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Nature vs. Navigation  Convertible / MY Roundup

Huron

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Ontario

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Michigan

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Erie

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Superior

Boating Adventures Flotilla up the Inside Passage 5th generation commercial fishermen

lakelandboating.com February 2011

Display Until February 28, 2011

cabo yachts

44 Hardtop Express


in this issue

Features 22

Cabo Yachts 44 Hardtop Express

26

Behind the Lens

30

On Osprey’s Sticks

34

Miracle on the St. Lawrence

36

A Family Affair

42

An Insider’s Look

44

Big City Boating

Custom built to suit your boating or fishing fancy

Up close and personal with aerial photographer and pilot Marge Beaver The ultimate showdown of nature vs. navigation The brotherhood of the sea is a tie that binds For the Weborgs, commercial fishing adventures are all in a day’s work Mother Goose Flotilla: The cruise of a lifetime Explore the exciting port of Toronto, Ontario PHOTO BY ONTARIO TOURISM

Departments

30

PHOTO BY TRAVIS STATON

36

4 From the Helm 6 Mail Call 7 Scuttlebutt 12 Gear Guru 13 Electronics 14 Corke Board 15 Boat Spotlight

69 Great Buy 70 Lakeshore Life 73 Classifieds 76 Above the Waterline

On the Cover

Four Winns V305

17 Roundup

Convertibles & Motoryachts

20 The Chandlery Winter gear

54 Marina Watch PHOTO BY TOM STURTEVANT

2 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

Ohio’s Venetian & Son Rise marinas

Whether you’re looking to hard-core fish with the guys or kick back and relax with the family, the Cabo 44 Hardtop Express offers something for everyone.


from the helm

All About Adventure

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his month, we’re all about adventure! Editor-at-large Heather Steinberger recently met up with long-time Lakeland Boating contributor, Marge Beaver who, now in her 70s, flies her very own plane to capture breathtaking aerial photos from all over the Midwest. Heather’s profile of Marge, entitled “Behind the Lens” on page 26, is an up-close and personal view of the intrepid aviator, photographer, author, wife, mother and life-long Great Lakes resident and enthusiast. Marge is one of the absolute best at her craft. She’s taken aerial shots of every port and harbor on each of the Great Lakes for our Ports O’ Call Cruising Guides for the past 15 years. She’s also a publisher, having recently inked her third coffee table book “Above the Lighthouses—Lake Michigan.” If you or someone you know enjoys Lake Michigan and lighthouses, this would make a lovely gift. It’s a handsome addition to any lake-lover’s library. “Miracle on the St. Lawrence” (page 34) is the true story of a Ukrainian seaman stricken with seizures aboard a down-bound “salty” headed through the St. Lawrence River out to sea. The story is recalled by Dr. Dick Withington, or “Doc” Withington, as he is affectionately know. Doc lives with his wife, Rosanne, in a turn-of-the-century Victorian cottage at the head of Round Island off of Clayton, New York, also home to the Antique Boat Museum. Doc recalls the heartwarming events and challenges and unlikely chain of events leading up to the seaman’s rescue and recovery, assisted by local Thousand Islanders. The Ukrainian man spoke no English, the Islanders spoke no Ukrainian, but somehow, miraculously, they found means to communicate—and it saved his life. No one is more adventurous than our very own Roland Schultz. Many of you followed Roland and his wooden tug, Restless, as he soloed his 38-footer around the Great Loop a few years back. This month, Roland’s penned “On Osprey’s Sticks” (page 30), which centers on the debate over these endangered birds building nests atop Aids to Navigation that mariners rely upon for safe passage. 4 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011

February 2011 Volume LXV, No. 2 Publisher Walter “Bing” O’Meara editorial staff Editor: Lindsey Johnson Senior editor: Dave Mull Editors-at-large: Heather Steinberger & Roland Schultz Field editor: Tom Thompson Creative staff Art director/production manager: Brook Poplawski Creative consultant: Christy Tuttle Bauhs Contributors John Anderson, Marge Beaver, Chris Caswell, Mark Corke, Jeanne Craig, Mike Harris, Roger McAfee, Zuzana Prochazka, Jacqui Ronan, Travis Staton, Mark Stevens, Tom Sturtevan, Colleen H. Troupis, Dave Wallace, Dick Withington

Roland, as some might recall, is a retired airline pilot. He’s also served two tours of duty in the U.S. Coast Guard and one in the U.S. Air Force. One thing Roland isn’t short on is opinions, and he’s got strong ones when it comes to the idea that birds nests are more important than the safety of boaters all over the Great Lakes, or the Coast Guard’s right to do its job protecting and serving seafaring folks by maintaining these valuable markers. The DNR and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at the state and federal levels have created a situation that could prove disastrous up north on the St. Marys, where traffic consists of 1,000-foot tankers. A dark marker buoy could cause the next Exxon Valdez. Last month, we listed NW Explorations as a Pacific Northwest charter company with bareboats available out of Bellingham, Washington. What we neglected to mention is the fact that they are the only authorized Grand Banks charterer in the world. Each May, they lead a guided flotilla from Bellingham to Alaska’s Inside Passage and north to Ketchican. This trip is one of the greatest adventures a boater can experience! Read all about it on page 42. It’s February, and Old Man Winter’s here in full force. But sit back, relax and let us take you on an exciting journey. PS: Remember, giving is always in season. If you’re looking to donate to a worthy cause—fighting pancreatic cancer—visit cruiseforcure.org and check out the “E-Shop” page. All proceeds go to finding a cure for this horrible disease.

business staff Associate publisher: David Leli Eastern advertising representative: Mark Conway Regional and classified sales manager: Kirsten Moxley Marketing director: Linda O’Meara Circulation director: Sharon P. O’Meara editorial & advertising offiCe 727 South Dearborn | Suite 812 | Chicago, IL 60605 phone: 312-276-0610 | fax: 312-276-0619 email: staff@lakelandboating.com website: lakelandboating.com Classified advertising 727 South Dearborn | Suite 812 | Chicago, IL 60605 phone 800-331-0132, ext. 21 | fax 312-276-0619 subsCriPtions P.O. Box 15396 | North Hollywood | CA 91615-5396 Customer Service: 800-827-0289 O’Meara-Brown Publications, Inc. Walter B. O’Meara, president Timothy Murtaugh, secretary Tracy Houren, controller Lakeland Boating (ISSN 0744-9194), copyright 2011, is published eleven times per year (except November) by O’Meara-Brown Publications, Inc. Editorial and advertising offices are located at 727 S. Dearborn St., Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605; 312-2760610. Annual subscription rates: United States, $24.95 per year; International and Canadian, $36.95 per year (11 issues), includes 7% G.S.T. tax (G.S.T. registration number 894095074-RT0001) and $12 postage included. Single copies are $4.99 for U.S. and Canada. Only U.S. funds are accepted. Subscription correspondence should be addressed to Lakeland Boating, P.O. Box 15396, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5396 (U.S.), or call 800-827-0289. Known office of publication: 727 South Dearborn Street, Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER, please send all address changes to Lakeland Boating, P.O. Box 15396, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5396. Lakeland Boating is a registered trademark of O’Meara-Brown Publications, Inc., Chicago, Illinois. Published as Lakeland Yachting 1946-1955. Unsolicited work may be submitted at the author’s, photographer’s or artist’s own risk. Lakeland Boating assumes no responsibility or liability for unsolicited material. All submissions must be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope with sufficient return postage.

Printed in the U.S.A


mail call

Don’t be Fueled

Gerry Tann (Kathy’s husband) and grandson Aiden cruise Lake Erie aboard the family boat, a Sea Ray dubbed Avatar.

The Tann family WON A FREE boat makeover!

Something to say? We love hearing from you! E-mail us at staff@lakelandboating.com, or drop us a line at Lakeland Boating, 727 South Dearborn, Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605. The opinions expressed in Mail Call are not necessarily those of Lakeland Boating. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

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Makeover Winner! To understand why our boat, Avatar, deserves a makeover, you must first understand how we think of her. Like all beloved boats, Avatar is our partner in boating, as well as a statement about our commitment to the boating lifestyle. Because she entertains and protects us while we are on the water, we pay close attention to every point of nautical safety and maintenance. Her reliability is a source of pride to us, but perhaps we may have overlooked her freshness somewhat and taken her appearance for granted. Like all babies, when she was new to us we thought her gorgeous. A decade has passed since then, and we still think of her as young and perfect. But perhaps, like anyone special, she needs to be appreciated, not taken for granted. Perhaps a lovely gift to say thank you is in order—and will certainly go a long way towards protecting our floating asset. Whenever we come aboard Avatar, we see her with prejudiced eyes because we just love her; but we are admiring her bone structure and her gleaming appointments. She has everything imaginable for our enjoyment, all the bells and whistles, but perhaps we have taken her style for granted. By refreshing Avatar with a makeover, we would renew our enjoyment of the boating experience. New color and finishing touches would say a lot about our future intentions to enjoy her. Our time aboard Avatar is a personal treasure; truly an ongoing relationship between us and our vessel. Like all relationships, it takes work to grow and continue the pleasure. No “taking for granted” here! Bring on the shiny, the new, the style, the fun—because this lady deserves it. Giving her our devoted attention promises our family and friends that the good times aboard Avatar will continue for a very long time. Good times make memories, and that’s what Avatar is all about. She deserves the best we can give her.

As long-time supporters of Lakeland Boating, we enjoy reading your magazine and appreciate your efforts to keep the Great Lakes boating community informed and entertained. We were pleased to see “Marina Watch” in the 2010 November/December issue (p. 58) spotlighting Jefferson Beach; however, we would like to make a correction to the article and point out that the marina’s fuel dock does offer low sulfur diesel fuel, in addition to mid-grade gasoline. We take pride in this, because it’s part of our ongoing strategy to improve the facility every year in the off season. The fuel dock was no exception. It received extensive upgrades, including a new seawall, tanks and high-speed fuel dispensers. We’re looking forward to spring when we can display the newly renovated G Dock. Similar to last year’s H Dock renovation, G Dock will feature a new concrete aggregate surface with decorative landscaping, new power pedestals, new docks and more. In the meantime, we hope to see you at the 2011 Detroit Boat Show! Semo Post General Mgr., Jefferson Beach Marina St. Clair Shores, MI

Calendar for the Cure Help find a cure for pancreatic cancer by donating to the cause! Order a 2011 “Cruising for the Cure” calendar, and net proceeds go to the Jane H. Thie Memorial Fund Inc., benefitting the Barbara Ann Karmanos Center Institute. Get one today for $17.75 ($20.30 priority shipped). Commemorative posters also are available for $18.25 each ($21.55 priority shipped). cruiseforcure.org — LB

Kathy Tann Columbus, OH LB: Congratulations, Kathy! In the October 2010 issue of Lakeland Boating, we asked readers, in 500 words or less, to tell us why they deserved to win a makeover for their boat, which included a design consultation, new sheets and towels courtesy of Walker Custom Linens and On Board Design, as well as a complementary three-night stay at CenterPointe Marina in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. Kathy’s entry (published above) was the winner. Congrats again! PHOTO COURTESY OF KATHY TANN (TOP)


scuttlebutt

Making Waves

ON THE

AIR Great Lakes boating radio talk show gets a boost.

E

BY H EATH E R STE I N B E RG E R

arly last year, Ohio-based marine industry professional Rick Lucas launched the Great Lakes’ first and only boating-focused radio talk show on Port Clinton’s radio station WPCR. Titled “Yacht-sa Talk,” the program generated so much interest that Lucas has revamped the format to better accommodate his listeners. Rather than simply showcasing industry experts, “Yacht-sa Talk” is now dedicated to answering boaters’ questions. Lucas said he receives 40 to 60 e-mails per week. “We’ve got about 6,000 listeners, so we’ve built a good following,” he said. “With the new format, our listeners get a much greater, more detailed response to their questions.” Lucas noted that he often answers multiple questions in one show. “Lots of questions are somewhat repetitious,” he explained. “Most boaters are concerned with the same issues, such as purchasing, surveying, maintenance and repair. Our approach to answering one little question might actually end up answering several.” The best part: You don’t have to live in northern Ohio to catch the show. “Yacht-sa Talk” is available through the WPCR website; simply visit portclintonradio.com and click on “Programs On Demand.” Lucas said he’s often blown away by the response to “Yacht-sa Talk,” which has taken on a life of its own in one short year. “It’s been extremely well received, so I’m really excited,” he commented. “And it’s going to evolve—I’d really love to do a live call-in show, so I’m exploring my options to make that happen.” Boaters may e-mail their boating-related questions directly to Lucas at castawayyachts@aol.com. The one-hour show airs year-round Sundays at 9 a.m. ET on WPCR and can be accessed anytime at portclintonradio.com. 7 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


scuttlebutt

Operation Summaries From the 9th District U.S. Coast Guard 10/27 Search for Missing Crewman Lake Ontario USCG rescue crews searched for a missing crewmember from a Canadian-flagged 710-foot freighter transiting Lake Ontario October 20, 2010. The crew of the Canadian Provider contacted USCG at about 13:30 and reported the Nova Scotian crewmember, Gary Charlton, 59, missing. Coast Guard rescue crews aboard a 47-foot MLB from Stations Oswego and Rochester, New York, a 25-foot RB-S from Station Alexandria Bay, New York, an HH-65 Dolphin rescue helo from A/S Detroit, and an HU-25 Guardian fixed-wing aircraft from A/S Cape Cod, Massachusetts, searched for Charlton. Also aiding in the search were CCG crews aboard a C-130 long-range surveillance plane and a rescue helo from JRCC Trenton, Ontario, and four search and rescue vessels. case pends

representatives from the u.S. Coast Guard and Chicago’s Christmas Tree Ship Committee present a donated Christmas tree to a family representing those that received the more than 1,200 trees the u.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw delivered to Navy Pier December 4, 2010.

10/28 Man Medevaced Beaver Island A USCG helo crew from A/S Traverse City, Michigan, medevaced a 54-year-old man who reportedly crashed his car on Beaver Island. Injured is Gordon Heikka, hometown unknown. The Traverse City aircrew was preparing to return to the A/S in their HH-65 Dolphin rescue helo after responding to another incident near Keweenaw, Michigan, when they were diverted to medevac Heikka. Heikka was reportedly in stable condition, but first responders didn’t know the full extent of his injuries and wanted him to be evaluated at a hospital. There isn’t a hospital on Beaver Island, so the aircrew brought Heikka to A/S Traverse City, where EMS was OS to transfer him to a local hospital. case closed 10/28 Man Rescued After Capsizing Lake Erie A USCG boat crew from Station Erie, Pennsylvania, rescued a 26-year-old Pittsburgh man after his kayak capsized in Presque Isle Bay in Lake Erie. Coast Guardsmen from Station Erie learned of the accident at about 08:30, immediately dispatching a rescue crew aboard a 47-foot MLB. The crew arrived OS about 10 minutes later. When the USCG crew arrived, they found the man clinging to his overturned kayak, which was tied off to the kayak of

8 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011

an accompanying friend. The man was not wearing a life jacket, and the hip waders he was wearing were filled with water, which added substantial weight and made it impossible for his friend to pull him out of the water. Once the his hip waders were removed and the man was brought aboard the MLB, the crew transported him, in stable condition but showing signs of hypothermia to Dobbins Landing. EMS was waiting to take him to a local hospital for further treatment. case closed 10/28 Cheboygan Man Sentenced Lake huron A Cheboygan, Michigan, mariner has been sentenced to 50 months in custody as a result of having been found guilty on charges related to the sinking of a boat and polluting the water. Wayne T. Duffiney, 60, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Thomas L. Ludington and ordered to pay $57,308.05 in restitution to USCG. Duffiney was convicted by a federal jury in April 2009 on three of four charges stemming from his conduct May 14 through 17, 2007. He was convicted of violating the federal Clean Water Act by discharging pollutants into the navigable waters of the United States; sinking or causing the sinking of the Misty Morning in the navigable channels of Lake Huron; and failing to mark the sunken vessel with navigation aids after it sunk in the navigation channel of Lake Huron. Duffiney was acquitted on the charge that alleged he willfully caused destruction of Misty Morning in the territorial waters of the United States. The initial criminal case was investigated by CGS Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, CGIS, and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. case closed r OpSums Legend A/S .................................................................................... Air Station CCG ........................................................Canadian Coast Guard CGIS...................................Coast Guard Investigative Service CGS...............................................................Coast Guard Sector EMS ..............................................Emergency Medical Services EMT.......................................... Emergency Medical Technician helo......................................................................................helicopter JRCC ..................................Joint Rescue Coordination Center medevaced .................................................. medically evacuated MLB......................................................................... Motor Life Boat OS ........................................................................................on scene RB-S ......................................................... Response Boat—Small USCG ............................................................... U.S. Coast Guard

PhOTO By PO3 GEOrGE DEGENEr


scuttlebutt

Calendar of Events february 4 – 6 Rochester Boat Show Rochester, NY | rochesterboatshow.com

february 16 – 20 Central New York Boat Show and Sale Syracuse, NY | cnyboatshow.com

february 10 – 13 Columbus Sports, Vacation & Boat Show Columbus, OH | hartproductions.com

Duluth Boat, Sport & Travel Show Duluth, MN | shamrockprod.com

LaCrosse Boat, Sport & Travel Show La Crosse, WI | shamrockprod.com Fort Wayne Boat Show & Sale Fort Wayne, IN | fortwayneboatshow.com february 11 – 13 Sportsmen’s Boat, Camping & Vacation Show St. Cloud, MN | cenaiko.com february 12 – 20 Detroit Boat Show Detroit, MI | detroitboatshow.net

Grand Rapids Boat Show Grand Rapids, MI | showspan.com/grb february 17 – 20 WBAY Boat Show Green Bay, WI | 920-438-3270 february 17 – 21 Miami International Boat Show Miami Beach, FL | miamiboatshow.com february 18 – 20 Dayton Boat Super Show Vandalia, OH vexpo.net/boat_shows/Dayton

february 18 – 27 Indianapolis Boat, Sport & Travel Show Indianapolis, IN indianapolisboatsportandtravelshow.com february 24 – 27 Ottawa Boat & Sportsmen’s Show Ottawa, ONT | ottawaboatandsportshow.ca Outdoorama Novi, MI | showspan.com/out february 25 – 27 Cleveland Boat Super Show Cleveland, OH rvexpo.net/boat_shows/Cleveland London Boat, Fishing & Leisure Show London, ONT | boatcottagefishingshow.com Petoskey Boat, Camp & RV Show Petoskey, MI | petoskeyboatshow.com

9 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


scuttlebutt

One of a Kind remembering Bay Breeze’s John Kraft. by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

C

onsumers often wax poetic about the good old days, the days when a business deal could be sealed with a handshake and a smile. When we do come across a contemporary professional who believes in real relationships, offers value-added service and takes tremendous pleasure in the work, we know we need to treasure that rare and special connection. Which is why the Great Lakes boating community suffered a great loss last October, when John Howard Kraft, 69, of Traverse City, Michigan, crossed the bar. Widely known and respected for his integrity, loyalty and finely developed sense of fun, Kraft owned and operated Traverse City-based Bay Breeze Yacht Sales with his son, Jay. A Michigan native, John was born in Pontiac, went to school in Redford Township and earned his teaching degree, with a minor in biology, at Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant. After graduation, he returned to Redford Township to teach biology at the local high school. Although John moved his family to California so he could take a sales job with Market Forge, he and his wife, Sandy, eventually decided to return to their roots. They and their three children—Jay, Korenne and Adam—moved back to Michigan, where Traverse City became home. “My dad was a water guy,” Jay said. “My greatgrandparents owned a family cottage at Houghton Lake, and in my childhood I was exposed to sailing prams, fishing, things like that.”

Long for the water

John Kraft (pictured standing) did business with a handshake and a smile. He believed in long-term relationships with his customers.

10 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011

Despite his love of the water, John Kraft’s career path was land-based for many years. He founded Silcraft Corporation in 1980, focusing on filling a need in the long-term and assisted-living industries. He oversaw and managed Silcraft for nearly two decades; then, in 1997, he sold it to Invacare Corporation and embarked on the next chapter in his life: Retirement. PhOTO COurTEsy Of ThE KrAfT fAMILy


scuttlebutt

“After he sold the company, he and my mom traveled extensively,” Jay said. “But he got tired of living out of a suitcase, and he also realized that a condo in Florida wasn’t for him.” Then his son came to him with an opportunity. “I’d worked for Bay Breeze Yacht Charters after high school and through college, part and full time, off and on,” Jay explained. “I really took to sailing and knew that I had to work in the industry. “When the previous owner was burned out after 30 years in the business, I figured this might be something for us,” he continued. “I knew the company and knew what it was all about. I also figured it would be fun, which was always part of our family philosophy. So I approached Dad.” John and Jay Kraft officially purchased Bay Breeze Yacht Charters on April 15, 2000. And they dove into the business headfirst. “Roles just didn’t apply, it was so fast-paced,” Jay recalled. “We did everything together, from accounting to the new website. It was cross-training! My dad was so personable, so friendly, he was into building the relationships—but he really did it all.”

