difference between the projected enrolment numbers in the trades program band and the projected enrolment numbers in the apprenticeship credential band is because interior design technology students and pre-employment students are not included in the apprenticeship category.

International FLE students International students enrolled at Lakeland in 2015-2016 accounted for 36 FLEs. The international headcount was 57. There were a total of 12 international completers, plus one offshore international student (online out of country).

Analysis of 2015-16 enrolment by total FLE headcount By Credential Certificate: 766 Degree: 41 Diploma: 950 Non-credential: 200

By Age

FLE

17 or under

76

18-24

1,439

25-34

276

35-44

120

Gender

45-54

40

Female: 939 Male: 1,018

55+

6

Aboriginal status Not reported: 1,888 Self-identified: 69

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 31


Research, Applied Research and Scholarly Activities Building on its successful record and facilitating excellent student outcomes that support the social, environmental and economic life of our communities is a priority for Lakeland’s Applied Research department.

Conventional energy

In the 2015-2018 Comprehensive Institutional Plan, four key themes were identified for applied research:

• The Emergency Training Centre has started preliminary surveys on the use of unmanned aerial systems by Alberta emergency response departments.

• Agriculture • Sustainable environments • Conventional energy • Fire

Agriculture • Applied research hired a crop research specialist to build crop research capacity in support of the commercial agriculture industry. • A beef research herd was acquired, and research was conducted in collaboration with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. • An SMF livestock research team was developed. • Applied research acquired a plot harvester. •

Alberta Biochar Initiative partner AirTerra received the first Canadian Food Inspection Agency approval for a soil amendment product containing biochar.

Sustainable environments • Lakeland completed several NSERC-funded research projects on renewable energy integration. •

Applied research created an internal practicum placement for a bachelor of applied science: environmental management student to undertake wetland and conservation research activities.

32 | Annual Report 2015-2016

• Research in this area will evolve as funding becomes available.

Fire

Other highlights include: •

Ongoing collaboration with the Regional Business Accelerator (RBA). The RBA and Lakeland collaborated to develop design thinking activities for students at the Lloydminster campus, and presented the project’s results at the 2016 Colleges and Institutes Canada national meeting.

• Supported Alberta Innovates in placing a technology development advisor in Lloydminster to coach and assist businesses. •

Reorganized department for effective resource management. The priority for 2016-2017 is to apply for more research funding, particularly in the areas of agriculture, environmental sciences and energy research.

• Lakeland was ranked 38th on the 2015 Canada’s Top 50 Research Colleges list compiled by Research Infosource Inc. •

Rob Baron, Lakeland’s renewable energy and conservation program head, was one of four people in Canada to receive a gold level award of excellence from Colleges and Institutes Canada for Leadership Excellence.

Mel Mathison, former dean of environmental sciences and applied research, was a finalist for a 2016 Emerald Award for Individual Commitment (Emerald Awards Foundation).


Community Lakeland’s academic prep modules are free online programs available to students who do not meet entrance requirements in their program area of choice. These modules are available to the six adult learning councils in our region including: Flagstaff, Provost, Lloydminster, Two Hills, Vermilion, and Wainwright. Lakeland’s deans are direct liaisons with the councils (one dean per council). A number of other steps were taken to enhance learner outcomes and increase efficiency and effectiveness of programs and services, as outlined earlier in the 2015-2016 Annual Report.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 33


Internationalization Lakeland is committed to increasing internationalization of its campuses. The key opportunities listed in the 2015-2018 Comprehensive Institutional Plan (CIP) include: recruitment of international students, international development projects and international mobility of college staff and domestic students. Along with international development, Lakeland’s international department acknowledges there is the possibility of corporate training opportunities, however, such opportunities take time to develop. The following is an update on the information included in the 2015-2018 CIP:

2015-2018 CIP

Update

Lakeland has grown its international student enrolment from a headcount of six, in 2010-2011, to 29 students on campus as of the 2015 winter semester (not counting Lambton program students).

At the beginning of the 2016 winter semester, Lakeland had more than 50 international students on campus.

In 2011, Lakeland began brokering Lambton College’s Management Certificate program to attract international students who have completed

Lakeland’s international department furthered its recruiting efforts with M Square Global and a number of new agents.

a post-secondary business management program. Lakeland successfully engaged three cohorts of students from India with the most recent intake in January 2014. This initiative is in its final stage with cohort three due to graduate and finish its co-op session by the end of August 2015. Lakeland will use this brokering experience to further its own recruiting efforts. Lakeland is actively partnering with overseas recruiting agents in key markets in Asia, Africa, Europe and South America.

Lakeland worked with select agents in these countries.

Lakeland will provide support for its international students in important social and academic aspects in order to ensure smooth transitions and overall success.

An international recruitment and student coordinator was hired to provide support to international students.

Lakeland has built on past experiences with Education for Employment Projects in Tanzania and is leading a similar CARICOM project in Belize. The emphasis of the Belize project is to support economic development in the Belize region with a focus on agricultural training development at the University of Belize Central Farm. The project is entering its third and final year and has enjoyed great success with the first students admitted to the program to begin studies in August 2015.

The project was successfully completed in June 2016. Lakeland and NorQuest College began a project with the Vocational Education and Training Centre in Tanzania to create opportunities for disadvantaged learners in Tanzania to access pre-technology training.

Lakeland is currently drafting a business plan to become the only International English Language Testing Score (IELTS) centre east of Edmonton.

This project was deemed not feasible.

In order to enhance services to international students, the international department unveiled its very own microsite in spring 2015.

This microsite is continually updated and is a big success. Indian students are regulary No. 2 behind Canadian students for hits to Lakeland’s main website

34 | Annual Report 2015-2016


2015-2016 Highlights Throughout the 2015-2016 year, Lakeland’s international department continued its work toward internationalization of the Lloydminster and Vermilion campuses as per Lakeland’s strategic goals: • Learner success • Relevant programming and research

Goal: Research and develop ESL pathway opportunities and bridging programs. End of year progress: This was researched and determined not to be an area of strength for Lakeland. It was decided to focus efforts elsewhere where Lakeland has opportunities for higher return on investments.

• Connectivity

Connectivity

• Sustainability

Goal: Build stronger relationships with Alberta Advanced Education, and other Alberta post-secondary institutions.

Learner Success Goal: Have two international trips qualify for funding through the Campus Alberta Grant for International Learning program. End of year progress: Funding was awarded to the business administration diploma real estate appraisal and assessment major students for a trip to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in February. The university transfer program’s trip to Ensenada, Mexico in April for an educational practicum and service learning project also qualified for funding. Goal: Provide on-site immigration consulting. End of year progress: A registered Canadian Immigration Consultant fulfilled this role for 2015-2016. Goal: Provide more transportation and leisure trips for students on both campuses. End of year progress: Lakeland provided international students on both campuses the opportunity for weekly trips to Lloydminster for shopping. Throughout the year there were several trips provided to Edmonton and one to Banff. Goal: Provide incoming, ongoing and outgoing service support to international students. End of year progress: Part of registered Canadian Immigration Consultant position was to provide this service support.

Relevant Programming and Research Goal: Grow new student recruitment.

End of year progress: All provincial level meetings were attended by Lakeland. Lakeland regularly reaches out to other colleges for collaboration ideas. In the spring of 2016, Lakeland and NorQuest College began a project with the Vocational Education and Training Centre in Tanzania to create opportunities for disadvantaged learners in Tanzania to access pre-technology training. The three-year project is part of Colleges and Institutes Canada’s Improving Skills Training for Employment Program. Goal: Engage in international project development work. End of year progress: At the end of June 2016, Lakeland completed its three-year Canadian government funded agriculture project for the University of Belize Central farm. As mentioned in the previous goal, Lakeland was awarded a three-year project contract in Tanzania.

Sustainability Goal: Conduct international student surveys. End of year progress: As a way to learn the best ways to support our international students, surveys were sent to all international students with a wide range of support type questions/ideas. The responses were favourable and no issues were raised. Goal: Develop a five-year international strategic plan. End of year progress: Lakeland submitted a five-year strategic plan, which was approved by the Board of Governors. The topics listed above are important components of that plan.

End of year progress: In the past, the majority of Lakeland’s international students came from the Lambton College recruiting partnership. With the end of that partnership, Lakeland hosted more than 25 new international students in September and 18 in January. The college was also part of the Student Partnership Program, which is a fast track way the government processes visas for Indian students. Lakeland also signed a 10-year recruiting/ branding/marketing contract with M Square Global, which is based out of India and British Columbia.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 35


Information Technology An Information Technology (IT) Roadmap for 2015-2018 was adopted during the fiscal year. The document outlines Lakeland’s plan specific to these four components: • IT efficiency projects • Operations and life cycle renewals • Information security risk identification and mitigation • Information technology support to new and existing business projects and initiatives Work on many of these projects is ongoing. One of the major initiatives completed during the year was upgrading bandwidth to accommodate high network traffic and future growth. A major upgrade to the internal network infrastructure in 2016-2017 will help support the rapid demand of users for data and video traffic. Lakeland is active with other Alberta post-secondary institutions in the collaborative initiative ShareIT. It’s hoped that participation will lead to expanded IT capabilities, increased efficiencies and improved service for Lakeland users.

36 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Capital Plan The following is an update on the capital projects listed in the 2015-2018 Comprehensive Institutional Plan.

New and expansion capital Project name

Status

Expected completion

Progress during the year

Farm Regeneration • Animal Health Clinic

• Planning/Design

• April 2018

• Completed needs assessment and identified project scope.

• Dairy Learning Facility

• Planning/Design

• April 2018

• Completed needs assessment and identified project scope.

• Poultry Production Facility

• Not Proceeding

• Not Proceeding

• Following review the decision was made not to proceed with this concept.

• Equine Centre

• Planning

• To be determined

• Preliminary planning initiated.

• Sustainable Environment & Agriculture Centre

• Project refocused during the year

• Not Proceeding

• Following a review, the option of the revitalization of the existing Vermilion buildings in place of a new build is now in planning.

Project name

Status

Expected completion

Progress during the year

Trades Centre, exterior and roofing repair

• Planning/Design

• To be determined

• A pilot project to accurately assess the scope of the problem was developed and will commence in March 2017.

