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Strolling through Saugatuck  Allure of Holland, MI

Huron

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Ontario

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Michigan

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Erie

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Superior

Sea Ray

450 Sedan Bridge TAX-SAVING TIPS FOR YOUR BOAT

Boat Loans

PRE-QUALIFY FOR FINANCING

lakelandboating.com April 2011

Display Until April 30, 2011

Carver Chaparral Glastron Minor 





in this issue

Features 24

Sea Ray 450 Sedan Bridge

34

Get Pre-qualified for Boat Loans

36

Way to Save

40

Idyllic Times Two

52

Holland, Michigan

The very best of both worlds

Pre-qual smooths the boat loan process

Enjoy savings with your boat come tax time Explore the sister cities of Saugatuck and Douglas Come one, come all to this artsy Dutch community

Search 1,000s of new and used boats for sale 40

lakelandboating.com/boat_search.cfm

58

PHOTO BY TERRY W. PHIPPS

52

PHOTO COURTESY OF HOLLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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PHOTO BY FELICIA FAIRCHILD

Departments

4 6 8 14 16 18 19 22

From the Helm

30

Boat Spotlights

58

Shoreleave

Mail Call Scuttlebutt Corke Board Gear Guru Ask an Expert

62 78 84 88

Marina Watch Lakeshore Life Classifieds Above the Waterline

On the Cover

Electronics The Chandlery

Spring commissioning Carver, Chaparral, Glastron, Minor SS Keewatin

Comfortable cruising and luxury living are personified in the new 450 Sedan Bridge from Sea Ray Boats.

from the helm April 2011 Volume LXV, No. 4 PUBLISHER Walter “Bing” O’Meara

Spring is in the Air

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor: Lindsey Johnson Senior editor: Dave Mull Editors-at-large: Heather Steinberger & Roland Schultz Field editor: Tom Thompson CREATIVE STAFF Art director/production manager: Brook Poplawski Creative consultant: Christy Tuttle Bauhs CONTRIBUTORS Elizabeth Altick, Stephanie Baker, Tom Barrat, Dan Bellyk, Chris Caswell, Mark Corke, Mark Dukti, Don Emery, Felicia Fairchild, Mike Harris, Michael Hauenstein, Paul Kemiel, Capt. Frank Lanier, Roger McAfee, Terry W. Phipps, Zuzana Prochazka, Greg Proteau, Jacqui Ronan, Richard Steinberger, Colleen H. Troupis, Dave Wallace

I

t’s mid-March, and we are moving—albeit slowly— towards spring. Here in Chicago, we’ve had record snow this winter—including one of the worst snow storms recorded in our city’s history. Fuses are short, colors are grey, and mental states border-line. Note Milt Gallups’ ad. It ran in a 1948 issue of Lakeland Yachting. I never had the pleasure of meeting Milt, though I wish I had. He made me laugh, and as I re-read his ad, I noticed no phone number, no fax, no cell number, no e-mail, no zip code. Simpler times; nice guy. According to Carl Sagan, “We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.” As I dotted the last sentence of this note, the sun briefly came out. I felt like a new man; gotta call the marina and tell them to paint the boat! Besides getting us into the boating mood, we also know April is famous for yet another important annual milestone: Tax time. We’ve got a great story, authored by Capt. Frank Lanier (pg. 36), that’s sure to help you maximize your tax breaks related to boating. Also with spring comes thoughts of trading up. If that’s your plan, you don’t want to skip Greg Proteau’s helpful piece on boat financing (pg. 34). In the article, industry veteran Proteau walks you through the advantages of pre-qualifying for boat loans and explains how advantageous it is for buyers to know exactly what they can afford before hitting the showroom. Speaking of trading up, new for the 2011 cruising season is the Sea Ray 450 Sedan Bridge (p. 24). This boat is a knockout! I think you will undoubtedly agree. If you’re like me, you’ve probably wondered what’s the story behind the SS Keewatin, docked in Douglas, Michigan. Check out Heather Steinberger’s profile of this remarkable and timeless vessel (p. 58). 4 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

BUSINESS STAFF Associate publisher: David Leli Eastern advertising representative: Mark Conway Regional and classified sales manager: Kirsten Moxley Marketing director: Linda O’Meara Circulation director: Sharon P. O’Meara EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING OFFICE 727 South Dearborn | Suite 812 | Chicago, IL 60605 phone: 312-276-0610 | fax: 312-276-0619 email: staff@lakelandboating.com website: lakelandboating.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 727 South Dearborn | Suite 812 | Chicago, IL 60605 phone 800-331-0132, ext. 21 | fax 312-276-0619

In last month’s issue, we profiled the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw and its new status as the Icebreaker Mackinaw Maritime Museum (March 2011, p. 55). Among the many programs the museum is offering, groups can take advantage of an overnight stay aboard this floating piece of American history. Visit themackinaw.org and click on the “Overnight Program” tab to learn more. For details about supporting the museum through a new annual membership program and to learn more about all the wonderful exhibits and offerings, call 231-436-9825 or visit the museum’s website, themackinaw.org. Let’s all hope for an early spring, and remember: Be calm, and carry on!

SUBSCRIPTIONS P.O. Box 15396 | North Hollywood | CA 91615-5396 Customer Service: 800-827-0289 O’Meara-Brown Publications Inc. Walter B. O’Meara, president Timothy Murtaugh, secretary Tracy Houren, controller Lakeland Boating (ISSN 0744-9194), copyright 2011, is published eleven times per year (except November) by O’Meara-Brown Publications, Inc. Editorial and advertising offices are located at 727 S. Dearborn St., Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605; 312-2760610. Annual subscription rates: United States, $24.95 per year; International and Canadian, $36.95 per year (11 issues), includes 7% G.S.T. tax (G.S.T. registration number 894095074-RT0001) and $12 postage included. Single copies are $4.99 for U.S. and Canada. Only U.S. funds are accepted. Subscription correspondence should be addressed to Lakeland Boating, P.O. Box 15396, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5396 (U.S.), or call 800-827-0289. Known office of publication: 727 South Dearborn Street, Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605. Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, IL and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER, please send all address changes to Lakeland Boating, P.O. Box 15396, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5396. Lakeland Boating is a registered trademark of O’Meara-Brown Publications, Inc., Chicago, Illinois. Published as Lakeland Yachting 1946-1955. Unsolicited work may be submitted at the author’s, photographer’s or artist’s own risk. Lakeland Boating assumes no responsibility or liability for unsolicited material. All submissions must be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope with sufficient return postage.

PRINTED IN THE U.S.A

mail call

Riding Shotgun

Professional photographer Paul Kemiel gears up for his Formula One boat ride on Illinois’ Kankakee River.

Got something to say? We love hearing from you! E-mail us at staff@lakelandboating.com, or drop us a line at Lakeland Boating, 727 South Dearborn, Suite 812, Chicago, IL 60605. The opinions expressed in Mail Call are not necessarily those of Lakeland Boating. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

Have you ever dreamed what it would feel like to ride in a Formula One tunnel boat? Well, my dream came true on assignment to photograph the OPC Nationals during the 2010 Labor Day weekend in Kankakee, Illinois. Race chairman Joe Walz was instrumental in arranging my ride. I’d be driven by Chris Fairchild, an APBA Hall of Fame champion—not to mention the countless other accolades he’s earned over the course of his career. Fairchild’s credentials speak for themselves, so I had trust and confidence for my safety in the hands of this professional, experienced Formula One driver. As the crew prepared the 1991 Seebold hull, in-line, two-seater tunnel boat, I selected my life jacket and helmet, climbed into the cockpit, and belted into a five-point harness restraint system. After receiving emergency escape instructions, the canopy was lowered and locked. The initial power thrust from acceleration of the 380-hp Mercury 2.5 liter F-1 engine got the boat up on plane in three seconds. Then, zero to 100 mph in five seconds from this powerful outboard powerplant! We entered the first turn at 75 mph on the 1.4-mile racecourse. Upon exiting the turn and heading down the backstretch, we reached 100 mph at 9,000 rpm. Another factor thrown into the equation: Wind. We had 20-mph winds, with gusts up to 25 mph. I felt the boat’s starboard and port sponsons dancing in unison with the triple-digit speed readout as we came up the front stretch on the Kankakee River. It’s a testament to the physical strength and mental stamina these drivers possess to endure and combat demands from the beatings and fatigue that set in during and after a course of 30 to 50 racing laps. I have a lot of respect for these tunnel boat racers! Competing on water has to be the most unpredictable and most challenging form of motorsports, with the ever-changing elements of wind, current, wakes and floating debris presented on a liquid racecourse. How fortunate I was to have the opportunity to know the feel of the two-lap ride in a Formula One bottle rocket. I’ll cherish the memory as my ride of a lifetime. Paul Kemiel Michigan City, Indiana

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PHOTO BY PAUL KEMIEL

BOATERS POINT 2541 NE Catawba Road Port Clinton, OH 43452 Phone: (419) 734-3796 Fax: (419) 734-1560 www.boaterspoint.com

scuttlebutt

Titanic at the Grand

The Gilded Age comes to life on Mackinac Island. BY H EATH E R STE I N B E RG E R

T

he White Star Line’s Royal Mail Ship Titanic has captured imaginations since her keel was laid in March 1909 at the Harland & Wolff shipyards in Belfast, Northern Ireland. At the time of her maiden voyage in April 1912, she was the largest passenger steamer in the world—in fact, the largest moving object ever built—and she offered an unmatched level of luxury. Her celebrity became legend one calm, bitterly cold night in April 1912. Just four days into her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, Titanic struck an iceberg and sank, taking more than 1,500 people with her to the bottom of the North Atlantic. Thanks to Walter Lord’s 1955 nonfiction book “A Night to Remember” and James Cameron’s 1997 blockbuster film “Titanic,” generations have remained entranced by this opulent ocean liner and the prewar Gilded Age society that walked her decks. But they haven’t been able to experience that vanished world first-hand. Until now. On May 13-15, the Grand Hotel will bring the Edwardian era and White Star Line shipboard life into throbbing color. During “Titanic at the Grand,” the hotel will transform itself into the ill-fated White Star Liner, and guests will

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take on the roles of those who were on board the ship when she sank nearly 100 years ago. The weekend will include accommodations; full breakfast and dinner daily; a Friday evening “Bon Voyage” party; “The Last Night on the Titanic,” an interactive dinner theater event that will incorporate the same 11-course meal served to first-class passengers on April 14, 1912; a period fashion show; seminars with Titanic experts; and other Edwardian-themed events. Costumes and reproductions of Titanic artifacts will be on display, and the hotel will host a special screening of James Cameron’s “Titanic.” For more information about the Grand Hotel, “Titanic at the Grand” and other special 2011 events and packages, call 800-33-GRAND, or visit grandhotel.com.  HOTEL PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GRAND HOTEL

scuttlebutt

Operation Summaries

From the 9th District U.S. Coast Guard.

12/21 Man, Woman Stranded Little Sturgeon Bay, WI USCG rescued two people from an ice floe in Little Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, at about 03:00. USCG Station Sturgeon Bay received a report from local dispatch at about 01:30 of a man and woman on a piece of ice about a half-mile offshore on the Green Bay side of Little Sturgeon Bay. Station crewmembers used a 22-foot airboat to bring the individuals safely to shore. Both people were reportedly in good condition. case closed

USCG A/S Detroit conducts rescue airlift training exercises on frozen Lake St. Clair February 9, 2011.

01/08 Photographer Rescued St. Joseph, MI An ice-rescue team from USCG Station St. Joseph, Michigan, rescued a 56-year-old man in Lake Michigan at approximately 13:30. The man was rescued after falling through the ice while taking pictures of ice cliffs. The victim fell through the ice into about two feet of water and called 911 after he was unable to get back onto solid ice. Station St. Joseph personnel received notification of a person in distress from the St. Joseph Police Department. The USCG ice-rescue team, St. Joseph Police Department and St. Joseph Fire Department responded. The man was assisted back to shore and transferred to awaiting EMS. case closed 01/12 Three Stranded on Lake St. Clair Lake St. Clair A USCG helo crew from A/S Detroit worked with Canadian Coast Guard personnel to rescue three men who became disoriented and stranded on an ice floe near the center of Lake St. Clair in Canadian waters. JRCC Trenton requested help from USCG at approximately 20:05. The Detroit helo crew lowered a rescue swimmer onto the ice to help airlift the men, who were taken to Selfridge Air National Guard base in Harrison, Michigan, where they were met and interviewed by CBP agents. The men were not carrying a VHF-FM marine radio or a GPS, but used a cell phone to call for help. case closed 02/05 Eleven Rescued on Lake Erie Catawba Island, OH Crew at USCG Station Marblehead, Ohio, helped 11 people disoriented on the ice off Catawba Island, Ohio, during a snowstorm. Initially, four ice fishermen called 911 to report they had become disoriented and couldn’t find their way back to shore. Dispatchers used the caller’s cell phone signal to obtain a GPS location, where the USCG airboat crew met the fishermen and began escorting them to land. As they were on the way in, the boat crew encountered three more people who also were disoriented, and escorted them back as well. While the boat crew was escorting those seven people, they were notified of four additional people, two on a four-wheeler and two on a three-wheeler, who were likewise disoriented off Catawba Island. The boat crew made sure the first seven people they were escorting made it safely to shore, and then turned around to assist the four additional people. When the airboat crew met the last four people, two of them came aboard because the three-wheeler they had been traveling on wouldn’t start. The remaining two, on a single four-wheeler, followed the airboat to shore. case closed r

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PHOTO BY USCG LT. MARK DUKTI

scuttlebutt

Breath of Fresh Air

Improve indoor air quality naturally with Kanberra Gel. BY H EATH E R STE I N B E RG E R

N

ot too many months ago, a New York-based company called Indoor Air Professionals worked with Lakeland Boating to offer a contest in which the boater with the best “smelly boat” story would win a package of Kanberra Gel products. At the time, I didn’t know too much about the product; in fact, I’d never heard of it. According to David Levesque, the company’s products division manager, I’m not alone.

We just took what Mother Nature gave us and created a delivery system.

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“That’s really our challenge moving forward with Kanberra Gel,” he said with a chuckle. “No one’s ever heard of it, and it’s doing things no product’s ever done!” The Kanberra Gel story began 18 years ago, when newly founded Indoor Air Professionals began providing commercial and residential ventilation-system cleaning and assessment services. Five years later, the company caught the attention of the U.S. Navy. To date, it has completed more than 325 projects aboard 75 vessels. Then, about three years ago, the company reorganized to pull all its products under one roof. Levesque’s project

was a unique tea tree oil gel that could provide airborne disinfection, one that had been in production for approximately eight years but wasn’t selling particularly well. “In the beginning, we were looking to disinfect air-conditioning coils and ductwork without chemicals,” Levesque recalled. “Back then, it was oily, watery and runny. We reworked it, and we redesigned the look and feel of the marketing to really emphasize that this was all-natural, like a grassroots, down-home remedy.” Branding the gel as a consumer product wasn’t what Levesque called a “typical New York boardroom process.” “We took the gel on a hiking trip, and we noticed it eliminated all the ‘guy smells’ in the cabin,’” he said. “We talked about it, and the name of Australia’s capital city, Canberra, came up. I liked the name but not the C, so we made it a K, and that led to the koala bear. The rest is history.” On April 1, 2008, the product relaunched. First, a South Florida megayacht supply company inquired about Kanberra Gel for disinfecting a megayacht’s ductwork. The product performed well, the supply company ordered pallets of it, and word spread throughout Florida and into the Midwest and New England. It’s now making inroads in the Pacific Northwest. “We’ve been playing catch-up ever since,” Levesque said. PHOTO BY RICHARD STEINBERGER

WHAT IT’S MADE OF So what is Kanberra Gel, anyway? Essentially, the gel comprises pharmaceutical-grade Australia tea tree oil, mixed with a difficult-to-harvest lemon-scented tea tree oil, several polymers and water. That’s it. “Tea tree oil has natural antiseptic ability,” Levesque explained. “When the oils are mixed together, you get natural antimicrobial properties amplified 15 to 20 times. The gel evaporates into the air, where the water completely dissipates. The oils then land on surfaces, where they eat away at mold, mildew, bacteria and fungus.” The oils remain effective for weeks, continuing to eat all that…well, icky microscopic stuff. They eliminate problems and resulting odors—naturally. To get started, simply open the Kanberra Gel container, take off the clear plastic lid and set the container down. “We just took what Mother Nature gave us and created a delivery system,” Levesque said simply. The goal, he added, has always remained constant: To provide indoor air-quality solutions that also improve health, educating Western society in the process. “The American public is programmed to think that ‘clean’ has a smell,” he commented. “But that’s the chemicals, things you really shouldn’t be breathing. With the Kanberra Gel, we disinfect without putting chemicals into the air. It’s all from nature.”

While Levesque acknowledged that the gel does have a pleasant scent at first, it won’t last. And that’s a good thing. “You shouldn’t smell the original odor, the gel, anything,” he said. “When we focused on the smell of the product, it didn’t sell. People thought it wasn’t working because they couldn’t smell it! We realized we had to redefine the way the American public thinks about clean air.” Even after Kanberra Gel evaporates, users benefit from a residual effect for up to 45 days. The rate of evaporation depends on surrounding conditions. For example, increased air flow near windows and fans will increase that rate, as will the presence of heavy particulates such as cigarette smoke and pet dander. But that’s where the gel really shines; it can provide a degree of allergy and asthma relief. These days, different sizes of Kanberra Gel containers are found in a variety of businesses, homes, cars, ships—and, yes, recreational boats. Many boat owners are concerned about air quality in their boats’ interior spaces, particularly after winter storage. “The marine industry found us,” Levesque noted. “It turned out to be a perfect fit.” To learn more, visit kanberragel.com. r

scuttlebutt

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corke board

Ain’t it Sweet

Keep your drinking water clean and fresh. BY MAR K COR KE

H

To-Do List

es clean ks and pip rd • Keep tan omes aboa ater as it c r te a • Filter all w er for w der-sink filt n u n a e s • U mption man consu t used for hu ration is no r: Water filt e b m e n m o e ti • R rifica s water pu the same a

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onestly, I give little thought to the water that flows from my home faucet. I have it tested from time to time, and apart from that I turn on the spout, and there it is—fresh and clear. I am, however, more cautious aboard; in fact, I’m as picky about my water as I am about fuel. Just like a bad dose of fuel will make your engine cough and wheeze, bad water can do more than simply spoil your vacation; it can have long-term health risks. And just because it looks clear doesn’t mean it’s safe to drink. In addition to having a bad odor and taste, water from questionable sources may be contaminated by a variety of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, and parasites that cause diseases such as dysentery, cholera, typhoid, and hepatitis. Perhaps the simplest form of water purification is the use of iodine tablets. For small quantities of water, these work well; but when you have a large tank on board, iodine won’t pass muster—although keeping a supply of tablets aboard is always a good idea for emergencies. Before using iodine, remember: Some people have allergies. Another complication: For iodine to be effective, the correct amount must be added, and the water must sit for at least 30 minutes before drinking.

Purification vs. filtration A lot of misinformation about water purification is floating around out there, so let’s start by clearing up some of the untruths. For starters, water purification and water filtration are not the same thing. Filtration takes lumps and debris out of water and can turn murky water clear, but it does not remove toxins and other contaminants. You could run water through a mesh stocking, and technically it has been filtered; but it will not be pure. If you use a water-maker aboard, always purify the water. A water-maker or, more properly, a reverse osmosis system removes salt and fish, but that’s about it. Another approach to water purification is using

Ultraviolet light to kill harmful microorganisms. The system consists of a fluorescent tube or tubes that emit UV light in a wavelength lethal to viruses, bacteria and mold spores. On its face, this sounds like the ideal system; but it does not remove solids from the water, which may appear cloudy or unpleasant looking. There are water purifiers, like the PUR Scout, for example, that pass water through both a filter and an iodine compound that kills smaller organisms that have passed through the filter. These purifiers kill all microorganisms down to 0.004 microns; however, like iodine tablets, people who are allergic to iodine should not use the filter. Always read the technical literature to ensure you’re buying and installing a system that meets your needs.