In spring 2008, the Krafts decided to sell their charter fleet and become a strictly sales operation. Jay said it was inevitable, especially since the charter side of the business was so time-intensive. “You’re basically running a hotel, but the rooms untie and head off!” he observed, chuckling. “We were working seven days a week, 50 to 60 hours per week. “It was time,” he said. “We needed some semblance of a reasonable schedule, plus sales was my dad’s passion. He thrived on it. He loved providing what people were looking for to make a lifestyle change.” Because John truly reveled in growing a business, seeing it mature and become successful, it came as no surprise that the life of a typical retiree didn’t appeal to him. “He didn’t want the condo, the pool, the game of golf,” Jay commented. With a laugh, he added, “Come to think of it, his golf game wasn’t all that good. Maybe that was it!” How should John Kraft be remembered? “Dad was classic old school,” he son said simply. “He was an old-fashioned, make-the-call, make-the-sale, handshake kind of guy. He was a no bull**** person, and people liked that. He had integrity, and he believed that work should be fun. “They don’t make them like that anymore.” r

Building the business While John and Sandy preferred trawlers to sailboats, Jay noted his dad embraced the charter portion of their business. “My dad, brother and I all went on a charter trip to the Caribbean in the first couple of years with the business,” Jay said. “Dad was always interested in how our Caribbean counterparts worked, how we could make our business better.” As a result of their research, the Krafts decided to get aggressive with their American Sailing Association (ASA) sailing school program. Bay Breeze won School of the Year for its region in 2004. “Dad knew we had to get people hooked on sailing, and then they could grow with us before moving on,” Jay said. “So we did something new: Students would be in school with us for four days, then we’d let them take the boat on their own for three days. “Sailing is one thing, and confidence is something else,” he added. “It would be worse to let them go home than it would be to let them take the boat. After that three-day opportunity, customers go home saying, ‘That was the best sailing experience of my life!’ That’s so important.” The Krafts steadily built their business, founding Bay Breeze Yacht Sales in 2002. They took on the Nordic Tug line; with a Nordic Tug 32, they created a trawler version of their popular charter school. “We started the trawler school in 2004, and it was great because there’s such a crossover between sailors and trawler boaters,” Jay recalled. 11 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


gear guru

For the Thrill of it

Great gear for adventure-seeking boaters. by z uzana prochaz ka

So you’re headed off on a boating adventure. Make sure you grab these handy essentials before heading out so you can stay safe—and even record all the fun you’re having!

<

sTANley Dip It, Drop It, Dunk It Spotlight

Here’s a durable light to keep at the helm, especially when traveling at night. The Dip It, Drop It, Dunk It Ultra Bright Spotlight by Stanley may be a mouthful of a name, but it’s actually a compact and durable light that really takes to the harsh boating environment. This 5-watt LED light is submersible to six feet, and since it delivers up to 200 lumens, it’s twice as bright as other LED spotlights. The Stanley light has a 7.2 volt NiMH battery built in, so it’s rechargeable. It will run up to 10 hours on a single charge. AC and DC cords are included, so you can charge at home, on the boat or in your car. A rubber handle provides a comfortable, non-slip grip and a high/low dimmer control extends runtime. The best part: It floats—face up. Even if your light goes overboard, you won’t lose it to the murky depths. Retail price is $59.99. stanleytools.com

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OCeANView TeCHNOlOgies Titan Digital Binocular

There are a number of night-vision products on the market, but here’s one with a twist; two twists, actually. First, the Titan Digital Binocular let’s you survey surroundings from the privacy of your helm station, as this camera/binocular combo can see through glass and isinglass. It even has a removable infrared illuminator that makes images discernible in total darkness, up to 1,600 feet away. Second, unlike some thermal scopes, you can use both eyes with the Titan, which effectively reduces fatigue. The Titan works in sunlight or near a bright light source at night. Images are displayed on the device’s 2.5-inch LCD screen or may be recorded and input to DVR. The Titan runs for approximately four hours and is rechargeable via AC or DC sources. It is available in 8x, 11x and variable magnification models. The Titan Digital Binocular retails for $2,800. n ig htboati ng . com

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ZUZANA PROCHAZKA is a U.S. Coast Guard 100 Ton Master with 20 years boating experience. Her work has appeared in numerous national boating magazines, and she authors a popular gear and boat review blog, TalkOfTheDock.com. 12 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011

CisCO Flip Video Camera

For video on the go, reach for the Flip by Cisco. It’s so simple to use, I set it up, took video and posted it to YouTube in a matter of minutes. The latest model is the UltraHD, which shoots in HD quality and features FlipShare software capabilities compatible with Macs and PCs. The 8GB version shoots 720p resolution, takes two hours of video and retails for $200. There’s also a 4GB version that shoots for an hour and sells for $150. It weighs six ounces and comes with a handy pop-out USB arm, so you don’t need cables; plug it directly into your computer to download clips. The Flip only shoots video (no stills) and has no memory card slot. It comes with a set of rechargeable NiMH AA batteries. th e fli p . com


electronics

The 411 on VHF Radios

New models designed to save lives; must monitor distress channel. by rog e r mcafe e

T

he days of putting a VHF marine radio on your boat for a hundred bucks are coming to an end, but more expensive replacements will deliver even more value—and probably help save more lives. As of May 2011, marine VHF radio manufacturers will no longer be allowed to import or sell single-channel, fixed-base receivers to the North American market. The new generation of radios must have a second receiver to monitor Channel 70, the Digital Select Calling (DSC) broadcast channel. Officials hope this move will increase the likelihood that boaters will pick up a DSC distress call. Standard Horizon Standard Horizon has gone farther than many other VHF manufacturers with technology that implements these changes. In fact, Standard Horizon’s Matrix GX2150 won the 2010 Technology Award at the National Marine Electronic Association’s October 2010 Conference in Seattle. The award singles out a new marine electronics product that advances technology and also takes into account innovation, boater benefits, practicality and value. The GX2150 has dual channels, but it also features a built-in dual channel Automatic Identification System (AIS) receiver. With a touch of the dedicated AIS key, this radio will display, on its LCD screen, the information of any vessel with an AIS transponder that’s within range. Plus, when connected to an external GPS, the radio’s DSC emergency calling feature will transmit a digital MAYDAY, including the vessel’s ID number, exact longitude and latitude, and time of the call. With the external GPS, the GX2150 will store up to100 waypoints a boater can select by using the radio’s navigation compass display. This unit can do it all with one antenna, whereas independent AIS units require a second antenna or a switch that allows the boater to use either the radio or the AIS. The unit carries a three-year warranty, and suggested retail price is $399. STANDARDHORIZON.COM Icom Another well-known and respected name in the marine VHF market, Icom, also recently introduced a new VHF model, the IC-M412. This two-channel radio has a menu-driven DSC cutout, which allows the user to turn off the automatic channel switch-over that occurs when a DSC call is received.

Both the radio and the microphone have IPX7 submersible protection, a large, easy-to-read LCD, a built-in Class D DSC, and a solid, rugged case. Its GPS/ Nav interface allows it to show current position and time on its display when connected to an external GPS receiver. Plus, when receiving position information from another vessel, the IC-M412 can transfer it to a navigational device via NMEA 0183 connectivity. Icom’s newest unit also features the AquaQuake function, which blows water away from the speaker grill, ensuring good reception even if the radio gets drenched. Suggested retail price is $199. ICOMAMERICA.COM Hand-held VHF Both Icom and Standard Horizon introduced updates to their hand-held, floating VHF. ICOM has equipped the new

IC-M72 with its AquaQuake function speaker and upped its submersible rating to IPX8, 4.9 feet for 30 minutes. Standard Horizon equipped its new HX751 with luminescent, glow-in-the-dark gasketing and a water-activated strobe light. This new technology has made VHF radios even more convenient than they have been in the past. A properly operating VHF radio has always been one of the best safety features a boater can have. The new radios, with their added safety features, make boating even safer. r 13 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011


corke board

Tool Time

Assemble a solid toolkit on board. BY MAR K COR KE

C

arrying a few tools on board is a great idea. Even if you have a boatyard do the lion’s share of maintenance tasks, things can still go awry at sea. A kit of well-chosen tools can definitely save the day. I assembled a toolkit that handles most routine maintenance tasks and emergencies. Needs vary from boater to boater, but these tools work well for me—and have gotten me out of a jam more than once! Remember: You get what you pay for. Cheap tools often yield disappointing results, so buy the best you can afford. Here are my suggestions:

■ Drill bits A selection from 1/32- to 1/4-inch will cover

almost all drilling. ■ Socket wrench & sockets One to fit every nut

and bolt on the boat. Add a plug socket if you have a gas engine. ■ Multi-meter For electrical and fault tracing. ■ Pencil Handy with the measuring tape for marking. ■ Screwdrivers A selection of Philips and straight

blades in various sizes and lengths. ■ Putty knife Scrapes up excess bedding compound

and the like. ■ Pliers You’ll need these to take a water pump apart.

■ WD-40 So useful, I classify it as a

■ Rigging knife Best thing for cutting lines.

tool. Lubricates and frees corroded and frozen parts.

■ Adjustable wrench A personal favorite. Made from

■ Duct tape Strong and easy to tear.

high-grade stainless steel, mine not only loosens nuts and bolts, but also has a shackle key (for my sails) and bottle opener in the handle.

Useful for temporary repairs. ■ Plastic insulation tape Insulates chafed electrical

connections. Can be wrapped around turnbuckles and other fixtures and fittings. ■ Tape measure You never know when you’ll need

to measure something—twice, before cutting once. ■ Hand drill Requires no batteries and takes drill bits

up to 3/8-inch in diameter. ■ Matches Melt the cut ends of synthetic line and

rope to prevent fraying. ■ Hacksaw Use to cut metal, fiberglass and wood.

■ Crimping tool A crimping tool cuts and strips wire

and crimps new terminals onto cable ends. ■ Wood chisel Will need sharpening if you use it for

fiberglass. ■ Extending magnet The perfect tool for retrieving

fittings from inaccessible places. ■ Needle-nosed pliers To hold small parts; built-in

cutters will cut seizing wire and small cable. ■ Allen keys The only tool that will easily undo socket head screws. 

■ Hammer Brings things together and gets them apart. ■ Vise grips Useful as a portable, small vise and

adjustable wrench in a pinch. ■ Mirror on a stick For locating errant components

that fall into the bilge or get lost. ■ Multi-tool Wear on your belt for a handy knife,

pliers and bottle opener. ■ File Mine is double-sided; one side is a metal file

Mark Corke is an accomplished journalist, author and sailor and creator of the popular blog onboardwithmarkcorke.com, focusing on various DIY boating projects.

and the other is a rasp for wood and fiberglass. 14 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

PHOTO BY MARK CORKE


boat spotlight

Four Winns V305

Creative juices overrun-eth on this 30-footer. by j ean n e craig

F

or decades, Four Winns has been hard at work creating models for the midsize express cruiser category. This segment of the market is highly competitive, and I would imagine the engineering team has struggled with its share of designer’s block over the years. After all, it has to be more than a head-scratching, pencil-tapping challenge to continually dream up innovative ways to improve a weekender for an active family. Fortunately for those clans that love to cast off lines for a few nights away from home, the team at Four Winns is having a productive year. The creative juices are flowing, as is evidenced by the brand-new V305. The V305 will be available in two versions for the 2011 model year. The first version made its debut at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show in October 2010 and then exhibited in Paris a few weeks later, where this sterndrive-powered addition to the company’s V-series met with good reviews. Among the well-received features was the windshield. “You can’t miss it,” says Christophe Lavigne, vice president of engineering for Four Winns. Rising a full 43 inches above the console, it has to be the tallest windshield in its class. “We’re very proud of it,” Lavigne continues, “because it offers fantastic protection from wind and seas, and with it, you have much less canvas to deal with.” That benefit alone could lure a number of boat owners to this model—namely those who are tired of struggling with too many pieces of fabric each time they want to enclose

PHOTO COurTEsy Of fOur WINNs

the bridge on a cool or wet day. On the 305, you only have to add a canvas section between the frame of the windshield and the T-top. The rear of the cockpit can be enclosed with another piece of canvas that attaches to supports on the top. All told, the system eliminates most bows and a good deal of loose, rattling hardware. The second version of the V305, to debut in early 2011, will have a more traditional, lower-slung windshield and an extended hardtop.

Specifications

Cool and comfortable Cold and rain are good reasons to put up canvas, but so are heat and humidity. On the V305, you can enclose the bridge and then turn on the air conditioning that vents at the helm. Climate-controlled cockpits have been showing up on larger boats in recent years; it’s nice to see this feature on a model that’s just over 30 feet. Of course, some people prefer to stay cool with a fresh sea breeze. That group will like the way the gap between the windshield and hardtop draws in just enough wind. Another interesting feature on the V305 is the uncommonly roomy cabin. You’ll stand at the foot of the U-shaped lounge and wonder how the builder managed to make the space feel so livable. “It’s very beamy, very large,” says Lavigne. “We did some unique things with the hull shape and fiberglass liner to create the extra space. Plus, because this boat has a high sheer we were able to install big windows that brighten the area and make for great views.”

fourwinns.com

LOA: 30'5" Beam: 10'2" Draft (engine down): 40" Weight: 10,560 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 120 gals. Power: Twin 4.3-liter Volvo Penta 225-hp GXi/DP gas sterndrives Price: $172,692

15 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r Y 2 011


boat spotlight

NAmE GAmE

ALLELUIA Christians by faith and classical musicians by profession, our 30-foot Bayliner’s name, Alleluia, resonates in both disciplines. It has generated many warm conversations and lasting friendships. Don and Suzi Grosz Webster, NY

The V305’s incredibly roomy interior is courtesy of Four Winns’ unique adjustments to the boat’s hull shape and fiberglass liner. These structural modifications helped create the additional living space. High windows and big sheer add to the spacious appeal.

16 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011

The views can be enjoyed from the lounge, which converts to a berth, as well as from the berth set above and forward of this lounge. There’s more to the accommodations, though. The V305 also has an aft cabin with a queen-size berth, which is not easy to find in a 30-footer. As you would expect, the headroom is low, but the space is made comfortable with air conditioning, lighting and a flat-screen TV. In addition, the mattress is sized for standard bedding, so you can buy sheets and pillows at Bed, Bath and Beyond. There’s one more detail that makes this cabin so roomy: There’s no galley. This is a breakthrough concept for Four Winns. To carve out more living space inside, the builder moved the cooking amenities out to the cockpit. In the cabin, then, is what the company calls a “breakfast center.” “If you’re like me, when you wake up all you want is to wash your face and have a cup of coffee,” says Lavigne. “My kids, like most kids, just want cereal. So here we have a small sink, refrigerator, microwave and coffeemaker. It’s very compact.” To prepare a serious meal, head to the cockpit, where there’s a cook top, sink, fridge and electric grill along the port side. By moving the galley outside, Four Winns creates a pleasant cooking experience for the owners, who can prepare fish to their hearts content in an open-air space. From this “summer galley,” it’s easy to serve guests seated at the cockpit lounge with table. The lounge, by the way, quickly and easily converts to a huge sunpad. From the smart-looking helm, the driver takes control of twin engines. The V305 is offered with gas or diesel power, from Volvo Penta or MerCruiser. Base power is a pair of 220-hp gas sterndrives. Trade up to the twin 5.0-liter Volvos and the boat will kiss 43 mph at top end. That’s a nice, brisk pace for a family cruiser; certainly one that could get the creative juices flowing for anyone. r

CJ’s CAB My son, Jared, came up with the name, which stands for: Carol (C); Jared (J); Celia (C); Austin (A); and Bill (B). William and Carol Modell Mt. Sinai, NY

LA PETIT This is a 1956 Chris-Craft, completely restored in 2007. Charles David Sandusky, OH PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE / PHOTO CREDIT MARY SMITH / PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE


convertible & motoryacht roundup

The Beautiful Life NOW THIS IS THE LIFE! Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re

looking to explore exciting new ports around the Great Lakes or hang around your home waters with friends and family, enjoying good food, good conversation and a beautiful sunset, the following collection of convertibles and motoryachts will get you there in style and comfort. 17 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


convertible & motoryacht roundup

Azimut 58 Flybridge

Bertram 540

Cabo 44 Hardtop Express

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 58'8" Beam ................................................................................................................... 16'3" Draft .......................................................................................................................4'6" Weight ................................................................................................................... N/A Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................740 gals. Base power ........................................................................ Twin MAN R6 800-hp Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website ........................................................................................azimutyachts.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 51'7" Beam .................................................................................................................17'10" Draft .......................................................................................................................5'2" Weight .....................................................................................................83,737 lbs. Fuel capacity .......................................................................................... 1,524 gals. Base power .................................................................. Twin CAT C-32 1676-hp Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website ................................................................................................. bertram.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 47'7" Beam ................................................................................................................... 16'6" Draft .......................................................................................................................3'7" Weight .....................................................................................................43,500 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................800 gals. Base power ......................................................................Twin QSM-11s 715-hp Base price ................................................................................................ $949,000 Website .......................................................................................... caboyachts.com

Carver 44 Sojourn

Egg Harbor 43 Sport Yacht

Hatteras GT 54

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 44'4" Beam .................................................................................................................13'11" Draft ........................................................................................................................46" Weight .....................................................................................................30,800 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................412 gals. Max power ................................................................... Crusader 8.1 MPI 385-hp Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website ........................................................................................carveryachts.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 45'8" Beam ....................................................................................................................... 15' Draft .......................................................................................................................3'6" Weight .....................................................................................................38,500 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................650 gals. Base power .......................................................................................................... N/A Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website ................................................................................ eggharboryachts.com

LOA ...................................................................................................................53'10" Beam ................................................................................................................... 17'3" Draft .......................................................................................................................4'2" Weight .....................................................................................................75,000 lbs. Fuel capacity .......................................................................................... 1,200 gals. Base power ................................................. Twin CAT C-18A diesels 1150-hp Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website ........................................................................... hatterasyachts.com.com

Hatteras GT 63

Maritimo 440 Offshore Convertible

Marquis 420 Sport Bridge

LOA ...................................................................................................................63'10" Beam ....................................................................................................................... 20' Draft ...........................................................................................................................5' Weight .................................................................................................. 101,000 lbs. Fuel capacity .......................................................................................... 1,930 gals. Base power ................................................. Twin CAT C-32A diesels 1600-hp Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website .................................................................................... hatterasyachts.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 48'7" Beam ................................................................................................................... 15'4" Draft .......................................................................................................................3'7" Weight ........................................................................................................ 15.9 tons Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................476 gals. Base power ................................................. Twin Volvo Penta IPS 600 435-hp Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website .......................................................................................... maritimo.com.au

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 43'7" Beam .................................................................................................................13'11" Draft ........................................................................................................................43" Weight .....................................................................................................32,000 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................300 gals. Base power ................................................... Volvo Penta IPS 550 gas 400-hp Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website .....................................................................................marquisyachts.com

18 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011


convertible & motoryacht roundup

Meridian 541 Sedan

Ovation 52

Riviera 45 Open Flybridge

LOA ...................................................................................................................53'10" Beam ................................................................................................................... 15'6" Draft ........................................................................................................................49" Weight .....................................................................................................52,000 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................634 gals. Base power ..................................................Twin QSC8.3-600 w/ Zeus drives Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website .................................................................................. meridian-yachts.com

LOA ......................................................................................................................... 52' Beam ................................................................................................................... 16'4" Draft ........................................................................................................................48" Weight .....................................................................................................52,000 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................200 gals. Base power ....................................................Triple Volvo D-6 IPS 600 435-hp Base price .............................................................................................$1,361,628 Website ...................................................................................... ovationyachts.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 51'3" Beam ................................................................................................................... 15'9" Draft .................................................................................................................... 3'11" Weight .....................................................................................................39,400 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................608 gals. Base power ..................................................................... Twin Caterpillar 575-hp Base price ................................................................................................ $949,000 Website ............................................................................................... riviera.com.au

Riviera 51 Enclosed Flybridge

Riviera 5000 Sport Yacht

Riviera 61 Enclosed Flybridge

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 58'2" Beam ................................................................................................................... 16'2" Draft .......................................................................................................................4'6" Weight .....................................................................................................48,060 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................978 gals. Base power ..................................................................... Twin Caterpillar 715-hp Base price .............................................................................................$1,440,000 Website ............................................................................................... riviera.com.au

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 54'9" Beam ................................................................................................................... 15'7" Draft .......................................................................................................................4'1" Weight .....................................................................................................40,800 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................634 gals. Base power ................................................................................Twin CAT 575-hp Base price ................................................................................................ $954,000 Website ............................................................................................... riviera.com.au

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 64'5" Beam ................................................................................................................... 17'9" Draft .......................................................................................................................5'2" Weight .....................................................................................................67,200 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................264 gals. Base power ...................................................................Twin Caterpillar 1015-hp Base price .............................................................................................$1,990,000 Website ............................................................................................... riviera.com.au

Sea Ray 450 Sedan Bridge

Silverton 36 Convertible

Viking 42 Convertible

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 45'6" Beam ................................................................................................................... 14'5" Draft ........................................................................................................................48" Weight ................................................................................................................... N/A Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................375 gals. Base power ......................... Cummins MerCruiser QSB 480 diesel w/ Zeus Base price ........................................................................................Contact dealer Website .......................................................................................... searay.com.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 37'7" Beam .................................................................................................................13'10" Draft ........................................................................................................................39" Weight .....................................................................................................18,550 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................286 gals. Base power ................................................................Twin 6.0 Crusader 375-hp Base price ................................................................................................ $294,660 Website ................................................................................................ silverton.com

LOA ..................................................................................................................... 42'7" Beam ....................................................................................................................... 15' Draft .......................................................................................................................3'7" Weight .....................................................................................................35,999 lbs. Fuel capacity ..............................................................................................525 gals. Base power .......................................... Twin Cummins 480-hp w/ Zeus drives Base price ................................................................................................ $993,000 Website .........................................................................................vikingyachts.com 19 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


the chandlery

foul-weather friends In good times and in bad, count on this gear to support all your on-water adventures!