Bentley Building renovation and classroom renewal

• In progress, further planning and design is required

• To be determined

• Renovated two classrooms, a more detailed plan for the revitalization of the Bentley and Mead buildings is being developed.

Co-generation, utilities and lighting retrofit project

• Planning/Design

• To be determined

• Utility and lighting upgrades are progressing in parallel with other renovations. Assessment of co-generation is ongoing.

Learning Commons renovation

• Planning

Preservation capital

• To be determined

• Preliminary planning initiated.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 37


38 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Financial Statement Discussion and Analysis This Financial Statement Discussion and Analysis (FSD&A) provides supplemental financial information and should be read in conjunction with Lakeland’s annual audited financial statements and accompanying notes for the year ended June 30, 2016. The FSD&A and audited financial statements are reviewed and approved by the college’s Board of Governors on the recommendation of the Audit and Risk Committee. Lakeland’s financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Canadian Public Sector Accounting Standards and are expressed in Canadian dollars. The FSD&A is an overview of the financial results Lakeland achieved in the fiscal year ending June 30, 2016 and offers discussion of the college’s: 1. Changes in financial presentation 2. Financial results 3. Net assets and net financial assets 4. Areas of significant financial risk

Changes in financial presentation During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2016, the college adopted the presentation of the Net Financial Asset indicator, commonly known as the “net debt model,” in the Statement of Financial Position. In adopting this presentation, the college, along with other post-secondary institutions in Alberta, responded to direction from the Office of the Controller of the Province of Alberta relating to the classification and presentation of portfolio investments restricted for endowments along with the treatment of endowment contributions and related investment income capitalized on an annual basis into the endowed balance. The impact of this direction results in: 1. Presentation of net financial assets on the Statement of Financial Position that separately presents portfolio investments restricted for endowments; and 2. The inclusion of endowment contributions and related capitalized endowment investment income in the Statement of Operations after annual surplus from operations. These amounts were not previously recorded in the Statement of Operations, but as direct increases to net assets. The impact of presenting portfolio investments restricted for endowments is discussed in more detail in the following Net Asset and Net Financial Asset section.

Financial results Lakeland ended the 2015-2016 fiscal year with an annual surplus of $4.6 million. Of this amount, $176,000 are donations directed to endowments and endowment capitalized investment income and therefore is not available for spending. While the college’s 2015-2016 budget was balanced, the annual operating surplus of $4.4 million was mainly attributable to an unanticipated increase in the base operating grant, coupled with cost savings in a variety of operational areas. Net assets of $53.6 million increased $4.3 million from the prior year. This increase is due to increases in cash, investments, and accounts receivable with corresponding decreases in liabilities.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 39


Revenue The college’s revenue totalled $68.8 million in 2016, an increase of $1.6 million from 2015. The Government of Alberta continues to be the most significant funding source for the college, at 59% of total college revenue, and plays a key role in the ability to fund college activities.

Revenue is received from the following sources:

Government of Alberta grants 59%

Federal and other government grants 4%

Student tuition and fees 20%

Revenue Sales of services and products 14%

Investment income 1%

Donations and other grants 2%

Revenue – 2016 Actual Results Compared to Budget and 2015 Results

Revenue Budget

39.1

40.3

38.9

($millions)

2016

Government of Alberta grants

Federal and other government grants

40 | Annual Report 2015-2016

Sales of services and products

Investment income

1.2

1.4

0.4

1.4

0.8 Student tuition and fees

1.0

10.5

9.8

10.4

12.7

13.7

2.4

2.6

2.2

12.9

2015

Donations and other grants


Government of Alberta grants Government of Alberta grants of $40.3 million was $1.4 million higher than budgeted primarily due to additional funding received from the Government of Alberta to compensate for a provincial tuition freeze, restoration of previous funding decreases, and cost of living increases. These increases were offset by timing differences in the recognition of infrastructure maintenance funding.

Expenses by Function

Federal and other government grants Federal and other government grants comprised 4% of all revenue collected, and were generally consistent with both budgeted amounts and amounts recognized in the prior year.

Student tuition and fees Student tuition and fees made up 20% of all revenue for fiscal 2016. Strong enrolments continue to drive the growth of tuition revenue, resulting in an increase of $735,000 over budgeted amounts, and growth of $930,000 over the prior year.

Sales of services and products In providing services to the community, students, and staff, the college continues to develop alternative sources of revenue to fund operations and strategic initiatives. Actual sales revenues in 2016 were slightly lower than both budgeted amounts and prior year amounts, as economic conditions throughout the province proved challenging.

Instruction and training 42%

Institutional support 14%

Academic and student support 18%

Ancillary services 9%

Facilities operation and maintenance 14%

Sponsored research 3%

Investment income, donations and other grants Comprising 2% of all revenue, investment income was $252,000 higher than expected due to better-than-anticipated market returns, but $376,000 lower than the prior year due to challenging market performance.

Expenses by Object

Revenue from donations and other grants made up 2% of all funding, and was generally consistent with the prior year, but was $966,000 better than budgeted amounts. This increase is attributable to an effective fundraising campaign.

Expense The college’s expenses totalled $64.4 million in 2016, which represented a modest increase of $532,000 over the prior year, and a decrease of $1.3 million from budgeted amounts. Expenses can be expressed both by function (i.e. by purpose) as well as by object (i.e. by type).

Salaries and benefits 60% Material, supplies and services 19% Repairs and maintenance 5%

Amortization of capital assets 11% Utilities 3% Scholarships and bursaries 1%

Cost of goods sold 1%

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 41


Expenses by Function Budget

27.5

27.4

28.1

($millions)

2016

Instruction and training

Academic and student support

Facilities operation and maintenance

Institutional support

Ancillary services

1.4

1.7

1.2

5.6

5.6

4.9

9.4

8.9

8.6

8.9

9.2

11.2

11.1

11.6

11.6

2015

Sponsored research

Expenses as expressed by function were generally consistent with the prior year. The most significant year-to-year variance was in academic and student support expenses. In this category, spending was $547,000 more than the prior year, but consistent with budgeted amounts. The most significant budget-to-actual variance was in facilities operation and maintenance costs. These costs came in $2 million less than budgeted, due to less spending than planned on repairs and maintenance and amortization expenses.

42 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Expenses by Object Budget

39.2

38.9

40.1

($millions)

2016

Salaries and benefits

Material, supplies and services

Repairs and maintenance

Cost of goods sold

Amortization of capital assets

Utilities

0.7

0.9

0.7

2.0

1.8

2.2

6.7

7.0

1.0

0.9

0.9

3.3

3.0

3.3

6.7

10.9

12.0

11.8

2015

Scholarships and bursaries

Salaries and benefits Salaries and benefits are the largest expenditure for the college, comprising 60% of all spending. These expenses were 3% less than budgeted but were generally consistent with the prior year.

Materials supplies and services This group of expenses is the next largest area of spending for the college, and made up 19% of all spending during 2016. These expenses came in close to budgeted amounts, but were $1.1 million higher than the prior year. This increase in spending was due to higher discretionary spending on strategic projects.

Repairs and maintenance These expenses made up 5% of all college spending, and came in $232,000 less than budgeted, and $274,000 less than the prior year. Spending was generally consistent in this category.

Utilities and cost of goods sold Together, these expense categories make up 4% of all college spending. There were no significant changes in these expenses during the year.

Scholarships and bursaries The college paid out $858,000 in scholarships and bursaries in 2016, an increase of 24% over our budgeted amount, and an increase of 15% from the prior year. Lakeland’s students also received $513,000 in scholarships and bursaries from other sources, which are not included in the financial statements.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 43


Net Assets and Net Financial Assets Net assets The college’s net asset balance is an important indicator of financial health. Prudent financial planning and decision-making combined with increased endowment contributions from donors have all contributed to the college’s success. Investments in tangible capital assets continue to comprise the largest component of Net Assets and represent the college’s capacity to deliver quality services in the years to come. Of the $53.3 million in net assets, $17.5 million are formally restricted by the Board of Governors for spending on strategic initiatives in support of student learning, capital projects, and community service. After Board of Governors restrictions, $2.5 million has been maintained for unforeseen events and future strategic decision making. Remaining net asset balances represent funds that are required to be maintained in perpetuity as endowments and are not available to spend. Net assets at June 30, 2016 are comprised of the following balances and related summarized transactions:

Unrestricted 45% Investment in tangible capital assets 33% Internally restricted 13% Endowment 4% Accumulated remeasurement gains 5%

Accumulated Investment in surplus from tangible capital operations assets Balance as at June 30, 2015

$

2,092,365

$

24,312,746

Internally restricted surplus $

13,833,886

Endowments

$

Total accumulated surplus

6,535,812

$

46,774,809

Annual surplus

4,614,201

-

-

-

4,614,201

Transfer to (from) endowments

(176,423)

-

-

176,423

-

Net capital acquisition, amortization and debt financing

680,611

(40,858)

(639,753)

-

-

Operating expenses funded from internally restricted surplus

296,755

-

(296,755)

-

-

(5,000,000)

-

5,000,000

-

-

Net Board appropriation to internally restricted surplus Balance as at June 30, 2016

$

2,507,509

$

24,271,888

$

17,897,378

$

6,712,235

$

51,464,630

Net financial assets The college’s liquidity needs are met primarily through operating cash flows, working capital balances and capital expansion funding received through grants or long-term debt. Net financial assets (net debt) is a measure of an organization’s ability to use its financial assets to cover liabilities and fund future operations. The college presents the net financial assets indicator as directed by the Controller of the Province of Alberta. The college’s presentation of net financial assets includes $9.1 million of portfolio investments that are restricted for endowments. Endowment restricted investments represent contributions from donors that are required to be maintained intact in perpetuity, as well as capitalized investment income that is also required to be maintained in perpetuity to protect the economic value of the endowment. Therefore these investments cannot be used to pay for liabilities or future operating or capital purchases. As a result, college management also monitors an adjusted indicator, which management believes is important in evaluating the assets the college has available for future spending.