Treating water So…what’s the best way to treat water? My preferred approach—and the one I’ve used for many years—is to treat water from the dockside faucet as it travels through the hose and into the boat using a two-stage filter system. I make sure my water tanks are clean and algae free, then treat drinking water as it comes out of the tank by passing it through a Seagull filter/purifier. I don’t routinely treat water that I’m going to use for showers and deck wash down. There’s little point in putting clean water into dirty tanks. I like to throw in half a cup of bleach for every 40 gallons, let it sit over night, then flush the mixture through the tanks, changing the water at least three times to eradicate any lingering chlorine taste and smell. This kills bacteria and algae in the tanks and ensures water aboard remains fresh. 

Mark Corke is an accomplished journalist, author and sailor and creator of the popular blog onboardwithmarkcorke.com, focusing on various DIY boating projects.

PHOTOS BY MARK CORKE

Calendar of Events

Jeremy Goldstein, owner of Custom Marine in Sandusky, Ohio, and president of the ACBS North Coast Ohio chapter, hosts the organization’s annual Spring Workshop, taking place April 9 in Akron, Ohio. April 9 | ACBS Spring Workshop | Akron, OH

PHOTO BY DON EMERY

scuttlebutt

March 30 – April 3 Northwest Sportshow Minneapolis, MN northwestsportshow.com

April 15 – 17 Brown Trout Fishing Tournament Baileys Harbor, WI baileysharbor.com

April 8 – 10 1000 Islands Spring Boat Show Clayton, NY 1000islands-clayton.com/ boatshow.asp

Up North Lake & Cottage Show Traverse City, MI tccottageshow.com

Traverse City Boat & Water Sports Show Traverse City, MI traversecityboatshow.com April 9 Antique & Classic Boat Society (ACBS) Spring Workshop Akron, OH | northcoastohio.org

April 29 – May 1 Catawba Island Boat Show Port Clinton, OH catawbaislandboatshow.com April 29 – June 5 Festival of Blossoms Door County, WI doorcounty.com

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gear guru

Spring Cleaning

Products to get you ready, from top to bottom. by z uzana prochaz ka <

wAveCRAft Waveblade

Getting your boat bottom ready for the season can be tough. Whether you’re hauling out or scrubbing underwater, check out the Waveblade, a lightweight, 12-volt, oscillating bio-fouling scraper. It works on any kind of growth, like barnacles, muscles or slime, easily sloughing them off with its high-speed vibrating head. Unlike other oscillating scrapers, the Waveblade may also be used underwater down to 15 feet, and it won’t damage bottom paint or wood, fiberglass or metal hulls. Waveblade has a 45-foot cord, and a number of blades can be changed on the fly with an allen key (included). Clean prop shafts, trim-tabs, rudders, outdrives and more, in or out of the water. The Waveblade comes in its own tool bag with safety glasses and gloves, two foam filters, two blades and a lanyard. The package retails for $399. waveblade.com

sHURHOld Professional Grade Cleaners

>

JMP Flexible Impellers

>

One thing you can’t afford to poo-poo on deck is, well, poop. Bird and spider droppings, which stain gelcoat, are harder to remove the longer they stay on. Shurhold offers a cleaner and two polishes that will not only help remove those stains, but also help with future cleanings. Shurhold’s Serious Marine Cleaner, Pro Polish and Serious Shine work on fiberglass, vinyl, carpet, rubber, teak and canvas. The cleaner is non-abrasive, so it removes dried-on particles without scratching. After removing the droppings, protect the surface with Shurhold’s Serious Shine or Pro Polish. Serious Shine cleans, polishes and protects in one step without leaving behind any residue, and it has UV inhibitors. Pro Polish produces a high-gloss finish and protects against the sun, salt, acid rain and more. A 32-oz. bottle of Serious Marine Cleaner is $11.98; a one-gallon concentrate is $29.98. Serious Shine comes in a 14-oz. aerosol can for $17.98. A 16-oz. bottle of Pro Polish is $22.98; a one-gallon bucket is $109.98. shurhold.com

ZUZANA PROCHAZKA is a U.S. Coast Guard 100 Ton Master with 20 years boating experience. Her work has appeared in numerous national boating magazines, and she authors a popular gear and boat review blog, TalkOfTheDock.com. 16 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

It’s best to check and, better yet, replace impellers that have been sitting in one position over the winter. JMP has provided cooling pumps for 30 years, and to help improve the pumps’ performance, they developed a line of flexible impellers touted to last longer than regular impellers. The U.S. Navy studied JMP’s impellers and found they outlasted the competition—in some cases by more than 500 hours. That means less maintenance and more reliability for you this summer. JMP impellers are manufactured using a high quality, longer lasting mixture of rubber materials and remain flexible with little or no damage or corrosion. JMP makes impellers for all the leading engine brands, and prices vary depending on size. jmpusa.com

name game CANINE CREWMEMBER

PERFECT UNION Here’s a picture of us on our 2004 Formula 37 PC we purchased on our 35th wedding anniversary in 2004, which is the reason for the name. We have a great time at Harborside Marina in Wilmington, Illinois, with our children and grandchildren. The boat (and we!) are still doing very well.

This is the life and times of a little boat dog called Nicky. She loves to be anywhere we are and finds any place to take a nap. If she’s not napping, then she is attacking the fish we bring on board. She’s a six-year-old, five-pound Yorkie-poo. Tina & Jim Stracke | Rochester, MI

Jim & Carol Nowak Naperville, IL

THIRSTY TURTLE Check out our 1974 47-foot Islander, complete with custom arches and fully restored by the owner. We purchased it on Ebay in 2009, and worked on it every weekend through August 2010—even in -15-degree degree weather! Steve & Judy Helfer Starved Rock, IL

WHERE’S WALDO? This is our 1978 Sea Ray Weekender that we dock in Port Clinton, Ohio. Our home town is Waldo, Ohio. Enough said. Notice the state outline — “X” marks the spot. Thank you for a great magazine! Chuck Groll & Janet Waldo, OH 17 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

ask an expert

Ethanol 411

ValvTect founder Jerry Nessenson is an expert on fuel issues, including formulations specific to marine engines.

LB: Why do marine engines require specially formulated fuel or additives? Nessenson: Marine engines operate at much higher rpm than other vehicles, using up to ten times more fuel per hour, which increases, among other problems, engine deposits, commonly known as “gunk.” Also, marine engines are used less frequently and in a hotter environment, so fuel tends to oxidize. Heat and humidity are the enemies of any fuel.

CONTACT ValvTect Petroleum Products 3400 Dundee Rd.

LB: Today’s 10 percent ethanol blend (E-10) has proved controversial for marine engines. Is there cause for concern? Nessenson: Almost all marine engines built since the mid-1980s can use E-10 without causing engine damage, but it’s always best to check with the manufacturer. When fuel is treated with the proper additive, there should be no problem—if boaters keep their fuel systems free of contaminents.

Northbrook, IL 60062 800-728-8258 gnessenson@valvtect.com valvtect.com

LB: Will the pump always be labeled as E-10? Nessenson: Most, but not all states, require pumps dispensing E-10 to be labeled. Just be aware that 90 percent of gasoline sold at land-based stations contains 10 percent ethanol. LB: We read on fuel-testers.com that with E-10, many gas additives are no longer necessary and may increase the risk of water absorption. Is this true? Nessenson: No. When E-10 is used in marine applications, it should always be supplemented with a multi-functional fuel additive. The additive should contain, in the proper proportion, a fuel stabilizer, corrosion inhibitor, water dispersant and detergent. Some companies claim that their product can “restore” phase-separated fuel. These additives generally contain a glycol base or other chemicals that absorb the water/ethanol mixture back into the fuel. This is not acceptable and can cause engine damage.

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LB: What are the symptoms of a tank of unsuitable fuel, and what do you do about it? Nessenson: If the engine starts to stall, the fuel or fuel tank may have too much water or other contamination. The boater needs to get to a safe place as soon as possible to check the fuel filters and water separators. Change them if needed (it’s a good idea to keep spares aboard). If the fuel is highly contaminated, have it pumped out and discarded properly. LB: Does E-10 have a shorter life? Nessenson: Yes. It can start to oxidize in a matter of weeks, depending on temperature. This is why boaters must use an additive with a stabilizer when using an ethanol gasoline, unless the fuel already contains a stabilizer. LB: Should boaters purchase higher octane E-10 gasoline? Nessenson: E-10 gasoline does not give the same octane performance as non- ethanol gasoline. Thus, an 87 octane E-10 is not the same as non-ethanol 87 octane. Ask the engine manufacturer for advice on the preferred octane, especially if the engine is pre-1990. LB: Why should you never use E-15 in a boat, and how do you avoid it? Nessenson: First, E-15 is not approved for use in any marine, off-road or pre-2001 automotive engine and cannot legally be sold. Once a warning label is approved and posted on fuel pumps, E-15 may be available at land-based gasoline stations. However, it is not legal for the station to sell E-15 to a person dispensing it into a boat. This creates a liability for the gasoline marketer, and most have indicated they will not sell E-15 unless they are exempt from this liability. Second, no marine engine manufacturer has approved E-15, so, if used, it would void the engine’s warranty. Third, most pre-1990 marine engines may have compatibility problems with seals and gaskets. This is a possible safety hazard and could cause engine damage. Although E-15 will not harm most newer marine engines (post-1990), the fuel/ air ratio would need adjusting to accommodate the higher oxygen content of E-15 versus E-10. The bottom line to all boaters—Do NOT use E-15 at this time!  PHOTO BY DAVE MULL

electronics

Phone Home

The latest sat phone from Inmarsat. BY ROG E R MCAFE E

M

arine communications are, once again, about to undergo a major improvement. Inmarsat, one of the world’s leading providers of satellite telephone and data services to the deep-sea merchant fleet, has entered the world of recreational boating. The new IsatPhone Pro hand-held satellite phone was featured at the National Marine Electronics Association International Marine Electronics Conference and Expo, held October 2010 in Seattle, Washington, and at the 2010 Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show. With an MSRP of $699, the phone includes a rechargeable lithium ion battery, Bluetooth compatibility and a single charge, eight-hour talk time. Standby time is up to 100 hours. The phone automatically acquires a GPS fix once activated and can send coordinates out as a text message or e-mail. Battery recharge time is 3.5 hours. It’s also convenient and light weight, tipping the scale at less than 10 ounces. “X” marks the spot Inmarsat satellites are geostationary, meaning that even though they are 22,236 miles above Earth, they remain in the same spot, making use of Earth stations around the world. Calls are not transferred from satellite to satellite, as is required by a Low Earth Orbit system. Test calls, made by yours truly at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show back in October, confirmed reception was as clear as a cellular phone. In fact, it was landline quality. The two-second satellite delay took a bit of getting used to, but the old trick of saying “over” to let the other person know it was his turn to speak worked well. All satellite communications are dependent on the phone antenna having a clear shot at the satellite. Sending a text message of no more than 160 characters is easy—simply turn on the phone; select the “new message” and “text message” icons; enter the message, the recipient’s phone number or e-mail address; and press “send.” Poof—the message is sent! The phone does not transmit data, but that capability will be added sometime in 2011, according to a company spokesperson. Accessories and fees MSRP for the IsatPhone Pro hand-held satellite phone is $699, which includes a waterproof Pelican case, battery

PHOTO COURTESY OF GMPCS

and travel chargers. Airtime is about $1 per minute, depending on the usage plan. Billing starts when the person called picks up their receiver. When making a call there are no roaming fees or long distance charges. Inmarsat operates through distributors and retail dealers and does not sell hardware or satellite time directly to the boater. Various accessories, including spare batteries, chargers (including a solar version), Bluetooth earpieces, USB connection cables, international plug kits, and additional, larger Pelican cases are available. A spare battery retails for $40.95, and a 12-watt solar panel that charges the phone through the DC adapter retails for $425. The phones carry a limited two-year warranty. INMARSAT.COM  19 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

scuttlebutt

It’s Good to be Captain

Enjoy discounts through Bay Harbor Captain’s Club. by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

I

n years past, boaters largely selected marinas based on price and proximity to their chosen cruising grounds. If the marina in question offered good access and a fair price, it was an appropriate choice, especially if it also offered such amenities as electricity, restrooms and a fuel dock. But things have changed. In today’s cruising world, marinas are taking impressive steps to become real destinations in their own right. And in doing so, they’re creating something that was once the province of yacht clubs—a sense of value, and of community, that extends beyond the ports of call. Michigan’s Little Traverse Bay has always been beloved among cruisers thanks to venerable resort communities Harbor Springs and Petoskey. That affection became

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fervor when developer David V. Johnson transformed a blighted industrial landscape west of Petoskey into one of the Great Lakes’ hottest destinations. Bay Harbor teems with residents, seasonal homeowners, tourists and even the glitterati during the summer season, and Bay Harbor Lake Marina bustles with boaters of every stripe. For the 2011 boating season, Bay Harbor has a new offering that will further enhance the marina as the heart of the community and as a world-class regional destination. The Bay Harbor Lake Marina Captain’s Club will allow seasonal and transient boaters to take advantage of discounts, special offers and important products and services from area businesses while staying in Bay Harbor. “The majority of visiting boaters come from farther PHOTOS COURTESY OF BAY HARBOR

scuttlebutt

away than Michigan,” reported John Russell, the marina harbormaster. “Many are coming from ports in Wisconsin. We want to give them the ability to stay longer, add to their experiences and enjoy our community.” Here’s how it works: Boaters may visit bayharbor.com and click on the Bay Harbor Lake Marina Captain’s Club logo. The dedicated BHLMCC page will outline the many area businesses with special offers for club members, as well as additional information about club benefits and available services. Each interested boater then fills out an application for club membership and submits the form online. Once accepted, each boater will receive a member ID number and begin his or her Little Traverse Bay adventures. According to Russell, all businesses from the Village at Bay Harbor, Charlevoix, Harbor Springs and Petoskey are eligible to participate in the Captain’s Club program. At press time, participants included the Bay Harbor Lake Marina; Bay Harbor Village Hotel & Conference Center & Home Rentals; Walstrom Marine in Harbor Springs, Cheboygan and Bay Harbor; Lake Michigan Yacht Sales in Bay Harbor; the Bay Harbor Equestrian Club; First Mate Yacht Care; Cava; Knot…Just a Bar; Macprofessionals;

and Signature Services Yacht Management. And there will be many participating retailers, including restaurants, shops and art galleries. “Captain’s Club members will be able to take advantage of everything from discount dockage rates, servicing, carpet-cleaning and detailing to a variety of special offers at village shops and restaurants,” Russell explained. He noted that word about the club is spreading quickly. “As we move forward, we’ll provide weekly specials to our members via the website and e-mail blasts,” he commented. “The site also will offer real-time reports with weather and lake conditions, as well as updates on area events and things to do. It’s already clear that this is going to take on a life of its own.” What’s more, the Captain’s Club will incorporate deals from outdoor recreational facilities in the area, allowing members to enjoy discounts on such activities as golf, skiing and boat rentals. The possibilities, Russell said, are endless—and down the road, the club might even include reciprocal benefits at marina facilities elsewhere in the Great Lakes. The Bay Harbor Lake Marina can accommodate boats and yachts up to 200 feet. Its amenities include a ship’s store, restrooms, ice machine, shower and laundry facilities, dry-cleaning pickup and delivery, pay telephone, data port availability, broadband internet access, ATM, paddleboat and kayak rentals and access to the Bay Harbor Swim & Fitness Club. The marina lies literally within steps of boutique shopping and fine dining, and within easy walking distance of luxurious lodging and even world-class golf. To contact Bay Harbor Lake Marina, call 231-439-2544. To learn more about Bay Harbor and the new Captain’s Club, visit bayharbor.com. 

Through a series of discounts and special offers made available only to members, the new Bay Harbor Lake Marina Captain’s Club will allow seasonal and transient boaters to more fully enjoy the amenities of this world-class port.

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the chandlery

< WAX TO THE MAX Formulated to protect even under the harshest weather conditions, Collinite Boat Wax is the perfect pre-season treatment for your boat. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loaded with the rarest, natural Carnauba, producing an armor-like barrier against chemicals, acids and anything Mother Nature can throw at you. Goes on easy and stays on all season long for a wipe-and-shine deck. $16.95/pint BOATSERVICES.COM

Spring Fever

Products and services to get you primed for boating season.

22 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

PHOTO BY STEPHANIE BAKER / STEPHANIENBAKER.COM

the chandlery

>

GREEN BOTTOM

Pettit Marine Paint offers the world’s first copper-free applies easily with a brush, roller or spray and is safe to use on fiberglass, wood, aluminum and steel hulls. Available colors include ivory white, black, blue and red. $239.99/gallon PETTITPAINT.COM

DASH MASTER

>

ablative antifouling bottom paint, Ultima Eco. The paint

Octopus Autopilot Drives are designed to conceal behind the dash of sterndrive or outboard boats, replacing the manual cable helm with a manual helm/autopilot combination that works with all major autopilot brands. No more big plastic case visible behind the steering wheel. $870 OCTOPUSMARINE.CA

< FAST TO THE FISH Feel confident your sonar screen is showing fish or bare bottom—and anything else that’s down there—with Airmar’s B260 1kW Broadband Thru Hull Transducer. The separation between targets leaves no doubt, even in extreme conditions. $809 + installation TECHNICALMARINE.COM

PORT PROTECTION > Protect your boat from pesky muskrats with Hurley Marine’s Muskrat Guards. These critters swim up into your exhaust and chew through thousands of dollars in equipment—and the damage is often excluded by insurance policies. Hurley’s guards are stainless steel, adjustable and easily install inside exhaust ports; no hull penetration required. Four sizes available, with custom options possible. $99.99 HURLEYMARINE.COM

< LAUNCHING MADE EZ Hit the water with your canoes and kayaks faster this season with the new EZ Launch system, brought to you by the folks at EZ Dock. Behold the first port system built specifically for paddle sports enthusiasts, making it easier than ever to board, launch and recover kayaks and canoes dockside. Meets all ADA requirements. EZ-DOCK.COM 23 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

boat test

Sea Ray 450 Sedan Bridge

The very best of both worlds. by ch r i s caswe ll

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boat test

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SEA RAY BOATS

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f you’re the owner of a flybridge yacht, you’ve probably looked at express cruisers with a certain envy at times, because the ability to move easily from indoor protection to outdoor pleasures is certainly their forte. And, if you own an express cruiser, you’ve probably felt a pang looking at flybridge yachts, since that raised bridge provides a great view and allows even more cabin space below. But wait, as they say in late-night Ginsu knife commercials! Now you can have the very best of both worlds. Sea Ray has taken the attractive features of both express cruiser and flybridge and combined them into the new Sea Ray 450 Sedan Bridge. Let’s take a look at the bridge first, because that’s where you, your family and your guests are going to spend most of your time underway. I’m not quite sure what to call this area, though, because it does several things so well. On a larger yacht, you’d call it a skylounge. Technically, it’s the flybridge. Whatever you call it, it’s wonderful and it makes great sense, especially for inland skippers who tend to stretch the weather envelope by starting their season early and ending late. Although most builders make you add a bridge hardtop as an option, Sea Ray includes it as standard equipment, and that’s what we had on our test boat. Combined with 26 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

the full enclosure (also standard), it creates an all-weather “living room” aboard the 450. If it’s chilly or wet outside, you’re fully protected, and you have climate control with the optional bridge heating and air-conditioning. If it’s pleasant, you can open the clear windows to enjoy the fresh air. Since the hardtop is standard, I’d suggest you add one option: The electrically retractable canvas sunroof. This truly gives you control of the weather. The day I tested the 450 was nippy, so we left the bridge enclosure buttoned up, but then we opened the roof. The sunlight poured in, but the breeze was kept at bay—and it was absolutely delightful. The entire aft section of the bridge is filled with a wrap-around settee that can handle all those friends who will want to join you on this yacht, with a mahogany table for meals or munchies. In easy reach is a drawer-style fridge for cold drinks, with a flat-screen TV atop the console. OK, I’m old-fashioned, but the TV was a bit too prominent for my tastes. I understand that people might want to watch the Sunday games while enjoying the bridge at anchor but, since it can be removed and stored below, I’d leave it there most of the time. Rivaling the electric sunroof for “My Favorite Feature” on the bridge is the clever seating arrangement. The

Sea Ray broke the mold when it created the layout for its new 450 Sedan Bridge. The roomy, open salon features a non-traditional furniture arrangement, perfect for lounging or entertaining. The galley, just steps down from the main salon, offers all the creature comforts from home, including stainless steel appliances, two-burner cooktop and plenty of natural light (below).

skipper has a custom pedestal chair to himself, with flip-up bolsters and full adjustments that include spinning around to face the lounge area. Opposite the skipper is a forward-facing double-wide bench seat with reclining backrests and, ta-da, this entire console also swivels 180-degrees to face the settee when entertaining. The skipper’s office is thoughtfully equipped in the usual Sea Ray fashion, with a leather-trimmed instrument panel arranged to provide a wealth of information at a glance. Our test boat had a pair of Raymarine 120 screens linked to the SmartCraft diagnostics and VesselView monitoring system, so everything is displayed with a touch. You get full information about the engine health and systems from the bilge pumps to tank levels. And, of course, the system provides a full array of navigational and communication electronics. Next to the throttles and just under the skipper’s right hand is the joystick for the Zeus pod-drive system that makes handling the 450 Sedan Bridge a cinch. Even better, Sea Ray includes the “Skyhook” system, which, with a single button, will hold the yacht in position within inches. You can Skyhook the 450 right next to a dock, and then take your time getting the lines ashore and the fenders just right. When it comes to getting to the bridge, Sea Ray provides safe and secure stairs with plenty of handrails, and I have to say that my creaky knees appreciated the easy access. Since the bridge is so well protected for all seasons, there’s no need for a lower helm, which gives you even more space in the salon. But Sea Ray wasn’t content with the usual couch-here-dinette-there layout. PHOTOS COURTESY OF SEA RAY BOATS

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The captain is sure to feel like a king seated in the 450s plush, custom pedestal chair complete with flip-up bolsters and full adjustments (above). Beauty sleep is never a problem in the master stateroom, which includes a centerline queen-size berth (right).