20 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE / PHOTO CREDIT MARY SMITH / PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE


the chandlery JUST BAG IT > No boater wants to entertain the worst case-scenario: Going overboard. But good preparation is key to survival. ACR’s Rapid Ditch Bag holds all the equipment necessary to abandon ship in an emergency. It’s constructed of water resistant, rugged fabric and closed-cell foam for buoyancy. Lots of pockets make gear easily accessible, especially GPS and EPIRB for quick activation. $81.99 DEFENDER.COM

>

DRY DIGITS

Wet, cold hands can hamper any on-water adventure. This pair of Offshore Gloves from Gill feature a waterproof membrane for exceptional warmth and durability. Proton-Ultra reinforcement on the gloves’ fingers ensures a solid grip and improved dexterity. $33.12 DEFENDER.COM

COVERUP < It gets cold on deck during the shoulder seasons. Lucikly, the new Softshell Jacket from Gill features a windproof, waterproof fabric that’s both breathable and lightweight. Microfleece lining provides warmth and adjustable cuffs keep water from seeping up the sleeves. Available in graphite, navy and silver grey, sizes XS to XXL. $139.00 GILLNA.COM

SAFETY FIRST > Adventures at sea just got safer, thanks to the Onyx A/M-24 Automatic/Manual Inflatable. Fall in, and it inflates automatically; or, pull the ripcord and inflate before you abandon ship. Reflective piping makes it highly visible. $118.99 ONYXOUTDOOR.COM

LIGHT BRIGHT < Wanna tame that on-water glare? Look no further than Ono’s Trading Company, which offers 13 different models of sunglasses for both men and women. Frames are available with and without prescription lenses, as well as a low-profile “readers” version for up-close work on deck. $90-130; under $200.00 for prescription lenses. ONOSTRADINGCOMPANY.COM 21 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


boat test

22 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


boat test

CABO

44 HT Express Custom built to suit your boating or fishing fancy. BY CH R I S CASWE LL

I REGRET USING TECHNICAL TERMS to describe the new Cabo 44 Hardtop Express, but I hope laymen will grasp the concept in spite of my insider jargon. The Cabo 44 is way cool. That’s really all you need to know, but if ever there were a yacht for all reasons, it would be the Cabo 44. Cabo yachts have a reputation as world-class sportfishing warwagons, capable of landing tournament-winning fish from Costa Rica to Bimini. But if fishing’s not your bag, don’t fret; all you have to do is check off one little box on the order form for your new Cabo 44. The one that says “Cruising Option.” In true “Transformers” fashion, elves on the Cabo production line morph your 44 into a comfortable, stylish and ever-so-quick family express cruiser. That big bait tank in the transom becomes a comfortable settee with table for enjoying cocktails or an alfresco meal with friends. Those tackle drawers the Izaak Waltons fill with hooks and lures turn into lockers where you can stash PHOTOS COURTESY OF CABO YACHTS

23 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


boat test

an electrically-operated swim platform works in conjunction with an onboard launching system for the 5000’s tender, neatly garaged out of sight (right). New riviera owners Carol and John Stimpson (below, pictured center and right) got exactly what they wanted in their new boat.

your snorkel and fins. Big fish boxes in the cockpit sole instantly become the ideal place to store fenders and lines. And that big door in the transom for hauling in thousand-pound marlin? It’s perfect access for the newly installed swim platform. The Cabo 44 Hardtop Express is a win-win for everyone. Want to go fishing? It’s a winner. Want to cruise with your family? It’s a winner. Want to do both? Go ahead. You can have everything you need for fishing and cruising, without having to compromise. Win-win.

No-nonsense reputation

The 44 HT express salon is open and airy (top). Through a pocket door is the forward stateroom, with a centerline double berth surrounded by teak lockers and private access to the head (bottom). a pair of single berths in the second cabin are perfect to house additional anglers or guests (right).

24 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011

Cabo Yachts was founded in the early 1990s by a couple of savvy boating guys who created and then sold a company (Pacific Seacraft) that built a successful line of cruising sailboats. Maintaining the same high standards and attention to detail as their sailboats, Cabo earned a reputation on the sportfishing scene for building no-nonsense, seaworthy yachts for serious anglers. In 2006, the company was acquired by Brunswick Corporation, which tucked Cabo under the umbrella of Hatteras Yachts. Although Cabo and Hatteras share factory space in North Carolina, their production lines are separate and each brand has its own personality. The Cabo 44 Hardtop Express replaces the Cabo 45 Express, a popular yacht first launched in 1997. If you’re familiar with the 45, well, you might not recognize the 44—except for some styling DNA that carries over from the older Cabo. The new 44 is wider and lower than the 45 and, if I were a fish, I’d say it looked a lot meaner, too. Step into the cockpit and you can’t help but be impressed by the immense space. Our test boat was rigged for fishing, so it had the 56-gallon bait tank in the transom and, though it wasn’t visible, there was a husky aluminum plate underfoot to support a big fishing chair. For folks used to express cruisers with teensy cockpits, the sheer delight of


boat test open space is overwhelming. The Cabo 44 has mezzanine seating just above the cockpit, which was intended to let fishermen keep an eye on their baits. But it works just as well for families, where it’s a pleasant place to watch the world zip past. And zip it does! The 44 hull was penned by Michael Peters, who has a reputation for designing seaworthy and quick hulls for everything from offshore-racing powerboats to sportfishing warwagons. Our test boat was the prototype Cabo 44, which has the optional 1150-hp Cat C18s. Even with props that needed a bit of tweaking for optimal performance, we were still doing just shy of 40 knots. Not bad for pushing 22 tons of fun across the water!

Have it your way The helm is amidships, a companion Stidd seat is to starboard and, on our boat, another pedestal Stidd chair was on the port side of the skipper. An L-shaped settee wraps around behind the helm area and, if you chose the cruising option, it stretches up next to the skipper in place of the optional chair. A long console to starboard conceals (in our fishing version) an Isotherm fridge, tackle drawers and a Kenyon barbecue grill. The hardtop on the 44 is not an option and, with an enclosure behind the settee, you can take full advantage of the air conditioning and heating piped via overhead vents. OK, here’s where the fun begins. Down a few steps into the cabin you’ll find enough space to host “Dancing With The Stars.” By putting the galley aft and a convertible dinette in the forward corner, the result is an open and airy living space accented by a teak-and-holly sole. Most express cruiser galleys are of the take-me-ashore-for-dinner variety, but you can actually do some serious cooking aboard the Cabo 44. Our test boat was fitted with four U-Line under-counter fridge and freezer drawers, a cooktop hidden in the Avonite counter and a microwave/convection oven. What you do with the rest of the interior is pretty much up to you. Our test 44 had a second cabin by the companionway with a pair of single berths that are perfect for either extra anglers or kids. An alternative is to create what Cabo calls the “angler room,” which eliminates the bulkhead and turns the area into a workspace with counter and drawers for working on lures, rods and reels. Or you can leave it as an enclosed space for storage. Your call. Underway, the Cabo 44 is fast and fun. You’ll be hard pressed to wipe that grin off your face the first time you push the throttles to the firewall. In front of the skipper is a vast fiberglass pod capable of absorbing every possible navigation, communication and fishing piece of electronics ever imagined. We had a rotten day for our sea trial, which was good because this is where the Cabo 44 shines. Offshore, an overnight wind built long rows of fours and sixes, with a few eights thrown in. The Cabo ran 30 knots in all directions without a creak. Whether it’s salty or fresh, water is water, and the Cabo handles it with aplomb. And if there was any question Cabo has a winner with its 44 Hardtop Express, consider this: The boat hasn’t yet gone into production, but the first five have already been sold! One is going to the owner of five previous Cabos, and several of the others have owned one or two Cabos. That speaks volumes about quality. So whether your tastes run toward taking the family to an island for a weekend of R&R or running some buddies into the Gulf Stream in search of blues, the Cabo 44 Hardtop Express is going to exceed your needs admirably. r

CABO 44 HT Express Standard Equipment Bow pulpit w/ anchor roller; bait-and-tackle center in cockpit; transom bait tank; cockpit fish boxes; padded cockpit coaming; transom door; Onan 11.5kW generator; Glendinning Cable Master; fire and bilge alarms; helm and companion seats; halon fire system; ac/heating; two-burner Kenyon cooktop; microwave/convection oven; Isotherm pull-out refrigerator/freezer drawers; Vacuflush head; trim tabs; anchor windlass and anchor with rode; seawater washdowns; integrated hardtop; compass; shore power system; flatscreen TV; 5" mattresses; safety package.

Specifications LOA: 47'7" Beam: 16'6" Draft: 3'7" Weight: 43,200 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 800 gals. Water Capacity: 100 gals. Power: Twin 715-hp Cummins QSM-11 Base Price: $949,000 caboyachts.com

25 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


profile

Behind the

LENS

Up close and personal with aerial photographer and pilot Marge Beaver. BY

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H EATH E R S TE I N B E RG E R

LONGTIME READERS OF LAKELAND BOATING and the Ports O’ Call Cruising Guides are intimately familiar with the aerial photographs that provide a priceless bird’s-eye view of the Great Lakes’ many ports, marinas and harbor facilities. Yet few may realize that the woman behind the camera is as colorful and complex as the breathtaking images she captures. Born in Onekama, Michigan, and based in Muskegon today, Marge Beaver said her lifelong affection for the Wolverine State first took shape at her family’s cottage. “We still have that cabin in the family,” she said. “We had a two-week vacation there most years until I was married. My husband and I even spent our honeymoon there, and our kids have grown up loving that place. It’s very primitive, with no electricity or even cell phone coverage, but its appeal is the acreage of undeveloped forest and beach. “I loved the water, the beach,” she recalled softly. “Oh, I have real strong feelings about that place! My love of the water… those roots go deep.” As it turns out, Beaver’s roots in photography run equally deep.


profile

Unleashing the monster “I started playing around with photography with my parents,” she said. “We’d cover all the windows with blankets and make contact prints. Later, when I was married, I had my own darkroom; I’d make photos of the kids, make Christmas cards, things like that. “My husband and I were 21 and 18 when we got married,” she continued. “He was in the U.S. Air Force, so most of our kids were born in different states. Then, in 1958, we bought a house in Muskegon, and I’ve lived here most of my married life.” During those years, Beaver was busy raising five children. Photography remained a hobby. Once the children were grown, however, she began looking for a way to turn her love of photography into something more. ‘I started spotting photos for a studio,” she said. “I retouched negatives, then I started doing that out of the house. My husband was an old-fashioned guy who believed in supporting the family, so I saved all the money I made from my business. It was really thriving at the time!” Those resources opened an unexpected door. In the early 1980s, Beaver attended a spiritual retreat in the American West. After a powerful experience there, she flew home on a commercial jet—and had an epiphany. “I was looking out the windows, and everything was just so beautiful,” she recalled. “I had tears running down my face. When I told my husband about it, he said, ‘Why don’t you learn how to fly?’ He didn’t know what kind of monster he was unleashing!” The money from Beaver’s negative-retouching business PHOTOS COurTESy Of MArGE BEAvEr

paid for her flying lessons. At first, she said, she thought she’d learn just enough to fly solo. “Suuuuure,” she said, laughing. “Next, I got my pilot’s license. Then I joined a flying club to make flying more affordable. I continued on in rapid succession to obtain my instrument and commercial ratings.” That was 1982. And things continued to move quickly.

Marge beaver has owned her 1972 Cessna Cardinal for more than 25 years, and she’s logged more than 7,000 flying hours on her thus far.

Removing the roadblocks “My son-in-law’s company had a plant fire, so I took some images from one of the club’s planes,” she said. “He showed them to his boss, who ordered 120 prints! He also wanted to hire me to shoot reconstruction on a monthly basis. I was absolutely thrilled.” Then, a roadblock. The flying club wouldn’t allow Beaver to use its planes for her new endeavor, as it was a not-forprofit operation. She wasn’t about to let that stop her. “I couldn’t let the dream die!” she exclaimed. “I ended up buying my own plane.” She found a 1972 Cessna Cardinal in Tulsa, Oklahoma. “I took a commercial flight down there, thinking to hire a mechanic to check everything out before I signed my life away,” she recalled with a merry laugh. “The flight was delayed, I got in after dark, and everyone had gone home! There was no one there to help.” The intrepid aviator bought the plane anyway—and quickly realized that it featured a variety of avionics she had never seen before. “I ran after the salesman so he could come back and show me,” she said, still chuckling. “I took off after dark 27 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r Y 2 011


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The Little Traverse lighthouse stands sentinel at the tip of Little Traverse Bay’s Harbor Point, a stone’s throw from the historic resort community of Harbor Springs, Michigan. First lit in 1884, the brick structure features a square 41-foot tower and attached two-story lighthouse keeper’s house.

and spent the night with my son in Kansas. The next day, I finally got to see what it looked like!” Fate smiled on Beaver and the new turn her life had taken. Today, more than 25 years later, she flies that same Cessna Cardinal. “I’ve logged 7,000 hours on it,” she said. “It’s been very good to me.”

Do-it-yourselfer

“Above the Lighthouses—Lake Michigan,” which is Marge Beaver’s third coffee table book, is a stunning, 208-page look at every Lake Michigan lighthouse in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin, as well as scenics.

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Beaver built a formidable aerial photography business, marrying her two passions— photography and flying—with a combination of exuberance and practicality. “Photography and flying are the two things I love most,” she said, “and they pay for each other. I don’t fly unless I have a job.” Because a photographer can’t capture good images through a window, Beaver had to modify the Cardinal. In particular, she needed a window that she could open. Although there are commercial windows like this on the market today, that wasn’t the case years ago. “I designed a window hinged on the bottom, which would swing in,” she said. “And, boy, did I jump through hoops to get approval for the thing! But I got it—and

then I couldn’t find a mechanic to do it.” So she decided to tackle it herself. “I had to cut the window plastic, which is hard not to crack when it’s old,” she explained. “I used a Weller hot knife. I had a new window made, but it was flat instead of curved, so I put it into the oven over a plaster cast my husband and I had made of the original window. “But as soon as it cooled, it snapped back flat!” she continued. “We ended up using a bowling ball to prevent that. Then I had my new window!” As she pursued her mix of commercial and editorial jobs, a new need arose.“Someone approached me for a job that would require me to shoot straight down,” Beaver recalled. “I didn’t have a way to do it, but I took the job anyway and then had to figure it out.” She found an airport with a mechanic who had the experience and all the approvals necessary to cut a belly-hole camera port into her Cardinal. Capturing vertical shots while flying on autopilot was now officially part of Beaver’s repertoire. “At least,” she observed, “I didn’t have to carve that one out by myself!”

Do-it-yourselfer, part 2 Over the last 25-plus years, Beaver’s work has taken her across the country—taking photos from the Statue of Liberty to the Golden Gate Bridge—and to every corner of her beloved Great Lakes. And as she spent so many hours in the sky, she realized she could capture far more than


profile what her employers required. A book publisher evidently realized the same thing. The University of Michigan Press, in conjunction with Petoskey Publishing, approached Beaver with an idea that eventually became her 2006 coffee table book, “Above the North.” She arranged to do three books; the second, “Above West Michigan,” was published in 2007. The third and final book would focus on Lake Michigan’s lighthouses. “The books have been great, because they give me a reason to shoot things that won’t sell commercially,” she said. “I acquired the images over all the years I was out there; they were just for me, just for fun.” Then there was a problem. “The publisher liked the lighthouse book, but they wanted me to take 80 pages out of it, including the index and local maps,” Beaver said. “I’d been telling my customers and friends that it was a complete book. How could I take 80 pages out?” So Beaver purchased the rights, contacted a printer and self-published “Above the Lighthouses—Lake Michigan.” This enormous undertaking, while daunting, has allowed her to preserve her vision for the book, as well as its integrity. The hard-cover coffee table book contains 208 pages of full-color aerial photographs, which include close-ups of every Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin lighthouse, as well as scenic views. These views offer Beaver’s unique perspective on each light’s location, and they provide important context as to why those lighthouses were so important to mariners in the first place. These powerful images incorporate lighthouses that are still operating, though automated; abandoned lights that remain intact; structures that have long since fallen into ruin; and the interesting cribs that lie off the Illinois coast. The images cover all four seasons and were taken in the years since 2004, when Beaver made the transition from film to digital photography. “I like the digital images better, and of course now I’m very happy I made the switch!” she said, adding, “Initially, though, it was quite traumatic.”

Win-win situation Although photography equipment and technology may have changed, some things have not. Beaver said she still prefers to fly alone. “I used to invite my customers to come along with me, but I made so many people sick!” she said. “When I’m getting a shot, I really move that plane around. I make a lot of tight circles.” She also still has the steadfast support of one very important figure: Her husband, the old-fashioned family man who ended up encouraging his adventurous wife to take flying lessons. “One of my biggest perks is that my husband, once we PHOTOS BY MARGE BEAVER

got over the changing-of-our-roles trauma, has taken over all the cooking chores,” she said. “He does all the grocery shopping and is a wonderful chef. “My business, as it grew, allowed him to take an early retirement and focus on the kitchen thing, which is way at the bottom of my list of desired activities, but at the top of his,” she continued. “It has been a win-win situation all around, and I am very grateful to have been married to this jewel for 57 years and counting.” And so the onetime homemaker has become one of the country’s most highly sought-after aerial photographers, as well as one of the region’s most fascinating producers of fine-art coffee table books. Wife, mother, professional photographer, aviator,

a familiar sight to freighters, Mac racers and recreational boaters, the Grays reef lighthouse has a 65-foot tower and octagonal-on-square dwelling anchored to a submerged stone and concrete crib. although a station was first established here in 1891, the current light dates to 1936.

“PhotograPhy aND FLyINg arE thE tWo thINgS I LoVE MoSt, aND thEy Pay For EaCh othEr. I DoN’t FLy UNLESS I haVE a JoB.” fine artist and now publisher as well—Marge Beaver is living proof that, really, the sky is the limit. r A special offer for Lakeland Boating readers: To order a personalized copy of “Above the Lighthouses” ($49.95) directly from Marge Beaver, call 866-300-9691, send an e-mail to mbeaver@photography-plus.com or visit photography-plus.com. In addition to the personal greeting, you’ll receive free shipping as well. 29 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r Y 2 011


On

Osprey’s Sticks

Common sense wings away when nature faces off against navigation. by rolan d sch u ltz

I

f you pick up a copy of “Chapman’s Piloting & Seamanship” and look under the “Aids to Navigation” section, you will read the following passage: “Whether or not established by the Coast Guard, all Aids to Navigation are protected by law. It is a criminal offense to cause any damage or hindrance to the proper operation of any aid. Do not deface, alter, move or destroy any aid to navigation.” Even a person with limited vocabulary doesn’t need to study rocket science to understand how important a buoy or light structure is for a mariner. Aids to Navigation are sacred; don’t mess with ’em. In March 2009, I was invited aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter (CGC) Mackinaw for a two-day cruise. Passing thru Neebish Channel, I saw a light structure amidst a collection of tree limbs, two-by-fours, and God knows what else heaped upon its upper structure. It resembled an exploded sofa. As an Aid to Navigation, it was totally worthless. Turns out the actual light was buried deep inside the nest of an osprey. As luck would have it, I was standing beside a Warrant Bosun who would soon become the new commanding officer of the CGC Buckthorn, which services most Aids to Navigation on the St. Marys River. I asked what the Coast Guard would do upon encountering such hindrances while commissioning Aids for the upcoming season. “Nothing,” he replied. End of conversation. Environmentalists, with backing from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Michigan’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR), make it a crime to disturb nesting areas of endangered species, no matter its location. This Federal Aid to Navigation, built to warn mariners of hidden dangers, was now a glorified bird house. Absence of the light would now become listed as a “Notice to Mariners.” This seemed akin to defiling the Lincoln Memorial by dumping a ton of bat guano upon it—with more potential for real tragedy and loss of life. I felt betrayed. A bird’s nest was now more important than the keeping of a navigation light.

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a surprised osprey warns intruders to its nest, which happens to be perched atop an aid to Navigation.