44 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Adjusted Net Financial Assets

2016

2015

Net Financial Assets (as presented in the Statement of Financial Position)

25,012,228

20,277,513

Less portfolio investments - restricted for endowments

(9,075,038)

(8,841,351)

Adjusted net financial assets

15,937,190

11,578,487

During the year, the Adjusted Net Financial Assets balance increased by $4.7 million primarily as a result of a stronger cash position and lower liabilities. The college continues to demonstrate financial strength and commitment to managing its financial position.

Areas of Significant Financial Risk Deferred maintenance The college directs significant resources to ensure that facilities are updated with relevant technology, operate efficiently, and meet contemporary standards. The college has a very significant outstanding deferred maintenance. While Infrastructure Maintenance Program (IMP) funding from the province increased notably to $1million (2015 - $773,000), the amount of targeted maintenance funding received does not allow the college to proactively manage and address its deferred maintenance risk.

Provincial funding The Campus Alberta (base operating) grant was increased by 2% for both fiscal years 2016 and 2017. Government of Alberta grants represent the college’s single largest source of funding, and any change reduction in the Campus Alberta grant results in significant budgetary pressure. The college recognizes that funding models are changing for public colleges and universities throughout the global post-secondary sector and that colleges are expected to generate a greater proportion of revenue than in the past in order to sustain and enhance the quality of its instruction, research and student life experiences. The college is pursuing steps which include but are not limited to growing its endowment, generating new net revenues, increasing support from other levels of government, and increasing the profitability of ancillary operations. The Government of Alberta has signaled it will review the funding model and tuition regulation within the next year; the college anticipates that any changes to the funding model will provide stability and allow for long-term planning.

Salaries The province is in the process of developing essential services legislation for Alberta’s public sector that aligns with the Supreme Court decision on the right to strike. This new legislation will apply to non-academic staff at post-secondary institutions and therefore may have an impact on future salary negotiations.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 45


Independent Auditor’s Report To the Board of Governors of Lakeland College Report on the Financial Statements I have audited the accompanying financial statements of Lakeland College, which comprise the statement of financial position as at June 30, 2016, and the statements of operations, remeasurement gains and losses, change in net financial assets, and cash flows for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information.

Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with Canadian public sector accounting standards, and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

Auditor’s Responsibility My responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on my audit. I conducted my audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that I comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my audit opinion.

Opinion In my opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Lakeland College as at June 30, 2016, and the results of its operations, its remeasurement gains and losses, its changes in net financial assets, and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Canadian public sector accounting standards.

[Original signed by Merwan N. Saher FCPA, FCA] Auditor General October 19, 2016 Edmonton, Alberta

46 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Statement of Management Responsibility year ended June 30, 2016

The financial statements of Lakeland College have been prepared by management in accordance with Canadian Public Sector Accounting Standards. The financial statements present fairly the financial position of the college as at June 30, 2016 and the results of its operations for the year then ended. In fulfilling its responsibilities and recognizing the limits inherent in all systems, management has developed and maintains a system of internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance that college assets are safeguarded from loss and that the accounting records are a reliable basis for the preparation of the financial statements. The Board of Governors is responsible for reviewing and approving the financial statements, and overseeing management’s performance of its financial reporting responsibilities. The Board of Governors carries out its responsibility for review of the financial statements principally through its Audit and Risk Committee. All members of the Audit and Risk Committee are not employees of the college. The Audit and Risk Committee meets with management and the external auditors to discuss the results of audit examinations and financial reporting matters. The external auditors have full access to the Audit and Risk Committee, with and without the presence of management. These financial statements have been reported on by the Auditor General of Alberta, the auditor appointed under the Post-secondary Learning Act. The Independent Auditor’s Report outlines the scope of the audit and provides the audit opinion on the fairness of presentation of the information in the financial statements.    

[Original signed by Alice Wainwright-Stewart] President

[Original signed by Gillian Henderson] Vice-President, Corporate Services

[Original signed by Heather Nanninga] Chief Financial Officer

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 47


Lakeland College

Statement of Financial Position as at June 30

2016

2015 (note 3, note 23)

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalent (note 4)

$

Portfolio investments - non-endowment (note 5)

4,661,485

$

2,777,745

26,483,597

26,165,592

Portfolio investments - restricted for endowments (note 5)

9,075,038

8,841,351

Accounts receivable (note 7)

2,574,358

1,409,789

Inventories for resale

288,721

391,777

43,083,199

39,586,254

Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

6,577,459

7,981,480

Debt (note 10)

1,320,000

1,440,000

10,079,536

9,776,756

93,976

110,505

18,070,971

19,308,741

25,012,228

20,277,513

81,803,910

85,451,002

Inventories of supplies

1,083,746

1,017,805

Prepaid expenses

1,788,899

1,459,483

84,676,555

87,928,290

109,688,783

108,205,803

Spent deferred capital contributions (note 12)

56,028,078

58,874,557

Net assets

53,660,705

49,331,246

51,389,010

46,774,809

2,271,695

2,556,437

Deferred revenue (note 11) Liability for contaminated sites (note 13)

Net financial assets

Non-financial assets Tangible capital assets (note 8)

Net assets before differed capital contributions

Net assets is comprised of Accumulated surplus (note 14) Accumulated remeasurement gains $

53,660,705

Contingent liabilities and contractual obligations (notes 15 and 16) Approved by the Board of Governors:

[Original signed by Darrel Howell] Chair, Board of Governors

[Original signed by Gary Moses] Chair, Audit and Risk Committee

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements 48 | Annual Report 2015-2016

$

49,331,246


Lakeland College

Statement of Operations for the year ended June 30

Budget

2016

2015

(note 19)

(note 3)

Revenue Government of Alberta grants (note 22) Federal and other government grants

$

38,923,299

$

40,285,715

$

39,058,234

2,238,410

2,643,168

2,360,509

Student tuition and fees

12,942,419

13,677,329

12,747,580

Sales of services and products

10,404,257

9,845,434

10,467,986

Investment income (note 17)

750,000

1,002,363

1,378,322

Donations and other grants

392,635

1,358,164

1,225,872

65,651,020

68,812,173

67,238,503

Instruction and training

28,102,758

27,410,563

27,482,132

Academic and student support

11,649,259

11,626,637

11,079,222

Facilities operation and maintenance

11,208,480

9,201,697

8,928,244

Institutional support

8,562,630

8,898,572

9,385,915

Ancillary services

4,937,119

5,561,217

5,556,821

Sponsored research

1,190,774

1,675,709

1,409,968

65,651,020

64,374,395

63,842,302

Annual operating surplus

-

4,437,778

3,396,201

Endowment contributions and capitalized investment income

-

176,423

106,701

Annual surplus

-

4,614,201

3,502,902

Accumulated surplus, beginning of year

-

46,774,809

43,271,907

Accumulated surplus, end of year

-

Expenses (note 20)

$

51,389,010

$

46,774,809

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 49


Lakeland College

Statement of Change In Net Financial Assets for the year ended June 30

Budget Annual surplus Acquisition of tangible capital assets Proceeds from sale of tangible capital assets

$

-

2016 $

(1,643,174)

4,614,201

2015 $

(3,327,122)

3,502,902 (12,144,589)

-

8,896

43,329

Amortization of tangible capital assets

6,701,048

6,886,649

6,667,943

Loss on sale of tangible capital assets

-

78,685

14,088

(65,941)

(97,834)

Change in inventories of supplies Change in prepaid expenses

(329,416)

155,291

(2,846,479)

1,107,124

Net accumulated remeasurement gains (losses)

(284,742)

384,557

Increase (decrease) in net financial assets

4,734,715

(367,188)

20,277,513

20,644,701

Change in spent deferred capital contributions (note 12)

Net financial assets, beginning of year

Net financial assets, end of year

$

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

50 | Annual Report 2015-2016

25,012,228

$

20,277,513


Lakeland College

Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended June 30

2016

2015

Operating transactions Annual surplus

$

4,614,201

$

3,502,902

Add (deduct) non-cash items: Amortization of tangible capital assets

6,886,649

Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets Expended capital recognized as revenue

78,685

14,088

(3,566,111)

(3,655,396)

-

(72,750)

39,358

(490,021)

Decrease in employee future benefits Gain on sale of investments Decrease (increase) in accounts receivable

6,667,943

(1,164,569)

520,314

103,056

(74,885)

(1,404,021)

(4,368,879)

(Decrease) increase in deferred revenue

374,168

481,338

Increase in spent deferred capital contributions, less expended capital recognized as revenue

519,632

4,680,671

(Decrease) increase in liability for contaminated sites

(16,529)

110,505

Increase in inventories of supplies

(65,941)

(97,834)

(Increase) decrease in prepaid expenses

(329,416)

155,291

Cash provided by operating transactions

6,069,162

7,373,287

(3,127,122)

(12,062,741)

8,896

43,329

(3,118,226)

(12,019,412)

(4,669,520)

(15,557,774)

Proceeds on sale of investments

3,722,324

5,554,023

Cash applied to investing transactions

(947,196)

(10,003,751)

Debt – repayment

(120,000)

(120,000)

Cash applied to financing transactions

(120,000)

(120,000)

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

1,883,740

(14,769,876)

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year

2,777,745

17,547,621

Decrease (increase) in inventories for resale Decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities

Capital transactions Acquisition of tangible capital assets Proceeds on sale of tangible capital assets Cash applied to capital transactions

Investing transactions Purchase of investments

Financing transactions

Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

$

4,661,485

$

2,777,745

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 51


Lakeland College

Statement of Remeasurement Gains and Losses for the year ended June 30

2016

2015 (note 23)

Accumulated remeasurement gains, beginning of year

$

2,556,437

$

2,171,880

Unrealized (losses) gains attributable to: Portfolio investments – non-endowment

(296,475)

693,776

11,733

(309,220)

Amounts reclassified to statement of operations: Portfolio investments – non-endowment Accumulated remeasurement gains, end of year

$

2,271,695

$

2,556,437

$

2,271,695

$

2,556,437

$

2,271,695

$

2,556,437

Accumulated remeasurement gains is comprised of: Portfolio investments – non-endowment

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements

52 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Notes to the Financial Statements June 30, 2016

1

Authority and Purpose

The Board of Governors of Lakeland College is a corporation which manages and operates Lakeland College (“the college”) under the Post-secondary Learning Act (Alberta). All members of the Board of Governors are appointed by either the Lieutenant Governor in Council or the Minister of Advanced Education, with the exception of the President, who is an ex officio member. Under the Post-secondary Learning Act, Campus Alberta Sector Regulation, the college is a comprehensive community institution offering mandated credentials and programs. The college is a registered charity, and under section 149 of the Income Tax Act (Canada), is exempt from the payment of income tax.