SEA RAY 450 SB Standard Equipment Zeus propulsion w/ helm joystick and Skyhook; autopilot; electronic controls; VHF radio; SmartCraft VesselView display; bridge refrigerator; fiberglass hardtop and full bridge enclosure; rope/change windlass w/ foot switches; 36,000-BTU zonecontrolled A/C; Ultraleather interior seating; Sony stereo w/ CD player, amplifier, subwoofer and 8 speakers; entertainment center w/ DVD player and 32" flatscreen TV; raised dinette w/ high-gloss wood table; coffeemaker; microwave/convection oven; upright refrigerator/freezer; two-burner recessed stove; utility room; 13.5-kW Onan generator; battery converter/charger; 240V/50 amp shore power w/ 75' cord; 11-gal. water heater; hydraulic trim-tabs; automatic fire suppression system.

Specifications LOA: 45'6" Beam: 14'5" Draft: 48" Weight: 36,602 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 375 gals. Water Capacity: 130 gals. Base Power: MerCruiser QSB w/ Zeus 480-hp Base Price: Contact dealer searay.com

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No, they started with a fresh sheet of paper and created a layout that is sure to be copied by other builders who didn’t think of it first. Our test 450 had the optional sofa to port that pulls out to become a double berth, and it was in a creamy UltraLeather that was almost edible. Opposite are two loose chairs on each side of a console with a 32-inch flatscreen TV atop it and, once again, I wish that Sea Ray had found a way to hide it, perhaps as a pop-up TV. Yes, I do have a TV fetish: I think they should be seen when you want them, and hidden when you don’t. This is all pretty standard fare to this point, but the really cool part is that Sea Ray created a raised settee/dinette just forward. Surrounded by huge windows, it has a great view whether you’re having dinner, playing Monopoly or just loafing. As an option, you can replace the dinette with a lower helm, but with an all-weather bridge helm, why would you? Down a couple of steps is the galley, which is open to the salon and benefits from the skylight effect of the windshield overhead. It has all the expected niceties, from a stainless steel fridge to a two-burner cooktop. The nearby steps are hinged, where you can hide the optional washer-dryer for easy and out-of-sight laundry. By raising the dinette, Sea Ray gave full headroom to the guest stateroom with a pair of single berths; but Sea Ray knows you might want to overnight with more than just kids, and so the twins convert to a king-size berth with a filler mattress piece. With the large window, this is no second-class stateroom; it’s a bright getaway with plenty of storage. Forward, the master has a centerline queen-size berth with innerspring mattress, good stowage around and under the berth, and a private head with a very clever shower arrangement. Trying to squeeze a full-sized shower compartment into a yacht of this size is a waste of space, because you may only use it ten minutes a day. But the alternative, often just a shower curtain, usually means soaking the rest of the head, including towels and toiletries. Sea Ray figured out a clever folding Lucite door that allows for plenty of shower space without getting everything wet. It’s hard to explain, so go take a look: It’s slick! The cockpit is designed for entertaining, with an L-shaped settee, mahogany table, and a console for the optional barbecue grill and wet-bar sink. There’s walk-through access to the large fiberglass swim platform, which, if you

boat test

want to carry a tender or jetski, can be replaced with a hydraulic platform for easy launching. If you prefer to walk the plank, you can add a passerelle for boarding. Standard power on the 450 is a pair of 480-hp CumminsMerCruiser Zeus pod drives and, since MerCruiser is under the same corporate umbrella as Sea Ray, you get good compatibility with the SmartCraft and VesselView systems. You can up the speed ante with optional 600-hp Zeus drives, but, again: Why would you? We topped out at 30 knots, or nearly 35 mph, and how often do you really need to run faster? The Zeus drives are very compact, so the fully-gelcoated engine room seems spacious for a yacht of this size. A gas-assisted hatch with a ladder makes access easy, and once inside, you can easily check everything from the oil PHOTOS COURTESY OF SEA RAY BOATS

levels to the Racor fuel filters. A 13.5-kW Onan generator is standard, and it’s just forward of the engines. Sea Ray doesn’t scrimp on the standard systems either, including the likes of oil changing systems for the engines and generator, automatic fire suppression system and freshwater washdowns. Underway, the 450 is great fun: Fast, nimble and well-mannered. With an 18-degree transom deadrise, she’s fine in a seaway, and the Zeus joystick handling makes difficult docking in front of spectators painless and white-knuckle free. With enough options to tailor the 450 Sedan Bridge to any tastes, I won’t be going out on a limb to predict this is going to become a very popular model for Sea Ray. Take a look, and you’ll see what I mean. r 29 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

boat spotlight

Minor 25 Offshore

The perfect pocket cruiser. by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

A

Specifications LOA w/swim platform: 25.5' Beam: 8.5' Draft: 2.5' Displacement: 2.7 tons Fuel Capacity: 79 gals. Water Capacity: 7.9 gals. Septic Tank Capacity: 10.5 gals. Standard Power: Volvo Penta D3-200 skarnemarine.com

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s a Lake Michigan boater who’s only owned trailerable boats, I’m always interested in new models designed for the Great Lakes’ ever-changing offshore conditions. But I’ll be honest: I’ve tended to gravitate toward sailboats, assuming powerboats 25 feet and under are better for harbor-hopping than serious blue water. I’ll also be the first to admit this assumption is incorrect. The boat that most recently hammered this point home is the new Minor 25 Offshore, the smallest boat in the Finland-based boatbuilder’s Offshore Series. This stout, seaworthy vessel will win hearts and minds as she demonstrates the many ways a trailerable boat can shine. “Just like her bigger sisters, she has single-level walk-around decks, which make it really safe to move around,” said Carl Skarne of Milford, Connecticut-based Skarne Marine, which imports the Minor Offshore boats from Finland. “The pilothouse has a large sunroof and two sliding doors on each side, a very rare feature on a 25-foot boat.” Within the pilothouse, you’ll find a fully equipped helm with an overhead instrument panel, adjustable steering wheel with hydraulic steering, adjustable helm and companion seats, and plenty of room for all the necessary electronics. Aft of the helm station is a comfortable U-shaped sofa with a dining table and lots of storage, both within the sole and underneath the seats. This entire space is warmed with laminate teak flooring. If you so desire, you also may add teak to the

swim platform and the deck around the pilothouse. An aft deck shower is available as well. Just steps below is the cozy lacquered-teak cabin with its V-berth and fully enclosed head. While the pilothouse can easily accommodate six people, you’ll have plenty of space and privacy to retire for an overnight stay. There’s a small galley to port, and a refrigerator is available. “People really are surprised by how much boat is in this package, for being trailerable and ‘only’ being 25 feet,” Skarne said. “The pilothouse allows passengers to sit comfortably and protected with full 360-degree views.” Skarne noted he frequently receives positive feedback on the belowdecks accommodations and handling underway. He observed a stock boat with a Volvo Penta D4-225 sterndrive engine burned 7.5 gallons per hour at 25 knots. At 7 knots, that drops to just 2.5 gallons per hour. Standard power on the 25 Offshore is Volvo Penta’s D3-200. You also can choose a 225-, 260- or 300-hp engine. With the 300-hp engine, top speeds are more than 40 knots. And with a maximum cruising range of more than 360 statute miles, the 25 is a truly versatile boat that can meet a variety of needs. “With speed potentials of more than 40 knots, she really can move and get you places fast,” Skarne said. “On the other hand, the boat has economical displacement speeds if you’re looking to meander.” The price point is user-friendly as well. A Minor 25 Offshore with Volvo Penta D3-200 engine delivered to the East Coast is approximately $145,000. r

boat spotlight

Chaparral 327 SSX

A dayboat with accommodations. by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

I

n February, the National Marine Manufacturer’s Association presented one of its 2011 Innovation Awards to Nashville, Georgia-based Chaparral, acknowledging the 46-year-old boatbuilder’s most revolutionary new product to date. The 2012 Chaparral 327 SSX falls into the “big bowrider” category, yet it offers so much more. “We rank the new 327 SSX among the most exciting boats we’ve ever developed,” commented Jim Lane, company president. “With its never-before-seen cabin design, the 327 is equal parts bowrider, sport boat and cruiser.” Thanks to its patent-pending design, the 327 boasts a sizable full-beam cabin with sleeping accommodations and a fully equipped head. It also has everything you need for a day of watersports or on-water entertaining. According to Mike Fafard, Chaparral’s vice president of design and engineering, the new 327 SSX first took shape two years ago. “Jim Lane, Buck Pegg, Mike Werle and I were flying back from the Miami boat show, and...we were discussing other manufacturers’ products and designs,” Fafard recalled. “Our conversation turned to our 327 and what we didn’t like about the competitive products in this size range.” The major dislike, Fafard noted, is that in this category, the cabin and head traditionally are separate compartments. “If you need to use the head, you have to leave the cabin—perhaps in the rain or in the dark,” he explained. “You can’t have both doors open at the same time, so you have to stop, close one and then open the other. It just doesn’t make sense.”

Fafard’s team devised a new plan: A stepped-up walkway between the dashes, which accommodates that desirable full-beam cabin; it also provides belowdecks headroom. The cabin features a lockable fiberglass cabin door with glovebox, L-shaped couch that converts to a full berth, cedar-lined hanging locker, galley countertop with storage, entertainment center, and a sound system with Sirius. Its head compartment provides standing headroom and a shower. Options include a microwave, 26-inch flat-screen TV with DVD player, air-conditioning and a generator. Topside, boaters will appreciate the standard hardtop with integrated speakers, lights, grab handles and canvas; custom sculpted dash; dual bucket helm seats; PowerSlide transom lounge; and the convenient electric hatch offering access to the engine room. Then there’s the variety of storage spaces, from the insulated ice chest and floor compartment in the bow to the large compartments underneath the lounge seating and the 36-quart, carry-on cooler. A gas grill also is available. And power? The 327 SSX is available with twin Mercury and Volvo engines, including Mercury’s Axius Bravo III and Volvo’s Joystick Catalyst, for a minimum of 600- and maximum of 860-hp. “Customers are telling us, ‘I’ve been thinking about this for years, so why did it take you so long?,” Fafard commented, adding, “This is what so many families need—a dayboat with accommodations.” r

Specifications LOA w/swim platform: 32'6" Beam: 10' Draft (Down): 38.5" Draft (Up): 23" Dry Weight: 10,200 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 150 gals. Water Capacity: 25 gals. Vacu-Flush Tank Capacity: 15 gals. Maximum Horsepower: 860-hp chaparralboats.com

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boat spotlight

Glastron GS 289 A versatile model with family appeal. by b i ng o ’ m eara

G

Specifications LOA: 28'10" Beam: 9' Draft (drive down): 3'5" Weight: 6,500 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 84 gals. Water Capacity: 18 gals. Standard Power: MerCruiser 350 Magnum MPI Bravo III 300-hp glastron.com

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lastron Boats got its start when entrepreneur Bob Hammond designed and tooled a prototype fiberglass boat in a rented garage in Arlington, Texas, putting it through strenuous testing in Gulf of Mexico waters. After passing with flying colors, Hammond secured $25,000 from investors and the corporation, first called Standard Glass Products, was officially created on October 14, 1956. The generic name came about because one of the investors owned a casket company that used cutting-edge fiberglass technology to make its wares. One evening Bob and his wife, Bettye, were out driving and she came up with the idea of combining “Glas,”representing the new fiber “glass” material, and “Tron,” which sounded high tech, and the Glastron name was born. By the end of 1956, the company had made and sold 24 boats. Glastron grew into one of the biggest fiberglass boatbuilders in the world and was based in Little Falls, Minnesota, until recently, when a change in ownership resulted in a move to Cadillac, Michigan. The GS 289 is the largest top-of-the-line cruiser that Glastron builds. She is queen of the fleet and loaded with accessories that are as attractive as they are functional. We walked through this beauty on a wintery day at Harborside Marina in Wilmington, Illinois.

The forward cabin has the expanse to house a family of four in style and comfort in the muggiest weather with dockside air conditioning. The engine on our boat, an 8.1 GiC DP Volvo Penta 400-hp (standard is the MerCruiser 350 Magnum 300-hp), tops the cabin cruiser out at better than 40 mph. While on land, the boat can essentially transform itself into an RV. On the water, it’s capable enough to handle the Great Lakes in moderate weather, yet small enough to gunkhole and enjoy inland waters. This truly is a multi-dimensional boat. Options include a ski tow ring that helps her become a ski- or wakeboard boat. The foredeck sunpad makes her attractive to the carefully sunscreened sun worshippers of the family. I also would recommend the extended swim platform; if your dock is low enough, you will board the boat at the stern and through the transom door. Additional options worth considering include the canvas package, as well as the complete camper package, which will keep the air conditioning in when the boat is closed up tightly. The galley package includes a refrigerator, microwave oven, coffee maker, electric stove, water heater that works off 110-volt dockside power, sink and water system. I predict this boat’s style, size and versatile livability—not to mention the fact that it’s trailerable and affordable—will make it an ideal package for small families and couples. Harborside Marina’s “Real Deal” price on the Glastron GS 289 is $95,118. MSRP with options is $106,886. r

boat spotlight

Carver 36 Mariner

Plenty of “sedex” appeal aboard this roomy vessel. by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

T

here’s an old adage in marketing communications: If you try to say everything, you end up saying nothing at all. The same proves true in yacht design. The folks at Carver Yachts, a 57-year-old boatbuilder based in Pulaski, Wisconsin, know this well. That’s why they had a specific focus for their new 36 Mariner. The Carver team recognized its contemporary customer is looking for more value in the 30- to 45-foot range. “We realized our boaters aren’t looking for the same top-end speeds as a few years ago, nor are they cruising as far,” explained Erik Nelson, Carver’s vice president of sales and marketing. “Instead, people are going back to their roots. They’re using their boats as condominiums, and they want the space for entertaining.” The 36 Mariner has consistently been a No. 1 or No. 2 seller for Carver, so its designers took the existing model, retooled the hull and superstructure for a different profile, and capitalized on the open, one-level floor plan. What they created is a distinctive “sedexpress.” “The 36 is a niche product, a balance between a sedan and an express,” Nelson said. “It’s a one-stateroom, one-head boat that has the salon and galley on the same level.” The advantages are readily apparent. Integral steps to port and starboard lead from the large cockpit to wide sidedecks and an impressively roomy bridge, which is able to seat up to 12 people. In addition to the pedestal captain’s and companion’s helm seats, lounges to port and starboard seat three people apiece, while a broad aft lounge seats up to five.

The bridge boasts a wet bar with self-draining sink, and a refrigerator and ice maker are available. Certain to be a hit is the bow seating, located between the windshield and forward hatch. Below, you’ll enter a full-beam salon with generous headroom and large windows for natural light. A dinette with two bench seats lies to starboard, and an L-shaped lounge is to port. The entertainment center is equipped with 20-inch TV, DVD player and AM/FM radio with CD player, satellite radio system and Apple iPod dock. The galley is forward of the dinette, and it offers a stainless steel refrigerator/freezer, electric two-burner stove, stainless steel microwave oven with built-in coffee maker, solid-surface countertops, five storage cabinets and three drawers. Across from the galley is the fully equipped head, which features full headroom, a vanity with integral sink and a cabinet with oak doors. Master accommodations, located in the bow, incorporate a queen-size berth with innerspring pillow-top mattress, oak end tables, carpeted hanging lockers, seven storage cabinets and two drawers. Air-conditioning is standard. Carver incorporated new technologies into the 36 Mariner, offering a 90-day trial subscription to the SeaKey security, safety and concierge system. In addition, the boat features the Carver Docking System with bow thruster and a range of power plants that include Volvo’s sterndrive with joystick. MSRP is $305,490. r

Specifications LOA w/ platform & gunnel molding: 39'9" Beam w/ gunnel molding: 12' 5" Draft w/ inboard engines: 37" Weight: 19,500 lbs. Fuel Capacity: 250 gals. Water Capacity: 75 gals. Holding Tank Capacity: 31 gals. Power: Crusader 5.7 MPI 330-hp carveryachts.com

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Get Pre-Qualified for Boat Loans Pre-qual smooths the boat loan process. BY G R EG PROTEAU

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Every American consumer knows it’s become harder to get loans after the “trouble” visited financial markets from 2007 to 2009. And 2010 changes in financial regulation—designed to better protect borrowers but loading new requirements on lenders—added some limiting and time-delay factors to the lending process. Now, boat sellers and financial firms seeking to extend credit are encouraging borrowers to pre-qualify for loans before they take a trip to the local dealer or boat show. It’s a pretty smart thing to do. When people buy real estate, they jump through all kinds of hoops to determine what they can afford and how much a lender will advance to help them acquire a property. Though the pre-qualifying process for boats will be less onerous (perhaps, except, for those buying superyachts), it is a useful exercise for the same reasons: It tells boat shoppers what price ranges they should qualify for (and thus help focus which brands, models, power and amenities to shop for), plus it lets them build the boat comfortably into their budget.

Do your homework A little up-front work will help make the acquisition process simple and successful. If the prospective borrower’s background is solid, there should be few if any delays or requests for additional information from a lender. But, if there are a few credit faux pas, knowing these up front will provide time to conceivably rectify them, identify alternatives or set purchase goals more in line with budget affordability. Start early when looking for loans and consider sources that may not be as visible as those in the past. Ask builders, dealers and brokers if they maintain relationships beyond traditional bricks and mortar banks. Builders may have established custom finance programs, dealers can have their own lending departments or be linked to industry servicers, and brokers maintain contacts with marine credit sources beyond their market area and sometimes globally. Information on boat loans and sources can be found on the National Marine Bankers Association website, marinebankers.org.

Review Time Boat sellers and financial firms seeking “ to extend credit are encouraging borrowers to pre-qualify for loans before they take a trip to the local dealer or boat show.

Readers of boating magazines may have an edge in the prequalifying process. Most are boat owners already, or have significant knowledge of the boat they want to own and where it will be used. Lenders are becoming more interested in their potential borrowers’ boat savvyness. Those with a history of ownership, and a pattern of borrowing to buy boats, provide comfort when it comes to approving the next loan. Borrowers should talk up their boating background and ideally be able to show that it has been good and safe for them—and for the institutions that financed their earlier purchases. Previous boat history is a good thing, and so is a solid credit history. Credit scoring is used to determine the likelihood of any loan repayment, and above-average scores will be helpful to finance discretionary purchases, boats included. Current lending practices suggest scores should be close to the 700 mark and higher to simplify the process of approving boat loans. Anyone can check their scores by visiting annualcreditreport.com which the Federal Trade Commission points out is the only authorized source for the free annual credit reports.