Keeping with tradition A Great Lakes lighthouse is the most tangible reminder of evolving development of the inland seas. Constructed to mark areas of danger to seafarers, lighthouses designate a safe route for passage. It raised the fur on the back of my neck to consider how the dedication and pains taken by old-time light keepers were being remembered. For me, personally, it insulted the actions and commitment of USCG buoy tender crews past and present. I wasn’t just thinking of my own experiences, but those dating back to the dawn of civilization. Aids to Navigation became necessary as soon as man went to sea. In the 19th century, keepers lived at the base of their towers, with no telephones, radio or electricity. Quarters were cramped, leaky and cold. Pay was barely adequate. In cases of life-threatening illness or accidents, keepers hoisted distress flags, hoping to attract a passing ship. Self-sufficiency and improvisation were the basic character ingredients needed to withstand isolation, loneliness, monotony and exposure to severe weather. Men dedicated to the safety of ships and their crews had the right stuff. Establishing the National Lighthouse Service improved things a little. Still, keepers faced long stretches of stormy seas, shrouding fog, and deprivations that come with living on small, remote islands. They spent months in isolation, polishing Fresnel lenses, trimming wicks for kerosene lamps and struggling to keep warm and dry in insufficient housing. When the lamps and lenses grew to several tons of phOTOs By jOhN ANDErsON (LEfT) AND TrAvIs sTATON (rIGhT)

“This Federal Aid to Navigation, built to warn mariners of hidden dangers, was now a glorified bird house.” glass and metal near the turn of the century, the lights became difficult to rotate. The solution: Float the lights in a channel filled with mercury. This reduced friction, mechanical wear and improved speed of rotation. But it did nothing to appease the endless hand cranking of counter-weights every two and a half hours to operate a revolving light. The health hazard posed by mercury floating three tons of lighting apparatus might have been profound to the various fowl that perched upon such structures; yet these birds were but passing visitors compared to the light keepers who worked there day and night with the mission and commitment to provide a beacon to all sailors in all types of conditions.

Serve and protect In the days prior to Loran C and GPS, Aids to Navigation buoys were positioned by a sextant. The small, fine, black charted dot was considered the bullseye from which a buoy would stand watch. 31 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011


Members of CGC Forward assist in the rescue of an injured osprey. The bird was taken to a rehabilitation center until it was well enough to be released back into the wild.

The mission of today’s buoy tenders is, like the old lighthouse tenders, to go in harm’s way. To service or maintain Aids, they must come in close proximity to the very hazard the buoy warns mariners to avoid. Working in rough seas, strong currents or ice is the norm. When a buoy was reported extinguished, an Aids to Navigation specialist was dispatched to repair the light. This often happened in darkness and foul weather. When the moment felt right, the specialist leaped from his small boat onto the buoy. Laden with heavy tools and equipment, the technician climbed through the cage, usually slimy with seagull excrement, to make the repair. How such operations were accomplished with these

“Men dedicated to the safety of ships and their crews had the right stuff.” brave men unscathed is beyond comprehension. Yet the mission of maintaining a lighted Aid always was first priority. In the days prior to automation, buoy tenders like Sundew, based at Charlevoix, Michigan, commissioned lighthouses and set buoys in early spring, while capricious wind pushed ice flows. Because lighthouses typically stood upon a shoal or reef, a ship’s small boat became the primary supply craft to transfer crew, equipment and supplies. 32 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011

S.O.S. on the Sundew With the opening of the 1965 navigation season, Sundew found herself operating 24/7. Standing off White Shoals Light in upper Lake Michigan, she loaded and launched one of two small boats carrying its own crew, plus lighthouse crew and supplies to transfer to the light. Sundew then turned south to commission Grays Reef Light, less than five miles distant. The term “ice-water mansion” well describes a lighthouse on the lakes left vacant during winter months. Exposed to wind, waves and spray, ice builds upon these structures, creating picturesque scenes—and dangerous overhangs. This day, with thawing temperatures and vibrations from the commissioning crew aboard the light, an overhang of ice suddenly broke loose. Its mass swamped the boat and cast all three crewmembers into the water. With ladders built into the lighthouse’s caisson caked with ice, these men had no way to climb from the frigid waters of Lake Michigan. The electronics of the 1960s were primitive by today’s standards, and Coast Guard launches had only a satchellike FM portable radio. Fortunately, while unloading the launch, this radio ended up on the lighthouse platform. With reflex reaction, the officer in charge of the White Shoals crew grabbed the radio and made a terse transmission: “Mayday, Mayday, Cutter Sundew…” No further explanation was necessary. Sundew’s commanding officer immediately perceived dire straits at White Shoals Light. He knew his men were in danger.


With Sundew having come on scene, the situation was evident; the only consideration was to get the ship as close as possible to the men in the water. With cargo nets rigged over the side and volunteer swimmers tethered in harness, rescue crew members watched helplessly as the men swam towards the ship. Fortunately, training, skill and luck saved the day, and three Coast Guardsmen spent a long time in the ship’s showers defrosting. Such was the job with its ever-present hazards. Men did what they had to do to provide a beacon to ships and sailors on the lakes.

Come on, feel the noise In the early 1970s, I found myself in another organization, wearing a different uniform. Having trained with the U.S. Air Force (USAF) as a pilot and now part of the Michigan Air National Guard, I worked with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the DNR, assigned as the navigation officer to the 127th Tac Fighter Wing at Selfridge Field. At the time, USAF wanted to develop tactical, high-speed, low level navigation routes in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Because I was in Michigan, I drew the short straw. Routes were to be flown 200 feet above ground, at 420 knots. A long list of restrictions and considerations had to be met to certify these flyways. To determine the off-limits airspace, a five-mile radius was drawn around every city, town and village. Radio and high-tension electrical towers, airports and areas that were known open air assemblies also had to be avoided. From the airspace that remained, you then drew a zigzag course to stay away from these locations. Additionally, an environmental assessment addressed both the emission of pollutants and the sound decibel level at the anticipated engine power settings. With this completed, the final seal of approval was required from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and DNR, which, I recall, had nothing but disdain for the project. They believed the noise level at such an altitude would stampede wildlife. I maintained the speed of the aircraft would make its passing seem like a brief thunderclap. Arriving in Lansing, Michigan, to meet with both groups at once, I quickly realized I was out of my element. A good deal of recent publicity drew attention to a small songbird that nested only in northern Michigan and spent its winters in the Bahamas. It was one of the first critters listed as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. When asked if any part of my route came within nesting of the Dendroica Kirtlandii, I realized one had to speak “Klingon” to communicate with these people. Lacking a formal education in Latin, I didn’t pick up on the scientific nomenclature for a bird known to mortal men as the Kirtland Warbler. photos courtesy of u.s. coast guard and jenden photography (top right)

Referring to the charted route, I was informed of a problem. I was promptly led to the “chart room,” where, in a space the size of a gymnasium, we walked in stocking feet over massive county charts. In less than a minute, they located their objective and pointed to a spot in the middle of a forest, a mile and a half away from my route. “Right here; we had an eagles nest last year with three eaglets.” I was mystified. “Three eaglets? How do you know the numbers?,” I asked. “Oh, we go out and count them every year.” “Isn’t that a bit dangerous, climbing trees into their upper branches to peek into a nest, with a mother eagle attacking?,” I asked, amazed such a census took place. “No. We use a helicopter to do the counting.” This response unglued me. Here these people were raking me over hot coals because my jet fighter would pass at 420 knots and create a brief noise disturbance, like a thunderclap, while these saviors of the environment were hovering over eagle nests in helicopters, creating downdrafts of approximately 85 knots and blowing the hell out of everything beneath them. If there were an easier way to make a nesting bird miscarry, I couldn’t think of one! r

Osprey nests contain a mish-mash of building materials and, unfortunately, do a heck of a job obscuring necessary navigation aids.

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Miracle on the St. Lawrence The brotherhood of the sea is a tie that binds. by dr . dick with i ngton

I

t was a sunny afternoon with a brisk wind out of the southwest. I’d just returned from a clinic at Fort Drum, New York. As deputy EMS coordinator for our county, I monitored the emergency dispatch frequency on the car radio. The initial call was a dispatch for the Alexandria Bay fireboat to manage a medical emergency that occurred on a down-bound “salty” heading for sea. A crewman on the ship was experiencing seizures and required evacuation to a hospital. This occurred before the days of paramedics, cell phones and GPS. The ship was in an area of the American Narrows where stopping, anchoring and even turning were not feasible. Reports from the ship indicated seizure activity continued. An attempt was made to transfer the man to the fireboat, but this was thwarted by an additional seizure. Seas were building, making it difficult to hold the fireboat’s position. With time passing quickly and the likelihood of either the weather or the patient’s situation improving remote, helicopter evacuation was requested.

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Time is of the essence Our nearest U.S. Coast Guard helicopter resource was Station Detroit, with a usual response time of 4 hours; but because the ship was in American (as opposed to Canadian) waters, the call went to a medevac helicopter crew stationed at Fort Drum, located 20 miles from the ship. Here, at Fort Drum, army crews were training for service in Iraq and Afghanistan. They were discouraged from flying over water, partly because they were not equipped with personal floatation devices. Clearly, someone looked the other way and bent a few rules in order to respond to this life-threatening emergency. Reports indicated the victim, a native of Ukraine, was deteriorating. His seizure activity increased. Care was hampered by the fact that medical personnel were not fluent in Russian. Two hours passed. I made a call to the Coast Guard to emphasize the urgency of getting him to a hospital.


Mission accomplished

More good fortune

At this point, the helicopter pilot was in command. I don’t know exactly how it was accomplished, but the victim was hoisted off the ship’s deck and into the helicopter. They headed for the hospital heliport, but the excitement was not over yet. Shortly after flying over land, the victim had another seizure. The pilot declared an in-flight emergency and landed in a farmer’s field. Once the seizure activity stopped, the patient went into a state resembling a deep sleep or coma. With the patient now docile, the pilot took off again and completed the hospital trip. He arrived alive and in stable condition. At last, things were starting to go his way. From here, the story turns into a “good news/bad news” routine. Good news: He’s alive and stable in an emergency room. Bad news: He’s still having seizures. Good news: This hospital has a high-quality CT scanner. Bad news: The scan suggests a brain tumor. Good news: There is a neurosurgeon on staff. He speaks Russian, not necessarily Ukrainian Russian, but at least they can communicate. The mass, it turns out, is treatable with immediate brain surgery. Bad news: It’s hard to get informed consent from someone with a language barrier and impaired functioning. Good news: A woman who worked at a nearby nursing home speaks Ukrainian. Her services are enlisted to help explain the risks of surgery to the patient.

Awakening from surgery can be scary. Finding you’re in a foreign country with no friends or relatives and have a big bandage where your hair used to be must be terrifying. At first, he could not talk; then only a few words in Russian. We both tried to communicate, but it wasn’t easy. Because I worked in the hospital, I visited him daily. His employer made contact with a representative in New Jersey who took care of his legal matters and helped contact his daughter. He had a long recovery and rehabilitation. The issue of where to go when hospitalization was no longer required arose. Again, his luck held. A local pilot stepped up and offered to take him into his home until he was well enough to travel back to Ukraine. His English improved. He was a celebrity at our hospital, particularly with the nurses. Prior to discharge, they collected money and took him shopping to purchase that pretty dress for his daughter. He kept his promise. After a month, arrangements were made for him to go back to Ukraine. He flew home to his daughter.

Distant reinforcements My daughter called from New York City. In relating the events to her, she became concerned for the man’s welfare and wondered how she could help. She worked in the broadcast industry and said, “Guess what; there’s a Ukrainian guy who works down the hall from me! He translates for the United Nations. Let me put him on the line.” You could feel the tide turning in the man’s favor. I chatted with him and explained the situation. His approach was, “If he’s Ukrainian and in serious trouble, then he is a brother of mine.” He asked me for directions and said he was on his way. It is a 6-hour drive from New York City to Clayton, New York, where I lived. He was there in 4 hours. The next day, my houseguest went to the hospital and met with the man. Informed consent was obtained, and we learned more about the patient. He had no relatives in the U.S. and was estranged from his wife. He left his 14-year-old daughter home to care for the family. He promised to bring her a pretty dress upon his return. He went to sea like many of our ancestors: To find a better life for himself and his family. He was trying to learn English. Fortunately, his luck held. The surgery was successful, and the tumor was benign. His life was saved. ILLusTrATION By u.s. COAsT GuArD

Awakening from surgery can be scary. “Finding you’re in a foreign country with no friends or relatives and have a big bandage where your hair used to be must be terrifying. Epilogue

This experience truly reflects the brotherhood of the sea. In a tradition that goes back centuries, seamen have come to aid their brothers in peril. Many of the circumstances in this case defy the laws of probability. None of these unlikely events is miraculous, but taken as a whole, it gives one pause. I’m sure the man went back home to Ukraine knowing he’d fallen into the hands of people who cared. These days, perhaps that’s the miracle. One final irony: The hospital where he received his care is called the House of the Good Samaritan. Think about that. r Author’s note: The events of this story are true. I have done no research to embellish the tale, but have no hard facts to confirm the name of the individual or the ship, the date the incident occurred, nor any other details or events surrounding the individual’s rescue and recovery. I simply relate the events as I recall them. I was not personally involved in the care of the victim. — D.W. 35 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


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A Family Affair For the Weborgs, commercial fishing adventures are all in a day’s work. B Y H EATH E R S TE I N B E RG E R

I Aboard Ranger, Jeff Weborg releases a gill net as his son, Eric, ties the next net to the string. Each gill net is roughly 6 feet tall and 1,000 feet long, and several are tied together for each set. Ranger continues to motor forward, making this process a hazardous one; if a person gets tangled in the weighted nets, he’ll quickly be dragged overboard.

PHOTOS BY TOM STURTEVANT

t was an everyday ranch house, trim with pretty blue shutters, along the last stretch of Wisconsin’s State Highway 42 near the tip of Door Peninsula. The older couple inside was winding down a quiet evening with their granddaughter, Mia, the living room warm and inviting on this bitterly cold December night. The man in the easy chair, cuddling the sleeping babe on his lap, could’ve been anyone’s grandfather. Then I heard the roaring in the darkness, the Lake Michigan surf thundering ashore just yards from that cozy white house, and remembered that Jeff Weborg isn’t just another Door County family man. He’s a commercial fisherman, one of five generations to wrest his living from the freshwater seas. Commercial fishing has never had a higher public profile thanks to Sebastian Junger’s 1997 book “The Perfect Storm,” the blockbuster 2000 movie of the same name and now the Discovery Channel’s hit show “The Deadliest Catch,” which airs in 150 countries. Yet the majority of tourists barreling up 42, bound for the Washington Island ferry, likely have no idea that similar adventures take place right here. By definition, “adventure” is an undertaking that involves danger and unknown risks, one that provides an exciting or remarkable experience. Measured by those standards, it doesn’t get more adventurous than commercial fishing. When “The Perfect Storm” and the Discovery Channel series came up, however, Weborg just shook his head slowly. “I don’t watch that stuff,” he said with a smile. “We go out there every day, and we know what we’re facing. We don’t need to talk about it. And I don’t need to watch it on TV.”

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“The hours are long, the work is hard, often the pay is little, and the danger is incredible. But I can’t imagine doing anything else.”

Humble beginnings Weborg’s story begins in the 1850s, when his great-grandfather emigrated from Norway and attempted to farm northern Door’s thin, rocky soil. “He found out that farming up here isn’t the greatest,” Weborg said wryly. “So he caught fish to help feed his family and then decided to sell fish to make some extra money. My dad grew up on the family farm, but by his 20s—by the end of my grandfather’s life—it was all fishing.” Weborg and his brother, Tim, began their fishing careers in 1970. “I’d done some fishing in high school, and after graduation, I went to work for my dad,” he said. “I remember we were fishing for chubs in November, the worst time for weather. I got seasick every day for the first two months. I tried everything, but nothing worked.” Then, one cold morning, he fell asleep after firing up the boat’s stove. He didn’t wake until they were out on the lake, and his father called for him. “In those days, we didn’t have all the instrumentation,” he explained. “You ran a compass course, watched your depth and time and looked for your buoy. So I heard Dad hollering to look for the buoy. I did that—and realized I wasn’t sick anymore! That was the end of it.” 38 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


The steel-hulled Ranger (left) operates throughout the winter months, as she can punch through 6 to 8 inches of solid ice. employees work on the fish tugs (below left) and in the dockside shed at Gills rock (right), where they clean the fish, pack them on ice and ship them to restaurants and processing facilities around the u.S. and abroad.

At one point, however, a lifelong career in such a difficult, dangerous profession was far from certain, and Weborg took some time off. “I remember dressing chubs in the boat and I said to my dad’s partner, Eddie, ‘I’m done with fishing!’” he said, chuckling. “I said, ‘I’m going to get a job for 40 hours a week.’ Eddie said, ‘You may be done with fishing, but fishing ain’t done with you.’” After a slight pause, he continued, “Eddie was right. I worked for a shoe factory in Minnesota, I did church visitation in California, but I came back. The hours are long, the work is hard, often the pay is little, and the danger is incredible. But I can’t imagine doing anything else.”

All in the family Weborg’s son, Eric, went through a similar experience of breaking away and then coming home. The young man, who had been living in Florida with his girlfriend, returned to Door Peninsula not long ago and now lives with his family in Sister Bay. “He wasn’t interested for a long time, but now he’s home,” Weborg said. “So I’m semi-retired; I’m gradually turning this over to Eric.” Weborg’s commercial fishing business is one of the larger operations in Wisconsin, and it has the largest whitefish quota in the state. In addition to son Eric, it also employs Weborg’s brother, Mark, Jim Laughlin and James Rice, as well as a variety of seasonal workers. The fleet comprises the trapnetters Robyn B and Heather J, named for his and Mark’s daughters, and the gillnetter Ranger. These days, they exclusively go after whitefish. “Chubs are in such decline, we don’t fish them anymore,” Weborg said somberly. “Forty-five years ago, if the stock dropped, we could say why and what happened. Now, no one knows about a recovery because there are so many exotics in the lake.” So the team focuses on whitefish, a pursuit that runs from early spring to October 25 out of Gills Rock with the trapnetters and through the winter months out of Rowleys Bay with the gillnetter. Whitefish is closed to fishing from October 25 to December 1. “My day starts at 5 a.m., looking at weather and getting the boats and gear ready,” Weborg said. “The guys come in at 5:30-6 a.m., and we head out. “Fishing is unique,” he added. “There’s no ‘normal’ PHOTOs By TOM sTurTEvANT

day. There’s different weather, and we fish different areas. Some days, we could net 10,000 pounds of fish. Other days, we might not catch even 100 pounds. We have to hit 500 to 600 pounds just to cover the cost of daily operations.” That’s tremendous pressure in a work environment filled with variables and, yes, fraught with danger. A few years ago, the Bureau of Labor Statistics ranked commercial fishing as the occupation with the highest fatality rate—141.7 per 100,000—making it the most dangerous job in the world. Its fatality rate is nearly 75 percent higher than that of pilots, flight engineers and loggers, the next most dangerous jobs on the list. It’s no wonder. Commercial fishermen face storms, 39 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


“I think commercial fishing is going to continue to decline. I mean, who wants to do what we do, work the hours we work, in the conditions we work in?”

wind, fog and high seas. They may have to deal with communications failures, fire or loss of power on board, and they may not have an easily accessible harbor of refuge if trouble strikes. And, during the winter months, there’s the ice. “We use the gillnetter in December and all winter,” Weborg said. “We do better, unless the ice is so bad that we have to tie her up.” While Ranger isn’t technically an icebreaker, she can break through 6 to 8 inches of solid ice with her steel hull. “She can break a lot of ice,” Weborg said, grinning. “We can run up onto it and punch through. In fact, before the Washington Island ferry line got the Arni J. Richter, we had to break ’em out!” Weborg also has assisted with emergencies at sea, including a 2006 medical situation aboard the famous lake freighter Arthur M. Anderson. In high winds and rough seas, his 50-foot open-decked trapnetter Robyn B carried two medics and a firefighter to rendezvous with the Anderson northeast of Washington Island. It was another day on the lake. Weborg and his crew go out in every season, in virtually all kinds of weather. 40 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

“With chubs, we’d rarely lay in, and with the gill nets, we can fish pretty much any weather,” he said. “But with trap nets, we’re limited by the way the nets are set. If we get more than 4- or 5-footers out on the lake, or if there’s too much current, we don’t go—the gear will get damaged.” Then Weborg chuckled. “Dad used to say, ‘We’ll go out and look at it,’ but that usually meant you weren’t coming back, and the guys would grumble,” he recalled. “I’ve heard myself say it over the years. I guess that’s where I got it from!”

Harsh reality There are jokes among the men, and there is plenty of laughter. But the hazards are real. “When it comes to the dangers, honestly, the only way I can sleep at night is if we’re out of town,” Weborg said. “If there’s even a puff of wind, I’m awake.” Fishermen also routinely deal with gear that has to bear tremendous loads, and accidents can happen. “My brother lost his arm, four years ago May,” Weborg said simply. There was nothing more to say. It was part of the job.


eric Weborg moves a used net container out of the way (left) to make room for the next one. When it’s time to haul the nets (right), a hydraulic system brings them aboard over a set of rollers. The Weborgs make and repair all their own nets.