2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Reporting Practices

{a} General – public sector accounting standards and use of estimates

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Canadian public sector accounting standards (PSAS).

The measurement of certain assets and liabilities is contingent upon future events; therefore, the preparation of these financial statements requires the use of estimates, which may vary from actual results. The college’s management uses judgment to determine such estimates. Amortization of tangible capital assets and the revenue recognition for expended capital contributions are the most significant items based on estimates. In management’s opinion, the resulting estimates are within reasonable limits of materiality and are in accordance with the significant accounting policies summarized below. These significant accounting policies are presented to assist the reader in evaluating these financial statements and, together with the following notes, should be considered an integral part of the financial statements.

{b} Valuation of financial assets and liabilities

The college’s financial assets and liabilities are generally measured as follows:

Financial statement component

Measurement

Cash and cash equivalents

Amortized Cost

Portfolio investments - fixed income

Amortized Cost

Portfolio investments - pooled funds

Fair Value

Endowment investments

Fair Value

Accounts receivable

Amortized Cost

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

Amortized Cost

Debt

Amortized Cost

Unrealized gains and losses from changes in the fair value of financial instruments are recognized in the statement of remeasurement gains and losses. When the restricted nature of a financial instrument and any related changes in fair value create a liability, unrealized gains and losses are recognized as deferred revenue. All financial assets are tested annually for impairment. When financial assets are impaired, impairment losses are recorded in the statement of operations. A write-down of a portfolio investment to reflect a loss in value is not reversed for a subsequent increase in value.

For financial instruments measured using amortized cost, the effective interest rate method is used to determine interest revenue or expense. Transaction costs are a component of cost for financial instruments measured using cost or amortized cost. Transaction costs are expensed for financial instruments measured at fair value. Investment management fees are expensed as incurred. The purchase and sale of cash and cash equivalents and portfolio investments are accounted for using trade-date accounting.

The college does not use foreign currency contracts or any other type of derivative financial instruments for trading or speculative purposes.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 53


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) Note 2 (continued)

Management evaluates contractual obligations for the existence of embedded derivatives, and has determined that no embedded derivatives are present for the year ending June 30, 2016. When derivatives are identified, management elects to either designate the entire contract for fair value measurement or separately measure the value of the derivative component when characteristics of the derivative are not closely related to the economic characteristics and risks of the contract itself. Contracts to buy or sell non-financial items for the college’s normal purchase, sale or usage requirements are not recognized as financial assets or financial liabilities.

{c} Revenue recognition All revenues are reported on the accrual basis of accounting. Cash received for which goods or services have not been provided by year end is recorded as deferred revenue. Government grants, non-government grants and donations Government transfers are referred to as government grants.

Restricted grants and donations are recognized as deferred revenue if the terms for the use, or the terms along with the college’s actions and communications as to the use, create a liability. These grants and donations are recognized as revenue as the terms are met. If the grants and donations are used to acquire or construct tangible capital assets revenue will be recognized over the useful life of the tangible capital assets.

Government grants without terms for the use of the grant are recorded as revenue when the college is eligible to receive the funds. Unrestricted non-government grants and donations are recorded as revenue in the year received or in the year the funds are committed to the college if the amount can be reasonably estimated and collection is reasonably assured.

In-kind donations of services, materials and tangible capital assets are recorded at fair value when such value can reasonably be determined. Transfers of tangible capital assets from related parties are recorded at the carrying value. While volunteers as well as college staff contribute a significant amount of time each year to assist the college in carrying out its mission, the value of their services is not recognized in the financial statements because fair value cannot be reasonably determined.

Grants and donations related to land Grants and donations for the purchase of land are recognized as deferred revenue when received, and recognized as revenue when the land is purchased. The college recognizes in-kind contributions of land as revenue at the fair value of the land when a fair value can be reasonably determined. When the college cannot determine the fair value, it records such in-kind contributions at nominal value. Endowments Endowments consist of externally restricted donations received by the institution and internal allocations by the college’s Board of Governors, the principal of which is required to be maintained intact in perpetuity. Investment income earned on endowments must be used in accordance with the various purposes established by the donors or the Board of Governors. Benefactors as well as college policy stipulate that the economic value of the endowments must be protected by limiting the amount of income that may be expended and reinvesting unexpended income. Under the Post-secondary Learning Act, the college has the authority to alter the terms and conditions of endowments to enable: • income earned by the endowment to be withheld from distribution to avoid fluctuations in the amounts distributed and generally to regulate the distribution of income earned by the endowment. • encroachment on the capital of the endowment to avoid fluctuations in the amounts distributed and generally to regulate the distribution of income earned by the endowment if, in the opinion of the Board of Governors, the encroachment benefits the institution and does not impair the long-term value of the fund. In any year, if the investment income earned on endowments is insufficient to fund the spending allocation, the spending allocation is funded from the cumulative capitalized investment income. Endowment contributions, matching contributions, and associated investment income allocated for the preservation of endowment capital purchasing power are recognized in the Statement of Operations in the period in which they are received. 54 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) Note 2 (continued) Investment income Investment income from restricted grants and donations is recognized as deferred revenue when the terms for use create a liability, and is recognized as investment income when the terms of the grant or donation are met. Realized investment income allocated to endowment balances for the preservation of endowment capital purchasing power is recognized in the statement of operations as a component of endowment contributions and capitalized investment income.

{d} Inventories Inventories held for resale are valued at the lower of cost and expected net realizable value and are determined using the first-in-first-out method. Inventories of supplies are valued at cost.

{e} Tangible capital assets

Tangible capital assets are recorded at cost, which includes amounts that are directly related to the acquisition, design, construction, development, improvement or betterment of the assets. Cost includes overhead directly attributable to construction and development, and interest costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition or construction of the asset. Work in progress, which includes facilities and improvement projects and development of information systems, is not amortized until after the project is complete and the asset is in service.

Capital lease obligations are recorded at the present value of the minimum lease payments excluding executor costs (e.g. insurance, maintenance costs, etc.). The discount rate used to determine the present value of the lease payments is the lower of the college’s rate for incremental borrowing or the interest rate implicit in the lease. The cost, less residual value, of the tangible capital assets, excluding land, is amortized on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives as follows:

Building & site improvements

3-40 years

Furniture and equipment

5-10 years

Computer hardware and software

5 years

Learning resources

10 years

Tangible capital assets are written down when conditions indicate that they no longer contribute to the college’s ability to provide goods and services, or when the value of future economic benefits associated with the tangible capital assets are less than their net book value. The net write-downs are recognized as expenses in the statement of operations. Contributed capital assets are recorded as revenues at their fair market value on the date of donation, except in circumstances where fair value cannot be reasonably determined, which are then recognized at nominal value. Transfers of capital assets from related parties are recorded at the carrying value. Intangible assets, works of art, historical treasures and collections are expensed when acquired and not recognized as tangible capital assets.

{f} Asset retirement obligations Asset retirement obligations are recognized for statutory, contractual or legal obligations, associated with the retirement of tangible capital assets when those obligations result from the acquisition, construction, development or normal operation of the assets. The obligations are measured initially at fair value, determined using present value methodology, and the resulting costs capitalized into the carrying amount of the related asset. In subsequent periods, the liability is adjusted for the accretion of discount and any changes in the amount or timing of the underlying future cash flows. The capitalized asset retirement cost is amortized on the same basis as the related asset and the discount accretion is included in determining the results of operations.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 55


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) Note 2 (continued)

{g} Foreign currency translation

Transaction amounts denominated in foreign currencies are translated into their Canadian dollar equivalents at exchange rates prevailing at the transaction dates. Carrying values of monetary assets and liabilities and non-monetary items included in the fair value category reflect the exchange rates at the statement of financial position date. Unrealized foreign exchange gains and losses are recognized in the statement of remeasurement gains and losses.

In the period of settlement, foreign exchange gains and losses are reclassified to the statement of operations, and the cumulative amount of remeasurement gains and losses is reversed in the statement of remeasurement gains and losses.

{h} Employee future benefits Pension The college participates with other employers in the Local Authorities Pension Plan (LAPP). This pension plan is a multi- employer defined benefit pension plan that provides pensions for the college’s participating employees based on years of service and earnings. Other employee future benefits The college provides other employment benefits to eligible employees; namely, self-insured short- term disability and other post- employment benefits. These benefits are recorded as a liability and expense when the event obligating the college occurs, and value is determined by actual costs incurred.

{i} Expense by function The college uses the following categories of functions on its statement of operations: Instruction and training Expenses relating to support for the academic functions of the college both directly and indirectly. This function includes expenses incurred by schools for their scholarly activities and learning administrative services. Academic and student support Expenses relating to support for the academic functions of the college both directly and indirectly. This function includes expenses incurred in order to provide services to students and faculty. Facilities operation and maintenance Expenses relating to maintenance and renewal of facilities that house the teaching, research and administrative activities within the institution. These include utilities, facilities administration, building maintenance, custodial services, landscaping and grounds keeping, as well as major repairs and renovations. Institutional support Expenses relating to support for the academic and operational functions of the college both directly and indirectly. This function includes expenses incurred by the administrative functions of the college. Ancillary services Expenses relating to services and products provided to the college community and to external individuals and organizations. Services include the college bookstore, recreation and student residences. Sponsored research Expenses for all sponsored research activities specifically funded by restricted grants and donations.

{j} Funds and reserves Certain amounts, as approved by the Board of Governors, are set aside in accumulated surplus for future operating and capital purposes. Transfers to / from funds and reserves are an adjustment to the respective fund when approved.