What to expect Depending on the intended boat purchase and size of the loan request, borrowers can expect lenders to consider the following details in deciding to approve the transaction:  Bank/brokerage account statements examined to verify liquid assets  Income verified through tax returns and paystubs  Credit history reflecting accounts paid as agreed; evidence of comparable borrowing history with boats or other similar items PHOTO BY STEPHANIE BAKER / STEPHANIENBAKER.COM

 Evidence down payments can be paid  Trade-in values supported by industry pricing guidebooks Down payments currently vary from 15 percent to 25 percent, based on boat type, age and loan size. Those buying new boats generally will ask for lower down payments, but should consider providing more to lower monthly payments and infuse more equity in the boat if (and when) it needs to be resold. Boats older than 20 years and performance boats are going to require more down and will have a higher rate and shorter term. Trade-ins and resulting values are being examined more closely now because of changes occurring in the boatbuilding industry. Obviously, if a particular brand is no longer being produced, its value will be less. However, the strong activity in the pre-owned boat market has benefitted some well-known brand values, popular categories like trawlers and other in-demand models that are in short supply. With the loan approval in-hand, buyers will generally have a 30-day rate commitment, and the actual credit approval can extend for 45-60 days. It’s prudent to advise the lender of the anticipated delivery date. To keep the deal moving forward, stay in contact with the seller and the lender to be sure all conditions of the approval are met so the deal can fund on time.  Greg Proteau writes about trends, companies and people in the boating and finance industries and serves as long-time executive director of Boating Writers International, an association of marine journalists. In addition to his journalism experience, Proteau also works as a marketing and communications consultant, both within and outside the marine sector.

Schedule an Annual Boat Insurance Review Boat owners moving to something new or keeping their current craft are both encouraged to contact their insurance agents and request an annual review. Experts in the marine insurance field are advising clients that rates reflect some of the lowest in history, and there are high quality policies available at competitive prices. In sum, boaters should shop around for insurance this year. In addition to the insurance market continuing to compete for business, another main reason for an annual review is that boats and owner operating habits change. • Has equipment on the vessel changed? • Have stated cruising limits changed? • Can enhancements be added at the same or reduced premium cost? • Can policies be “bundled” to gain premium discounts? Remember: Premiums can also reflect “agreed to” values determined by the overall boating market. With industry changes, double check price guide listings to determine if a boat’s value could now be too high or low based on changes in used boat prices. — G.P.

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WAY TO

SAVE Enjoy savings with your boat come tax time. BY CAPT . FRAN K LAN I E R

W

hile “boat” and “sound financial investment” are rarely used in the same sentence, tax time may be the right time to actually reap some monetary benefits from boat ownership. Ah, yes, actually getting money back from Uncle Sugar for owning a boat—it’s the stuff of legend in every tiki bar conversation from Kalamazoo to Key West…but is it true? Let’s take a look at two of the more common strategies that apply to boat owners. [Disclaimer: Tax laws are constantly changing, and each taxpayer’s circumstances are unique. Any deduction reported to the IRS should only be made after consultation with a professional tax preparer.]

Second home mortgage interest Millions of boaters qualify for the “second home mortgage interest” deduction. It’s not only the most popular boat- related deduction, but it’s also the one that draws the least amount of scrutiny from the IRS. If a vessel is purchased with a secured loan (one using the boat as collateral, for example) and meets certain requirements, the IRS allows you to treat it as a second vacation home and deduct the interest paid for that year. For tax purposes, a boat can qualify as a second home if it has basic living accommodations—a sleeping area, galley and head. As the rules defining each of these areas are pretty flexible, virtually every boat with an enclosed cabin can qualify—just don’t go overboard with creativity. Throwing a sleeping bag

and plastic bucket into that bow rider you keep on a trailer in the backyard won’t qualify it as a second home, even with that $5 hibachi grill from the Quickee Mart. If claiming this deduction, the IRS expects you to get out there and enjoy your boat! Owners have to spend at least 15 nights on board per year and be able to prove it (your boat’s logbook can satisfy the latter requirement). Owners that occasionally charter their boats must meet the 15-day overnight requirement or stay aboard 10 percent of the number of days the boat was chartered, whichever is greater. You also can rent or charter your boat for up to 14 days a year and pocket the cash, tax-free. Even if you’re charging $10,000 a week, the IRS doesn’t want to hear about it. Another point to note is that you can only claim one second-home deduction on your tax return—in other words, if you also own a condo at the lake or qualifying motor home, you can only select one for the deduction. Although lending institutions always issue a Form 1098 (Mortgage Interest Statement) for homes they finance, most fail to issue them on the boat loans they service, mainly because the lenders (and many boat owners) aren’t aware this interest deduction applies to qualifying boats. Fortunately, the IRS allows you to claim the interest without the form. Finally, like real estate taxes on your home, personal property tax paid on your boat can be claimed as well. To qualify, the tax must be charged to you on a yearly basis, even if it’s collected more than once during the tax year or the following year. 37 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

Charter ownership

Another possible tax strategy is placing your boat into charter service to defray ownership costs. Doing so converts your boat from a personal asset to a business asset, allowing you to qualify for business tax deductions that would not be available if the boat was used strictly for pleasure. It’s certainly not for everyone, but it can generate significant tax savings in some cases, such as writing off dock fees, insurance, maintenance and loan payments.

the break-even point (although excess passive losses can be carried forward to offset passive income from future years). Unused passive losses can be claimed in full in the year the taxpayer disposes of his or her entire interest in the activity (selling the boat, for example). If you have passive income, passive losses aren’t a problem; if, however, you don’t have passive income, you need to “materially participate” in the business in order to create active business losses, which can be used to offset active income.

Turns out your boat may generate substantial tax savings, but only for owners who do their homework and follow the rules concerning boat-related tax deductions. Operating your boat as a business also allows you to take advantage of the Section 179 election, which allows taxpayers to deduct the cost of owning a boat on their income taxes as an expense, rather than requiring the cost of the property to be capitalized and depreciated. A key point is understanding the difference between passive and active income and losses. Lease or rental activity is considered a passive activity, meaning it neither produces active income or active losses—no matter how much an owner participates. If you sign a contract with a charter company that guarantees revenue, then you likely have a lease—meaning you won’t be able to claim the vessel as a business activity. Passive losses can’t be deducted against active income (i.e. money earned on a job) and can only be deducted up to

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Any lease or rental activity is passive, regardless of whether the taxpayer materially participates; however, if one of six exceptions is met, the activity is not termed a lease or rental for purposes of the passive loss rules. One of these exceptions is when the average period of customer use is seven days or less—the typical length of most charters. Another is when the business/taxpayer offers personal services along with the charter, such as provisioning, outfitting, boat use instructions, transportation services—all of which can be subcontracted out by the owner, if desired. Both of these tax “safe harbors” are typically met when a boat is managed by a charter service; however, be forewarned that all fall within a quasi-gray area of the tax laws and are open to audit challenges. 

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IDYLLIC TIMES TWO The sister cities of Saugatuck and Douglas, Michigan, offer boaters a perfect mix of food, fun and culture.

T

he online dictionary defines idyllic as “perfect; extremely pleasant.” For a Lake Michigan boater looking for a relaxing destination to spend some time or just weather a stormy afternoon, that describes sister cities Saugatuck and Douglas, Michigan, all the way. And if you’re a boater interested in art—performing arts, painting and pottery and the culinary arts—this is a must-stop on your cruise agenda. The two towns are on opposite sides of Lake Kalamazoo, one of Michigan’s sunken river lakes, this one at the mouth of the Kalamazoo River. Both towns offer great marina facilities, but Saugatuck has more restaurants, bed and breakfasts, antique stores and other shops, while Douglas is more residential. A chain ferry, powered by the arm strength of local teenagers, connects the two towns across the Kalamazoo, and public transportation via the Inter-Urban Bus service costs a whole dollar and runs between the two burgs, too. Transient boaters alighting in either place can thoroughly enjoy both. When approaching Saugatuck and Douglas from the offshore waters of Lake Michigan, the only discernable landmark for miles out is a round, white orb of a microwave relay station, visible just above the treeline. If you’ve got the lat/lon punched in correctly on your GPS, you’ll see the flat spot marking the mouth of the Kalamazoo River, punctuating green, tree-covered high dunes behind a long line of sandy beach. To port of the entrance is one of the few visible beachfront residences along this Art Coast of Michigan—a mansion with a silvery roof. Once past the piers, an inlet appears to starboard. This is a popular anchorage, but it is quite shallow in spots. About 15 minutes of idle-speed takes you up the channel past residences and forested banks (where deer often appear for a drink) and gets you to Saugatuck on the north side of the channel at the entrance to Lake Kalamazoo.

PHOTO BY FELICIA FAIRCHILD

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Good Karma My wife, Kathy, and I met our friends, Jim and Tracey Ridderbos, at the ramp belonging to Star Ferry in downtown Saugatuck. The fine folks at Hall’s Sports Center up the road in Muskegon brought us a big Four Winns Horizon 310 bowrider for our August day of cruising. After paying our $30 launch fee (it’s free at a couple of ramps upstream, both on the Saugatuck and Douglas sides, where we’ve easily launched 21-footers in the past), we headed directly for the big lake. Putting the hammer down through the chop, we headed out a few miles and noticed a man in a small recreational fishing boat, about four miles from shore, flailing his arms somewhat frantically in the rolling three-foot waves. He needed a tow, and we were happy to give him one, as we really didn’t have a schedule to meet. Using the first hour and a half of our day being good samaritans seemed like it would provide good karma for the rest of the day. The fellow tossed us his anchor line. We tied it to the ski tow and headed slowly back to port. Once past the winding channel between the big lake and Lake PHOTOS BY FELICIA FAIRCHILD / STREET FAIR PHOTO BY DAVE MULL

Boaters and other tourists have many opportunities to relax and enjoy the waterfront in Saugatuck and Douglas (opposite). The annual Sidewalk Sale Days in August are a great time to enjoy the ambiance of downtown Saugatuck—and find great deals (top). Three happy revelers enjoy Independence Day (bottom).

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You can shop ’til you drop in Saugatuck, and fortunately plenty of great restaurants and watering holes provide perfect places to recuperate (left).

Kalamazoo, we got an education in careful navigation. His dock was a ways upriver from Saugatuck, beyond the Blue Star Highway bridge on the Douglas side. As we didn’t have any GPS mapping software, we had to rely on the powerless angler to show us how to follow the fairly tricky channel. Lake Kalamazoo is not a place for casual cruising. The lake is full of shallows that are thankfully muddy (we had to back our big bowrider off a mud flat after I ran her aground—better described as “amuck”—at idle speed). Several times our digital depth gauge read two feet, but we were still able to maneuver to the deeper channels. It’s hard to imagine the Kalamazoo River once allowed ships to go all the way upstream to the inland town of Allegan—a distance of more than 25 miles.

Tasty delights

Brewtiquing, Anyone? BREWTIQUING: The activity of shopping the antique mall until you need a break, grabbing a bite at the brewery, going back to the mall, then back to the brewery... That’s the definition provided by David Hulst, owner of the Blue Star Antique Pavilion (2948 Blue Star Memorial Highway; 269-857-6041), housed in the same building as the Saugatuck Brewing Company. The antique mall opened in July 2004 and fast became a destination mall for serious antiquers and casual browsers alike, says Hulst. He noted the Antique Pavilion occupies half of a 50,000-square-foot former manufacturing facility and features more than 175 antique dealers from all over the United States—including Detroit, Chicago, and even Nevada. The dealers have no singular specialty, says Hulst, therefore offering “a little bit of everything for everyone.” “The founders of (public television’s) ‘Antiques Roadshow’ stopped in while filming in Grand Rapids and stated this was the best mall they have seen, and they have seen many,” says Hulst. “The mall has many regular customers, and dealers who go out of their way to shop there, one regular all the way from Canada and another from Georgia, stop as often as they can. “Now that the Saugatuck Brewing Company has occupied the other half of the building, a new activity has been born,” says Hulst. “Brewtiquing!” – D.M.

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Happy angler back in his slip, it was getting close to lunchtime, so we docked at Sergeant Marina, which cost $15 for four hours, and walked up to the Coral Gables restaurant for lunch. Food here—we were hungry for burgers and salads—was sumptuous, and the drinks were cold. Service was great, too. I’ve been to Saugatuck numerous times fishing on my own and a couple of times shopping with Kathy, and we’ve never experienced a bad meal. The Mermaid Bar and Grille gets a high personal recommendation, with entrées that go well beyond basic bar and grill fare. The Butler is renowned for charbroiled burgers and steaks, and you can’t go wrong at Wicks Park Bar and Grille, either. Don’t leave town without trying the perch sandwich at Wally’s—you won’t find a better one anywhere on the planet. All of these and more are in the downtown shopping area of Saugatuck, within easy walking distance from the docks on the Saugatuck side. To sample some great craft brews, check out the Saugatuck Brewing Company (sbrewing.com) in Douglas, which offers a wide range of beer, ale and stout brewed on site, as well as a range of local wines. These compliment some fine meals available in an Irish pub-type atmosphere. The SBC also hosts a series of classic films throughout the year on its own big screen—you can drink and dine during the films, too. The microbrewery takes up half of a large, former manufacturing facility, which has the Blue Star Antique Pavilion and its amazing selection of antique and art taking up the other half (see “Brewtiquing” sidebar). PHOTOS BY FELICIA FAIrCHILD

PHOTO b CY R EDDAI Tv EJ OMEu l S lH M ( TOOEP ) / P H O T O C R E D I T MARY SMITH / PHOTO CREDIT JOE SHMOE

Whether in Saugatuck/Douglas for the afternoon or the whole season, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find ample accommodating slips and marinas.

Hungry Village Tours A new way to sample a community’s plate

Other places to eat and drink in Douglas that are close to Tower Marine and its transient slips include Back Alley Pizza Joint, the Wild Dog Grille (try the Wasabi Salmon) and Everyday People Café, which has a rather misleading name, as it’s only open in the evenings and serves gourmet meals and adult libations. A great way for boaters to experience the culture of Art Coast cuisine is by hooking up with Hungry Village Tours, which offers a free walking tour of the two towns, as well as a driving tour of the surrounding area (see “Hungry Village” sidebar). You also can provision the boat in either town at several groceries.

Home of the arts We happened to be in town during sidewalk sale days, which attracted a lot of weekday foot traffic. Here, we perused all manner of paintings and sculptures, clothing and antiques. We look forward to exploring Douglas this boating season. Other items worth noting include the many bed and breakfasts in the area, offering some respite from life aboard the boat. And Saugatuck’s Ship & Shore Motel offers boaters who have smaller craft lacking overnight accommodations the opportunity to dock and walk to their waterfront room. I’ve stayed here, and it’s a nice place. Felicia Fairchild, executive director of the Saugatuck/Douglas Convention and Visitors Bureau, notes that the town populace is serious about the arts—and attracting people to the area to see them. She explained the community has become well-known for the visual arts, with 36 art galleries in the area. Saugatuck also offers venues for the performing arts, with the Red Barn Theatre and the Red Barn Playhouse, which offers live performances. PHOTOS BY FELICIA FAIRCHILD / FARMERS MARKET PHOTO BY DAVID GEEN

David Geen started Villas and Vines more than 15 years ago, specializing in food and wine adventures in Italy, France, Spain, Argentina and Ireland. Repeat customers such as The Cooking Cottage (a cooking school from Buck’s County, Pennsylvania) were requesting new culinary destinations, so Geen went local and created Hungry Village Tours. “David’s creating a local, agriculture-related micro-business focusing on culinary/cultural tourism in the Saugatuck/Douglas lakeshore community,” according to Felicia Fairchild, executive director of the Saugatuck/Douglas Convention and Visitors Bureau. Geen plans two tours a day: A walking tour that probably will cost less than $50 per person, exploring Saugatuck and Douglas’ culinary secrets behind the storefronts with demonstrations and tastings; and a driving tour of the lakeshore’s producers, including farms, orchards, blueberry patches, vintners, brewers, creameries and smokehouses. Geen said the driving tour will cost less than $100 per person and includes transportation, making it appealing for foodies who arrive by boat. Both tours will convene at the Saugatuck Center for the Arts, acknowledging the center’s weekly Greenmarket and its history as a pie factory. Tours are slated to begin in May and run through October. “I want to make clear that this is not a restaurant sampling kind of thing,” Geen explained. He said the tours will offer exceptional “behind the scenes, personal” glimpse of local culture, food, wine, customs and fun. Special tours can be designed for groups, too. For more information, call 800-593-6350 or visit hungryvillagetours.com. — D.M.

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The Saugatuck Center for the Arts is housed in a former factory that had 30-foot ceilings and converted nicely to a 450-seat theater. Here, the Mason Street Warehouse Theatre serves as an incubator for Broadway productions. It also is close to the waterfront. The community has come into its own as a venue for the cinematic arts, quietly establishing the Waterfront Film Festival as the third most popular film festival in the world, behind Cannes and Sundance. This year, the 13th Annual Waterfront Film Festival takes place June 9-12.

Marinas The Saugatuck Chain Ferry provides a handy, unique way to shuttle between Saugatuck and Douglas (top). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simply not possible to find a bad meal in either town (bottom).

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Approaching Saugatuck up the Kalamazoo River, the first marina you encounter is Saugatuck Yacht Service (269-506-6361), which offers 10 transient slips, heads, showers and laundry, along with gas, diesel and pump-out services. Coral Gables Marina (269-857-2162; coralgablessaugatuck.com), Singapore Yacht Club (269-857-2442;

The Lost Town of

Singapore, MI

Up until 1875, sailing or steaming into the river from Lake Michigan would put you in downtown Singapore, now one of Michigan’s oldest ghost towns. But today, there’s barely any evidence it ever existed. Long buried by shifting sands after being founded and booming in the 1830s as a lumber town, the site is now mostly groomed private land. Singapore only exists in Saugatuck as the name of a yacht club and the Singapore Bank Bookstore. The bookstore’s name recalls an alleged, ongoing scandal in which the Singapore and Allegan banks shared funds to meet federal requirements compelling the institutions to have a certain amount of money. The federal bank examiner would inspect the Allegan Bank, then be taken out to get drunk by the Allegan banker while the money was transported 25 miles down the Kalamazoo River and deposited at the bank in Singapore—before the bank examiner could get there to count it.

singaporeyachtclub.com) and Sergeant Marina (269-857-2873; sergeantmarina.com) are next in line, and on the town’s waterfront. Each has up to 10 transient slips available. Coral Gables and Sergeant each sell gas and diesel; all three offer pump-out. On the Douglas side and around to starboard as you enter Lake Kalamazoo is the full-service Tower Marine (269-857-2151; towermarine.com), which has 40 transient slips and a service facility than can handle a full complement of repairs.

Activities abound For a couple of small towns, there’s an amazing amount of things to do beyond what we’ve already covered. Some activities yet to mention include

According to Wikipedia, the 40-day Blizzard of 1842 might have wiped out Singapore if the ship Milwaukie had not wrecked just off shore. The food aboard the ship kept Singapore residents alive. Here’s the creepy thing: The town and surrounding trees were greatly damaged by fire the same night as the Great Chicago Fire, and the fires that wiped out Peshtigo, Wisconsin—all on October 8, 1871. Although the Chicago fire is most well-known, the Peshtigo fire killed 1,300 people, while the fire that spanned from Saugatuck to Holland and up to Manistee, Michigan, swept completely across the state and burned Port Huron and other towns on the Lake Huron coast. What trees the fire spared around Singapore were harvested for lumber to rebuild Chicago and Holland, and without lumber to feed its two mills, Singapore soon became a ghost town, the last resident reportedly leaving in 1875. – D.M.

the Ravines Golf Course, designed by Arnold Palmer. You can take sailing lessons. Or throw your own pottery at the Express Yourself Art Barn in Douglas. Rent a canoe from Old Allegan Canoe and float down the Kalamazoo from New Richmond, Michigan. Watch puppet shows or go on exciting dune rides. Take a tour of the whole harbor aboard the Star of Saugatuck, an old-fashioned stern wheeler. Visit the Saugatuck/ Douglas Historical Museum. There’s really just too much to list here, which is why you should go to saugatuck.com and check out the complete online visitors guide, or call the Saugatuck and Douglas Convention & Visitors Bureau, 269-857-1701. Saugatuck/Douglas are cruising destinations you just may add to your itinerary year after year. r

Fishing Saugatuck: A Mixed Bag Fishing, whether from the pier or in boats, is good in Saugatuck/Douglas early in the year and into June. Kings, cohos and steelhead can be found near the pierheads, feeding on alewives spawning in the river. The action moves offshore as the water warms, but by August and September action can be hot for staging king salmon headed for the Kalamazoo River. Charters I can personally recommend are Best Chance Too (616-292-6098), with captains Dave Engel and Bill Bale, who dock at Big Lake Outfitters downtown. Capt. Matt Shanahan of Matt’s Charter Service (616-857-4316) is another captain. To research additional charters in the area, call Big Lake Outfitters at 269-857-4762. – D.M.