And, occasionally, fishermen are lost. On December 11, 1998, the 42-foot fish tug Linda E disappeared on Lake Michigan east of Port Washington, Wisconsin. Search efforts found neither wreckage, nor any trace of her three-man crew: Leif Weborg, the Linda E’s owner; Scott Matta, his son-in law; and crew Warren Olson Jr. Leif Weborg was Jeff Weborg’s cousin. “We were out there that day,” Weborg said quietly. “I fished on that boat for a year, and when they said it was a massive structural failure? What a joke. We know those boats inside and out. We did all the work ourselves. There’s no way it was a structural failure.” Thanks to pressure from the families and involvement from U.S. Representative Mark Green (R-Wisconsin, 8th), the U.S. Navy dispatched minesweepers to Lake Michigan. “I told ‘em, go where the nets were, set a course for Port Washington, and you’ll find that boat,” Weborg said. “They did.” In an October 2000 report, nearly two years after the sinking, the public learned that Linda E had been rammed by a barge and sunk. Her wreckage lay in approximately 250 feet of water, the final resting place for three fishermen who never even had time to call for help. “We had stories, Leif and me,” Weborg said, eyes focused somewhere beyond the living room. Yet Weborg carries on, as does Eric, now the fifth generation in this historic fishing family. “We’re one of the last multi-generational fishing families in continuous operation,” Weborg said. “But I think commercial fishing is going to continue to decline. I mean, who wants to do what we do, work the hours we work, in the conditions we work in? If we didn’t have our boys, who would we sell to? No bank will finance a business like this.”

Challenges ahead To be sure, the challenges facing Great Lakes commercial fishing are enormous. To start, existing exotic species already have wreaked havoc with native fish species. And the threat of potential exotics, Weborg said, is alarming for a business owner with a $1 million investment. Then there is staying competitive. Weborg currently sells fish domestically in the Door County, Chicago and New York markets, and he sells in Canada. “I’m at a disadvantage because I’m competing with Canada and its government-sponsored Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation,” he said, his frustration evident. “They’ve driven the price down in our market. They can lose money. I can’t.” PHOTOs By TOM sTurTEvANT

Weborg has had success selling in Europe, and he’s expanding his marketing efforts in Asia. And so, he said, the transformation of commercial fishing to a hardcore business continues. “Commercial fishing, as a tradition, has a flavor,” Weborg observed. “But as it’s evolved into a business, a lot of families have dropped out. “This is the difference between a tradition and a business,” he continued. “The traditional fisherman sells 100 fish for $1 per fish. He gets $100. The price drops to 50 cents, so he works harder, hires more people, buys another boat and increases his investment so he can catch 200 fish. And does he still make $100? Not with all those costs. A businessman will find a way to market the fish at $2 per fish, lower his costs and earn the same or better. That’s the only way.” Today, there are perhaps a half-dozen fishermen operating in Door County. When Weborg began his career, the peninsula was home to 30 or 40. The decline has been steep and, to Weborg, saddening. “I’m the last connection between the old and the new,” he said wistfully. “But I still love watching the sun come up over the water. It never ceases to amaze me.” r 41 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


For more than 40 years, NW Explorations owner Brian Pemberton (pictured below) has been operating both power- and sailboats. He and his wife, Carol, launched their charter operation in 2004 and have been cruising and leading flotillas ever since.

An Insiderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Look Mother Goose Flotilla provides the cruise of a lifetime. B Y B I NG Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;M EARA

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Constantly exploring new areas, Mother Goose 2011 brings a brand-new route through the Queen Charlotte Islands, as well as the tried-and-true Glacier bay, Desolation Sound and Hakai recreational area, among others.

“Awesome!” “The cruise of a lifetime!” “The most romantic experience we have ever had!” These are just a few comments from participants in the Flotilla Cruise from Bellingham, washington, through the famed Inside Passage to Ketchikan, Alaska. You could charter a boat and do this 25-day cruise by yourself, but consider the benefits of sharing the experience with other boaters in a small flotilla. The “mother Goose Flotilla,” assembled by Nw explorations out of Bellingham, consists of a lead boat along with a small number of other chartered Grand Banks trawlers. All of these trawlers are in top shape and clean as a whistle. The lead boat helps get you to the best anchorages. Along the way, the lead boat takes you where you will see whales, bears and eagles. The isolation allows true immersion into the tranquility of the natural world. while you travel, the naturalist aboard the lead boat will identify points of historical interest along the way and explain the culture of the indigenous people. You’ll prepare and feast on freshly caught fish, crabs and maybe even sip some wine before a nap. while experiencing the majesty of snow-capped mountains, you’ll also enjoy meeting and getting to know other members of your small group, who often share the same interests. PHOTOS BY NW EXPLORATIONS

The mother Goose Flotilla is so well run and fun that it attracts many repeat customers. This is the experience of a lifetime, and being on board a Grand Banks cruising the Inside Passage for 25 days may just be exactly what the doctor ordered. For the once-in-a-lifetime adventure you’ll never forget, call 800-826-1430 or visit nwexplorations.com and download the beautiful brochure. r

2011 Mother Goose Flotilla LeG Outside Vancouver Island Misty Fjords Captain’s Choice Glacier Bay Best of Alaska Queen Charlotte Islands

Destination Bellingham, WA to Ketchikan, AK Ketchikan, AK round-trip Ketchikan, AK to Sitka, AK Sitka, AK to Juneau, AK Juneau, AK to Ketchikan, AK Ketchikan, AK to Bellingham, WA

Dates 5/18 - 6/13 6/14 - 6/23 6/24 - 7/05 7/06 - 7/17 7/18 - 7/29 7/30 - 8/24

For more information, visit nwexplorations.com 43 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


44 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


Big City

Boating The bustling city of Toronto, Ontario offers boaters the best of both worlds. by mar k steve n s

I can see the towers of toronto from halfway across Lake ontario. they dominate the lake’s west end, rising up like monuments to Mammon. they are both scenic backdrops and aids to navigation. when I power closer, they morph into concrete canyons. I steer to port, entering the western Gap. Landfall: canada’s biggest city. the gold-inlaid glass façade of the scotiabank tower reaches for the sky along with a multitude of other bank towers. they jostle each other like impatient moviegoers. the cn tower climbs to the clouds a third of a mile above its base beside the rogers centre, a dinosaur-egg-shaped stadium, home of the toronto Blue Jays. the western Gap, leading to toronto’s Inner harbour, is always choppy. sailboats, cabin cruisers and commercial vessels stir the waters into a bubbling cauldron. I hear a ship’s horn. a ferry slices the channel, taking travelers from downtown to the Island airport, scant yards off my starboard beam. I motor into the inner harbor. I hear a rumbling roar. a freeway marches to its final destination at Yonge street, the longest street in the world and toronto’s main artery. a flock of planes rises up from the Island airport. this is Big city Boating.

PhOTO By ONTArIO TOurIsM

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The Toronto waterfront boasts an impressive skyline for boaters and watersports enthusiasts alike. For more adverturous folks, Centreville Island Amusement Park (right) offers rides, a Ferris wheel, carousel and even a petting zoo for the little ones.

A tale of contrasts A tall ship with three masts is at first impressive until it changes course and the towers dwarf the masts. I post a lookout, pointing out water taxis sending up wakes that shatter like glass on seawalls sprouting crowds of people headed for the restaurants and shops of Harbourfront. I give way to a concatenation of white triangles—sailcloth clinging like Brazilian bikinis to dinghies heeled dangerously, canvas propelling serious sailboats headed for the waters outside the Eastern Gap in preparation for another day at the races. People in red canoes and yellow kayaks bob like corks in the uneasy waters. I make for Blockhouse Bay on the most westerly island of the chain called Toronto Islands, and the sudden dichotomy startles me. I’m gliding through quiet waters in the shade of towering oak trees, past a sun-dappled meadow punctuated by an undulating path. Five minutes lashed to the seawall and the city—no more than a nautical mile across the harbor—could be a million miles away. The story of Big City Boating is a tale of contrasts. And a saga of adventures. My wife and I are over-nighting in an archipelago of fourteen islands, a tree-lined playground and escape for Torontonians. It features serpentine channels, hidden seawalls where you dock for an afternoon and stroll the formal gardens, stretch out on beaches, and do lunch at The Rectory Café, an haute cuisine establishment nestled in the shadows with a perfect lake view, play Frisbee golf, and prowl laneways populated by a community of quirky little cottages and equally quirky people. 46 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


Float Plan For a complete rundown of area attractions, festivals and amenities, log on to seetorontonow.com. Public marinas offering transient berths include Marina Quay West, Ontario Place Marina, Toronto Island Marina, Lakefront Promenade Marina, Credit Village Marina, Marina Four and Bluffer’s Park Marina. Larger vessels, up to 200 feet in length, can dock at John Quay. Call 416-203-2620. For a list of marinas and yacht clubs offering reciprocal privileges, check out Lakeland Boating’s online cruising guide at lakelandboating.com/cruise_guide_ontario.cfm. To navigate these waters, you’ll need paper charts 2077, 2086 and 2085. You can purchase these charts from The Nautical Mind, a dockside cornucopia of boating books and accessories. Call 800-463-9951 or visit thenauticalmind.com. Bristol Marine offers full services and emergency repairs dockside at Port Credit Harbour Marina in the west. Call 905-891-3777 or visit bristolmarine.ca. A must-stop is “The Store” Mason’s Chandlery Ltd., with more than 6,000 square feet of inventory for power- and sailboats. Call 800-263-1506 or visit thestoremasons.com.

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“Lived here for forty years,” says Lynn Cunningham, a writer who’s repaired to the terrace of The Rectory to catch up on her e-mails. “Couldn’t imagine ever living anywhere else.” Testament to this place: In an hour, she’s going to moderate a writers’ group composed entirely of islands. Today there’s an island-wide exhibit of installation art created by residents. It’s one more activity in a place that seems filled with them, for all its isolated charm. Come August, the island hosts part of the celebrations for Caribana, the biggest Caribbean celebration outside the Caribbean. Also on island is the perfect family getaway. Here at Centreville Island Amusement Park is a Ferris wheel, a period carousel, petting zoo, swan boats and a miniature train. It is a prime destination for landlubbers. Bikers board the ferry in downtown Toronto and ship their own vessels ashore after the 10-minute cruise. You can rent bikes on Centre Island, or a pedal-driven, four-wheeled cross between a bike and a carriage. Then you round a corner and it hits you—gasping at a sudden skyline view framed by a tiny beach, surprised by the image of a gracious antebellum white mansion with Corinthian columns guarding the porch of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club—that you are scant minutes from the core of Canada’s biggest city. It also hits you that you are immersed in a Babel of nationalities. Orthodox Jews cavort in family groups on the grass, East Indians and Caribbean ex-pats toss footballs. Part of the charm of a city once known as Toronto the Good. Translation: Toronto the Boring. But no longer.

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You can opt for the tranquility of the seawall at Blockhouse Bay on the islands, taking advantage of the ferry service, treating yourself to dinner at Toulà, a red cherry wood, fine linen, fine dining establishment at the top of the Harbour Castle Westin Hotel, a hundred steps from the ferry dock, boasting an eagle’s-eye view of neighboring towers. Then grab a water taxi back to your island berth. Or dock on the mainland where the city awaits mere steps from your transom. Take the subway to Little Italy or Little Portugal. Savor exotic aromas and get a deal on some knock-offs at Chinatown. Dine on souvlaki and moussaka in Greektown. Discover the hottest curry this side of Mumbai. Or soak up a different sort of culture. A 20-minute walk from Queen’s Quay Terminal and a 10-minute subway ride gets you to the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and the Ontario Art Gallery. 48 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

Check out dinosaur skeletons and Egyptian mummies at the ROM, explore a real castle, discover 18th century garrison life at Fort York, history and fashion at the Bata Shoe Museum— featuring the world’s second biggest footwear collection. Go shopping on Bloor Street, a sort of Rodeo Drive but for the fact your dock is less than half an hour away. This is boating, big city style. If your manifest includes kids, consider the marina at Ontario Place, a lakeside collection of geometrically shaped white buildings scattered among undulating lawns and big maples. Can’t miss it: Great blue water slide right at the water’s edge, a geodesic dome where they show IMAX movies. But Ontario Place isn’t just kid-friendly: The waterside amphitheatre boasts a whole season of headliners. Now you realize that you’ll have to return; that the “Big City” part is a much larger part of the equation than the “Boating” part.


Toronto offers visitors an array of cultural and culinary offerings— from Little Italy and Little Portugal, to Greektown and Chinatown (pictured left). Once you’ve whet your appetite, soak up local knowledge in the city’s many museums and educational centers.

Come for the peace Toronto has come a long way since American invaders stormed the harbor, setting it afire during the War of 1812. “Everybody’s heard of Pike’s Peak,” says Alan Rimmington, senior consultant for Ontario Tourism’s War of 1812 Commemoration. “But they don’t know that Zebulon Pike actually died here during the attack. And very few people know that that’s why the White House was burned.” It was retribution for this amphibious invasion of Toronto. Your amphibious invasion is much more peaceful. Go west to a port town that still shows like a little lakeside village—and acts like it—even if it’s part of Canada’s sixth biggest city: Port Credit. Once in a while, it sounds like a squadron of scrambling fighter jets (Credit Village Marina hosts an annual Poker Run). There are more festivals and celebrations than you can shake a stick at—from the annual art show dockside just in the lee of a popular seafood eatery called Snug Harbour, to the biggest in-water boat show on the lake; from Canada Day fireworks where you get a ringside seat, to a jazz and blues festival. There are 10 bars less than 10 minutes from the transient docks at Port Credit Harbour Marina. But it’s still got village ambiance. People walk their dogs on the pier, youngsters rollerblade, everybody says hello. Mason’s Chandlery is one of the longest family-run marine stores on the Great Lakes, while Bristol Marine or Toronto Yacht Services can take care of any mechanical issues to ensure your Big City Boating adventure continues unabated. For next landfall may well be the eastern shores of this lakeside metropolis. PhOTOs By ONTArIO TOurIsM

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Pampered Provisioning If you dock on the Toronto Islands, you deserve a lunch break at the Rectory Café on Ward’s Island. This restaurant boasts an elegant interior, though you’ll want to get a seat in the garden courtyard with great views of the lake from a downright forested perspective. It’s been rated Toronto’s best lakeside patio and the food is just as good, with gourmet sandwiches and salads as lunchtime features. Rectory Café, 102 Lakeshore Avenue (on the island); 416-203-2152; therectorycafe.com One of the most romantic places you can do dinner—with some of the best views of the city from this glass-enclosed, cherry wood highlighted restaurant on the floor of the Harbour Castle Westin Hotel—is at Toulá. Great cuisine, even better views, candlelight and live piano music. And a two-minute walk from the city side of the Island Ferry Dock. Toulá Restaurant, 1 Habour Square; 416-777-2002; toularestaurant.com Light-hearted atmosphere with a nautical theme, Snug Harbour, where the Credit River meets Lake Ontario, offers patio seating dockside. It’s the perfect place for people-watching, as it’s right beside a public walkway heading out to the lake. It’s also a mere 50 steps from Credit Village Marina, with berths strictly reserved for transient boaters. Varied menu, though they specialize in seafood. Snug Harbour, 14 Stavebank Road South; 905-274-5000; sungharbourrestaurant.com One of the most spectacular area views outside the skyscrapers themselves is the vista from the glass wall that comprises most of Bluffer’s Park Marina Restaurant. Dine here with white linen and fine silver and watch the play of sun on the towering bluffs. Great food and the most idyllic setting in the Toronto area. Bluffer’s Park Marina Restaurant, 7 Brimley Road South; 416-266-4556

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A day at “The Beach” Near sunset one day early in August, our first waypoint is a man-made harbor five or six nautical miles east of the islands. We cut through a narrow and treacherous passage and sight the yacht club off our port side. We tie up at Ashbridge’s Bay. A beach stretches eastward in a graceful arc, just past the seawall. The posts of a battalion of beach volleyball nets stand at attention. Families frolic in the waters off this brown sugar expanse; bikes click along the five-mile-long boardwalk. This is a transition zone for boaters who want to debrief from the hustle and bustle of the city before hitting the natural—if not supernatural—splendor of a secret harbor know as the Bluffs. Here narrow streets fall away gently down a rise toward the lake—a shoreline sporting beach after beach. As we stroll these streets, a lady greets us from the porch of a house, half-cottage, half-mansion. It is a metaphor for a place called either “The Beach” or “The Beaches,” depending on your home port and your geography. For this is a fascinating community—part city, part beach resort, part village—where shops display their wares from century-old establishments; where come July, one of the best jazz festivals around kicks into high gear. We stop and prowl the beaches; we window-shop along Queen Street. But we are on a mission. So we cast off for points east. Here the shores climb. The beach gives way to bluffs 50 feet high, a hundred.


In July, Toronto hosts one of the best jazz festivals in North America (left). Despite its bustling metropolis, the city offers visitors and residents alike beachfront views and stunning sunsets (right).

We pull in late in the day and dock at Bluffer’s Park Marina. Three or four yacht clubs share the basin with this public haven. A glass and steel building sports fine dining on the top level, and Dogfish Pub, a friendly unassuming place, sits right beside the water. To the north, cliffs rear up precipitously. In the harbor just to the east is Cathedral Bluffs Yacht Club. The name couldn’t be more appropriate. I imagine castle walls, sandstone skyscrapers and, yes, cathedrals. I look west and those same bluffs fall away into the sunset, silhouetted and purple in the fading light. I scan the western horizon: Nothing but a smattering of trees hovering like mirages beneath violet skies. And the lake. Not a skyscraper in sight. Late on another day, one of the last fair weather days of the season, my friend Kevin and I plied the waters west of the city. We watched the sunset; we stared at mansions on shore, nestled in the shelter of autumn-painted, scarlet- and pumpkin-colored trees. The sun glittered on the crystal walls of the city, gilding them the color of a late-night campfire, transforming them in a lightshow to crimson, then lavender, then indigo beneath a cotton-candy sky. Kevin looked at me and grinned. “We own this lake,” he said. Back on our dock we watched the stars grow in the sky. We fired up the Force Ten on the transom of Soggy Dollar, rocking gently on H Dock at Port Credit Harbour Marina. Five signet swans glided across the water to beg for food. A leaping salmon broke the surface of the yacht basin. This is one of Lake Ontario’s biggest marinas, but tonight Kevin and I shared the docks with no one. “So much for Big City Boating,” I said. Then I threw some steaks on the barbecue. r PhOTOs By ONTArIO TOurIsM

Seasonal & Visitor Dockage Harbourfront Centre Marine Dept. 235 Queens Quay West Toronto, ON Canada M5J 2G8 marine@harbourfrontcentre.com harbourfrontcentre.com Government Site Partners

Toronto, Canada

Marina Quay West: 416-203-1212 Marina Four/John Quay: 416-203-2620 Pumpout Info Line: 416-973-4148 VHF.ch 68 Corporate Office: 416-954-5596 Corporate Site Partner

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Flybridge 38’ 41’ 43’ 45’ 47’ 51’ 58’ 61’ 70’ Sport yacht 36’ 44’ 50 58’ open expreSS 43’ 48’

We monitor VHF channel 68

3282 Ogden’s Beach Rd. Box 40 Midland, Ontario L4R 4K6 For more information visit us at Doral Marine Resort or call

1-888-446-4545 52 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


special advertising section

53 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


marina watch SON RISE MARINA

SON RISE MARINA

VENETIAN MARINA

Venetian Marina 2035 First St. Sandusky, OH 44870 800-487-3625 venetianmarina.com

Son Rise Marina 1535 First St. Sandusky, OH 44870 888-508-3625 sonrisemarina.com

Amenities Transient slips: Nearby Pump-out: Yes Gas: Yes (Venetian) Gas: Nearby (Son Rise) Diesel: Nearby Lifts: Yes Launch ramp: Nearby Engine repair: Yes Hull repair: Yes Marine store: Nearby Restaurant: Nearby Showers: Yes Laundromat: Yes

54 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

Venetian Marina & Son Rise Marina

Sister marinas offer something for every boater. by colle e n h . trou pi s

W

hether you’re looking for a home base for your 15-footer or 50-footer—or both—you can find what you need in the accommodations available at Venetian Marina and Son Rise Marina in Sandusky, Ohio. Run by the family-owned and -operated Hoty Enterprises, the two marinas sit four blocks away from each other in Sandusky Bay, just a 10-minute ride from Lake Erie. “An advantage of being in the bay is that you don’t have the big water fluctuation and waves you might have on Lake Erie,” says Dick Henry, general manager of both marinas. Although Venetian Marina dates back some 40 years, it doesn’t show its age. Bought by Hoty in 1983, it underwent a complete remodel in 1988 that included installing 420 floating docks ranging from 25 to 50 feet. “Over the years, we’ve added new restrooms, new community rooms and new decks,” Henry says. Rack storage for approximately165 boats was added in 1989. The marina also boasts yacht-club-like amenities, including a heated in-ground pool, patio area and picnic deck.