56 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) Note 2 (continued)

{k} Future accounting changes In March 2015, the Public Sector Accounting Board issued PS 2200 Related party disclosures and PS 3420 Inter-entity transactions. In June 2015, the Public Sector Accounting Board issued PS 3210 Assets, PS 3320 Contingent assets, PS 3380 Contractual rights, and PS 3430 Restructuring transactions. These accounting standards are effective for fiscal years starting on or after April 1, 2017, with the exception of PS 3430, which is effective for fiscal years starting on or after April 1, 2018. • PS 2200 - Related party disclosures defines a related party and identifies disclosures for related parties and related party transactions, including key management personnel and close family members. • PS 3420 - Inter-entity transactions, establishes standards on how to account for and report transactions between public sector entities that comprise a government’s reporting entity from both a provider and recipient perspective. • PS 3210 - Assets provides guidance for applying the definition of assets set out in PS 1000, Financial statement concepts, and establishes general disclosure standards for assets. • PS 3320 - Contingent assets defines and establishes disclosure standards for contingent assets. • PS 3380 - Contractual rights defines and establishes disclosure standards on contractual rights. • PS 3430 - Restructuring transactions defines a restructuring transaction and establishes standards for recognizing and measuring assets and liabilities transferred in a restructuring transaction. Management is currently assessing the impact of these new standards on the financial statements. The college discloses transactions and balances related to the Government of Alberta in note 22.

3 Change in Accounting Policy a) Adoption of the net debt model The net debt model (with reclassification of comparatives) has been adopted for the presentation of financial statements. Net financial assets or net debt is measured as the difference between the college’s financial assets and liabilities. The effect of this change results in changing the presentation of the statement of financial position and adding the statement of change in net financial assets.

b) Endowment contributions and capitalized investment income

Effective July 1, 2015, endowment contributions, matching contributions, and associated investment income allocated for the preservation of endowment capital purchasing power are recognized in the statement of operations in the period in which they are received. In prior years, such transactions were recognized as direct increases to endowments, not through income in the statement of operations, in the period they were received. This change in accounting policy is applied retroactively with restatement of comparatives.

4 Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash and cash equivalents is composed of: 2016 Cash

2015

$

4,661,485

$

2,777,745

$

4,661,485

$

2,777,745

Cash equivalents include short-term investments with a short maturity less than three months from the date of acquisition.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 57


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

5 Portfolio Investments 2016 Portfolio investments – non-endowment

$

Portfolio investments – restricted for endowments

2015

26,483,597

$

26,165,592

$

35,006,943

9,075,038 $

8,841,351

35,558,635

The composition, fair value, and annual market yields on portfolio investments are as follows: 2016 Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Investments at cost or amortized cost:

Total $

6,713,787 6,713,787

Investments at fair value: Bonds Pooled investment funds

$

-

$

9,734,506

$

-

$

9,734,506

Equities Canadian equities

1,309,476

-

-

Foreign equities

2,065,775

-

-

2,065,775

-

15,279,950

-

15,279,950

-

455,141

-

455,141

3,375,251

25,469,597

-

28,844,848

Pooled investment funds Money Market

Total investments

$

3,375,251

$

9.5%

25,469,597

$

71.6%

-

1,309,476

$

35,558,635

0.0%

100.0%

Level 3

Total

2015 (note 23) Level 1

Level 2

Investments at Cost or Amortized Cost:

$

6,475,808 6,475,808

Investments at fair value: Bonds Pooled investment funds

$

-

$

9,125,192

$

-

$

Equities

-

Canadian equities

1,314,254

Foreign equities Pooled investment funds Money Market

Total investments

$

-

-

2,051,290

-

-

2,051,290

-

15,588,793

-

15,588,793

1,314,254

-

451,606

-

451,606

3,365,544

25,165,591

-

28,531,135

3,365,544 9.6%

58 | Annual Report 2015-2016

9,125,192

$

25,165,591 71.9%

$

0.0%

$

35,006,943 100.0%


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) Note 5 (continued) The fair value measurements are those derived from: Level 1 – Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities; Level 2 – Fair value measurements are those derived from inputs other than quoted prices included with level 1 that are observable for the assets, either directly (i.e. as prices) or indirectly (i.e. derived from prices); Level 3 – Fair value measurements are those derived from valuation techniques that include inputs for the assets that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs).

6 Financial Risk Management The college is exposed to the following risks: Market price risk The College is exposed to market risk - the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate as a result of changes in market prices, whether those changes are caused by factors specific to the individual security, its issuer or general market factors affecting all securities. To manage this risk, the college has established an investment policy with a target asset mix that is diversified by asset class with individual issuer limits and is designed to achieve a long-term rate of return that in real terms equals or exceeds total endowment expenditures with an acceptable level of risk. At June 30, 2016, the impact of a change in the rate of return on the investment portfolio is as follows: • 2.50% change in fixed income securities would have a $10,441 increase or decrease (2015 - 2.50% change would have a $10,633 change) • 2.50% change in common stocks and equivalents would have a $32,473 increase or decrease (2015 - 2.50% change would have a $31,503 change) Foreign currency risk

The college is exposed to foreign exchange risk on investments that are denominated in foreign currencies. The college does not use foreign currency forward contracts or any other type of derivative financial instruments for trading or speculative purposes. The college’s exposure to foreign exchange risk is very low due to minimal business activities conducted in a foreign currency.

Credit risk

The college is exposed to credit risk on investments arising from the potential failure of a counterparty, debtor or issuer to honour its contractual obligations. To manage this risk the college has established an investment policy with required minimum credit quality standards and issuer limits. The credit risk from accounts receivable is low as the majority of balances are due from government agencies and corporate sponsors.

The credit risks on investments held are as follows:

Credit rating

2016

2015

AAA

14.6%

19.6%

AA

25.5%

27.2%

0.0%

8.8%

AAA+

19.1%

5.6%

A

37.7%

35.5%

3.1%

0.0%

ABBB-

0.0%

3.3%

100.0%

100.0%

Liquidity risk The college maintains a portfolio of short-term investments to manage short-term cash requirements. Annual Report 2015-2016 | 59


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) Note 6 (continued) Interest rate risk

Interest rate risk is the risk to the college’s earnings that arise from the fluctuations in interest rates and the degree of volatility of these rates. This risk is managed by investment policies that limit the term to maturity of certain fixed income securities that the college holds. Interest risk on the college’s long-term liabilities is managed through fixed-risk agreements with Alberta Capital Finance Authority (note 10).

The maturity of interest bearing investments are as follows: Less than 1 to 5 Greater than Average effective .

Cash and cash equivalents Canadian government and corporate bonds

1 year

years

5 years

market yield

100.0%

0.0%

0.0%

1.1%

0.0%

46.6%

53.4%

1.7%

7 Accounts Receivable 2016 Accounts receivable

$

2,576,090

Accrued interest

$

833

Less: Allowance for doubtful accounts

1,426,663 1,112

(2,565) $

2015

(17,986)

2,574,358

$

1,409,789

Accounts receivable are unsecured and non-interest bearing.

8 Tangible Capital Assets 2016 Computer Building & Site Furniture & Learning Land Hardware & Total Improvements Equipment 1 Resources 1

Software

Cost ª Beginning of year b

5,580,712

$139,669,622

$ 32,010,179

$ 17,661,031

-

604,819

1,187,632

-

(57,660)

5,580,712

Beginning of year Amortization expense Effects on disposals, including write-downs

Acquisitions

$

b

Disposals, including write-downs

$

3,498,863

$198,420,407

1,472,769

61,902

3,327,122

(2,806,450)

(359,680)

(122,029)

(3,345,819)

140,216,781

30,391,361

18,774,120

3,438,736

198,401,710

-

74,964,366

19,669,790

15,252,848

3,082,402

$ 112,969,406

-

3,255,333

2,419,339

1,140,004

71,973

6,886,649

-

(57,660)

(2,719,502)

(359,064)

(122,029)

(3,258,255)

-

78,162,039

19,369,627

16,033,788

3,032,346

116,597,800

5,580,712

$ 62,054,742

$ 11,021,734

406,390

$ 81,803,910

Accumulated Amortization

Net Book Value at June 30, 2016

60 | Annual Report 2015-2016

$

$

2,740,332

$


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) Note 8 (continued)

2015 Land

Building & Site Improvements

Furniture & Equipment 11

Computer Hardware & Software

Learning Resources

Total

Cost ÂŞ Beginning of year

5,580,712

$134,074,625

$ 27,117,771

$ 18,525,991

3,599,252

$188,898,351

Acquisitions b

$

-

5,815,815

5,712,200

541,685

$

74,889

12,144,589

Disposals, including write-downs

-

(220,818)

(819,792)

(1,406,645)

(175,278)

(2,622,533)

5,580,712

139,669,622

32,010,179

17,661,031

3,498,863

198,420,407

Beginning of year

-

$ 72,123,813

$ 18,106,143

$ 15,450,123

$ 3,186,499

$108,866,578

Amortization expense

-

3,061,371

2,334,115

1,201,277

71,180

6,667,943

Effects on disposals, including write-downs

-

(220,818)

(770,468)

(1,398,552)

(175,278)

(2,565,116)

-

74,964,366

19,669,790

15,252,848

3,082,401

112,969,405

5,580,712

$ 64,705,256

$ 12,340,389

$ 2,408,183

416,462

$ 85,451,002

Accumulated Amortization

Net Book Value at June 30, 2016

$

$

No interest was capitalized by the college in the 2015/16 year (2014/15 - $0). (1) Equipment includes vehicles, office equipment and furniture, and other equipment. (a) Cost includes work in progress at June 30, 2016 totalling $889,363 (2015 - $23,353,789) comprised of $392,949 in buildings and site improvements (2015 - $23,158,482), $378,112 in equipment (2015 - $172,246) and $118,302 in software (2015 - $23,060). These assets are not amortized as the assets are not yet available for use. (b) Acquisitions during the year include in-kind contributions of vehicles valued at $200,000. In-kind acquisitions in 2015 consisted of equipment ($81,848).