PHOTOS BY FELICIA FAIrCHILD (LEFT) / DAvE MuLL (rIGHT)

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special advertising section Contact John Danno: 616.836.2780 slips@towermarine.com Two Locations: Saugatuck & Douglas, Michigan

Full Service Marinas Seasonal & Transient Slips Special New Customer Slip Discounts Full Complement of Amenities Aerial photos by Photograpy Plus 231-798-2395

Lakeside in Saugatuck Village

Inspired by its lakefront setting, this beautifully appointed waterfront duplex has the ambiance and space of a private, country home, surprisingly tucked into the center of the village.  Walk to shops, galleries, and restaurants, literally steps away.  No hassels with driving to the village, and looking for parking. This location has it all!  Ample green lawns & gardens flank the bulkheaded, deepwater dock.  Two slips accompany the sale. Each slip 40L X 25W,

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or along the outside, 80ft of tie-up. Good water depth. Direct channel access to Lake Michigan. Singapore Yacht Club, and fueling station close by. The southern facing 2000-plus square foot residence enjoys a 27ft private, waterside terrace, with room for gracious entertaining. There are three oversized bedrooms, each with adjoining full baths, and a second floor family, or media room.  The living-dining room has beautiful built-in cabinetry,

a marble wetbar, 2 large bay windows, new cypress hardwood flooring, and Pella doors & windows. This home is not to be missed, for those who want quality, elegance, and convenience, on the water. Owner is a licensed Michigan Realtor.

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Mill Pond Realty, Inc

Laura Durham

747 Water Street, PO Box 1093 Saugatuck, MI 49453 Phone: 269.857.1477 888.528.7238 www.millpondrealty.com www.saugatckrealestate.com

DAVE HULST REALTOR ®

S AUGATUCK R EAL E STATE (616) 813-2751 CELL (269) 857-1349 FAX (269) 857-4902 OFFICE

dave@davehulst.com www.davehulst.com Each Office is Individually Owned and Operated.

WOODLAND SCHMIDT

2987 Blue Star Highway Douglas, MI 49406 CBGreatLakes.com 51 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

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Holland,

Michigan

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PHOTO BY TOM BARRAT

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Come one, come all to this artsy Dutch community.

T

by m ichae l hau e n ste i n

The Holland, Michigan, area combines natural beauty with well-cultivated artistic vibrancy. No wonder the locals seem so happy. The approach to Holland from Lake Michigan is marked by the dramatic coastal sand dunes of the Western Michigan shoreline. The aid to navigation indicating the harbor entrance, however, is a manmade beauty: “Big Red,” the unmistakable Holland Harbor Lighthouse. Local history states that the area’s citizens, lacking adequate federal funds, dug the channel themselves to connect Lake Michigan to Lake Macatawa (at the time called Black Lake). As with so much around Holland, hard work and investment paid off—today a deep shipping channel greets visiting boaters. Downtown Holland, located at the eastern end of the six-mile-long “Lake Mac,” is lined with fantastic shops, restaurants and artwork. My parents joined me on a trip to Holland last summer. When we arrived, we quickly made our way to…an Irish pub? But I had a rock-solid reason to venture to the Curragh Irish Pub that summer day: The Netherlands was competing in the World Cup Finals. The sea of Dutch orange soccer jerseys having justified the stop, we settled in to watch the match (which was won in the end by Spain) and commune with the locals. I learned two certainties over the course of the match: (1) these were some of the nicest people I’ve met; and (2) these nice people are authentically Dutch. “Holland is a very friendly, welcoming community,” says Lorma Williams Freestone, executive director of the Holland Area Arts Council. “And we’re just happy to show off what we love about our community.”

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located in the town’s 1914 post office, the Holland Museum (top) houses one of the finest Dutch art collections in the country. Holland is famous for its many statues throughout town (right).

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Destination for the arts Located at the eastern end of downtown, the Holland Area Arts Council is an advocate for the arts in the region and administers grants, Freestone says. Its headquarters also acts as the contemporary art museum for the area. “We have a lot of one-day workshops,” Freestone adds. “If you boat in, you can make art in one stop.” Every summer, the council organizes public art projects like the ReMastered banner project, in which local artists put a contemporary spin on master artworks—for example, Whistler’s Mother sitting in a Henry Miller-designed Eames chair—displayed on banners hanging from light poles. The Holland Area Arts Council is working on a contest this year for cover art for the Tulip Time Festival program. Residents and visitors will vote to determine the “people’s choice” from among 20 finalists. Outdoor art also includes more than a dozen statues, depicting everything from the Reverend Dr. Albertus C. Van Raalte, who founded Holland in 1847, to a police MusEuM phOTO By MIChAEL hAuENsTEIN / sTATuE phOTO COurTEsy Of hOLLAND CVB WINDMILL phOTO COurTEsy Of NELIs’ DuTCh VILLAGE (rIGhT)

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officer holding a little girl’s hand in front of the Holland Police Station. In addition to the visual art found throughout the community, visitors will find a symphony orchestra, chorale, several theater groups and other live music offerings. “I believe [Holland] is a destination for the arts,” says Freestone. “I think we have a very strong talent in our community, and a great value is placed on that talent.” It also has a strong philanthropic community that supports the visual and performing arts. “We have a fabulous museum that has one of the finest Dutch art collections, I would say, in the country,” says Freestone. The Holland Museum is located in the town’s 1914 post office. The first floor contains a permanent gallery on the town’s history, from its founding by Dutch settlers in the mid-1800s to its manufacturing history, which includes boatbuilding and Herman Miller’s modern office furniture. Additional pieces in the permanent gallery include items from the Netherlands Pavilion of the 1939 New York World’s Fair and the Netherlands East Indies Pavilion of the 1939 Golden Gate Exposition in San Francisco. “Mr. [Willard] Wichers, who started this museum, worked for the Netherlands Information Services Bureau, and when the war broke out in Europe, they told him, ‘We can’t take these now,’” says Anne Stewart, a docent at the museum. “We get visitors from the Netherlands who come over and say they don’t have anything like this in their museums because they were destroyed during the war,” says museum and galleries manager Taylor Wise-Harthorn. The museum also hosts temporary and traveling exhibitions on the first floor. Harthorn says a planned temporary exhibition, tentatively scheduled for the summer of 2013, will cover all the boating companies ever associated with Holland, from classic Chris-Craft cruisers to modern-day Tiara Yachts. Additionally, the city closes 10th Street in front of the museum for the annual Vintage Holland Boat Show, which is organized by the Holland Museum.

A colorful history of leisure By the turn of the century, Black Lake was a popular vacation destination. “This was the resort area to come to—people came by rail from Chicago and Grand Rapids, but they also came from Indiana and Missouri,” says Stewart. “There were big resorts on both sides of the lake; they’re all gone now, unfortunately.” For today’s boaters, however, the north and south

shores of Lake Macatawa each boast hundreds of slips. One can’t-miss facility is Yacht Basin Marina, a family-friendly, full-service marina located on the north shore of Lake Macatawa. The marina features overnight dockage in a well-protected setting away from Lake Michigan’s swells. The author L. Frank Baum is said to have written “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” while summering in the Macatawa community. “The rumor was that the Wicked Witch of the East and the Wicked Witch of the West were in cottages on either side of him—one to the east and one to the west,” says Stewart. As a tourism destination, Holland offers activities for the whole family, from educational demonstrations including wooden shoe carving and candle making to less-traditional pastimes such as laser tag, miniature golf and go karts.

De Zwaan, the 250-year-old windmill shipped from the Netherlands to Holland more than 50 years ago, is still active as a working flour mill.

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Because of its deep basin, Holland Harbor is a great place to catch a glimpse of the largest racing yachts (top). This year marks a special anniversary for Holland’s Tulip Time Festival. During festival time, you’ll find millions of beautiful tulips in bloom on Windmill island (right).

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For that authentic Dutch experience, look no further than De Zwaan, the 125-foot-tall windmill located on Holland’s aptly-named Windmill Island. And we mean authentic: The 250-year-old windmill was shipped from the Netherlands more than 50 years ago and still puts in a hard day’s work grinding flour. Windmill Island is located along the Macatawa River, east of Lake Macatawa on the edge of downtown—and contains 36 acres of manicured gardens, dikes and canals, picnic areas, and historical attractions including the miniature Netherlands Village. The Windmill Island Gardens are open daily from late April through early October. Not surprisingly, the tulip is the flower of choice; Holland has held its Tulip Time Festival each May for more than 80 years. This is a special year for the town and the festival, as it marks the 200th anniversary of Reverend Van Raalte’s birth. You’ll find millions of tulips in bloom during Tulip Time: On Windmill Island, in flower gardens around town, lining the streets, and especially at the Veldheer Tulip Gardens & Farm. In addition to the massive tulip farm, the site contains the De Klomp wooden shoe factory and an authentic Delftware pottery factory. Nelis’ Dutch Village, another nearby family attraction, recreates an 1800s Dutch village. The theme park is complete with native architecture, costumes and educational demonstrations. Heading back downtown, you can take the kids for ice cream—or stop for an adult beverage. Warner Vineyards opened a tasting room in downtown Holland in May 2010.

“It’s always five o’clock here,” says third-generation winemaker Billy Warner. Warner Vineyards, located in Paw Paw, Michigan is the second-oldest of Michigan’s 80 commercial wineries, according to Warner. He says the heart of the Michigan wine industry can be found along the Lake Michigan shore because of glacial deposits and the area’s sandy soil. In addition to the wineries, there are a handful of orchards and “pick-your-own” farms in the surrounding area. The New Holland Brewing Company offers brewery tours on Saturdays on the north side of Holland. The New Holland Brewing Company Restaurant and Pub is located downtown and open seven days a week.

On the water For brief Lake Michigan dayboating excursions out of Holland, there are a couple beaches to each side of the harbor entrance. The topography is marked by natural, low- and high-bluff coastal sand dunes. “Between here and Saugatuck there’s Laketown Beach [and Saugatuck Dunes State Park],” says Wade Eldean, of Eldean Shipyard on the south shore of Lake Macatawa. “There’s a couple more dunes that are in a more natural state that are privately owned, and they don’t mind people anchoring out there. You’ll see, on a busy weekend, thousands of boats out there on a mile of beach.” There’s plenty of action inside the harbor, though. For sailors, the Macatawa Bay Yacht Club holds races several days a week, from prams and Optis up to larger boats. On the other side of the lake, the Bayshore Yacht PHOTOS By wADE ELDEAN (LEfT) / TuLIP TIME (rIGHT)

Club’s Wednesday night races are usually held on Lake Michigan. Fishing tournaments, too, are regularly held during the summer months. Because of the deep harbor basin, the largest race boats are a regular sight, says Eldean. The late Roy Disney’s Pyewacket has visited, and the 86-foot Windquest, a fellow Race to Mackinac winner, is based in Macatawa. “From west to east, the whole length of Lake Mac is a shipping channel, so when in doubt you stick to the channel markers,” says Eldean. Some spots outside the channel that look deep are not, so a chart is recommended. “It’s become more popular, when it’s very rough on the big lake, for a lot of people to raft up in the channel here, and spend the day swimming and hanging out,” says Eldean, who notes that the lake offers more room than narrower harbors for wakeboarding, tubing and fishing. “There’s plenty to do on Lake Mac.” That includes grabbing a bite to eat—even if you didn’t bring your reel. Located next to the Eldean Shipyard in Macatawa, and owned by Patricia Eldean, is the Piper Restaurant. The second-floor main dining room and bar provide panoramic views, and courtesy docks are available. On the eastern end of Lake Macatawa you can tie up at the Boatwerks Waterfront Restaurant. Even if you just stop in for a drink in the Runabout Lounge, you’ll probably enjoy the décor: Classic outboards and old Chris-Craft advertisements and murals cover the walls, while even

the bar top is finished like a boat’s mahogany-planked deck. And it’s just a short walk from downtown Holland, Hope College and the historical district. “Holland is really beautiful,” says the Holland Area Arts Council’s Freestone. “We have the lakeshore, a vibrant downtown, and it’s a very attractive, walkable community.” r

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A Floating Piece of History The lovely ss Keewatin is the last of her kind. by h eath e r ste i n b e rg e r

The ship is “a time capsule,” according to Eric Conroy, the youngest surviving crewmember. From her elegant dining room and staterooms (pictured right) to her wheelhouse and crew quarters, “she hasn’t changed since i left her. She’s exactly the same.”

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ot too many ships remain from the great age of passenger steamship travel. You can see the original RMS Queen Mary at her dock in Long Beach, California, and if all goes well with her refitting, soon you may be able to visit a newly restored SS United States. But what of the earlier Edwardian era ships? Some were destroyed by fire, some were sunk during the war years. One particularly famous one met an iceberg. Many simply became obsolete and went sadly to the scrap yard. The acclaimed White Star Line itself no longer exists; it merged with rival Cunard in the 1930s, and its sole remaining Edwardian vessel is the French passenger tender Nomadic. Once upon a time, she brought passengers to Titanic in Cherbourg, France. A fixture for many years on the Seine in Paris, today she is undergoing restoration in Belfast, Ireland. Fortunately, the ocean wasn’t the sole province of the passenger steamer. The Great Lakes basin was home to many coal-burning Canadian and American passenger ships in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and while most of them are long-gone, one very special ship remains. And she is accessible to the public.

She is the elegant SS Keewatin, now resting peacefully as a floating museum in Douglas, Michigan, across the Kalamazoo River from Saugatuck. She is, officially, the last of her kind. Built at Scotland’s Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company and launched in July 1907, Keewatin entered the Great Lakes passenger trade in 1908 and served the region for 57 years. She carried passengers on a 2½-day route between Port Arthur/Fort William—now Thunder Bay—on Lake Superior and Port McNicoll on Georgian Bay for the Canadian Pacific Railway’s Great Lakes Steamship Service. As a railway steamer, she also carried packaged freight. Keewatin was a magnificent ship. At 350 feet long, she could comfortably accommodate 288 passengers and 86 crew. Thanks to her 3,300-horsepower quadrupleexpansion steam engine, she could travel at 14 knots, burning 20 tons of coal each day. She even had running water and electric lights. And she was luxurious. She boasted hand-carved oak panels, Italian hand-etched lounge skylights, stainedglass windows, gracious fixtures and beveled mirrors. PHOTOs By TErry W. PHIPPs

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Delicate gold leaf adorned many of her public spaces. Among her 105 staterooms were seven deluxe suites with private baths, and her walnut-lined Edwardian dining room doubled as a formal ballroom. Toronto native Eric Conroy, 65, joined the steamer’s crew during her last two seasons in passenger service. He is her youngest surviving crewmember. “I was 17 years old, and it was my first time away from home,” Conroy recalled. “Teenagers today are so sophisticated, but I was just a kid—to get a job on this massive ship, to undergo the intensive training to be a waiter, it was just so exciting.” It may have been the 1960s, but aboard the Keewatin, Edwardian sensibilities remained. “We had 15 pieces of silverware per passenger, and we had two sittings,” Conroy said. “We had to remember everything, the pieces, the passengers, the sittings. Being a waiter on that ship was a bustling thing.” It also changed his life. “It was quite an experience for a young kid, to live and work with others on a big ship,” he said. “And the influences of traveling! I thought I lived on a big lake, but Lake Superior…I never saw water like that.” After a pause, he added, “I remember seeing the Edmund Fitzgerald. The captain would announce her, and we all would come on deck.” For a young man not yet out of his teens, the wonders of traveling went even farther. “American girls,” Conroy mused, chuckling. “I mean, I met girls from St. Paul, Minnesota.” By 1965, however, the decline of the Great Lakes passenger trade became too steep, and Keewatin was pulled from passenger service. She carried freight for one more year and then was retired for good. Enter Rollie “RJ” Peterson, who grew up in Gary, Indiana, and harbored a deep affection for the old lake steamers. “At that time, they were junking all the old ships,” Peterson said. “I really loved the old steamships, so I bid on one and had her towed down from Canada. She was in fair condition; she’d only been out of service a year.” Peterson, a west Michigan entrepreneur who became a marine industry name through the manufacture of River Queen houseboats, purchased Keewatin. He

brought her to Douglas, and spent the next 45 years taking good care of her. “She’s a time capsule,” said Conroy, who travels to Douglas four or five times each year to visit his friend Peterson and climb aboard the ship, where his occasional turns as tour guide and his role as “Captain Rick” delight countless visitors. “She hasn’t changed since I left her. She’s exactly the same.” In the Keewatin Maritime Museum tour, visitors experience the wheelhouse, captain’s suite, crew quarters, dining rooms, lounges, passenger staterooms and much more. Museum e ide further explanation and context. The ship is open 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily from Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day weekend. 59 LAKELANDBOATING.COM a p r i l 2 011

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Visitors to the ship this year will have a special treat: The opportunity to view her newly restored Marconi radio room (left), installed in 1908.

According to Peterson, visitors to the ship this season will have a special treat: His team has restored the Keewatin’s Marconi radio room. “It was installed in 1908, and it’s identical to the one that was on the Titanic,” he commented. To help raise funds for the ship’s ongoing maintenance as well as for special restoration projects, Keewatin will be available for weddings, receptions and dinners during the summer season. She also hosts an Edwardian high tea each day at 4 p.m. “People really enjoy that,” Peterson said. “They dress up, they bring their grandchildren.” And they enjoy the Red Dock, the popular waterfront bar and grill alongside Keewatin. “It’s a tiki bar, and it’s usually going full blast,” Peterson said. “It draws people from all over.” The reality is, however, that a 104-year-old passenger steamer requires a substantial amount of TLC. And as Conroy noted, “RJ is on his own with a limited seasonal staff and no formal volunteer system.” So this year, Peterson is in

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the process of forming a private foundation to solicit donations and enlist volunteer support. Fellow entrepreneur and good friend Conroy, who runs Toronto’s famous Santa Claus Parade and publishes a Canadian monthly youth magazine, is deeply involved in the effort. “We’re going through an approval procedure for a ‘Join the Crew’ fundraising idea,” he said. “The ship does quite well during the season to raise funds, but she does need some extra-special projects funded. We’re looking at having her lifeboats sponsored and named so they can be rebuilt.” “We’re doing things,” Peterson observed, “to ensure her survival.” For more information about the SS Keewatin and the Keewatin Maritime Museum, or to learn more about fundraising and volunteering, call 269-857-2464 or visit keewatinmaritimemuseum.com. At press time, the website was undergoing reconstruction and is due for an April relaunch. r

marina watch

Sarnia Bay Marina

Top-notch service is the norm at this Lake Huron marina. by colle e n h . trou pi s

Sarnia Bay Marina 97 Seaway Rd. Sarnia, Ontario, N7T 8E6 877-797-2233 sarniabaymarina.com

Amenities Transient slips: Y Pump-out: Y Gas: Y Diesel: Y Lifts: Nearby Launch ramp: Nearby Engine repair: Y Hull repair: Nearby Marine store: Nearby Restaurant: Y Showers: Y Laundromat: Y

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estled into Sarnia Bay on the St. Clair River just south of the Blue Water Bridge, Sarnia Bay Marina is conveniently positioned at the mouth of Lake Huron. Built in 1986, the marina is managed by neighboring Bridgeview Marina. In 2005, a series of renovations began that included a new heated saltwater pool, renovations to the pavilion, new lobby, secure parking and landscaping. A wakeboard cable park and 50 additional slips were added in 2010, bringing the total number of slips to 350. “We also have free WiFi, experienced dockhands, and friendly, knowledgeable staff,” says Paul Churchill, director of operations for Sarnia Bay and Bridgeview marinas. “A concierge greets guests and provides them with information on area attractions.” Also onsite is Selina’s by the Bay, known for its fresh fruit breakfast. “It’s in a really beautiful setting and they have friendly service,” Churchill says. Friendly service throughout, Churchill says, is what makes Sarnia Bay stand out. “You are welcomed at your slip and made to feel special your entire stay,” he explains. “We hold all of our marina operations to the highest standards. We have immaculately clean facilities, and they’re located among some of the best scenery this part of Canada has to offer.”