Also on site is Hoty Marine Service Center, a full-service repair facility that can handle pretty much anything. The service office is open seven days a week during the summer months, and there’s always a full-time technician on duty weekends. While Venetian Marina is more suited to smaller boats, Son Rise Marina was built from scratch in 2001 with larger boats in mind. It features 230 concrete floating docks ranging from 40 to 50 feet and can accommodate boats up to 60 feet. “It is a state-of-the-art marina for the upscale boater,” Henry says. “There are storage lockers in the restrooms and dock boxes at each dock, and deck hands will meet the boats when they come in.” Like Venetian, Son Rise is gated and open year round. It includes 109,000 square feet of heated storage, a large community room, a heated pool, restrooms and an office. “The two really complement each other,” Henry says. “The idea is to make it easy for boaters [to] enjoy their boat without a whole lot of hassle.” r


See our exciting NEW Marketing Plan Below!

See the NEW Ranger Tug 27 Chicago Boat Show January 12-16, 2011

Come to Manitowoc, Wisconsin

More trawlers at one location than anywhere in the Midwest

We Sell the Dreams, You Build the Memories!

IDEAL GREAT LOOP & FRESH WATER TRAWLERS NEW TRAWLERS

American Tugs 525, 435, 395, 365

41 Camano 2011 $50,000 off new order

31 Camano 2006 $189,000

NEW TRAWLERS

29 Ranger Tug 2010 $239,500

27 Ranger Tug 2011 with trailer $191,000

25 Ranger Tug 2008 with trailer $137,000

BROKERAGE TRAWLERS

21 Ranger Tug 2010 with trailer $63,000

65 Custom Trawler 1998 $585,000

45 CHB Sedan 1981 $110,000

43 Saberline 1996 $375,000

42 Nordic Tug 1999 $339,000

42 Grand Banks 1993 $289,000

42 Grand Banks 1987 $219,000

42 Grand Banks 1977 $119,000

42 Ocean Alexander 1996 $205,000

41 American Tug 2006 $395,000

41 Lindmark 1987 $105,000

40 Ocean Alexander 1983 $109,900

37 Great Harbour 1996 $279,000

37 Custom Steel 1986 $110,000

36 Heisier Lobsterboat 2000 $139,000

36 Grand Banks 1984 $145,000

36 Grand Banks 1973 $63,900

32 Grand Banks 1990 $135,000 SOLD

32 Cheoy Lee 1983 $64,000

26 Nordic Tug 1981 with trailer $75,000

32 Island Gypsy 1983 $59,900

21 Ranger Tug 2007 with trailer $47,000

31 Camano 2001 $139,000

21 Ranger Tug 2006 with trailer $45,000

31 Blue Seas 1988 $94,500

26 Glacier Bay 2007 with trailer $109,500

26 Glacier Bay 2005 with trailer $94,500

Our marketing plan includes: an opportunity to place your trawler with Southeast Yachting School & Charters in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, located just 20 miles from us. Your trawler will remain in our brokerage and can be sold at anytime. Call us to discuss the benefits.

*Please note the location of the brokerage boat in the website listing: at Manitowoc or at the owner’s location

www.trawlersmidwest.com • 920-894-2632 • 866-375-1633


Windy City Yacht Brokerage, llC

85 Brokers

800 Listings

20 Offices

We post all listings on 16 different multiple listings.

1988 55’ oCean suPer sPort 735HP detroit 8V92s, HeaVy renoVations. looks great $235,000

1971 54’ striKer sPort Fisherman 550HP detroit 1271s, many new uPgrades, 18’ Beam, al Hull $225,000

1980 53’ hatteras CLassiC 435HP detroit 8V71s, Bow & stern tHrusters, wHaler/25HP, naiad, 2 furunos $159,000

1991 44’ Lee WiLbur Custom 375HP Cat 3208s, Hull Blue awlgriP, suPer struCture wHite awlgriP, fanatiCally maintained $274,900

19698 40’ sea ray sundanCer 350HP Cat 3116ts. VdriVes, 965Hrs, inside Heated, metiCulous maintenanCe, many Custom, fresHwater $139,500

1986 36’ Carver 3607 aFt CBn 350HP Crusaders, gen 2 srs, 2 Heads, 2 Helms great PriCe fresHwater $37,900

1992 36’ bayLiner 3688 200HP Hino dsls, straigHt driVes, Very Clean, new uPgrades fresHwater $90,000

2003 32’ sea ray 320 sundanCer merC 300HP mag V driVes 410 Hours, generator, radar, fresHwater $92,500

1997 70’ nePtunus my 1110HP 12V92 detroits, 2 jet skis tender, tHrusters, staBilizers $799,000

SiSter Ship

SiSter Ship

SiSter Ship

2003 32’ reGaL 3260 Commodore VolVo 320HP 5.7l V driVes only 240 Hours, generator, fresHwater $89,000

1991 31’ sea ray sundanCer t-310HP V driVes, only 530 Hrs., furuno radar, garmin gPs, aC, windlass fresHwater $18,000

1990 30’ Carver 30 santeGo twin merC 260HP 5.7l alPHa one 550 Hrs, exCePtionally Clean, fresHwater $24,900

2005 30’ bayLiner 305 twin merCs, Blue Hull, 11’ Beam windlass, Clean fresHwater $49,000

1998 28’ sea ray ss single 385HP merC w/205 Hrs. VaCuflusH Head 9’6” Beam fresHwater $34,900

2000 27’ Grady White 272 twin 200HP yamaHas, 782 Hrs, aC, Head, ComP galley, trailer inCluded $49,000

www.WindyCityYachts.com •

Jeff Pierce, CPYB

• 312-440-9500 Email: jeff@windycityyachts.com


marine marketplace 58 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r Y 2 011


marine marketplace

Come see us at the chicago boat show January 12-16, 2011 We will be joining Gordyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lakefront Marine in the Cobalt Display.

59 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r Y 2 011


marine marketplace

2007 RAYBURN 92V SKYLOUNGE

1994, 2000 & 2005 HATTERAS 50’ CONVERTIBLE

2007 GRAND BANKS 49 EASTBAY SX

17’ 28’ 28’ 29’ 29’ 30’ 31’ 31’ 32’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 37’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 41’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 43’

2006 1996 2001 2007 2006 2008 1995 1997 2007 1986 1986 1988 1989 1995 1988 2001 2003 1967 1987 2005 2006 1975

2008 TIARA 4300 SOVRAN

Boston Whaler 170 Montauk S-Mercury 90 hp Four Stroke.................$ Pursuit 2870 Offshore C.C. T-Yamaha 225 VX, 225 hp .............................$ Pursuit 2870 Offshore C.C. T-Mercury Optimax, 225 hp .........................$ Hydra-Sports 2900 Center Console T-Evinrude ETEC, 250 hp ...............$ Tiara 2900 Classic T-Crusader 6.0 MPI, 375 hp .......................................$ Tiara 3000 Open T-Crusader 6.0 MPI, 375 hp ...........................................$ Tiara 3100 Open - Hardtop T-Crusader 454 XLI, 320 hp..........................$ Tiara 3100 Open T-Crusader 454 XLI, 320 hp............................................$ CABO 32 Express T-Caterpillar C-7, 461 hp..............................................$ Trojan F-36 Convertible T-Crusader 350’s, 270 hp ...................................$ Hatteras 36 Sedan T-Crusader 7.4 ltr., 350 hp .........................................$ Mainship 36 Double Cabin T-Crusader 350 5.7L, 270 hp ........................$ Tiara 3600 Convertible T-Crusader 350 hp ...............................................$ Tiara 3700 Open T-Caterpillar, 3208, 435 hp .............................................$ Hatteras 38 Convertible T- Detroit Diesels, 6V-71TI ...............................$ Cruisers 3870 Express T-Mercruiser 8.1 ltr. HO, 425 hp .........................$ Powerquest 380 Avenger T-Mercruiser 496 MAG HO, 475 hp .............$ Hatteras 41’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 6V53N 216 hp ......................$ Chris Craft 42’ Commander T-Detroit Diesel 6V71TI’s ............................$ Tiara 4200 Open - Plan A T-Cummins QSM11, 660 hp ............................$ Tiara 4200 Open - Plan C T-Cummins QSM11, 660 hp ............................$ Hatteras 43 Flybridge MY T-Cummins VT903, 320 hp .............................$

21,500 49,900 64,900 84,900 129,900 192,900 89,900 89,900 309,900 49,500 79,900 57,900 86,500 139,900 164,000 149,900 115,000 79,900 119,900 419,900 479,900 99,900

43’ 43’ 44’ 44’ 45’ 46’ 47’ 48’ 48’ 48’ 49’ 50’ 50’ 50’ 50’ 52’ 58’ 58’ 60’ 85’ 92’

1995 2008 1984 2006 2000 1985 2009 1988 1994 2004 2007 1988 1994 2000 2005 1999 1978 1985 2000 2006 2007

Grand Haven, MI Contact Brent Reed (616) 402-0180 Lasalle, MI Contact Paul Reed (419) 304-4962

Tiara 4300 Open T-Detroit Diesels 6V92’s, 550 hp ...................................$ 229,900 Tiara 4300 Sovran T-Volvo IPS 600, 435 hp...............................................$ 499,900 Viking 44’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesels 671, 450 hp .............................$ 169,900 Tiara 4400 Sovran T-Caterpillar C-12, 715 hp ...........................................$ 524,900 Silverton 453 Motor Yacht T-Cummins QSM 11, 535 hp .........................$ 229,900 Ocean 46 Sunliner T-Detroit Diesel, 6-71’s ..............................................$ 119,900 Sunseeker 47 Portofino - owner is central agent...................................$ 819,000 Ocean 48 Super Sport T-Detroit Diesel 6-71’s, 485 hp ...........................$ 169,900 Hatteras 48’ Cockpit MY T-Detroit Diesel 6V92, 535 hp .........................$ 249,900 Silverton 48’ Convertible T-Caterpillar C-12, 700 hp ...............................$ 449,000 Grand Banks 49 Eastbay SX T-Caterpillar C-12, 715 hp .........................$ 749,900 Bertram 50’ Convertible T-Detroit Diesel 8V-92 735 hp..........................$ 449,000 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Detroit Diesel 12V-71TA DDEC, 900 hp ......$ 399,900 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Caterpillar 3406E, 800 bhp ...........................$ 565,000 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Caterpillar C-18, 1000 bhp ...........................$ 899,900 Hatteras 52’ Cockpit MY T-Caterpillar 3406E, 800 bhp ...........................$ 499,900 Hatteras 58’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 8V92 TA’s, 550 hp ................$ 299,900 Hatteras 58’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 8V92 TA’s, 650 hp ................$ 349,000 Hatteras 60’ Convertible T-Caterpillar, 3412, 1350 hp .............................$ 974,500 Pacific Mariner 85 - owner is central agent ...........................................$4,795,000 Rayburn 92’ Skylounge T-Caterpillar C30, 1550 hp .................................$5,500,000

www.reedyachtsales.com

RIVERFRONT YACHT sales & services Introduces Quality • Value • Craftsmanship • Tradition NEW MODEL!

See the Back Cove 30’ & 33’ at the

Cleveland Boat Show Booth 510

See the Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 409 & 36i at the Cleveland Boat Show Booth 510

NEW Back Cove 30’ Experience a lobster boat tradition mingled with the sleek lines of Back Cove Yachts. From gentle contours above to the extraordinarily economical diesel power below, this is a ride you won’t want to miss! Practical and beautiful, Back Cove Yachts are a delight to drive and a joy to behold. With ample room in the cockpits, simple and well thought out systems. and comfortable amenities below, they will give owners years of pleasure Available in 30’, 33’ and 37’.

NEW MODEL!

NEW Jeanneau Sun Odyssey

1890 Carter Road | Cleveland, OH 44113 Located on the Cuyahoga River

www.riverfrontyacht.com

Ask us about our certified installations They include proper sea trialing, calibration & review with the owner on board

POWER BOATS 37’ 1995 Sea Ray 370 Sundancer ..$69,900 29’ 2008 Back Cove Express HT .. $174,900 37’ 1975 Marinette Sedan ...............$25,900 27’ 1988 Sea Ray..................................$12,000 33’ 2009 Back Cove Express......... $299,900 26’ 2008 Back Cove 26 Special ... $119,900 33’ 1987 Chris-Craft Stinger ............$19,900 26’ 1995 Wellcraft 2600 Coastal ....$24,900 30’ 1990 Doral Prestancia ................$37,750 Contact us for Special Storage Rates on qualified brokerage boats We have more buyers than boats! Call us to set up your listing now! (216) 861-4904

Savor the unique pleasure of sailing aboard the Sun Odyssey 36i. You’ll be seduced by the high performance hull, powerful sail plan and a deck and rigging designed for safety and security. The large leather wheel, generous cockpit, self-tailing winches and more, offer ease and simple sailing. For the cruising sailor it offers a large cabin, head with SEPARATE shower, L-shaped galley with refrigerated icebox and

SAILBOATS 54’ 2005 Jeanneau 54DS ...........$529,000 34’ 2002 J Boats J 105 .................. $99,900 41’ 1984 C&C Centerboard Sloop$99,900 32’ 2006 Beneteau 323 ................ $79,900 41’ 1987 C&C Sloop....................... $69,900 30’ 1983 Catalina 30 Tall Rig...... $15,900 36’ 2010 Jeanneau 36i Shoa Draft$149,000 30’ 1980 Irwin Sloop ..................... $16,900 36’ 1996 PDQ MK II LRC .............$149,900 26’ 1974 Ranger Sloop ....................$4,900 35’ 1986 Express-Goman Exp.... $59,900

For Yacht Sales & Brokerage, Call 216-861-4904 • For Dockage, Electrical & Mechanical Sales & Service, Call 216-861-7393 60 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


DEMO BOAT OF THE MONTH

85 94 05 85 92 00 87 87 94 90 90 08 89 88 07 07 09

25’ 27’ 27’ 28’ 29’ 29’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 33’ 33’ 35’ 36’ 36’ 37’ 42’ 43’

07 30’ 05 31’

Cruisers 33 Hardtop

2008 Carver 36 $229,000

2011 Cruisers 48 Cantius PRE-OWNED BOATS Sea Ray 250 Sundancer w/260, Merc ......................................................................11,400 Wellcraft 2700 Martinque w/7.4L Merc ...................................................................19,900 Sea Ray 270 Amberjack w/350 MAG MPI BRIII .......................................................49,900 Bayliner Contessa w/260 HP Volvo.............................................................................9,900 Sea Ray 290 Sundancer w/7.4 Bravo II 310HP Merc ....................................................24,900 Chaparral Signature w/T-4.3L Volvos .......................................................................49,900 Chris Craft Amerosport T-350 Crusaders ..................................................................24,900 Carver Mariner w/T-270HP Crusaders ......................................................................39,500 Wellcraft 3200 Martinique w/5.7L Merc ..................................................................39,900 Trojan 10 Meter Express w/T-454 Crusaders ...........................................................34,900 Donzi Center Console w/T-250 Johnsons .................................................................19,900 Carver Mariner w/T-5.7 MPI Crusaders ..................................................................229,000 Regal 360 Commodore w/T-7.4L Mercs ...................................................................44,900 Carver Aft Cabin w/T-340 HP Crusaders .....................................................................49,900 Cruisers 370 Express w/T-Yanmar Dsls ...................................................................279,000 Rinker 420 Express w/T-496 HO Mercruiser BRIII ..................................................199,000 Carver 43 Super Sport w/T-IPS 500 Volvos ............................................................499,000 BROKERED BOATS Cruisers 300 Cxi w/T-225 HP GXI SX Volvos ............................................................84,500 Formula PC w/T-6.2L Mercs ....................................................................................119,900

97 06 95 00 04 88 90 99 02 02 07 85 88 99 01 03 04 04 94 02 03 04

Ph: 815-357-8666

32’ 32’ 33’ 33’ 33’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 39’

Carver 325 Aft Cabin w/T-350XL Crusaders .............................................................54,900 Cruisers 320 Express w/T-6.2 MPI Mercs ...................................................................99,500 Sea Ray 330 Sundancer w/T-7.4L Mercs .................................................................59,000 Wellcraft 3300 Martinique w/T-7.4L Mercs .............................................................74,900 Chaparral 330 Signature w/T-350 MAG MPI BRIII .................................................119,000 Mainship Convertible w/T-454 Crusaders ................................................................49,500 Sea Ray 350 Express w/T-7.4L Mercs ......................................................................39,900 Carver 356 Aft Cabin w/T-7.4L Mercs ....................................................................119,000 Carver 356 Aft Cabin w/T-7.4L Mercs ....................................................................129,900 Carver 350 Mariner w/T-6.2 MPI 320 Mercs............................................................89,000 Rinker 350 Express w/T-350 MAG MPI BRIII Mercs ..............................................134,500 Carver Aft Cabin w/T-454 CID Crusaders ....................................................................39,900 Carver Mariner w/T-454 CID Crusaders.......................................................................54,900 Carver 36 Mariner w/T-350 Mag Mercs......................................................................74,900 Trojan 360 Express w/T-454 Mag MPI Mercs.............................................................99,000 Carver 360 Sport Sedan w/T-8.1GI Volvos ................................................................172,500 Carver 360 Mariner w/T-6.0L MPI Crusaders .........................................................159,000 Carver 360 Mariner w/T-6.0 Crusaders ..................................................................153,000 Carver 380 Santego w/T-7.4 Mercs ..........................................................................63,000 Carver 380 Santego w/T-6.2L Mercs ........................................................................99,000 Sea Ray 380 Sundancer w/T-8.1L Mercruisers ......................................................169,900 Silverton MY w/T-3126 CATS .................................................................................279,900

www.springbrookmarina.com

05 05 01 03 07 08 85 07 89 05 95 93 01 03 07 01 00 04 86 03 09

39’ 39’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 42’ 42’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 45’ 46’ 46’ 48’ 50’ 69’

Carver 396 Aft Cabin w/T-8.1 GI Volvos .................................................................219,000 Carver 396 Motor Yacht w/T-8.1 GI Volvos ............................................................289,000 Sea Ray Sedan w/T-3126 Cats ...............................................................................255,000 Cruisers 405 Express Bridge w/T-370 HP Volvo Dsls .............................................215,000 Cruisers 415 Express MY w/T-8.1GXI Volvos .........................................................399,000 Marquis Sport Coupe w/T-D6 Series IPS 370HP ....................................................569,000 Grand Banks 42 Classics w/T-3208 CATS ..............................................................139,500 Carver 42 SS w/T-IPS 370 HP Volvo Dsls ...............................................................349,000 Sea Ray 440 Aft Cabin w/T-330 Mercs ....................................................................89,000 Carver 444 CMY w/T-D6 Volvo Dsls .......................................................................289,000 Carver 440 Aft Cabin w/T-420 HP Cummins...........................................................229,900 Carver 440 MY w/T-3116TA CATS .........................................................................169,900 Carver 444 CMY w/T-370 Cummins........................................................................219,000 Carver 444 CMY w/T-63P Volvo Dsls .....................................................................295,000 Cruisers 447 Sport Sedan w/T-480 HP Yanmars ....................................................499,000 Silverton 453 MY w/T-450 HP Cummins ................................................................319,000 Sea Ray 460 Sundancer w/T-450 Cummins ................................................................209,000 Carver 466MY w/T-480 HP Volvos..........................................................................399,000 Chris Craft 480 Catalina w/T-350 HP Crusaders ......................................................99,000 Cruisers 5000 Sedan w/T-715 HP D12 Volvos ..............................................................399,000 Marquis 690 w/T-1200 HP MTU’s .......................................................................2,499,000

Fax: 815-357-8678

61 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

marine marketplace

We are Proud to Announce our New Partnership with Princess Yachts


marine marketplace 62 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r Y 2 011


New PrOducTs: Sail Alerion Express • J-Boat • Precision • Laser Performance lifeStyle Patagonia • O’Brien • Puma • Gill • Rip Curl • Slam

For complete specs and additional photos visit www.IrishBoatShop.com

BOAT FINANcING

2001 Monk 36 Trawler

1987 Tiara 3600 Open 36’ 36’ 36’ 34’ 30’ 29’ 28’ 28’ 28’ 26’ 26’ 25’

BOAT FINANcING

Sea Ray 360 Sundancer ‘04 ................ $167,500 Monk 36 Trawler ’01 .......................... $229,000 Tiara 3600 Open ’87 ............................. $54,900 Sea Ray 340 Sedan Bridge ‘85 ............. $36,000 Regal 3060 ‘06 .......................................... $79,900 Tiara 2900 Coronet ‘07 ......................... $129,500 Sea Ray 280 Bow Rider ‘00 ................... $29,995 Sea Ray 280 Bow Rider ‘97 ................... $25,000 Sea Ray 280 Sundancer ‘03 .................. $68,500 Glacier Bay 2670 Isle Runner ‘07 ......... $94,000 Cobalt 263 Cuddy Cabin ‘01................... $39,500 Chris Craft Sportsman ‘48 ................... $120,000

25’ Rosborough RF-246 ‘05 .......................... $79,500 23’ Bayliner 2350 Capri ’00 .......................... $11,995 22’ Sea Ray Seville 21 ’88 ........................... $5,500 21’ GLBBS Zimmer Launch ‘09 ................... $40,000 20’ Bayliner 2050 Capri ’00 ............................ $9,900 18’ Boston Whaler 18 Outrage ’81 .......... $14,900 18’ Herreshoff Pilot 18 ’74........................... $9,500 17’ Boston Whaler 17’ Striper ’89............ $22,400 17’ Assembled Beach Cruiser ‘08 ................ $6,900 16’ Chris Craft Deluxe ‘41............................. $27,900 13’ Boston Whaler 13 Sport ’71 ................. $8,900

13000 Stover Rd. Charlevoix MI 49720

231-547-9967

cvx@irishboatshop.com

400 Bay Street Harbor Springs MI 49740

231-526-6225

hs@irishboatshop.com

ThINkING OF BuyING A BOAT? Call us to see what options we have for you.