9 Employee Future Benefit Liabilities Defined benefit plan accounted for on a defined contribution basis Local Authorities Pension Plan (LAPP) The LAPP is a multi-employer contributory defined benefit pension plan for support staff members and is accounted for on a defined contribution basis. At December 31, 2015, the LAPP reported an actuarial deficiency of $923 million (2014 - $2.45 billion deficiency). An actuarial valuation of the LAPP was carried out as at December 31, 2014 and was then extrapolated to December 31, 2015. The pension expense recorded in these financial statements is $3,122,273 (2015 - $3,026,109). Other than the requirement to make additional contributions, the college does not bear any risk related to the LAPP deficiency.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 61


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

10 Debt Debt is measured at amortized cost and is comprised of the following:

2016

Debentures payable to Alberta Capital Finance Authority

Collateral

Maturity

Interest Rate

Residences

2026

6.5%

2015 Amortized Cost

Amortized Cost

$

1,320,000

$

1,440,000

$

1,320,000

$

1,440,000

Principal and interest repayments in each of the next five years and thereafter are as follows:

Principal 2017

$

120,000

Interest $

Total

78,000

$

198,000

2018

120,000

70,200

190,200

2019

120,000

62,400

182,400

2020

120,000

54,600

174,600

2021

120,000

46,800

166,800

Thereafter

720,000

117,000

$

1,320,000

$

837,000

429,000

$

1,749,000

Interest expense on debt is $86,450 (2015 - $94,250) and is included in the statement of operations. The net book value of assets pledged as collateral is $2,155,301.

11 Deferred Revenue Deferred revenues are set aside for specific purposes as required either by legislation, regulation or agreement: 2016 2015 Deferred Research Unspent Tuition and and Special Deferred Capital Total Total Other Fees

Purpose Contributions Balance, beginning of year $ 5,865,959 $ 1,354,303 $ 2,556,492 $ 9,776,754 $ 8,873,550 8,800,842

614,996

15,539,829

24,955,667

28,182,787

Restricted investment income

Grants, tuition, donations received

252,877

22,247

-

275,124

319,300

Change in unrealized (losses) gains

(71,388)

-

-

(71,388)

279,545

(225,216)

(494,416)

-

(719,632)

(4,762,520)

(8,554,677)

(26,705)

(15,494,163)

(24,075,545)

(23,091,127)

(20,523)

(37,555)

-

(58,078)

(24,779)

-

(3,366)

-

(3,366)

-

1,429,504

$2,602,158

Transfers to spent deferred capital contributions Recognized as revenue Transfers to endowments Other Balance, end of year

62 | Annual Report 2015-2016

$

6,047,874

$

$

10,079,536

$

9,776,756


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

12 Spent Deferred Capital Contributions Spent deferred capital contributions is comprised of restricted grants and donations spent on tangible capital acquisitions

(not yet recognized as revenue).

2016 Spent deferred capital contributions, beginning of year

$

2015

58,874,557

$

57,767,433

Transfers from unspent deferred capital contributions

494,416

Transfers from deferred research and special purpose

225,216

1,080,846

(3,566,111)

(3,655,396)

Expended capital recognized as revenue Net change for the year Spent deferred capital contributions, end of year

3,681,674

(2,846,479) $

1,107,124

56,028,078

$

58,874,557

13 Liability for Contaminated Sites The composition of liabilities is as follows: 2016 Liability, beginning of year

$

110,505

Addition to liabilities during the year

$

-

Remediation work performed Liability, end of year

2015

(16,529) $

110,505 -

93,976

$

110,505

The college has accepted responsibility to perform remediation work on three sites related to contaminated soils and groundwater.

Two sites were contaminated as a result of historical agricultural activity, and remediation is expected to consist of risk management and monitoring over the next three years. The remaining site was contaminated as a result of the disposal of ash and petrochemical products. Remediation for this site is expected to consist of excavation and disposal of contaminated soil over the next year.

Liabilities have been calculated using estimates of undiscounted cash flows generated by third parties.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 63


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

14 Accumulated Surplus

The composition of accumulated surplus is as follows:

Accumulated Surplus (deficit) From Operations

Balance as at July 1, 2014

$

2,515,157

Investment in Tangible Capital Assets $

19,661,852

Internally Restricted Surplus $

Total Accumulated Surplus (note 20)

Endowments

14,665,787

$

6,429,111

$

43,271,907

Annual surplus

3,502,902

-

-

Transfer to (from) endowments

(106,701)

-

-

106,701

-

Amortization of internally funded tangible capital assets

3,012,547

(3,012,547)

-

-

-

57,417

(57,417)

-

-

-

(120,000)

120,000

-

-

-

(1,332,329)

7,600,858

(6,268,529)

-

-

563,372

-

(563,372)

-

-

(6,000,000)

-

6,000,000

-

-

Net book value of assets disposals Debt repayment Internally funded acquisition of tangible capital assets Operating expenses funded from internally restricted surplus Net board appropriation to internally restricted surplus Balance as at June 30, 2015

$

2,092,365

$

24,312,746

$

13,833,886

3,502,902

$

6,535,812

$

46,774,809

Annual surplus

4,614,201

-

-

-

4,614,201

Transfer to (from) endowments

(176,423)

-

-

176,423

-

Amortization of internally funded tangible capital assets

3,320,538

(3,320,538)

-

-

-

87,564

(87,564)

-

-

-

(120,000)

120,000

-

-

-

(2,607,491)

3,247,244

(639,753)

-

-

296,755

-

(296,755)

-

-

(5,000,000)

-

5,000,000

-

-

Net book value of assets disposals Debt repayment Internally funded acquisition of tangible capital assets Operating expenses funded from internally restricted surplus Net board appropriation to internally restricted surplus Balance as at June 30, 2016

$

2,507,509

$

24,271,888

$

17,897,378

$

6,712,235

$

51,389,010

Total value of endowments is comprised of:

2016

2015

Endowment component of accumulated surplus

$

6,712,235

$

6,535,812

$

6,712,235

$

6,535,812

Investment in tangible capital assets represents the amount of the college’s accumulated operating surplus that has been invested in the college’s capital assets.

64 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued) Note 14 (continued) Internally restricted surplus represent amounts set aside or appropriated by the Lakeland’s Board of Governors. Those amounts are not available for other purposes without the approval of the board and do not have interest allocated to them. Reserves for future purposes are summarized as follows:

Balance, Beginning of Year

Appropriations From (returned to) Unrestricted Net Assets

Net Additions or (disbursement) During the Year

$

$

Balance, End of Year

Appropriations for capital activities Heavy oil petroleum facility

$

Major capital projects Emerging capital needs

2,047,778

-

(41,350)

$

2,006,428

7,500,000

5,080,000

(19,094)

750,000

370,000

(579,309)

12,560,906 540,691

10,297,778

5,450,000

(639,753)

15,108,025

2,515,731

Appropriations for operating activities Major maintenance

2,907,526

-

(391,795)

Operating initiatives

450,000

(450,000)

-

-

Delivery initiatives

178,582

-

95,040

273,622

3,536,108 Total appropriations

$

13,833,886

(450,000) $

5,000,000

(296,755) $

(936,508)

2,789,353 $

17,897,378

15 Contingent Liabilities (a)

The college is a defendant in a number of legal proceedings. While the ultimate outcome and liability of these proceedings cannot be reasonably estimated at this time, the college believes that any settlement will not have a material adverse effect on the financial position or the results of operations of the college. Management has concluded that none of the claims meet the criteria for being recorded under PSAS. (b)  The college has identified potential asset retirement obligations related to the existence of asbestos in a number of its facilities. Although not a current health hazard, upon renovation or demolition of these facilities, the college may be required to take appropriate remediation procedures to remove the asbestos. As the college has no legal obligation to remove the asbestos in these facilities as long as the asbestos is contained and does not pose a public health risk, the fair value of the obligation cannot be reasonably estimated due to the indeterminate timing and scope of the removal. The asset retirement obligations for these assets will be recorded in the period in which there is certainty that the capital project will proceed and there is sufficient information to estimate fair value of the obligation.

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 65


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

16 Contractual Obligations The college has contractual obligations which are commitments that will become liabilities in the future when the terms of the contracts or agreements are met. The estimated aggregate amounts payable for the unexpired terms of these contractual obligations are as follows:

Service contracts 2017

$

1,164,158

Information systems and technology

Capital projects $

494,876

$

420,207

Long term leases $

Total

183,119

$

2,262,359

2018

811,056

167,843

140,469

168,452

1,287,820

2019

590,506

-

10,200

100,884

701,590

2020

535,566

-

10,200

60,373

606,139

2021

401,675

-

10,200

15,471

427,346

-

-

-

-

Thereafter $

3,502,961

$

662,718

$

591,276

$

-

528,299

$

5,285,255

17 Investment Income 2016

2015

Restricted funds Investment earning on cash, cash equivalents and portfolio investments held for endowments and other restricted purposes

$

Transferred to deferred revenue

277,009

$

(252,656)

308,110 (307,266)

Transferred to endowment net assets

(24,353)

(844)

Add deferred revenue recognized as investment income

252,656

307,266

Restricted funds recognized as investment income

252,656

307,266

Investment earnings on unrestricted cash, cash equivalents and portfolio investments

772,175

1,083,090

Transferred to deferred revenue

(22,468)

(12,034)

749,707

1,071,056

Unrestricted funds

Unrestricted funds recognized as investment income

Total investment income

66 | Annual Report 2015-2016

$

1,002,363

$

1,378,322


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

18 Salary and Employee Benefits 2016

Other cash benefits 22

Base salary 11

2015

Other non-cash benefits 33

Total

Total

Governance Chair of Board of Governors

$

-

Members of Board of Governors

$

8,558

$

4,545

$

13,103

$

14,582

-

16,401

4,275

20,676

20,864

-

24,959

8,820

33,779

35,446

275,000

-

43,202

318,202

477,048

VP Academic 4

188,175

-

45,175

233,350

194,196

VP Advancement 4

151,017

-

43,002

194,019

424,439

VP Corporate Services 4

177,375

-

45,688

223,063

454,296

791,567

-

177,067

968,633

1,549,979

Executive President 4 Vice-Presidents

$

791,567

$

24,959

$

185,886

$

1,002,412

$

1,585,425

(1) Base salary includes pensionable base pay. (2) Other cash benefits includes honoraria and other non-salary payments. (3) Employer’s share of all employee benefits and contributions or payments made on behalf of employees including pension, health care, dental coverage, vision coverage, out of country medical benefits, group life insurance, accidental disability and dismemberment insurance, long and short term disability plan, professional memberships and tuition. (4) During the 2014/15 fiscal year, this position was occupied by two different individuals

19 Budget Figures

The college’s 2015/2016 budget was approved by the Board of Governors on May 27, 2015 and was presented to the Minister of Advanced Education as part of the college’s submission of its 2015 - 2018 Comprehensive Institutional Plan. Certain budget figures from the college’s 2015 - 2018 Comprehensive Institutional Plan have been reclassified to conform to the presentation adopted in the 2016 financial statements.