Dave Brown, managing partner of both marinas, agrees. “Sarnia Bay Marina, under the management umbrella of Bridgeview Marina and its affiliate companies, and with day-to-day direction from Paul Churchill and Steve Gelinas, has developed into a premier boating destination. They extend a phenomenal welcome mat to all the boaters that come through.” An extensive service facility is located at Bridgeview, just a three-minute shuttle ride away. “It offers all marinebased services, such as 75-ton hoist services and 50,000 square feet of inside heated storage,” Churchill says. The marina can accommodate vessels up to 70 feet, though water depth maxes out at five to six feet. Of the 350 slips, typically 200 are available for transients. Reservations are recommended, especially during peak season and pre-scheduled events, like Bayfest. “[Bayfest is] nationally recognized as one of the premier outdoor concert events in Canada,” Churchill says. This year’s lineup includes Montgomery Gentry, Trace Adkins, and more. There’s plenty to do here even when events aren’t happening. “There are miles of bike paths, two casinos and horseracing tracks, plus many great shopping locations, galleries and museums,” Churchill says, all of which are accessible via the marina’s complimentary shuttle service. r PHOTO BY DAN BELLYK

Extensive Marketing Plan List your Trawler with us!

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Come to Manitowoc, Wisconsin We Sell the Dreams, You Build the Memories!

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41 Camano 2011 $50,000 off new order

31 Camano 2006 $189,000

29 Ranger Tug 2010 $239,500

27 Ranger Tug 2011 with trailer $191,000

25 Ranger Tug 2008 with trailer $137,000

• Yearning to do the Great Loop? • Looking for a fuel-efficient trawler? • Matching your budget... priceless! We are the listing broker and selling broker so we work for the SELLER and the BUYER BROKERAGE TRAWLERS

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21 Ranger Tug 2010 with trailer $63,000

65 Custom Trawler 1998 $585,000

45 CHB Sedan 1981 $110,000

43 Saberline 1996 $359,900

42 Nordic Tug 2008 $649,500

42 Nordic Tug 1999 $339,000

JUST REDUCED

42 Grand Banks 1993 $289,000

42 Grand Banks 1987 $219,000

42 Grand Banks 1977 $109,000

41 Lindmark 1987 $105,000

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37 Custom Steel 1986 $110,000

36 Heisier Lobsterboat 2000 $139,000

36 Grand Banks 1984 $129,000

40 Ocean Alexander 1983 $99,900

37 Great Harbour 1996 $269,000

JUST REDUCED

36 Grand Banks 1973 $63,900

32 Grand Banks 1990 $125,000

32 Cheoy Lee 1983 $64,000

26 Glacier Bay 2007 with trailer $109,500

26 Nordic Tug 1981 with trailer $75,000

21 Ranger Tug 2007 with trailer $47,000

JUST REDUCED

32 Island Gypsy 1983 $59,900

31 Camano 2001 $139,000

31 Blue Seas 1988 $89,000

*Please note the location of the brokerage trawler in the website listing: at Manitowoc or at the owner’s location

www.trawlersmidwest.com • 920-894-2632 • 866-375-1633

C U T W AT E R 2 8

Cutwater Boats produce 26' & 28' single-inboard diesel models, each a contemporary interpretation of the classic downeast style. Cutwater Boats is a division of Fluid Motion, LLC, manufacturer of Ranger Tugs.

Reed Yacht Sales is the new Midwest dealer!

17’ 28’ 28’ 29’ 30’ 31’ 31’ 32’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 37’ 38’ 38’ 41’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 43’

2006 1996 2001 2006 2008 1995 1997 2007 1986 1986 1988 1989 1995 1988 2003 1967 1987 2005 2006 1975

• Long list of standard features • Revolutionary new hull design • Exceptional interior volume

• Superior ride, comfort, speed, economy, range and handling • Trailerable (8' 6" beam)

2007 RayBuRn 92 skylounge

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Boston Whaler 170 Montauk S-Mercury 90 hp 4-Stroke ......................$ 18,900 Pursuit 2870 Offshore C.C. T-Yamaha 225 VX, 225 hp .............................$ 49,900 Pursuit 2870 Offshore C.C. T-Mercury Optimax, 225 hp .........................$ 64,900 Tiara 2900 Classic T-Crusader 6.0 MPI, 375 hp .......................................$ 129,900 Tiara 3000 Open T-Crusader 6.0 MPI, 375 hp ...........................................$ 184,500 Tiara 3100 Open - Hardtop T-Crusader 454 XLI, 320 hp..........................$ 89,900 Tiara 3100 Open T-Crusader 454 XLI, 320 hp............................................$ 89,900 CABO 32 Express T-Caterpillar C-7, 461 hp.............................................$ 309,900 Trojan F-36 Convertible T-Crusader 350’s, 270 hp ...................................$ 49,500 Hatteras 36 Sedan T-Crusader 7.4 ltr., 350 hp .........................................$ 79,900 Mainship 36 Double Cabin T-Crusader 350 5.7L, 270 hp ........................$ 57,900 Tiara 3600 Convertible T-Crusader 350 hp ...............................................$ 79,900 Tiara 3700 Open T-Caterpillar, 3208, 435 hp .............................................$ 139,900 Hatteras 38 Convertible T-Detroit Diesels, 6V-71TI ................................$ 164,000 Powerquest 380 Avenger T-Mercruiser 496 MAG HO, 475 hp .............$ 115,000 Hatteras 41’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 6V53N 216 hp .....................$ 79,900 Chris Craft 42’ Commander T-Detroit Diesel 6V71TI’s ............................$ 119,900 Tiara 4200 Open - Plan A T-Cummins QSM11, 660 hp ............................ Sale Pending Tiara 4200 Open - Plan C T-Cummins QSM11, 660 hp ............................$ 479,900 Hatteras 43 Flybridge MY T-Cummins VT903, 320 hp .............................$ 99,900

43’ 44’ 44’ 45’ 46’ 47’ 48’ 48’ 48’ 49’ 50’ 50’ 50’ 50’ 52’ 58’ 58’ 60’ 85’ 92’

1995 1984 2006 2000 1985 2009 1988 1994 2004 2007 1988 1994 2000 2005 1999 1978 1985 2000 2006 2007

Tiara 4300 Open T-Detroit Diesels 6V92’s, 550 hp ...................................$ 199,900 Viking 44’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesels 671, 450 hp .............................$ 169,900 Tiara 4400 Sovran T-Caterpillar C-12, 715 hp ...........................................$ 499,900 Silverton 453 Motor Yacht T-Cummins QSM 11, 535 hp .........................$ 229,900 Ocean 46 Sunliner T-Detroit Diesel, 6-71’s ..............................................$ 119,900 Sunseeker 47 Portofino T-Volvo IPS 600, 435 hp.....................................$ 819,000 Ocean 48 Super Sport T-Detroit Diesel 6-71’s, 485 hp ...........................$ 169,900 Hatteras 48’ Cockpit MY T-Detroit Diesel 6V92, 535 hp .........................$ 249,900 Silverton 48’ Convertible T-Caterpillar C-12, 700 hp ...............................$ 449,000 Grand Banks 49 Eastbay SX T-Caterpillar C-12, 715 hp .........................$ 749,900 Bertram 50’ Convertible T-Detroit Diesel 8V-92 735 hp..........................$ 449,000 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Detroit Diesel 12V-71TA DDEC, 900 hp ......$ 399,900 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Caterpillar 3406E, 800 bhp ...........................$ 565,000 Hatteras 50’ Convertible T-Caterpillar C-18, 1000 bhp ...........................$ 899,900 Hatteras 52’ Cockpit MY T-Caterpillar 3406E, 800 bhp ...........................$ 499,900 Hatteras 58’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 8V92 TA’s, 550 hp ................$ 299,900 Hatteras 58’ Motor Yacht T-Detroit Diesel 8V92 TA’s, 650 hp ................$ 349,000 Hatteras 60’ Convertible T-Caterpillar, 3412, 1350 hp .............................$ 899,900 Pacific Mariner 85’ Pacific Mariner T-MTU 10V2000, 1500hp ..............$ 4,795,000 Rayburn 92 Skylounge T-Caterpillar C30, 1550hp ...................................$ 5,500,000

Contact Brent Reed Grand Haven, MI (616) 402-0180 w Contact Paul Reed Lasalle, MI (419) 304-4962

www.reedyachtsales.com

Windy City Yacht Brokerage, LLC

85 Brokers

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We post all listings on 16 different multiple listings.

1997 70’ NEPTUNUS MY 1110HP 12V92 DETROITS, 2 JET SKIS TENDER, THRUSTERS, STABILIZERS $799,000

1988 55’ OCEAN SUPER SPORT 735HP DETROIT 8V92S, HEAVY RENOVATIONS. LOOKS GREAT $235,000

1971 54’ STRIKER SPORT FISHERMAN 550HP DETROIT 1271S, MANY NEW UPGRADES, 18’ BEAM, AL HULL $225,000

1991 44’ LEE WILBUR CUSTOM 375HP CAT 3208S, HULL BLUE AWLGRIP, SUPER STRUCTURE WHITE AWLGRIP, FANATICALLY MAINTAINED $274,900

1998 40’ SEA RAY SUNDANCER 350HP CAT 3116TS. VDRIVES, 965HRS, INSIDE HEATED, METICULOUS MAINTENANCE, MANY CUSTOM, FRESHWATER $139,500

1986 36’ CARVER 3607 AFT CBN 350HP CRUSADERS, GEN 2 SRS, 2 HEADS, 2 HELMS GREAT PRICE FRESHWATER $37,900

1992 36’ BAYLINER 3688 200HP HINO DSLS, STRAIGHT DRIVES, VERY CLEAN, NEW UPGRADES FRESHWATER $90,000

2003 32’ SEA RAY 320 SUNDANCER MERC 300HP MAG V DRIVES 410 HOURS, GENERATOR, RADAR, FRESHWATER $84,900

2003 32’ REGAL 3260 COMMODORE VOLVO 320HP 5.7L V DRIVES ONLY 240 HOURS, GENERATOR, FRESHWATER $89,000

SISTER SHIP

SOLD

1990 30’ CARVER 30 SANTEGO TWIN MERC 260HP 5.7L ALPHA ONE 550 HRS, EXCEPTIONALLY CLEAN, FRESHWATER $24,900

2002 31’ SEA RAY SUNDANCER T-6.2L MERCS W/BRAVO III 250 HRS, RADAR, ONE OWNER, FRESHWATER $69,900

2005 30’ BAYLINER 305 TWIN MERCS, BLUE HULL, 11’ BEAM WINDLASS, CLEAN FRESHWATER $49,000

SOLD

SISTER SHIP

1998 28’ SEA RAY SS SINGLE 385HP MERC W/205 HRS. VACUFLUSH HEAD 9’6” BEAM FRESHWATER $34,900

2000 27’ GRADY WHITE 272 TWIN 200HP YAMAHAS, 782 HRS, AC, HEAD, COMP GALLEY, TRAILER INCLUDED $39,900

www.WindyCityYachts.com •

Jeff Pierce, CPYB

2006 27’ SEA RAY 270 SELECT EX HIGH END BOW RIDER, SINGLE 350MAG W250HRS, BLACK HULL, ARCH, HEAD FRESHWATER $55,000

• 312-440-9500 Email: jeff@windycityyachts.com

Authorized FerrettiGroup Dealer for the Great Lakes & Chicagoland

FeRRetti 570

FeRRetti 53

2012 Riva 75 veneRe

aquaRiva 33 BY gucci

For more information or to set up an appointment, contact elite Yachts or Barbara Walsh www.yachtworld.com/eliteyachtbrokerage | 630.887.1478 | Cell 630.235.0227 | yachts98@sbcglobal.net

A Complete Line of New & Pre-owned Yachts 67’ 1989 61’ 2002 58’ 2000 56’ 1999 53’ 1994 50’ 2001 46’ 1999 46’ 1985 46’ 2004 46’ 2004 46’ 1979 45’ 2007 41’ 2001 40’ 2000 39’ 1987 38’ 2002 38’ 1999

Hatteras Cockpit MY, T-12V71TA Detroit Dsl, 770HP ............$ 595,000 Sunseeker 61 Predator, T-V10 MAN, 1050HP ..........................$ 825,000 Sea Ray 580 Super Sun Sport, T-3406 Caterpillar, 800HP ........$ 499,900 Sea Ray 560 Sedan Bridge, T-3406 Caterpillar ..........................$ 449,000 Ocean 53 Super Sport, T-8V92 Detroit Diesel, 760HP .............$ 395,000 Cruisers 5000 Sport Sedan, T-74P TAMD Volvo, 480HP.........$ 379,000 Sea Ray 460 Sundancer, T-Diamond Series Cummins, 450HP ...$ 180,000 Viking 46 Convertible, T-892 Detroit Diesel, 675HP ...............$ 129,000 Carver 466 MY, 125 hrs T-TAMD75P Volvos, 370HP ..............$ 325,000 Carver 466 AC MY, T-TAMD 75P EDC Volvo, 480HP .............$ 325,000 Hatteras Sport Fisherman, T-8V71T1 Detroit Dsl, 425HP ......$ 137,500 Formula 45 Yacht, T-Volvo Penta, 575HP ..................................$ 495,000 Sea Ray 410 Sundancer, T-8.1 S Merc Horizon, 370HP ...........$ 154,900 Carver 406 Aft Cabin, T-Cummins, 330HP................................$ 160,000 Sea Ray 390 Express Cruiser, T-454 Merc, 340HP ...................$ 41,900 Regal 3860 Commodore, T-8.1 Gxi Volvo, 420HP.....................$ 139,900 Sea Ray 380 Sundancer, T-7.4L Merc, 380HP ...........................$ 122,900

37’ 2004 36’ 2001 36’ 2006 36’ 1992 35’ 1997 34’ 1980 33’ 1996 33’ 1999 33’ 2003 32’ 1998 32’ 1988 31’ 2002 30’ 1980 29’ 2003 29’ 1999 28’ 1989 28’ 2008

Larson Cabrio 370 Midcabin, T-8.1 HO Merc, 420HP .............$ 139,900 Trojan 360 Exp.Cruiser, T-Merc MX 6.2 MPI Horizon, 320HP. $ 95,000 Carver 36 Mariner, T-Crusader, 375HP.....................................$ 175,000 Four Winns 365 Express, T-Ford, 460HP..................................$ 59,900 Carver 350 Mariner, T-350 Crusader, 320HP............................$ 79,900 Mainship 34 Trawler, Perkins diesel, 160HP ............................$ 25,000 Sea Ray 330 Sundancer, T-454 Merc, 310HP ............................$ 57,900 Cruisers 3375 Esprit, T-7.4L Merc, 310HP ...............................$ 54,900 Wellcraft Coastal, T-8.1L Merc, 370HP ......................................$ 84,900 Wellcraft 3200 Martinique, T-Merc, 260HP ..............................$ 55,000 Chris Craft Amerosport, T-350 Crusader, 270HP.....................$ 21,000 Sea Ray 310 Sundancer, T-Merc 350MAG, 300HP ...................$ 72,000 Sea Ray 300 Weekender, T-Merc, 260HP ..................................$ 16,900 Four Winns 298 Vista Cruiser, T-5.0 GXi/DP Volvo, 270HP .....$ 69,900 Sea Ray 290 Sundancer, T-5.7L EFI Merc, 260Hp ....................$ 42,900 Sea Ray 280 Sundancer, T-5.7L Merc, Alpha I/O, 260HP........$ 25,900 Maxum 2700 SE, Merc Bravo III sterndrive, 320HP ...............$ 55,900

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Check out our Brokerage ad on page 75

70 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A p r i l 2 011

Live out your dream on the water LET WALSTROM MARINE

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Services & Amenities Offered: • Seasonal & Transient Slips up to 120’ • Seasonal & Transient Moorings • Laundry, Shower & Dockside Parking • Indoor Heated & Outdoor Storage • Fuel Dock with Gas, Diesel & Pump-Out • WiFi Internet Access • Near-By Yacht Club • On-Site & Mobile Yacht Repair Services • Complete Mechanical Services • Certified Technicians • 70 Ton Travel Lift • On Site Yacht Sales & Brokerage Services • Launch & Retrieve Program for All Sizes • Member: Boat U.S. & Tow Boat U.S.

Slip & Storage Specials Available: • Multi-Year & Group Discounts • Free Pickup & Delivery Anywhere on Lake Michigan with long term contract • Free Slip for up to 4 weeks in the Spring or Fall with Winter Storage

155 EAST REDWOOD ST., STURGEON BAY, WISCONSIN, 54235

68’ 58’ 56’ 56’ 52’ 46’ 44’ 43’ 42’ 41’ 40’ 40’ 39’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 32’ 32’ 29’ 29’ 26’ 25’ 24’ 20’ 19’

2002 2010 1985 2007 2005 2010 2005 2000 2008 1988 2000 1990 1984 1999 1989 2000 1985 1983 1998 1996 1991 1997 1996 2002 2001 1998 1990 2007 1987 1989 1996

Sunseeker Predator Ocean Alexander 58 MY Hatteras 56 Motor Yacht Cruisers Yachts 560 Express Ocean Alexander 52 Sedan Cruisers Yachts 460 Express Cruisers Yachts 440 Express Ocean Alexander 430 MKI PH Cruisers Yachts 420 Express Sea Ray 415 Aft Cabin Carver 404 Cockpit MY TollyCraft 40 Sport Sedan Sea Ray 390 Express Carver 380 Santego Carver 380 Santego Cruisers Yachts 3870 Exp. Dsls Chris-Craft 382 United Ocean Trawler Cruisers Yachts 3870 Exp. Dsls Cruisers 3650 Aft Cabin Cruisers 3675 Esprit Cruisers Yachts 3575 Express Carver 325 Aft Cabin Cruisers Yachts 320 Express Shamrock 29 WA Cobalt 293 Cuddy Cruisers Yachts 2660 Vee Sport Chris-Craft 25 Corsair Sea Ray S24 Sorrento Wellcraft Center Console Four Winns U-19 Unlimited

• 920-743-6526 • BAYMARINE.NET 1815 Ottawa Beach Road, Holland, MI 49424

Ph: 616-399-6304 • Fax: 616-399-6329

Brokers for Power & Sail

www.anchorageyachtsales.com

TRADES CONSIDERED!