K

TED PATRIC

Lake & Bay

Y A C H T

S A L E S

“Specializing in Larger Yachts”

rateS have juSt reached a new 3 year low! (2 6 2 8)

1-616-494-BOAT NEW w USED w REFINANCE

PARTIAL LISTINGS visit us on the web for more!

89’ 74’ HATTERAS CPMY T-870HP DSL .................. $599,000 00’ 67’ CROSWAIT SPORT FISH. T-1350HP DSL .$1,395,000 87’ 60’ JEFFERSON MARQUESSA T-550HP DSL.... $299,000 98’ 53’ NAVIGATOR CLASSIC CUSTOM T-430HP .. $349,000 79’ 53’ HATTERAS YACHTFISH T-435HP DSL ......... $249,900 06’ 52’ TIARA SOVRAN SALON T-865HP DSL ........ $749,000 99’ 52’ TIARA EXPRESS T-800HP DSL...................... $549,900 97’ 52’ EGG HARBOR SY T-800HP DSL ................... $389,500 86’ 48’ VIkING MOTOR YACHT T-735HP DSL ......... $279,000 86’ 46’ OCEAN SUNLINER T-450HP DSL ................ $115,000 74’ 46’ EGG HARBOR SEDAN FISH.T-300HP DSL ... $64,000 89’ 43’ BERTRAM CONVERTIBLE T-550HP DSL ..... $189,000 95’ 43’ WELLCRAFT PORTOFINO T-350HP DSL........ $89,900 04’ 43’ EGG HARBOR SY T-700HP DSL..................... $459,900 06’ 43’ EGG HARBOR SY T-700HP DSL..................... $570,000 86’ 42’ CHRIS CRAFT 426 DOUBLECABIN T-350HP .$113,900 83’ 42’ BERTRAM CONVERT. T-435HP DSL ............ $150,000 02’ 42’ EGG HARBOR SY T-535HP DSL..................... $399,000 95’ 40’ SEA RAY 400 EC T-330HP ................................. $94,900 95’ 38’ EGG HARBOR GOLDEN EGG T-485HP DSL $269,900 73’ 38’ EGG HARBOR SEDAN T-350HP ...................... $29,900

05’ 37’ FORMULA PC T-425HP ................................... $182,900 01’ 37’ EGG HARBOR SY T-420HP DSL..................... $240,000 93’ 37’ SILVERTON CONVERTIBLE T-320HP ............. $97,900 92’ 36’ FOUR WINNS 365 VISTA T-390HP ................. $69,900 98’ 36’ SEALINE F36 T-330 HP DSL ........................... $150,000 00’ 36’ LUHRS CONVERTIBLE T-8.2L ........................ $139,900 83’ 36’ EGG HARBOR TOURNMNT. FISH T-350HP .. $49,900 96’ 35’ CARVER 355 MOTORYACHT T-320HP.......... $129,900 89’ 35’ OCEAN SUPER SPORT T-350HP ..................... $89,900 87’ 35’ EGG HARBOR SPORTFISH, T-350 HP ............ $59,900 88’ 35’ TROJAN 10.8M CONV T-350HP ...................... $49,900 95’ 34’ PHOENIX SFX CONVERTIBLE T-375HP DSL ... $134,900 89’ 34’ SEA RAY 340 SEDAN BRIDGE T-340HP............. $49,900 96’ 33’ CARVER 330 MARINER T-270HP .................... $55,000 87’ 33’ TROJAN 10 METER MID-CABIN T-350HP .... $17,900 04’ 33’ PURSUIT 3370 OFFSHORE T-300HP ............. $155,900 95’ 33’ SEA RAY SUNDANCER T-300HP .................... $59,350 99’ 33’ SEA RAY EXPRESS CRUISER T-310HP.......... $98,000 94’ 31’ TIARA OPEN T-300 HP DSL ............................ $89,900 99’ 31’ TIARA OPEN T-350 HP ................................... $117,900 96’ 30’ PURSUIT 3000 OFFSHORE T-350 HP .............. $69,900 98’ 30’ CENTURY CC, T-250 HP .................................... $47,500 84’ 29’ PHOENIX FB/CR T-235HP ................................. $19,900

www.yachtworld.com/lakeandbay P . O . B O X 2 3 7 • Marblehead, Ohio 43440

Phone/Fax 419-798-8511 • Email: lakeandbay@roadrunner.com

LIMITED CHARTER BOATS HIGH PERFORMANCE BOATS LOw dOwN PAyMeNT PrOGrAMs Are AvAILABLe We offer Personal Service! Terms up to 20 YRS

regional Office: holland, MI Financing satisfied customers for over 24 years *Rates are subject to change at any time

www.coastalfinancialcorp.com 63 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r Y 2 011

marine marketplace

BOAT FINANcING

Power Sea Ray • Boston Whaler • Hunt Yachts • Zodiac


marine marketplace

1815 Ottawa Beach Road, Holland, MI 49424

Ph: 616-399-6304 • Fax: 616-399-6329

www.anchorageyachtsales.com

Brokers for Power & Sail

Trades Considered!

1986 DeFever 53 POC Trawler

2006 MainShiP 43 Trawler

T-CAT 3208’s Stabilized, 3 strm, Thruster, Clean. Ask 299k

2003 Sea ray 380 SunDanCer T-Merc 8.1L, Genny, Cherry Int, Radar/Pilot, Beautiful! Ask 168k

T-Cummins QSC 8.3L, 2 Stateroom, Teak Interior, Very Loaded!! Ask 359k

2001 Tiara 3500 OPen

T-Crusader 8.1L, Newer Stamoid canvas, Real Teak Salon, Windlass, None Cleaner! Ask 148k

NORTH SHORE MARINA Year Round Full Service Marina 821 W. Savidge, Spring Lake, MI 49456

Ph: 616-604-0234 Marina 616-842-1488 •

www.northshoremarina.com

Newest Great Lakes Edgewater Dealer

Edgewater 24 Center Console

SEE US AT grand Rapids, Mi show February 16-20, 2011

Cruisers 330 Express in-stock

Select Pre-Owned / BrOkerage / rePOSSeSSIOnS / call FOr cOMPlete lISt

43’ ‘97 Carver 430 Cockpit Motoryacht Clean, Well Equipped T-315 Cummins...............189,900 40’ 03 Cruisers 405 MY, washer/dryer, full elect. low hrs and clean, T-8.1 ..........234,900 40’ ‘89 Luhrs Convertible, ready to fish, owner purchased new boat, T-7.4 ........... 74,900 38’ ‘00 Cruisers 3870 electronics Air/Heat, Gen, T-385 Horizons ............................. 149,900 37’ 92 Carver 3608/370 Aft Cabin Hardtop, wing doors, elect. sharp! T-7.4............ 74,900 37’ ‘99 Carver 374 Voyager, one meticulous owner, well equipped, ready! ......... 129,900 34’ ‘85 Sea Ray Sedan Bridge, dual helms, autopilot, canvas, T-7.4......................... 22,900 32’ ‘99 Trojan/Carver Express 1 owner, super clean, T-5.7 MAGS............................ 56,900 28’ ‘74 Bertram Flybridge, nice freshwater condition rebuilt engines ...................... 24,900 26’ ‘05 Sea Ray Sundancer AC, Full Canvas, Blue Hull Sharp! Merc 350 Mag................49,900 24’ ‘98 2470 Pursuit Center Console Trailer, T-Top, Porta Potti T-Yamaha 150HP ......... 29,900 24’ ‘08 Sportcraft Center Console, T-Top, 1 owner, freshwater 250HP, Yamaha... 52,900

rePO’S 28’ ‘06 Rinker 282 BR 30’ ‘99 Bayliner Express 33’ ‘02 Proline 34’ ‘03 Rinker342 FiestaVee 35’ ‘06 Regal 3560

T-CAT 3126, Cherry Int, C-120, Pilot, New Canvas, Mint! Ask 164k

1999 Sea ray 270 SunDanCer

Merc 7.4L MPI BIII, Arch, Air/heat, Windlass, Camper, Beautiful Cond! Ask 35k

55’ 50’ 47’ 45’ 42’ 41’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 38’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 34’ 34’ 31’ 31’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 27’ 26’ 25’ 24’

’90 ’03 ’70 ’79 ’87 ’97 ’10 ’87 ’96 ’08 ’00 ’87 ’73 ’85 ’98 ’01 ’89 ’85 ’89 ’81 ’93 ’02 ’90 ’04 ’94

36’ 36’ 35’ 35’ 34’ 32’ 30’ 30’

‘99 ‘00 ‘77 ‘76 ‘77 ‘05 ‘73 ‘84

Fleming Pilothouse Motor Yacht...................... $495,000 Sea Ray Sundancer 50......................................... 449,000 Chris-Craft Commander ......................................... 48,000 C&L Trawler ........................................................... 117,000 Jefferson 42 Sundeck .......................................... 129,900 Maxum 4100 SCR .................................................. 119,900 Fathom Element .................................................... 395,500 Silverton AFT CABIN .............................................. 49,900 Sea Ray EC ............................................................... 99,900 Fathom Expedition ................................................ 499,000 Sea Ray Sundancer.............................................. 129,900 Grand Banks 36 Classic ....................................... 154,900 Trojan Convertable ................................................. 19,900 Viking Convertible ................................................... 84,900 Nordic Tug 32......................................................... 175,000 Powerquest 340 Vyper 2001 .................................. 91,000 Tiara FLybridge ........................................................ 59,900 Island Packet IP 31 ................................................. 49,000 Sea Ray Weekender............................................... 33,000 Carver AFT CABIN .................................................. 19,900 Sea Ray 300 Sundancer......................................... 29,900 Sea Ray SunDeck ................................................... 49,000 Wellcraft Prima 2600 .............................................. 17,000 Aylward 25 “Rosborough Style Trawler” ............ 39,900 Maxum 2400 SCR .................................................... 14,900 sail Catalina 36 MkII .................................................... 110,000 Catalina MkII 2000 .................................................. 99,900 Hallberg-Rassy Rasmus ........................................ 39,900 Hallberg-Rassy Rasmus ........................................ 42,000 Tartan Centerboard ............................................... 26,000 Beneteau 323 ........................................................... 79,900 Pearson ...................................................................... 9,900 Catalina 30 ............................................................... 27,900

36’ ‘88 Regal 38’ ‘93 Carver Santego 39’ ‘07 Cruisers 395 MY 42’ ‘07 Carver Super Sport MORE ARRiVing wEEklY!

64 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r Y 2 011

1999 CruiSerS 4270 exPreSS

info@harborviewyachtsales.com • Traverse City, MI 49684 Call Bill Allgaier office: 231-933-5414 • cell: 231-218-1227


OUT YOUR DREAM ON THE WATER LET WALSTROM MARINE TAKE YOU THERE...

Tiara 5800 Sovran – Now in Stock

WALSTROM.COM

HARBOR SPRINGS, MI 231-526-2141 | CHEBOYGAN, MI 231-627-7105 | BAY HARBOR, MI 231-439-2741

65 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

marine marketplace

LIVE


marine marketplace

Specializing in quick selling of larger yachts! 48 Sea Ray SB 2001 ..............$339,000 46 Sea Ray DA 2000 .............$209,000 46 Cigarette RR 2002 ...........$319,000 43 Tiara Sovran 2005 ...........$369,000 43 Carver CMY 2007 .......... New Listing 41 Maxum SCA 1996 ............... $88,900 41 Sea Ray Express 2001 ...$189,900 41 Tiara Open 2001 ......................... Offers 40 Sea Ray Sedan 1999 ......... Just Sold 40 Formula SS 2004..............$189,900 40 Fountain 12 Meter1987 ...$49,900 39 Sea Ray Exp.Dsl 1988 ........ $49,900 39 Sea Ray Exp.Dsl 1998 ......... $47,600 37 Sea Ray Aft Cabin 1997 .. $119,900 37 Formula SS 2004............. $138,500 36 Sea Ray DA 2004 .............$177,500 36 Tiara 3600 Sovran2006$239,900 36 Tiara 3500 Exp. 2000 ....$204,000 36 Tiara Open Dsl 2003 .......$219,000 35 Regal 3560 Com. 2005$129,900

34 Sea Ray Exp.1989 ................ $39,900 34 Sea Ray DA 1997 ................ $69,900 34 Sea Ray DA 2008 .............$198,000 34 Sea Ray DA 2000 ................ $89,900 34 Mainship 34 Pilot 2000 .$116,900 34 Sea Ray Exp.1988 ................ $19,900 33 Sea Ray Exp. 1994............... $39,900 33 Sea Ray DA 1998 ................ $76,800 32 Chris Craft 1987 .................. $19,900 32 Tiara Open 2005 ...............$198,500 31 Tiara Open 1996 .................. $89,900 30 Bayliner Ciera 1999............ $39,900 30 Pursuit Offshore 1995 ...... $71,500 29 Fountain Fever 1993 .......... $25,000 29 Tiara Open 2001 ...............$109,900 28 Stamas WA 2001 ............... $31,500 27 Sea Ray Express 1993 ...... $24,500 22 Tiara Sport 1993 ................. $19,900 18 Maxum 2000 ............................ $9,500 17 Mako 2005 ............................. $14,500

Yacht-sa-Talk Radio program at www.portclintonradio.com To View our complete pre-owned inventory:

www.castawayyachtsalesllc.com 205 SE Catawba Rd. in the Beacon Plaza

Office: 419-732-2938 â&#x20AC;˘ Cell: 419-834-0788 castawayyachts@aol.com

RICK LUCAS

Help Find a Cure for Pancreatic Cancer 2011 calendars and apparel now available.

Net proceeds go to the Jane H. Thie Memorial Fund, Inc. benefiting the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute. w w w.cr uis eforc ure.org Calendars are $17.75 each for regular shipping and $20.30 each for priority mail. Commemorative Posters are $18.25 each for regular shipping and $21.55 for priority mail. If purchasing by credit card, please go to www.cruiseforcure.org and visit the e-shop page or you may send a check made payable to Jane H. Thie Memorial Fund, Inc, P. O. Box 370, Metamora, MI 48455. The Jane H. Thie Memorial Fund is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization and is considered a public charity under section 509 (a)(2), tax ID #80-0453866.

66 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011


marine marketplace

Power Boats

Remanufacturerd transmissions in stock. Older transmissions our speciality.

35’ ‘95 Carver 350 Aft .................... 57,900 43’ ‘95 Wellcraft 4350 Portofino 145,000

26’ ‘99 Sea Ray Sundancer.......... 37,500 36’ ‘82 Carver 3607 Aft .................. 36,500 46’ ‘77 Bertam FBMY................... 135,000 27’ ‘98 Four Winns 278 .................. 42,500 37’ ‘88 Chris Craft Amerosport .... 49,500 52’ ‘ 63 Chris Craft Connie ............ 49,500 29’ ‘87 Cruisers Sea Devil............. 25,500 37’ ‘78 Vinette Steel Trawler ........ 49,900

Distributors of the Drivesaver flexible couplings and mounts, oil coolers and dampers.

Dealer Inquiries Invited 2706 Portage St., Kalamazoo, MI 49001 • 269-345-0629

29’ ‘04 Four Winns 298 .................. 72,900 37’ ‘95 Cruisers 3775...................... 89,900 29’ ‘94 Sea Ray 290 ........................ 28,900 38’ ‘88 C.C. 381................................ 79,500

27’ ‘73 Catalina ................................. 8,750 30’ ‘97 Maxum 3000 SCR............... 42,900 38’ ‘98 Carver 380 Santego........... 89,500 27’ ‘77 O’Day ..................................... 6,900 31’ ‘92 Silverton 31C ...................... 40,900 38’ ‘85 Bayliner 3870...................... 51,900 30’ ‘84 O’Day ................................... 24,900 31’ ‘97 Carver 310 EX ..................... 44,900 40’ ‘94 Mainship Sedan .............. 119,900 30’ ‘95 Catalina MK III ................... 49,900 32’ Wellcraft St. Tropez 4 starting @ 18,900 41’ ‘79 Lindmark Trawler .............. 94,900 32’ ‘78 Endeavor 32 Sloop ............ 26,500 34’ ‘01 Sea Ray 340 ...................... 105,500 42’ ‘87 Carver Aft ........................... 99,500 32’ ‘94 Sea Ward 32 Eagle............ 43,900 34’ ‘87 Sea Ray Express................ 31,900 42’ ‘82 Bertram FBMY ................. 135,900 34’ ‘96 Gemini 105M ..................... 84,950

5309 E. Wilder Rd. Bay City, MI 48706

Ph: 989-684-5010 • info@bayharborbaycity.com

Trident Funding

Boat Loans

Purchase Refinance Pre Approval Low Rates Serving Boat Buyers Nationwide

1-888-386-3888 Vincent Luzietti Robert Dunford, Jr.

Sail Boats 25’ ‘85 Catalina................................. 6,900

Details on over 150 listings at

www.kellymarinesales.com

Creating family & fishing memories for over 20 years.

www.beaconpointmarine.com 40’ Carver 2000 Four O Six T-Dsl Cos Cob ...................... $ 39’ Sea Ray 1988 Express Cruiser T-Gas Cos Cob .......... $ 39’ Mainship 2004 Trawler T-Diesel Cos Cob ................. $ 38’ SeaRay 2006 Sundancer T-Gas Cos Cob .................. $ 37’ Cruiser 2004 Express Gas Cos Cob............................ $ 37’ Sea Ray 1996 Sundancer T- Gas Cos Cob ................. $ 36’ Sea Ray 2002 Sundancer T- Gas Cos Cob ................. $ 35’ Contender 1995 Express T-Gas Cos Cob ................... $ 35’ Jefferson 2002 Marlago Gas Cos Cob ...................... $ 34’ Sea Ray 1999 Sundancer T-Gas Cos Cob .................. $ 33’ Donzi 1987 Cuddy cabin T-Gas Cos Cob .................... $ 32’ Stamas 1993 Express Gas Cos Cob ........................... $ 30’ Bertram 1984 Sportfish T- Gas Cos Cob .................... $ 30’ Stamas 1988 T- Gas Cos Cob ..................................... $ 30’ Pursuit 2001 Express Cos Cob ................................... $ 29’ Formula 1988 Performance Cruiser T-Gas Shelton ..........$ 29’ Pro-Line 2007 Express T-Gas Shelton ....................... $ 25’ Sea Fox 2010 Center console T-Gas .......................... $ 24’ Sea Ray 2007 Sundeck Mercruiser I/O ...................... $ 23’6” Sea Fox 2010 Walkaround Suzuki 250hp ............... $ 23’6” Sea Fox CC Suzuki 200hp ....................................... $ 23’ Everglades 2011 CC Single Yamaha 250hp ............. $ 23’ Sea Ox 1992 walkaround single Suzuki 300hp.......... $ 22’ Harris Floate-Bote 1995 .......................................... $ 22’ Sea Pro 2003 Walkaround.......................................... $ 21’ Sea Ray 1999 Express ................................................ $

199,900 45,000 184,900 210,000 139,500 89,995 145,000 56,500 79,000 79,995 25,995 19,995 42,000 15,000 69,995 15,000 85,000 57,500 38,000 42,500 36,995 76,000 22,900 12,995 17,500 9,995

49 River Road 722 River Road Cos Cob, CT Shelton, CT

203-661-4033 • 203-929-7444

67 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


marine marketplace

Custom Marine Inc. Innovative Solutions for Your Boat

✵ Custom-Built Boats ✵ Yacht Interior Refits ✵ First Class Antique & Classic Wooden Boat Restoration ✵ Paint Jobs & Bright Work ✵ Expert Fiberglass Repair

Sandusky, OH

Custom built 28 foot Deluxe Sportsman

www.custommarine.biz 419.621.1188

BERGMANN MARINE

Charlevoix, MI 49720 • Phone 231/547-3957

18’ 24’ 23’ 26’ 26’ 26’ 28’ 28’ 32’ 33’ 33’ 33’ 34’ 35’ 36’ 36’

www.bergmannmarine.com

1955 Chris Craft Sea Skiff................................$ 10,500 1994 Chris Craft Concept.................................$ 12,500 1959 Lyman Sportsman....................................$ 8,500 1983 Bertram Express ......................................$ 41,500 1986 Sea Ray Sundancer ................................$ 10,500 1957 Chris-Craft Sport Express ......................$ 59,900 2003 Formula 280BR .........................................$ 55,000 2003 Chris-Craft Launch ..................................$ 54,900 1988 Sea Ray Pachanga..................................$ 24,000 1983 Bertram Flybridge....................................$ 52,000 2002 Formula Sun Sport ..................................$ 82,500 1998 Sea Ray Sundancer ................................$ 75,000 2002 Pursuit 3400 Express...............................$ 159,000 1972 Chris-Craft Salon .....................................$ 29,900 1991 Tiara Convertible .....................................$ 110,000 1987 Tiara Convt w/ Diesels ...........................$ 139,900 Fiberglass – Woodworking Storage – Heated Storage

36’ 36’ 37’ 37’ 37’ 37’ 39’ 40’ 40’ 41’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 43’ 44’ 55’

1996 1997 1996 1966 1966 1977 1994 1994 1994 1975 2006 1992 2000 1995 1992 1996

Saberline Express ...................................$ 198,000 Cruisers 3650 ............................................$ 120,000 Sea Ray Express......................................$ 87,000 Chris Craft Roamer H/T ..........................$ 20,000 Chris Craft Roamer S/T...........................$ 25,000 Endeavour Ketch .....................................$ 34,000 Carver 390/404..........................................$ 95,000 Hatteras Double Cabin ...........................$ 179,000 Sea Ray Express Diesels .......................$ 125,000 Chris-Craft Motor Yacht .........................$ 59,500 Beneteau Trawler ...................................$ 349,000 Sea Ray Sundancer ................................$ 139,000 Provincial Trawler ...................................$ 199,500 Tiara 4300 Open .......................................$ 199,900 Sea Ray Sundancer ................................$ 139,000 Sea Ray Sedan Bridge ...........................$ 180,000 Complete Mechanical Electrical Rigging – Haulout

MAKE CRUISING EASIER ComNav Sales & Service by KimKo

Starting at $3,600 installed

ALSO SPECIALIZING IN boat rigging, hard-top enclosures, trailer repair and custom trailers.