20 Expense by Object The following is a summary of expense by object: 2016 Budget Salaries and benefits Material, supplies and services

$

40,074,015 11,823,483

2015 Actual

$

38,888,573

Actual $

12,009,463

39,185,825 10,924,651

Repairs & maintenance 3,263,109 3,031,517 3,305,538 Cost of goods sold 901,269 949,594 1,008,138 Amortization of capital assets 6,701,048 6,886,649 6,667,943 Utilities 2,193,950 1,750,167 Scholarships and bursaries

694,148

858,433

2,006,193 744,014

$ 65,651,022 $ 64,374,395 $ 63,842,302 Annual Report 2015-2016 | 67


Notes to the Financial Statements (continued)

21 Funds Held on Behalf of Others The college holds the following funds on behalf of others over which the board has no power of appropriation. Accordingly, these funds are not included in the financial statements.

2016

2015

Campus Alberta Risk Assurance Committee

$

57,628

$

-

$

57,628

$

-

22 Government of Alberta Transactions and Balances The college operates under the authority and statutes of the Province of Alberta. Transactions and balances between the college and the Government of Alberta are measured at the exchange amount and summarized below. 2016

2015

Grants from Government of Alberta Advanced Education Operating

$

Capital

$

2,792,265

Alberta Innovates Technology Futures Other Total Advanced Education

32,257,225

$

30,787,784 6,563,022

55,000

40,000

5,339,198

5,294,095

40,443,688

$

42,684,901

Other Government of Alberta departments and agencies Alberta Agriculture and Forestry

$14,346

Alberta Sport, Recreation, Parks and Wildlife

$12,244

96,976

64,652

Total other Government of Alberta departments and agencies

$

111,322

$

Total contributions received

$

40,555,014

$

Less: deferred revenue

(269,299) $

76,896 42,761,797 (3,703,563)

40,285,715

$

-

$

39,058,234

Accounts receivable Other post-secondary institutions

$

Other Government of Alberta departments and agencies

172,255

2,875 105,874

$

172,255

$

108,749

$

18,381

$

171,412

Accounts payable Other post-secondary institutions Other Government of Alberta departments and agencies

8,581 $

26,962

$

The college has liabilities with Alberta Capital Finance Authority as described in note 10.

23 Comparative Figures Certain 2015 figures have been reclassified to conform to the presentation adopted in the 2016 financial statements.

68 | Annual Report 2015-2016

171,412


The following appendices are not part of the audited financial statements.

Appendix A – Program full load equivalents (FLEs) Program Business Accounting Accounting Technician Business Administration

2015-2016

2014-2015

175.439

150.057

37.8

36.1

3.9

11.1

79.7

42.5

Business Administration Certificate

8.6

8.6

Marketing

7.6

18.1

Office Administration Certificate Real Estate Appraisal and Assessment Small Business and Entrepreneurship Education Educational Assistant Health Sciences Animal Health Technology Diploma Emergency Medical Emergency Medical Responder Health Care Aide Practical Nurse Diploma Veterinary Medical Assistant Languages, Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities Child and Youth Care Diploma Early Learning and Child Care Development Certificate

0

0.273

27.439

22.284

10.4

11.1

38.33

33.422

38.33

33.422

140.073

150.2

78.033

78.7

20.1

27.613

1.335

0

16.606

10.101

0

12.604

23.999

21.182

395.059

406.425

41.575

27.025

71.6

50.675

Early Learning and Child Care Development Diploma

34.975

29.175

Interior Design Technology Diploma

40.773

35.275

0

6.4

28.836

59.175

8

11

International Development Open Studies Sign Language Interpretation Sign Language Study

8.5

10

160.8

177.7

77.647

73.598

0.601

13.003

Emergency Services Technology: Fire

42.542

36.187

Fire Fighter Certificate of Achievement

34.504

24.408

467.609

433.062

70.899

75.364

89.71

74.061

Conservation and Restoration Ecology

36.917

37.584

Crop Technology Diploma

71.403

60.835

Environmental Conservation and Reclamation

38.168

42.082

11.5

19.418

University Studies Legal & Security Bachelor of Applied Business: Emergency Services

Physical, Natural & Applied Sciences Agribusiness Animal Science Technology Diploma

Environmental Monitoring & Protection General Agriculture Certificate

24.428

7.5

B of Science: Monitoring/Environmental Protection

10.707

14.619

Bachelor of Science: Reclamation/Remediation

29.291

28.211

2.001

1.638

Renewable Energy and Conservation Certificate

26.7

11.5

Western Ranch and Cow Horse

21.8

22

34.085

38.25

Renewable Energy and Conservation Diploma

Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 69


Program (continued)

2015-2016

2014-2015

Preparatory & Basic Upgrading

10.6

23.206

Employment Skills Enhancement

10.6

17.533

Tourism - Ready to Work Trades & Technologists

0

5.673

652.348

650.052

3rd Class Power Engineering

1.449

1.101

4th Class Power Engineering

36.177

53.084

APPR: Automotive Service Technician

22.695

21.627

APPR: Carpenter

32.307

33.909

APPR: Electrician

91.145

90.210

8.811

7.476

APPR: Heavy Equipment Technician

78.231

73.158

APPR: Instrument Technician

13.140

10.875

APPR: Parts Technician

15.606

14.604

APPR: Steamfitter-Pipefitter

37.914

36.579

APPR: Welder

APPR: Gasfitter

79.833

101.727

Esthetician

8.100

11.500

Gas Process Operator

3.110

3.740

166.589

113.357

Heavy Oil Engineering Technology Heavy Oil Operations Technician

0

31.875

Pre-Employment Carpentry

4.002

3.752

Pre-Employment Electrician

8.442

8.911

Pre-Employment Hairstylist

10.223

7.059

8.442

6.566

Pre-Employment Instrument Technician Pre-Employment Welder

13.132

8.442

Street-Rod Technologies

13.000

10.500

1,957.11

1,920.02

Grand Total

70 | Annual Report 2015-2016


Appendix B – Donors Lakeland thanks the following supporters for their donations to the college between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. Our thanks also to the many donors who chose to make their contribution anonymously. Our apologies to anyone whose name we may have inadvertently missed. A.D.R. Farms Ltd.

Arthur & Gladys McGinnis

Calvin Harrison

Aaron & Trisha Rawlake

ASL Paving Ltd.

Cameron & Cheryl Nawrot

Action Towing & Recovery

ATB Financial

Affinity Credit Union

ATCO Electric

Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers

Agi-Envirotank

ATCO Gas

Agland

Austin & Riley Starko

Agriculture Financial Services Corporation

Bar Engineering Co. Ltd.

AGSI Solutions Centre

Baywash Oilfield Services Inc.

Alberta Assessors’ Association

Benmar Roofing Ltd.

Alberta Association of Animal Health Technologists

Bernie & Shirley Huedepohl

Alberta Blue Cross Alberta Branch Canadian Seed Growers Association (1993)

Battle River Community Foundation

Best Environmental Technologies Inc. Bill & Elaine Pocock Bill & Myrna Fox

Alberta Business Education Association

BioVision Seed Research Ltd.

Alberta Innovation & Advanced Education

Blaine & Michele Burns

Alberta Minister of Finance Disbursement Account II

Blazing Saddle Western Display

Alberta Society of Professional Biologists Alexandra Ungar Alice Wainwright-Stewart & Dr. Alex Stewart

Blair Hill

Blushrose Simmental Farm Bob & Eileen Cholowski Border City Building Centre Ltd. Border City Optimist Club

Canadian Tire #341 Canadian Western Bank Capital Colour Press (1992) Ltd. Carla Herbst Pittman Carol Beckie Carolyn DeFord Cathi Bishop CDC Inc. Cenovus Energy Inc. Charlene Cybenko Charles & Brenda Brown Charmaine Morris Chartered Professional Accountants of Alberta Chris & Alice Swan Chris & Sharon Rottier Chris McQuid Chris Senaratne

Border City Rotary Club

Christopher J. Sarsons Professional Corporation

Allison Manning

Border Logistics Inc.

CIBC

Amanda Barlow

Brad Humphrey Architect Ltd.

Citadel Mechanical Ltd.

Angela Coombs

Bradley Bardoel

City of Lloydminster

Angela MacArthur

Bradley Pelley

Claire McInnis

Angie Molaro

Brandi Hofer

Clarence Kuse

Angie Rowsell

Brett Klein

CNRL

Apple Drugs, Vermilion

Brian & Dorothy Pidruchney

APX Hotel Group

Bryan & Sharon Perkins

Coca-Cola Refreshments Canada Company

Aramark Canada Ltd.

Buffalo Lake Management Team / Wind Power Society

Arch & Geretta Partington Arrow Activewear Art Boggs

Cockburn Construction

Buryniuk Insurance Ltd.

Colchester & District Agricultural Society

Byron Buick

Colin Porozni

C.M. Wolters

Compliant Environmental Services Ltd. Annual Report 2015-2016 | 71


Convergint Technologies Ltd.

Desmond & Cora Shubert

Gordon Hissett

Cory’s Tire Service Inc.

Desmond & Kay Fey

Gord’s Plumbing & Heating Ltd.

Country Commodities Limited

DNOW Canada ULC

Country Side Golf Course

Don Lutzak

Government of Saskatchewan Advanced Ed, Employment & Immigration

County of Vermilion River

Don Narcisse

Courtney Fitzgerald

Doug & Marg Gilby

Craig & Kendra Kuse

Doug Elliott

Craig’s Vermilion Ltd.