2000 SEA RAY 480 SEDAN BRIDGE

T- CAT 3196, Lift, Hardtop, Twin E-120’s, Teak Floor Ask 359k

2001 TIARA 3500 OPEN

T-Crusader 8.1L, Newer Stamoid canvas, Real Teak Salon, Windlass, None Cleaner! Ask 148k 72 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

1999 CRUISERS 4270 EXPRESS

2002 CARVER 410 SPORT SEDAN

T-CAT 3126, Cherry Int, C-120, Pilot, New Canvas, Mint! Ask 164k

T-Crusader 8.1L, Gen, Air, Cherry Int, Radar/Plot, Low Hours Ask 159k

1994 CARVER 350 AFT CABIN

2006 SEA RAY 340 SUNDANCER

T-Crusader 7.4L, Air, Hardtop, Wing doors, 397 hrs Ask 79k

T-Merc 8.1L, Gen, C-80, Cherry, 3 Flatscreens, Loaded! Mint! Ask 154k

DEMO BOAT OF THE MONTH

94 85 94 05 85 00 92 00 87 87 94 90 90 08 89 88 03 07 09

20’ 25’ 27’ 27’ 28’ 28’ 29’ 29’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 33’ 33’ 35’ 36’ 36’ 38’ 42’ 43’

PRE-OWNED BOATS Sea Ray 200BR w/5.0 Merc, Trl...........................................................................................9,900 Sea Ray 250 Sundancer w/260, Merc ...............................................................................11,400 Wellcraft 2700 Martinque w/7.4L Merc............................................................................19,900 Sea Ray 270 Amberjack w/350 MAG MPI BRIII ................................................................49,900 Bayliner Contessa w/260 HP Volvo .....................................................................................9,900 Sea Sport 2744 WA w/5.7L BRIII Merc, Trl ........................................................................29,900 Sea Ray 290 Sundancer w/7.4 Bravo II 310HP Merc .............................................................24,900 Chaparral Signature w/T-4.3L Volvos ................................................................................49,900 Chris Craft Amerosport T-350 Crusaders ...........................................................................24,900 Carver Mariner w/T-270HP Crusaders...............................................................................39,500 Wellcraft 3200 Martinique w/5.7L Merc...........................................................................39,900 Trojan 10 Meter Express w/T-454 Crusaders....................................................................34,900 Donzi Center Console w/T-250 Johnsons..........................................................................19,900 Carver Mariner w/T-5.7 MPI Crusaders...........................................................................229,000 Regal 360 Commodore w/T-7.4L Mercs ............................................................................44,900 Carver Aft Cabin w/T-340 HP Crusaders..............................................................................49,900 Silverton 38 Convertible w/T-8.1 MPI Crusaders ............................................................169,000 Rinker 420 Express w/T-496 HO Mercruiser BRIII...........................................................199,000 Carver 43 Super Sport w/T-IPS 500 Volvos .....................................................................499,000

07 05 97 06 95 00 04 88 90 99 02 02 07 85 88 99 01 03 04 94 02

Ph: 815-357-8666

55’ 50’ 47’ 45’ 42’ 41’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 38’ 37’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 34’ 32’ 31’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 27’ 26’ 25’ 24’

’90 ’03 ‘70 ‘79 ‘87 ‘97 ‘10 ‘08 ‘96 ‘00 ‘00 ‘87 ‘73 ‘85 ‘01 ‘98 ‘89 ‘93 ‘89 ‘81 ‘02 ‘90 ‘04 ‘94

37’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 35’ 34’ 32’ 31’ 30’ 30’ 28’ 18’ 15’

‘67 ‘00 ‘99 ‘77 ‘76 ‘77 ‘05 ‘85 ‘73 ‘80 ‘76 ‘92 ‘08

Cruisers 330 Express

2008 Cruisers 300 Cxi $129,000

Princess 42 Flybridge

Fleming ........................................................................$495,000 Sea Ray .......................................................................$449,000 Chris-Craft ....................................................................$48,000 C&L ..............................................................................$117,000 Jefferson.....................................................................$129,900 Maxum ........................................................................$119,900 Fathom Element .........................................................$395,500 Fathom.........................................................................$499,000 Sea Ray .........................................................................$99,900 Sea Ray .......................................................................$129,900 Nordic Tugs ................................................................$315,000 Grand Banks...............................................................$154,900 Trojan .............................................................................$19,900 Viking .............................................................................$84,900 Powerquest ..................................................................$91,000 Nordic Tug ..................................................................$175,000 Tiara ...............................................................................$59,900 Sea Ray .........................................................................$29,900 Sea Ray .........................................................................$33,000 Carver ............................................................................$19,900 Sea Ray .........................................................................$49,000 Wellcraft .......................................................................$17,000 Aylward 25 ....................................................................$39,900 Maxum ..........................................................................$14,900 SAIL Chris Craft .....................................................................$19,900 Catalina .........................................................................$99,900 Catalina .......................................................................$110,000 Hallberg-Rassy ............................................................$39,900 Hallberg-Rassy ............................................................$42,000 Tartan.............................................................................$26,000 Beneteau ......................................................................$79,900 Island Packet ...............................................................$49,000 Pearson ...........................................................................$9,900 Catalina .........................................................................$22,000 Sabre .............................................................................$19,900 Tri-Star.............................................................................$3,000 Hunter..............................................................................$6,300

info@harborviewyachtsales.com • Traverse City, MI 49684 Call Bill Allgaier office: 231-933-5414 • cell: 231-218-1227

BROKERED BOATS Cruisers Cxi W/T-4.3 Volvos, Gen......................................................................................84,500 Formula PC w/T-6.2L MPI 320HP Mercs..........................................................................119,000 Carver 325 Aft Cabin w/T-350XL Crusaders......................................................................54,900 Cruisers 320 Express w/T-6.2 MPI Mercs ............................................................................99,500 Sea Ray 330 Sundancer w/T-7.4L Mercs ..........................................................................59,000 Wellcraft 3300 Martinique w/T-7.4L Mercs......................................................................79,900 Chaparral 330 Signature w/T-350 MAG MPI BRIII..........................................................119,000 Mainship Convertible w/T-454 Crusaders .........................................................................49,500 Sea Ray 350 Express w/T-7.4L Mercs ...............................................................................39,900 Carver 356 Aft Cabin w/T-7.4L Mercs .............................................................................119,000 Carver 356 Aft Cabin w/T-7.4L Mercs .............................................................................129,900 Carver 350 Mariner w/T-6.2 MPI 320 Mercs ....................................................................89,000 Rinker 350 Express w/T-350 MAG MPI BRIII Mercs .......................................................134,500 Carver Aft Cabin w/T-454 CID Crusaders .............................................................................35,900 Carver Mariner w/T-454 CID Crusaders................................................................................54,900 Carver 36 Mariner w/T-350 Mag Mercs ..............................................................................74,900 Trojan 360 Express w/T-454 Mag MPI Mercs .....................................................................79,900 Carver 360 Sport Sedan w/T-8.1GI Volvos .........................................................................172,500 Carver 360 Mariner w/T-6.0L MPI Crusaders..................................................................159,000 Carver 380 Santego w/T-7.4 Mercs...................................................................................63,000 Carver 380 Santego w/T-6.2L Mercs .................................................................................99,000

30’ 31’ 32’ 32’ 33’ 33’ 33’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 35’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 38’ 38’

www.springbrookmarina.com

03 04 05 05 01 03 07 08 85 07 89 05 95 93 01 03 07 01 00 04 86

38’ 39’ 39’ 39’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 40’ 42’ 42’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 45’ 46’ 46’ 48’

Sea Ray 380 Sundancer w/T-8.1L Mercruisers ...............................................................169,900 Silverton MY w/T-3126 CATS..........................................................................................279,900 Carver 396 Aft Cabin w/T-8.1 GI Volvos..........................................................................219,000 Carver 396 Motor Yacht w/T-8.1 GI Volvos.....................................................................289,000 Sea Ray Sedan w/T-3126 Cats ........................................................................................255,000 Cruisers 405 Express Bridge w/T-370 HP Volvo Dsls ......................................................215,000 Cruisers 415 Express MY w/T-8.1GXI Volvos..................................................................399,000 Marquis Sport Coupe w/T-D6 Series IPS 370HP.............................................................569,000 Grand Banks 42 Classics w/T-3208 CATS .......................................................................139,500 Carver 42 SS w/T-IPS 370 HP Volvo Dsls ........................................................................349,000 Sea Ray 440 Aft Cabin w/T-330 Mercs .............................................................................89,000 Carver 444 CMY w/T-D6 Volvo Dsls................................................................................289,000 Carver 440 Aft Cabin w/T-420 HP Cummins ...................................................................229,900 Carver 440 MY w/T-3116TA CATS ..................................................................................169,900 Carver 444 CMY w/T-370 Cummins ................................................................................209,000 Carver 444 CMY w/T-63P Volvo Dsls ..............................................................................295,000 Cruisers 447 Sport Sedan w/T-480 HP Yanmars.............................................................499,000 Silverton 453 MY w/T-450 HP Cummins .........................................................................299,000 Sea Ray 460 Sundancer w/T-450 Cummins .........................................................................209,000 Carver 466MY w/T-480 HP Volvos ..................................................................................369,000 Chris Craft 480 Catalina w/T-350 HP Crusaders ...............................................................99,000

Fax: 815-357-8678

NORTH SHORE MARINA Year Round Full Service Marina 821 W. Savidge, Spring Lake, MI 49456

Ph: 616-604-0234 Marina 616-842-1488 •

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Newest Great Lakes Edgewater Dealer Yellowfin Yachts

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SELECT PRE-OWNED / BROKERAGE / REPOSSESSIONS / CALL FOR COMPLETE LIST

66’ ‘95 Ocean Yacht SS Convt., T-12V92’s, trolling valves, HT, rebuilt engines ... $620,000 50’ ’93 Sea Ray DA, Air/Heat, Gen, Full Elect., Dsls, Motivated Seller ............ $129,900 47’ ‘98 Bayliner 4788 MY, T-330 Cummins, Bow Thruster, Full Elect, Upgrades $279,900 44’ ‘03 Carver MY, Air/Heat, Gen, Full Electronics, Only 213 Hrs, Diesel ........... $239,900 38’ ‘00 Cruisers 3870, Full Elect., Air/Heat, Gen, New Canvas, Low Hrs, T-385 ..$149,900 38’ ’99 Carver Santego, Air/Heat, Gen, Radar, Low Hrs, Very Nice, T-7.4L....... $97,500 36’ ‘90 Tiara Convertible, Air/Heat, Gen/ Loaded, Full Elect., Low Hrs, T-454 ... $124,900 35’ ‘02 Carver 355 MY, Low Hrs, Full Elect., Air/Heat, Gen, T-7.4L .......................$129,900 33’ ‘90 Wellcraft 330 Coastal, Air/Heat, Gen. Full Electronics, Fish Ready ..........$49,900 30’ ‘99 Pursuit Exp., New Listing, Rebuilt T-5.7L, Full Elect, HT, Air/Heat .......... $84,900 27’ ‘07 World Cat, New Listing, Loaded, Gen, Air, HT, T-225HP Suzuki 4-Stks . $89,900

REPO’S 30’ ‘99 Bayliner Express 33’ ‘02 Proline 34’ ‘03 Rinker342 FiestaVee 39’ ‘07 Cruisers 395 MY 40’ ‘01 Baja Outlaw 41’ ‘95 Silverton MY 42’ ‘07 Carver Super Sport MORE ARRIVING WEEKLY! 73 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

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2010 Boston Whaler 200 Dauntless

2010 Sea Ray 250 SLX

Brokerage Boats, for complete specs & additional photos visit IrishBoatShop.com 36’ Monk 36 Trawler ‘01 ...................... $ 229,000 25’ Rosborough RF-246 Sdn Cruiser ‘05$ 79,500 36’ Sea Ray 360 Sundancer ‘04 ......... $ 167,500 25’ Chris-Craft Sportsman ‘48 ............. $120,000 36’ Tiara 3600 Open ‘87 .......................... $54,900 23’ Bayliner 2350 Capri ‘00 .................... $11,995 34’ Sea Ray 340 Sedan Bridge ‘85....... $ 36,000 20’ Bayliner Capri 2050 LS ‘99 ................. $9,900 30’ Regal 3060 ‘06.................................. $ 79,900 18’ Boston Whaler 18 Outrage ‘81 ...... $14,900 29’ Tiara 2900 Coronet ‘07................... $129,500 18’ Herreshoff Pilot 18 ‘74....................... $ 9,500 28’ Sea Ray 280 Bow Rider ‘97 ............. $25,000 17’ Sea Ray 176 Bow Rider ‘03 ............. $10,500

Swim Platforms Inc. is the world leader in aftermarket fiberglass swim platforms. A platform will enhance the value and enjoyment of your boat. You will appreciate the safety and pleasure to your family, friends and pets. Visit our website and submit your request for a beautiful swim platform. Our experienced crew is ready to build your new swim platform.

28’ Sea Ray 280 Bow Rider ‘00 ............. $29,995 17’ Boston Whaler Striper 17 ‘89.......... $22,400 28’ Sea Ray 280 Sundancer ‘03 ............... SOLD 17’ ‘08 Assembled 17’ Beach Cruiser70’s$ 6,900 26’ Glacier Bay 2670 Isle Runner ‘07 .. $94,000 16’ Chris Craft Deluxe ‘41 ...................... $27,900 26’ Cobalt 263 Cuddy Cabin ‘01 ............. $39,500 13’ Boston Whaler 13’ Sport ‘71 ............ $8,900

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231-547-9967

cvx@irishboatshop.com

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www.IrishBoatShop.com 75 LAKELANDBOATING.COM a p r i l 2 011

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Creating family & fishing memories for over 20 years.

UPDATED FOR 2011 Lake Erie & Lake St. Clair Ports o’ Call Cruising Guide

www.beaconpointmarine.com 40’ Carver 2000 Four O Six T-Dsl .................................... $ 199,900 39’ Sea Ray 1988 Express Cruiser T-Gas ....................... $ 30,000 39’ Mainship 2004 Trawler T-Diesel .............................. $ 184,900 39’ Mainship 2002 3900 Mode .............................. Call With Offer 37’ Cruiser 2004 Express Gas ......................................... $ 139,500 37’ Sea Ray 1996 Sundancer T- Gas ............................... $ 89,995 35’ Contender 1995 Express T-Gas ................................ $ 56,500 35’ Jefferson 2002 Marlago Gas .................................... $ 79,000 34’ Sea Ray 1999 Sundancer T-Gas ................................ $ 79,995 33’ Donzi 1987 Cuddy cabin T-Gas .................................. $ 19,995 32’ Stamas 1993 Express Gas ......................................... $ 19,995 30’ Bertram 1984 Sportfish T- Gas ................................. $ 42,000 30’ Stamas 1988 T- Gas .................................................. $ 15,000 30’ Pursuit 2001 Express ................................................ $ 69,995 29’ Formula 1988 Performance Cruiser T-Gas Shelton ..........$ 15,000 29’ Pro-Line 2007 Express T-Gas Shelton ....................... $ 85,000 27’ Sea Ray 2007 Sun Deck ...................................... Call With Offer 25’ Sea Fox 2010 Center console T-Gas .......................... $ 57,500 24’ Sea Ray 2007 Sundeck Mercruiser I/O ...................... $ 38,000 24’ Regulator 2006 Forward Seating ............................... $ 75,000 23’ Everglades 2011 CC Single Yamaha 250hp ............. $ 76,000 23’ Sea Ox 1992 walkaround single Suzuki 300hp.......... $ 22,900 22’ Harris Floate-Bote 1995 .......................................... $ 12,995 22’ Sea Pro 2003 Walkaround.......................................... $ 17,500 21’ Sea Ray 1999 Express ................................................ $ 9,995 15’ Boston Whaler 2003 ................................................. $ 10,000

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for 20 11 !

FEATURES INCLUDE: • Pull-out lake chart and aerial photos of each port • Complete marina listings and info on restaurants, events and local landmarks • Cruising tips • Getting through customs

Pre-order by phone

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49 River Road 722 River Road , CT Shelton, CT

Available June 2011

203-661-4033 • 203-929-7444

Power Boats

34’ ‘87 Sea Ray Express................... 31,900 42’ ‘82 Bertram FBMY .................... 135,900

26’ ‘99 Sea Ray Sundancer ............. 37,500 35’ ‘94 Carver 350 Aft ....................... 82,900 43’ ‘95 Wellcraft 4350 Portofino ... 145,000 27’ ‘98 Four Winns 278 ..................... 42,500 36’ ‘82 Carver 3607 Aft ..................... 36,500 46’ ‘77 Bertam FBMY...................... 135,000

Does the barbecue on your boat need a Cleaner Cook?

29’ ‘87 Cruisers Sea Devil................ 25,500 37’ ‘88 Chris Craft Amerosport ....... 49,500 52’ ‘ 63 Chris Craft Connie ............... 49,500 29’ ‘04 Four Winns 298 ..................... 72,900 37’ ‘78 Vinette Steel Trawler ........... 49,900 29’ ‘94 Sea Ray 290 ........................... 28,900 37’ ‘95 Cruisers 3775......................... 89,900 25’ ‘85 27’ ‘73 30’ ‘97 Maxum 3000 SCR.................. 42,900 38’ ‘88 C.C. 381................................... 79,500 27’ ‘77 31’ ‘92 Silverton 31C ......................... 40,900 38’ ‘98 Carver 380 Santego.............. 89,500 30’ ‘84 31’ ‘97 Carver 310 EX ........................ 44,900 40’ ‘94 Mainship Sedan ................. 119,900 32’ ‘78 32’ Wellcraft St. Tropez 4 starting @ .. 18,900 41’ ‘79 Lindmark Trawler ................. 94,900 32’ ‘94

Sail Boats Catalina .................................... 6,900 Catalina .................................... 8,750 O’Day ........................................ 6,900 O’Day ...................................... 24,900 Endeavor 32 Sloop ............... 26,500 Sea Ward 32 Eagle............... 43,900

Call or visit our website for specials! (425) 530-6376 www.cleanercook.com

34’ ‘01 Sea Ray 340 ......................... 105,500 42’ ‘87 Carver Aft .............................. 99,500 34’ ‘96 Gemini 105M ......................... 84,950

5309 E. Wilder Rd. Bay City, MI 48706

Details on over 150 listings at

Ph: 989-684-5010 • info@bayharborbaycity.com

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TECHNICAL SUPPORT AVAILABLE Authorized Dealer / Distributor for

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18’ 23’ 24’ 25’ 26’ 26’ 26’ 26’ 28’ 28’ 28’ 33’ 33’ 34’ 35’ 36’ 36’

1955 1959 1994 1986 1983 1986 1957 2003 2003 2003 2007 1983 1998 2002 1972 1991 1987

www.bergmannmarine.com

Chris Craft Sea Skiff .................................$ Lyman Sportsman .....................................$ Chris Craft Concept ..................................$ Bontnia Targa 25 (Diesel)........................$ Bertram Express .......................................$ Sea Ray Sundancer..................................$ Chris-Craft Sport Express........................$ Regal 2665 Commodore ...........................$ Formula 280BR ..........................................$ Chris-Craft Launch ...................................$ Chris-Craft Launch 28 ..............................$ Bertram Flybridge .....................................$ Sea Ray Sundancer..................................$ Pursuit 3400 Express ................................$ Chris-Craft Salon ......................................$ Tiara Convertible ......................................$ Tiara Convertible w/ Diesels...................$ Fiberglass – Woodworking Storage – Heated Storage

9,500 8,500 12,500 39,000 41,500 10,500 59,900 32,000 55,000 54,900 115,000 52,000 75,000 149,000 29,900 110,000 139,900

36’ 36’ 36’ 37’ 37’ 37’ 37’ 39’ 40’ 40’ 41’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 43’ 44’ 55’

1996 1997 1994 1996 1966 1966 1977 1994 1994 1994 2002 2006 1992 2000 1995 1992 1996

Saberline Express.....................................$ Cruisers 3650 .............................................$ Sabre 362....................................................$ Sea Ray Express .......................................$ Chris Craft Roamer H/T............................$ Chris Craft Roamer S/T ............................$ Endeavour Ketch ......................................$ Carver 390/404 ...........................................$ Hatteras Double Cabin.............................$ Sea Ray Express Diesels .........................$ Tiara 4100 Open ........................................$ Beneteau Trawler.....................................$ Sea Ray Sundancer..................................$ Provincial Trawler ....................................$ Tiara 4300 Open ........................................$ Sea Ray Sundancer..................................$ Sea Ray Sedan Bridge.............................$ Complete Mechanical Electrical Rigging – Haulout

198,000 120,000 169,000 87,000 20,000 25,000 34,000 89,900 173,000 125,000 309,000 349,000 139,000 169,500 199,900 139,000 170,000

NORTHPORT BAY BOAT YARD Complete Marine Service HEATED & COLD STORAGE

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Remanufacturerd transmissions in stock. Older transmissions our speciality.

Distributors of the Drivesaver flexible couplings and mounts, oil coolers and dampers.

Dealer Inquiries Invited 2706 Portage St., Kalamazoo, MI 49001 • 269-345-0629

77 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

marine marketplace

Custom Marine Inc.

lakeshore life

Bay Harbor, Michigan The “Nantucket of Northern Michigan.” by colle e n h . trou pi s

Specs Bedrooms: 1 to 8 Baths: 1 to 9 Square Footage: 690 to 20,000 Acreage: 1,200 Shoreline: 5.5 miles Price: Starting at $195,000; home sites starting at $39,900

Contact Tracy Bacigalupi, director of sales Harbor Sotheby’s International Realty 4000 Main St. Bay Harbor, MI 49770 231-439-2000 harborsir.com bayharbor.com

78 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

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ocated on 5.5 miles of Lake Michigan shoreline, 1,200-acre Bay Harbor, Michigan, is truly a place to call home. With more than 550 homes (and a total of 800 projected), there’s something for everyone. “Village living puts you within walking distance of boutique shopping, exquisite dining and events, or you can enjoy one-of-a-kind waterfront living on Bay Harbor Lake and Lake Michigan,” says Tracy Bacigalupi, director of sales for Harbor Sotheby’s International Realty, which represents distinctive properties in Bay Harbor, Boyne City, Petoskey, Walloon Lake, Harbor Springs and Lake Charlevoix. More than 300 GEM cars (Global Electric Motorcars) are used in Bay Harbor, helping reduce traffic and improve air quality. The green community also has an extensive recycling program, uses energy-efficient light bulbs and light switches, and much more. A year-round resident herself, Bacigalupi knows what Bay Harbor has to offer from personal experience. “Many refer to Bay Harbor as the ‘Nantucket of Northern Michigan,’” she says. “Every home is unique. There’s cedar shake, plenty of stone, marble, granite, hardwood, breathtaking views on expansive decks, and multiple kitchens.”