CALL NOW! 269-683-2692

PORTSIDE YACHT BROKERS

POWER

56’ 1963 Chris Craft Roamer, ........................ 109,900 50’ 1993 Sea Ray Sundancer ........................ 189,000 46’ 1975 Bertram Convertible ....................... 165,000 45’ 1989 Viking Convertible ........................... 249,900 43’ 1979 Viking Fly Bridge Motor Yacht........ 69,900 43’ 1985 Hatteras Motor Yacht ..................... 189,500 42’ 1986 Chris Craft 422 Convertible ............ 119,000 42’ 1967 Chris Craft Commander DC.............. 39,500 42’ 1975 Bertram Flybridge Motor Yacht .... 129,900 41’ 1998 Formula PC ....................................... 119,000 41’ 1986 Egg Harbor Convertible .................... 89,900 40’ 1992 Sea Ray Express Cruiser................ 89,900

Serving Midwest Boaters Since 1978

39’ 1996 Trojan 390 Express Cruiser ............ 104,900 38’ 1989 Sea Ray Aft Cabin ............................. 89,900 38’ 2001 PowerQuest Avenger ....................... 95,000 38’ 1987 Chris Craft 381 Catalina .................... 69,900 38’ 1982 Chris Craft Corinthian ....................... 49,900

Propeller Optimization & Repair Bring your propellers to Peak performance

• Increase speed • Reduce fuel consumption • Eliminate propeller induced vibration • Enable sync of multiple engines

SAIL

56’ 1977 Irwin Custom Ketch ....................... 155,900 44’ 1980 Miller Marine Center Cpk ................ 89,900 44 1986 Mason Cutter .................................... 219,900 43’ 1986 Beneteau First 435 ............................ 79,900 41’ 1983 Nelson Marek .................................... 59,900 41’ 2001 Hunter 410 ........................................ 139,900 41’ 1984 C&C 41................................................ 94,500

2401 Sawmill Parkway Suite1 Huron, OH 44839

915 W. SAVIDGE • SPRING LAKE, MI 49456

419-433-9550

PH 616-850-7678 • FAX 616-850-7679 e-mail: portsideyb@sbcglobal.net web: yachtworld.com/portsideyachtbrokers

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON

Dealer/Brokerage Advertising Please Contact: Kirsten Moxley

LAKELAND BOATING MAGAZINE 727 S. Dearborn St., Ste. 812 Chicago, IL 60605 Ph: 312-276-0610 x.21 • FAX: 312-276-0619 68 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

www.NorthCoastPropTech.com

Does the barbecue on your boat need a Cleaner Cook? Call or visit our website for specials! (425) 530-6376 www.cleanercook.com


great buy

The More, the Merrier

Our pick this month is a roomy, low-hour gem.

2007 27â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cobalt 272

ContaCt brian J. Luby | beacon Point Marine | Cos Cob, Ct 203-661-4033 office | 203-618-0612 fax beaconpointmarine.com

Brand new to the market! This 27-foot boat had just one owner who kept her in like-new condition and performed all required maintenance, including winter storage. It was primarily used in fresh water. With only 206 hours on the 8.1L Volvo Penta engine with duo-prop drive system, this boat is ready to roar! Plenty of open seating makes it a perfect vessel for the whole family to enjoy. Storage is ample, so thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room for all the toys and goodies you plan to bring aboard. The stern lounge includes a built-in cooler, ski pylon and convertible backrest. This boat features the dual ladder option: One on the swim platform and another concealed for the bow, which is great if you want to beach the boat or require boarding access away from the prop. Additional features include extended swim platform with wet locker, new Lowrance GPS and Sony stereo with surround sound. Asking price is $65,995.

marine marketplace 69 LAKELANDBOATING.COM f e b r u a r y 2 011


lakeshore life

Marblehead, Ohio Lake Erie living doesn’t get any better than this. by colle e n h . trou pi s

SpecS bedrooms: 4 baths: 2.5 – 3.5 Square Footage: 1,760 – 2,175 acreage: 227 acres Shoreline: approx. 2 miles price: Starting at $379,000 contact ellen calzonetti Dress Street Sothebys International realty bay point resort Sales 419-341-9578 baypointresorthomes.com

70 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F e b r u a r y 2 011

I

n real estate, the motto is “Location, location, location.” Bay Point Resort has it in spades. For anyone looking to settle near the Lake Erie Islands, it may truly be the home of your dreams. Nestled between Lake Erie and Sandusky Bay in Marblehead, Ohio, it also overlooks Cedar Point Amusement Park, making it the home of your kids’ and grandkids’ dreams as well. “I’ve been visiting and living in the area for more than 50 years,” says Scott Street, broker of Street Sothebys International Realty, which is selling the homes. “I have come to love Lake Erie life and believe there is no better way to live it than Bay Point Resort.” Indeed, a home in Bay Point Resort not only means easy access to all that the area has to offer, but also access to everything within the 200-plus-acre development. That includes sandy beaches stretching for miles, a nine-hole par-3 golf course, abundant walking paths and a 730-slip marina. Residents have the option to lease dockage annually at the marina, which can accommodate boats up to 55 feet. It includes two bathhouses, a gas dock and free pump-out and hosts various social events all season long. The resort itself dates back to the 1940s. A change in ownership in 2006 brought a new project: Adding residences to the development, which up to that point included the marina and a few resort homes. Development

of the 33-home subdivision known as Bay Point Shores began in 2008. Most recently, construction of Sunset Cove, which is composed of approximately 50 homes and villas, began in August 2010. Homes are available in both neighborhoods, but they’re going fast. And the reason has to do with more than just location. “Bay Point’s villas are designed to be both charming and sophisticated,” says Jill Sandvick, vice president and interior designer for Sandvick Builders Inc., which is building the homes in Sunset Cove. “Interior elements bring in the feel of the beach, and the large, welcoming front porches act as extensions of the living space.” No expense has been spared. Standard features include Amish-built cabinets, detailed wood trim, hardwood floors, granite countertops and more. The ability to customize just heightens the allure. From adding small touches like built-in bookcases and bench seats to choosing paint colors, the buyer is in control. The homes have a first-floor master suite, but there is the option to have a second master suite upstairs as well. And all homes have two-car garages with storage space above that can be built out as a media room or additional bedroom. A new clubhouse and pool, currently under construction by Prete Builders Inc. and exclusive to Bay Point Resort residents, will be complete for the 2011 season. r PHOTOS By ELLEN DRESS


Resort and Marina

There is a place .... where sparkling waters and white sands provide an escape for the imagination. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a heritage rich in relaxation where the peaceful shores of Lake Erie embrace Sandusky Bay. This is a setting of dreams. This is Bay Point Resort and Marina.

10948 East Bayshore Rd. | Marblehead, Ohio 43440 | Ph: 419.798.4434 | ecdress@baypointmgt.com


Gulf Harbour Marina Located on the Intracoastal Waterway in South Ft. Myers Florida

Gulf Harbour is the “Destination Of Choice” for many Midwest boaters! This 186 slip yacht basin has docks from 38' to 97'. Cruise the protected waterways to the islands of Sanibel, Captiva, and Boca Grande. Experience the marinas, resorts, restaurants, bays and beaches or cruise the Gulf Of Mexico to Ft. Myers Beach, Naples or the Florida Keys.

• Marina Boat Slips for Lease - 38', 48', 50', 60', 70' and T-Docks • 186 Slips Marina with concrete floating docks, pump-out, cable & electric • JR’s Harbourside Café open to all residents of Gulf Harbour • Full time marina staff on-site 7 days a week • Gas and diesel fuel available in marina, discount for slip owners • Protected Yacht Basin by Intracoastal Barrier Island

GulfHarbourMarina.net • 239-437-0881 Boating@Gulf HarbourMarina.net

JR’S HARBOURSIDE CAFÉ

Gulf Harbour Properties

• Marina Boat Slips for Sale - 38', 48', 50', 60', 70' and T-Docks • Condominiums and Single Family Homes for sale at all price points • Over 20 neighborhoods homes available 150,000 to over 5 million • Gated community with 24 hours roving security staff • Equity Country Club memberships available if desired: 18 hole. Championship golf course, Tennis complex, Spa-Fitness Center, 30,000 S.F. Clubhouse, Waterfront pool & Tiki Bar, Johnny Browns waterfront restaurant. • Only 5 miles to Beach Islands and 30 minutes to International Airport.

Call Us... We are former Midwest residents and Great Lakes cruisers, we live in Gulf Harbour and own a slip for our boat. GulfHarbourProperties.com • 239-565-2766 GREG & JO CALLAWAY

RealEstate@Gulf HarbourProperties.com


1980 MAINSHIP 34 TRAWLER. 200hp Turbo Diesel, 40 gal water, 200 gal fuel, fly-bridge, full electronics, well maintained. $20,000. 815-347-2624. MAY11

39’ 1989 CHRIS CRAFT SEDAN CRUISER. C80 Raymarine Radar/Fish/Chart; New Carpet and Half Tower Glass $80,000. 216-408-1301 FEB11

1977 25’ CHRIS CRAFT CATALINA. Single 230hp gas engine, trim tabs. New upholstery in cockpit. Full canvas, fresh water, teak interior, good condition $4000. 773-272-2418. bilgepump54@netzero.net. MAY11

1994 CARVER 350. AC, Twin Crusaders, Gen, GPS, Radar, Plotter, Auto Pilot, New Canvas ’09, Excellent Condition. $79,9K OBO, 248-644-2850 or stundo@aol.com MAY11

40’ 1967 CHRIS CRAFT CORINTHIAN. Rare awesome award winner. Needs nothing. Nov ‘08 survey. Please, serious inquiries only. 586-791-3744 eve., 248-588-4410 day. MAR11

2001 PURSUIT 2870 OFFSHORE Center Console Hardtop, Outriggers, Cuddy Cabin with Head, Full Electronics, Low Hours, 100% Freshwater, 220 hours, Custom Trailer, Bottom Paint. Asking $64,900. Call Brent @ Reed Yacht Sales (616) 402-0180 RYS

1991 TIARA 290 SPORTBOAT – Fastidious original owner; maintained by Tiara dealer; heated storage; All service records available. 920-854-4521. APR11

2008 RIVIERA 3600 SPORT YACHT. $475,000 Bring an Offer! New Riviera 3600 Sport Yacht ready for delivery with full manufacturer’s Warranty. Twin Diesels. No canvas!! Please call for details. 705-340-1255.. Ask for Rick. NYS

1986 CARVER 42 AFT/CABIN M/Y. Cats, One Owner, Hard enclosure aft deck. Two Queen staterooms. Fresh water, $125,000. kalconfl@aol.com MAR11

ed! Reduc 2009 RIVIERA 44 SPORT YACHT. Brand New with Full Warranties. Please call for more details and photos. 705-340-1255. Ask for Rick. NYS

2005 TIARA 32 OPEN. 8.1 Crusaders, E120 w/ digital sounder, autopilot, open array, pristine, $199,000. Jeff 517-202-2123. NO BROKERS! FEB11

ed Reduacin! Ag

StoraWinter ge PA ID!

34’ 2001 SEA RAY SUNDANCER. 160 hours, new camper– top, heated storage since new. Excellent Condition. $93,000. 419-571-7997 MAR11

2004 TIARA 3600 SOVRAN. Twin 450hp Cummins, heated storage, excellent, pictures available, $249,000. robert_cummings@ml.com or 920-737-7304 MAR11

Reduc ed!

2004 SEA RAY 390 MOTOR YACHT. Twin 480CE Cummins 290 hrs. Bristol condition. Loaded with options. Freshwater only. Heated storage. $199,000. 317-523-8506 MAY11

2009 SUNSEEKER PORTOFINO 47 Mint Condition, 100% Freshwater, Low Hours, Volvo IPS 600’s, 435hp each, Full Electronics, Hydraulic Platform, Full Electronics, Loaded! Owner is central agent Asking $819,000. Call Brent @ Reed Yacht Sales (616) 402-0180 RYS

2008 RIVIERA 47G2 FLYBRIDGE CONVERTIBLE. Retail $1,239,000 NOW $975,000 OBO, New with manufacturer’s Warranty. Loaded. Please call for details. 705-340-1255 Ask for Rick. NYS 73 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

classifieds: boats for sale

1996 PURSUIT 2460 DENALI. Freshly rebuilt 7.4 Merc with duoprop, new interior, new trailer. Ready to go. $23,900. Call for pics. 812-371-2375. FEB11


classifieds: boats for sale

BOAT LOANS

2000 SEA RAY 480, Cats, 600 hrs, thruster, custom interior, one owner. $295K or trade down to 36-40. 231-313-2191. MAY11

40’, 60’, 88’ DOCKOMINIUMS FOR SALE at beautiful Duncan Bay Boat Club. Clubhouse, pool, floating docks, wifi & more. Straits of Mackinaw. 866-993-3625, sales@duncanbay.com FEB12 48’ 1986 CALIFORNIAN MOTOR YACHT. 3208 Cat Diesels Three staterooms three heads Decorator interior MI $159,000. 313-402 9579 MAY11

Yacht Delivery MOVE YOUR BOAT WORRY FREE on our air ride hydraulic

trailer. Free Quotes! Dave’s Marine Transport. Toll Free: (866) 814-DAVE (3283) www.davesmarinetransport.com 1991 500 SEA RAY SUNDANCER, One Owner 10 years, many upgrades and accessories, Records and pictures available. 330-550-3714 APR11

ed! Reduc

Financial Services, LLC

RUC

Charters BAREBOAT CANADA’S FABULOUS NORTH CHANNEL, LAKE HURON. 25 power and sailboats, 27’-50’, cruise and learn, skippered. Canadian Yacht Charters, Gore Bay, Ontario. 800-565-0022. email: info@cycnorth.com, www.cycnorth.com RUC

Powerboat 2005 OCEAN ALEXANDER. 54 LOA (2)500HP Yanmars300 hrs, dual stations, full Raymarine electronics,12KW gen, Air, Zodiac H/B, deluxe bridge. $585,000. 920-739-7668. MAY11

1981 MAINSHIP 34 TRAWLER. 200hp Turbo Diesel, 40 gal. water, 200 gal. fuel, fly-bridge, full electronics, wellmaintained. $20,000. 815-347-2624. FEB11 1987 36’ TIARA CONVERT. Heated stg, pro serviced, 350 HP/905 HRS, all electronics, fresh water, excellent, photos available. Reduced $99,900. Call 616-340-7300 or 616-866-5135 MAY11 2004 SILVERTON 35 MOTOR YACHT, 8.1 gas, 50 hours, fully equipped, pristine, covered slip, pro. Maintained. Reasonable offer. 563-332-7222. MAY11

57’ CHRIS CRAFT 1968. GM diesels. Mahogany hull, teak decks, FBG top. Great Lakes only. Asking $169,000. 954-463-1400 MAR11

ed! Reduc

Lake Effect

OWNERSHIP IN 45’ BOAT, bristol condition for $45,000. Stringent Credit and Seamanship Requirements. 4550Bayliner@gmail.com for complete details. FEB11

William Otto, III 2907 S. Horseshoe Dr. Grandville, MI 49418 PH:

616-538-5777 FAX: 866-530-6058 CELL: 216-577-1460 EMAIL: billotto3@gmail.com

Originating agent for:

REDUCED AGAIN! ‘95 500 DA SEA RAY. Heated storage, T-550 Detroits. 502 hrs. Clean and equipped. Fresh water only. $235,000. ph: 216-469-7000 MAY11

Slips 40’ SLIP Ellenwood Landing, White Lake, Montague rent for 2011 season $2695. Buy for $12,000. 269-986-9081 MAY11

1991 VIKING 66/CMY 1991 VIKING 66/CMY. MAN-T/1200hp, 300hrs. Staterooms(4), F/Heads(3), Walk Around Engine room, Meticulously Maintained, Freshwater, One Owner, OAL 72’6”. $495,000. 800-213-3323, louismunao@dcwis.com APR11

74 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

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75 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

classifieds: boats for sale

The Best Way to D L O S Sell Your Boat Fast!


above the waterline

Wide-body Boating

Expandable boats open a new world to cruisers. BY DAVE WALLACE

D

uring the same period of our lives when my mate and I were testing the challenging waters of Great Lakes cruising, we also were sharing the somewhat parallel experience of using a rented motor home to transport our daughter to a distant college. These were the early years when affordable cruising boats and motor homes were almost directly comparable in terms of amenities. The galleys were small, the bathrooms were even smaller, the “master” bedroom was designed to accommodate a midget master, and additional sleeping facilities unfolded like army cots into the remaining part of the cabin. Fuel stops required pump-out facilities and an auxiliary power supply if you expected your battery to start the vehicle the next day. The only real difference was trading the gentle hull slap of waves for the distant hum of highway traffic during the nighttime hours. In the years that followed, we upgraded our boats several times, but the dimensions pretty much stayed the same. During that same period, a good friend of mine entered the world of motor home cruising, caused in part by the fact that he had a mother in Florida, family in Texas and his own home in Michigan. The more we traded cruising/ traveling stories over lunch, the more I came to realize his world was expanding much faster than mine.

on wheels. The most obvious step up was the switch to diesel power for highway travel, as well as self generated electricity. The idea of the expandable living area became so popular that by the time my friend got into the game, everything expanded. Once off the highway, these expanding engineering marvels could puff themselves up to near-condominium size. And in no way does this transformation limit his ability to cruise around town for shopping or dining. He tows his own auxiliary vehicle; not a lightweight mini-car, but a full-size, six-passenger SUV! Needless to say he also enjoys satellite navigation, satellite radio and full-color surround sound satellite television. He probably lives better on the road than I do at home—and much, much better than we did on the Great Lakes. So here’s my point, and my question: How could a cruising boat be made slim enough to skim through the water most efficiently, and yet expand dockside to become a true home away from home? And please don’t tell me that going bigger would solve the problem, and that yachts have offered this luxury benefit since the invention of the “leisure class.” Most of us can’t afford bigger because boats are sold and priced by the foot. I’m talking about also making “affordable” expandable. I realize this is a major engineering challenge. I also realize it could be a major challenge to existing marinas, which are used to matching boats to slips only in terms of length. As the owner of a 36-foot cruiser, I knew I’d need a 40-foot slip. The width required was pretty much taken for granted. This assumption will change, however, when Expand-a-Boat hits the market. Dock masters will require more information from incoming boats, and much more flexibility in adjustable slip design. Marina: “Dragon Lady, what’s your length?” Dragon Lady: “40 feet.” Marina: “And your expanded beam?” Dragon Lady: “30 feet.” Marina: “Let me power Dock 14-B out to full width.” Dragon Lady: “Great; and make it a port side tie. That’s the side my sliding porch doors are on.”  DAVE WALLACE has been boating in the

Great Lakes for more than 34 years. He’s

76 LAKELANDBOATING.COM F E B R U A R Y 2 011

Expand-a-Boat

written for Lakeland Boating since 1993 and

The rented vehicle I remember as an underpowered camper now looms large on the highway as a mansion

helped develop the first edition of Lakeland Boating’s Ports O’ Call Cruising Guides. ILLUSTRATION BY MIKE HARRIS


ADVE RTISE I N

CALL 800-331-0132 FOR MORE INFORMATION


Lakeland Boating February 2011