Doug Vokins

Creative Glass & Aluminum Ltd.

Dr. Bob Holowaychuk

Crown Investments Corporation of Saskatchewan

Dust’s Plumbing

Dan Tally Daniel Livingstone

Electrical Contractors Association of Alberta

Danny & Zoria Lieffers

Elevation, Mind Body Spirit

Helen Banks

Darrel & Elizabeth Howell

Elizabeth Franks

Heritage Sales & Service (1998) Ltd.

Darren & Christine Wagner

Ellis & Donna Treffry

Highland Feeders Limited

Darren Blair

Elster Canadian Meter

Hot Peppers Clothing Co.

Darwin Miller

Emily Chaykowski

Hugh & Barbara Allan

Dave & Angela Wilm

Fang Liu

Husky Group of Companies

Dave & Debbie Neigum

Farm Credit Canada

Dave & Lorraine Powell

Fidelity Investments Canada ULC

Highway 43 Trailer Sales (A Division of Dow Fertilizer Ltd.)

Dave King

Fillmore Construction Management Inc.

David Lazaruk

First Truck Centre Lloydminster Inc.

David Loxam

Five Point Womens’ Institute

Dawn Interiors

Florence Hafso

Dawn Wilson

FOCUS

Days Hotel & Suites

Focused SP

Deanna Carter

Four B’s Oilfield Services Ltd.

Debra Dustow

Furniture Gallery Lloydminster Ltd.

Decorator’s Den

Gail McDonald

Delia Morgan-Tetz

Gary & Bev Taylor

Denham Chrysler Ltd.

Gary & Isabelle Moses

Denis & Carolyn Martin

George & Luella Crooker

Denise Allen

George Caraganis Engineering Ltd.

Denise Martin

Gert Isert

Dennis Slywka

Glen Teasdale

Dennis Turner

GMACK Oilfield Services Ltd.

Deseret Ranches of Alberta Ltd.

Golden Jubilee Rebekan Lodge #133

Designer’s Choice (Lloyd) Ltd.

Goodhand Law Office

72 | Annual Report 2015-2016

Eastalta Co-op Ltd.

Greenlee Greg & Christy Kuse Greg Poirier Guy & Denise Totman Hailee McKenna Harold & Keri Pullyblank Heather Bayne Heather Nanninga Heavy Crude Hauling LP

Ideal Office Solutions Image Press Ltd. Ina McLean-Lawrence Independent Order of Odd Fellows No. 189 Innovation Credit Union Ivan Tkaczuk Ivy Livestock Ltd. J C McCrae Jacinda Kitt James Tally Janice Clennett Janice Fretor Janice Heit Jared Fehr Jean Peelar Jeff & Lisa Schwark Jeff Dustow & Debra Malekoff


Lakeland College Information Technology Staff

Margaret Taylor

Lakeland College Rodeo Club

Marjorie Locke

Lakeland College Rowing Club

Mark & Debbie Johre

Lakeland College Staff Association

Mark & Charlotte Dubkowski

Lakeland College Stock Dog Club

Mark & Sarah LaBoucane

Lakeland College Students’ Association, Lloydminster Campus

Marty & Nicole Madsen

Johnson Inc.

Lakeland College Students’ Association, Vermilion Campus

Mary Harrish

Jon Fox

Lakeland Country Florists

Mattea Pittman

Joni Orenchuk

Larry & Rosanne Bingham

May Cinema 6

Josephia Van Lent

Larry & Sharon Bilben

Mead Family Farm Inc.

Judy Woyewitka

Laurie Rasmussen

Meridian Surveys (Alta.) Ltd.

Just Kruzin

Layne & Lonnie Boothman

Merle Klumph

Kagan Kneen

Leanne Hawes

Michael & Kathy Crowe

Karen Lehmann

Les Hanson

Michael & Kim Wetsch

Kasian Architecture Interior Design & Planning Ltd.

Let’s Golf Lloydminster

Michael Quwek

Leuschen’s Country General Store

Microserve

Lex Buse

Midwest Floorcovering

Libbie Young Centre

Midwest Furniture & Appliances

Lina Foster

Mike & Colleen Symes

Linda Werklund

Mike Miske

Lions Club of Lloydminster Corp.

Miller Show Cattle

Liquor Stores GP Inc.

Milton & Carrol Wakefield

Lloydminster & District Co-operative Limited

Milton & Katherine Anderson

Kevin Blair Keyera

Lloydminster Chamber of Commerce

MNP LLP

Kim & Carla Medernach

Lloydminster Economic Development Corporation

Motion Fitness

Kinsmen Club of Lloydminster Kirk & Pam McInroy

Lloydminster Golf & Curling Centre

Kirk Wilkinson

Lloydminster Jr. ‘A’ Bobcats Hockey Association, AJHL

Jim & Louise Storch Jo Berglund Jocelyn McKinnon Jody & Diann Quickstad Joel Lavine John & Sandra Stilborn John Robinson & Alice Curry John Winter

Katherine Boychuk Kelly Gehlen Kelly Lavoie Ken Rutherford Kenneth & Jessie Hoffman Kenneth & Kristina Allan Kerry Leckie Professional Corporation

Kishwar Mirza Kristine Knourek Kurri Carlson & Maureen McHattie Kyle & Carrie Boerrichter Lacey Gartner Ladybug Scrapbook Lakeland College Alumni Association

Lloydminster KFC Longridge Consulting Lorne & Joey MacGregor Lynda Campbell Lynne Bayne Macare Lawn & Yard Care Margaret Harcus

Marian Williams

Marvin & Kathy Morvik

Misericordia Community Hospital

Musgrave Agencies Ltd. Nadine Walker-Perry NAIT National Kitchen & Bath, Prairie Provinces Chapter Nestor & Loretta Yaganiski Newcap Inc. Noralta Technologies Inc. North Central Livestock Exchange Inc. Northwind Radio Ltd. NOVA Chemicals Corporation Annual Report 2015-2016 | 73


Olga Wingrove

Robert & Shirley Cameron

Shirley Williams

Orest & Patricia Yackimec

Robert Hoyteniuk

Simple Farmer Country Store

Osika Holdings Inc.

Robert Porozni

Six Mile Red Angus Ltd.

Pape Rents

Rock Creek Tap and Grill

Park & Beth Letts

Rockytop Ventures Ltd.

Society of Petroleum Engineers Lloydminster Section

Patrick Grondin

Ron & Sheri Heller

Paul & Lori Quinn

Ron & Wendy Tonita

Paul & Patti Breland

Ross Ulmer

Pembina Pipeline Corporation

Rotary Club of Vermilion

Perma Earth Consulting Ltd.

Roy Galloway

Peter & Bonnie Walsh

Roy Kubica

PharmaChoice

Royal Canadian Legion Br. 11

Phillip & Tara Tod

Royal Canadian Legion Br. 39

PIC Investment Group Inc.

Royal Canadian Legion, Alberta-NWT Command

Points North Freight

Spiro’s Steak & Pizza Staedtler-Mars Limited Stantec Architecture Ltd. Stephen Washington Steven & Alberta Mak Streamline Mechanical L.P. Sue Gunson Synergy Credit Union T.J. & Georgina Altman Taco Time, Lloydminster

Royal Canadian Legion, Marshall Br. 92

TD Insurance Meloche Monnex

Roy’s Courier Service

Techmation Electric & Controls

Russ Doyle & Turnaround Planning Inc.

Ted & Kathleen Sutton

Ruth Shaw

Terry & Rhonda King

Ryan Deis Professional Corporation

Terry West

Sandi Romanchuk

The Bea Fisher Centre Inc.

Saskatchewan Assessment Management Agency

The Calgary Foundation

Saskatchewan Association for Community Living

The Child and Youth Care Association of Alberta

RE/MAX Prairie Realty

Saskatchewan Association of Veterinary Technologists

The Kohel Family

Real Deals on Home Decor

Scott & Bernie Webb

Redhead Equipment

Seasons: Flowers, Gifts & Garden

Reid Signs Ltd.

Serena Hawkins

Rene Arts Waterwell Ltd.

Servus Credit Union Ltd.

Rhino Roofing Ltd.

Shaif & Mary Jetha

Ribstone Creek Brewery

Shannon Mauthe

Richard & Joyce McBain

Sharon Meyer

Richardson Pioneer International

Sharon Oattes

Rita Rondeau-Cain

Sheldon & Laura Baker

Robert & Caroline Sweeney

Sheldon & Peggy Becker

Robert & Cheryl Day

Shelley Thomas Prokop

Robert & Geraldine Little

Shirley Curry

Polishuk Farms Ltd. Premium Spas & Billiards Preston Parsons Priscilla Holt Process Combustion Ranch and Feedlot Rider Club Randy & Brenda Dancey Randy Smith RBC Royal Bank RE/MAX of Lloydminster

74 | Annual Report 2015-2016

The Canadian Brewhouse

The Root: Community Emporium Theresa Smith Tim Dyck Financial Services Inc. Tintech Sheet Metal Ltd. Tourism Saskatchewan Travis & Debbie Minish Tru-Co Structures Inc. TVS Mor Drafting Services Ltd. Tyco Integrated Fire & Security UCG Universal Consulting Group Ltd. Val Smith Vancouver Foundation Vermilion “SOS” Support our Students


Vermilion & Area Volunteer Crisis Line Vermilion & District Chamber of Commerce Vermilion Credit Union Ltd. Vermilion Feeds Vermilion Jr. B Tigers Verses Vet Med Assistant Club VetStrategy Alberta Inc. Vic & Ann Juba Vic Juba Community Theatre Viterra Inc. W5 Management Corp. Walter Skripitsky Wayne & Susan Sigurdson Wesley Horvey West Earth Developments William & Diane Gow Winston & Rene Wirachowsky Y’s Marketing

Annual Report 2015-2016 | 75


Vermilion Campus 5707 College Drive Vermilion, Alberta T9X 1K5

Lloydminster Campus 2602 59 Avenue Lloydminster, Alberta T9V 3N7

lakelandcollege.ca

Lakeland College 2015-16 Annual Report  

The annual report of Lakeland College for the fiscal year July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016.