Every condo community has a range of floor plans, while single-family homes vary. Plus, there are still sites available that allow buyers to build homes from scratch. Beyond the exquisite residences, there’s plenty to love about Bay Harbor itself. All residents are members of Bay Harbor Yacht Club, which has a swimming pool, hot tub, fitness center, tennis courts, a sandy beach with a cabana house, dining, and much more. “There also are plenty of scheduled activities and classes for everyone, from toddlers to adults,” Bacigalupi says. Residents can purchase slips at the yacht club, where docks range from 35 feet to 90 feet. A total of 237 slips can be found at Bay Harbor, between the yacht club, Bay Harbor Lake Marina and private residences. The dog-friendly marina includes a ship’s store, laundry and shower facilities, pump-outs at each slip, free wireless Internet, golf pickup, and more. Just steps away is the Village at Bay Harbor, a year-round shopping and dining destination that overlooks Bay Harbor Lake and Little Traverse Bay. “It is within walking distance of many of the residences, and a short bike or GEM car ride away for the entire community,” Bacigalupi says. (continued on p. 80) PHOTOS COURTESY OF BAY HARBOR

lakeshore life listings 1

2 1 ONE OF THE MOST POSH CONDO COMPLEXES in this residential resort town is the Marina District Condos and Penthouses. Right on the waterfront, the residences feature one to eight bedrooms, and are just steps away from both the Bay Harbor Lake Marina and the Bay Harbor Swim & Fitness Club. Plus, you’ll find many opportunities for boutique shopping and fine dining. Prices start at $239,000 and go up to $5.9 million 2 THIS EXQUISITE HOME is located on the privately gated Peninsula Drive within the exclusive Bay Harbor community. The home has stunning Lake Michigan views—complete with incredible sunsets. Here, you’re not limited to enjoying 130 feet of Lake Michigan frontage—the property also has 130 feet of frontage on Bay Harbor Lake with private dock that can accommodate multiple boats. This wonderful home has six bedrooms, five full baths, three half baths, six fireplaces, a wine cellar, an elevator and more. $7,695,000

3

In your style of waterfront living.

Illinois River

55

The Quarry presents a rare opportunity to build your custom waterfront home in a private, gated marina community surrounded by wildlife. Less than one hour from almost anywhere in Chicagoland, the Quarry in southwest suburban Channahon, IL, offers some of the finest recreational boating and fishing imaginable. All lots offer boat dock access and are located next to a full-service marina.

NORTH

Des Plaines River Rd.

294

3 Want to design your home on a TRULY UNIQUE PIECE OF PROPERTY

that includes well-protected dockage for your boats? This double-sided waterfront homesite offers a view of Lake Michigan on one side and is permitted for a 60-foot boat dock on the other. $2,300,000 

Chicago

Channahon Will Rd. 294

55

Lorenzo Rd.

Joliet

For more information on these and other

57

80

52

Channahon

80

Ottawa

57

Lorenzo Rd. 55

Wilmington

815.693.5316 www.thequarrylife.com

YOUR GATEWAY TO THE WATERWAYS OF THE WORLD 80 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

Bay Harbor properties, visit harborsir.com or contact Tracy Bacigalupi at 231-439-2000

BOATHOUSE POTENTIAL...Permits in process. Make this estate size parcel your “Heaven Up North”, with 24 acres of mature landscapeing, 1400’ of frontage on Lake Charlevoix (300’ of which is a sandy beach), 3500 square foot main house with 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, and a lakeside guest cottage with fireplace. This all sports lake is for a true boating enthusiast with fishing and direct access to Lake Michigan.

If you are thinking of listing your home, put the Power of Team 21 to work for you. Please call us 231 -582-6554 or email us c21 vp2010@gmail.com

www.c21vp.com 98’ of frontage 4000 sq. ft.home with 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 3 fireplaces, incredible kitchen, a floating stairway, and vinyl decking with glass and stainless steel.

114’ of frontage 3700 sq. ft. home with 3 bedrooms, 3 full & 2 half bath main house, a fully furnished guest house above the 2-car garage. Meticulously landscaped property.

classifieds: boats for sale

1977 25’ CHRIS CRAFT CATALINA. Single 230hp gas engine, trim tabs. New upholstery in cockpit. Full canvas, fresh water, teak interior, good condition $4000. 773-272-2418. bilgepump54@netzero.net. MAY11

1984 27’ ALBIN FAMILY CRUISER Super clean, freshwater only.Own this popular diesel cruiser. Approx 1/2 GPH $29,900. 563-349-9161. JUL11

2003 SEAMASTER 28WA HARDTOP with Tri-Axle Trailer. Tournament Fishing Boat: RayMarine C80 Radar,Gps,FishFinder. Contact: Dominic 708-906-6889 dspigolo@amfam.com JUL11

31’ FOUR WINNS VISTA, 1988, excellent condition, T-5.7, sleeps 6, heat/air, windlass, newer full canvas, headliner, carpet. $18,900. 616-399-7382. JUL11 1980 MAINSHIP 34 TRAWLER. 200hp Turbo Diesel, 40 gal water, 200 gal fuel, fly-bridge, full electronics, well maintained. $20,000. 815-347-2624. MAY11

2000 NORDIC TUG 32’ 570 Hours, Cummins Diesel, Bow/ Stern Thrusters, Dish TV, Clean, Great Lakes Only, Heated Storage, $190,000, 616-588-4127. JUN11

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1994 CARVER 350. AC, Twin Crusaders, Gen, GPS, Radar, Plotter, Auto Pilot, New Canvas ’09, Excellent Condition. $79,9K OBO, 248-644-2850 or stundo@aol.com MAY11

2005 TIARA 32 OPEN. 8.1 Crusaders, E120 w/ digital sounder, autopilot, open array, pristine, $199,000. Jeff 517-202-2123. NO BROKERS! JUN11

ed Reduacin! Ag 2003 SILVERTON 35C. One Owner, freshwater. T-Crusaders, 240 hours. Loaded-usual + bow & stern thrusters; remote controller; davits. Cincinnati. 218-349-8381 JUN11

1991 TIARA 290 SPORTBOAT – Fastidious original owner; maintained by Tiara dealer; heated storage; All service records available. 920-854-4521. APR11

2001 SEA RAY SUNDANCER 34’ 2001 SEA RAY SUNDANCER. 160 hours, new camper–top, heated storage since new. Excellent Condition. $89,000. 419-571-7997 JUL11

1997 CHAPARRAL 29’9 Twin 350 EFI Remote Spotlight, Sunpad, Radar, Dingy, Windlass, Halon. Pictures Available. Clean. Trailer Optional. 906-370-9411 JUL11 2003 SEA RAY SUNDANCER 320, 32’, 350 hrs. Twin 300hp inboards. Raymarine electronics w/radar, cabin amenities, $115,000. 574-210-4640, alanwrightcpa@comcast.net. JUN11

2008 TIARA 3000 OPEN 100% Freshwater, Crusader 6.0 ltr, 375hp, hardtop, painted arch, transom fold down seat, curved companion L-Lounge, cockpit refrigerator, new salon layout, full Raymarine E-Series package, Must See! Price Reduced - Now Asking $184,500. Call Brent @ Reed Yacht Sales (616) 402-0180 RYS 84 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

2006 SEA RAY 320 SUNDANCER, T6.2 Horizon IO’s, 150 hrs, purchased new in 2007, fully equipped. For info, email edkathys@tds.net, or call 608-576-6906 JUN11

1987 36’ TIARA CONVERT. Clean/pro-serviced. T-350hp/ 905 hrs. All electronics, photos. Arcadia, MI. $95,900. Call 616-340-7300 MAY11

2008 RIVIERA 3600 SPORT YACHT. $475,000 Bring an Offer! New Riviera 3600 Sport Yacht ready for delivery with full manufacturer’s Warranty. Twin Diesels. No canvas!! Please call for details. 705-340-1255.. Ask for Rick. NYS

1995 TIARA 4300 OPEN 100% Freshwater, excellent condition, 550hp, hardtop, newer aft & drop curtains, newer electronics, upgraded stereo, trolling valves, Must see! Price Reduced - Now Asking $199,900. Call Brent @ Reed Yacht Sales (616) 402-0180 RYS

2004 TIARA 3600 SOVRAN. Twin 450hp Cummins, heated storage, excellent, pictures available, $239,000. robert_cummings@ml.com or 920-737-7304 JUL11

2004 CARVER 466 MOTOR YACHT 40’ 1967 CHRIS CRAFT CORINTHIAN. Rare awesome award winner. Needs nothing. Nov ‘08 survey. Please, serious inquiries only. 586-791-3744 eve., 248-588-4410 day. MAR11

1998 37’ SEA RAY EXPRESS CRUISER, Wide beam. Excellent condition, fresh water only, all options, heated storage, Twin 380hp 7.4 mercs. Chip@pfisales.com. 313-510-8555. JUL11

l!

Diese

125hrs Twin TAMD75P Volvos, 370HP. Full Raytheon Elec Pkg, hardtop, Satellite TV, granite countertops, wood flooring, thruster, backup camera, generator, A/C, washer/dryer, wetbar w/ice, fresh water, impeccable condition, “one owner” $325,000

630.887.1478  EliteYachtBrokerage.com APR11

1998 Sea ray 40 Sb 2000 SEA RAY 380 SUNDANCER T7.4 Merc. HorizonsGarmin. 2010 GPS, low hours (280). Excellent. Like new. Asking $154,900 OBO. 315-469-1712 days, 315-476-3901 eve and weekends. JUL11

Freshwater, loaded and immaculate! Cat diesels, generator, new canvas and carpet, upgraded electronics & satellite TV. $179,900

586-772-4200 • emeraldcityharbor.com APR11

2009 RIVIERA 44 SPORT YACHT. Brand New with Full Warranties. Please call for more details and photos. 705-340-1255. Ask for Rick. NYS

Fresh ! Water

1990 BAYLINER 3888 MOTOR YACHT. 175hp diesels. Some upgrades. Low hours fresh water boat. Peoria/ Illinois River. $69,000. 309/696-5672 or josephcin@comcast.net JUN11

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2004 SEA RAY 390 MOTOR YACHT. Twin 480CE Cummins 290 hrs. Bristol condition. Loaded with options. Freshwater only. Heated storage. $199,000. 317-523-8506 MAY11

1995 SEA RAY 40 FT EXPRESS, Loaded with every option Sea Ray had to offer, plus a full complement of electronics. A 2008 Zodiac RIB w/15hp Honda, this boat has been stored in an inside-heated facility. Beautifully maintained, in excellent condition and ready for her next owner. Priced over twenty thousand below recent survey. Survey available upon request. $99,500. Contact Jim, 616-293-4359. JUL11

1996 FORMULA 41' PC, Twin 420hp Cummings Diamond Series approx 690 hours, Kohler generator, air/heat, bow thruster, pilot, plotter GPS, radar, Vacu-flush, depth sounder, central vac, windlass, much more. A pristine fresh water boat, recent survey. $129,900. 630-243-0454 JUL11

1997 445 CARVER AFT CABIN. All new canvas & glass. Asking $189,500. ALL OFFERS & TRADES CONSIDERED. Call 920 231-0148 or bacssdb@yahoo.com JUN11

2001 SEA RAY SUNDANCER 1990 BAJA 420 ES. One owner boat!! Properly maintained and ready for immediate delivery.Triple 454 Mags. $69,900. CALL!!! 269.251.5530. JUL11

2000 CRUISERS YACHTS 4270 EXPRESS Low Hr. 430 Volvos New Radar+ Plotter Dinghy MTR Lift Underwater Lights $189,900. 219-741-0212. JUL11

2001 460 SEA RAY SUNDANCER 450hp CAT diesels; bow stern thrusters, hydraulic swim platform, new canvas and carpet. Fresh water only, inside storage, $235,000. 847-287-4317. arrobobh@comcast.net JUL11

47’ CHRIS CRAFT COMMANDER 1972, Highly Customized! FRESH WATER, repowered w/Cummins 370’s, 530hrs., Mathers, NEW fuel, water & holding tanks, canvas, cushions, interior, 3 staterooms, queen master, dinghy w/crane, same family 25yrs, 3 boat owner, Must Sell! $158,000 OBO ROB, 612-743-4192. JUL11 85 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

classifieds: boats for sale

ed! Reduc

classifieds: boats for sale

2008 RIVIERA 47G2 FLYBRIDGE CONVERTIBLE. New with manufacturer’s Warranty. Loaded. Please call for details and special pricing. 705-340-1255 Ask for Rick. NYS

BOAT LOANS Lake Effect

Financial Services, LLC 2000 SEA RAY 480, Cats, 600 hrs, thruster, custom interior, one owner. $295K or trade down to 36-40. 231-313-2191. MAY11

William Otto, III 2907 S. Horseshoe Dr. Grandville, MI 49418

48’ 1986 CALIFORNIAN MOTOR YACHT. 3208 Cat Diesels Three staterooms three heads Decorator interior MI $159,000. 313-402 9579 MAY11

1991 500 SEA RAY SUNDANCER, One Owner 10 years, many upgrades and accessories, Records and pictures available. 330-550-3714 APR11

PH:

616-538-5777 FAX: 866-530-6058 CELL: 216-577-1460 EMAIL: billotto3@gmail.com

Originating agent for:

ed! Reduc

2005 OCEAN ALEXANDER. 54 LOA (2)500HP Yanmars300 hrs, dual stations, full Raymarine electronics,12KW gen, Air, Zodiac H/B, deluxe bridge. $585,000. 920-739-7668. MAY11

1997 55 SEA RAY SEDAN Bridge CAT3196-660HP w/250 hours. Array of Electronics, Mint+ Condition. $259k 248-912-4789. JUN11 86 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

CAPT. LARRY LOWE WILL MOVE YOUR BOAT, either power or sail, for you in the Great Lakes, East Coast, Mississippi, or Gulf. Free quotes. Resumé on request. 614-885-3601. llowe7298@wowway.com JUL11 MOVE YOUR BOAT WORRY FREE on our air ride hydraulic trailer. Free Quotes! Dave’s Marine Transport.

Toll Free: (866) 814-DAVE (3283) www.davesmarinetransport.com

RUC

CAPT. BILL YOUNKIN awaiting orders. At your service in the Great Lakes, Florida, and all points in between. 100 Ton USCG License, references, 561-353-6827. JUN11

Charters BAREBOAT CANADA’S FABULOUS NORTH CHANNEL, LAKE HURON. 25 power and sailboats, 27’-50’, cruise and learn, skippered. Canadian Yacht Charters, Gore Bay, Ontario. 800-565-0022. email: info@cycnorth.com, www.cycnorth.com RUC

Powerboat 2005 21FT. ARIMA SEA RANGER, soft-top,radar arch, 150 Honda, 9.9, Lowrance, many accessories, very nice, $34,000. 507-247-5160. JUL11 THOMPSON 260 FISHERMAN 2001. 330 hours looks new must see Equipped for Great Lakes. $30,000. 989-239-3805. APR11 1981 MAINSHIP 34 TRAWLER. 200hp Turbo Diesel, 40 gal. water, 200 gal. fuel, fly-bridge, full electronics, wellmaintained. $20,000. 815-347-2624. JUN11 2008 SEA RAY 330/350 SUNDANCER, twin 370 V-drive inboards, 30 hours, all upgrades, never slept on, like new. Freshwater, heated storage only, $195K. 847-848-5199. APR11 TIARA 35 OPEN, 8.1 Crusaders, Hardtop, Full electronics, New Canvas, 500hrs, Glendenning. Oil Changer. Mint 185K. 734-847-8031. JUN11 2004 SILVERTON 35 MOTOR YACHT, 8.1 gas, 50 hours, fully equipped, pristine, covered slip, pro. Maintained. Reasonable offer. 563-332-7222. MAY11

1990 JEFFERSON MARQUESSA 53' MOTORYACHT. Detroit 6V92s, 3 staterooms, 3 heads. Extensive 2001 upgrades. Custom Pilothouse. Zodiac. BEAUTIFUL. 612-850-2000. JUL11

Reduc ed!

Yacht Delivery

1991 VIKING 66/CMY 1991 VIKING 66/CMY. MAN-T/1200hp, 300hrs. Staterooms(4), F/Heads(3), Walk Around Engine room, Meticulously Maintained, Freshwater, One Owner, OAL 72’6”. $495,000. 800-213-3323, louismunao@dcwis.com APR11

REDUCED AGAIN! ‘95 500 DA SEA RAY. Heated storage, T-550 Detroits. 502 hrs. Clean and equipped. Fresh water only. $235,000. ph: 216-469-7000 MAY11

Slips 40’ SLIP Ellenwood Landing, White Lake, Montague rent for 2011 season $2695. Buy for $12,000. 269-986-9081 MAY11

SELL THAT BOAT! 40’, 60’, 88’ DOCKOMINIUMS FOR SALE at beautiful Duncan Bay Boat Club. Clubhouse, pool, floating docks, wifi & more. Straits of Mackinaw. 866-993-3625, sales@duncanbay.com FEB12

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classifieds: boats for sale

The Best Way to D L O S Sell Your Boat Fast!

above the waterline

Wii Not?

The ultimate in helmsmanship. BY DAVE WALLACE

T

88 LAKELANDBOATING.COM A P R I L 2 011

he evolution of watercraft steering has been slow, given the span of history that began with dugout canoes and paddle-powered braided rafts. The transition from dragging the stern paddle to a tillercontrolled rudder was so logical and simple, it’s still the steering system of choice on small boats. Although outboard motors came along later, they continued to employ the same physics, with the skipper seated in the stern, using the tiller’s push-pull motion on the outboard handle to change direction. This system is simple, inexpensive and incredibly responsive on small boats.

Until recently, the act of “taking the wheel” was accepted as the ultimate symbol of control in our boats, trucks, automobiles—even our airplanes. Now, all that is so last century! Joystick-controlled rotating power pods have eclipsed the wheel as the steering method of the future. We few remaining old salts look upon this trend with mixed emotions. We envy this new level of control that can eliminate panic, cursing and fractured rub rails from the act of docking. On the other hand, we miss the colorful stories of dramatic docking failures so often shared over a post-cruising brew.

By the time boatbuilding matured and our ancestors were tempted to explore the oceans, tillers had pretty much reached the peak of practicality. The Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria that made up the historic fleet led by Christopher Columbus were still using tillers that weighed up to 800 pounds and required a team of muscled helmsmen to stay on course. Such was the ponderous state of marine steering until the wheel was introduced in the early 1700s. With the wheel came mechanical advantages of using pulleys, cables and rudder arms that made it easy to handle large ships in heavy weather. The iconic picture of a bearded helmsman in a yellow sou’wester hat, leaning hard against a spoked wheel in the face of the storm, has come to represent the ultimate challenge of man against sea. Today, some retro-boat designs include a wooden-spoked wheel as an homage to history. The rest of the industry connected its gas and diesel engines to automotive wheels, while serious ocean-going fleets upgraded to miniature power steering controls that would make Captain Ahab weep with embarrassment.

One advantage of joystick control is the relative ease with which a proud skipper can train a youngster in the art of helmsmanship. In spite of this technological breakthrough, joysticks share the same limitation of the tiller and wheel. These steering mechanisms are attached to the boat, forcing the skipper to remain in place for the entirety of the voyage. I predict the next big breakthrough in marine maneuverability will be the adaptation of Nintendo’s Wii game-playing technology. For the first time in history, the helmsmen will be set free of his or her traditional post to wander, snack and otherwise enjoy the company on board—all while making course corrections with the mere wave of the controller. And if you think I’m taking the concept too far, just you wait...and remember: You read it here first!  DAVE WALLACE has been boating in the

Great Lakes for more than 35 years. He’s written for Lakeland Boating since 1993 and helped develop the first edition of Lakeland Boating’s Ports o’ Call cruising guides. ILLUSTRATION BY MIKE HARRIS

ADVE RTISE I N

CALL 800-331-0132 FOR MORE INFORMATION


Lakeland Boating April 2011