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student interpretations of francis parker school

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PERSPECTIVE

The primar y goal of learning environments in the 21st centur y is to facilitate a culture and community of lifelong learning. In response, both pedagogy and architecture must allow for education to be customized for and by the student. The evolving paradigm shifts the focus to learning — helping students develop skills of accessing, filtering, and sharing information. Whether through project-based learning labs, hands-on experiments, or multi-media production studios, INNOVATIVE schools have unique spaces that incubate ground-breaking, inspirational, and cross-disciplinary learning. As they encourage collegial interaction and provocative discourse, the result will be a learner-centered environment expressive of ingenuity and creative problem solving. Traditional classrooms have given way to studio-type spaces that can be configured in a variety of ways to accommodate both individual study as well and group collaboration. These mutable, FLEXIBLE spaces support multi-disciplinary learning and allow changing programs to be absorbed by the building over time. A

building with a long life and loose fit will provide the ability to adapt and change with education. A successful campus must also be a unique place that is culturally appropriate, regionally responsive, environmentally authentic, and inspirational to students. The architecture should fit the location – climate, landscape, and regional craft – and respect the surrounding COMMUNITY. Here students can learn to engage the world on a regional and global scale in a safe and comfortable environment. It is also necessary for the campus to provide places that foster interaction – spaces where people of all ages want to gather and share their studies, ideas, and work. ECOLOGY is a key element in designing 21st century schools. Ecology seeks to do more with less, imbue a sense of place, and integrate the natural surroundings. Controlled use of daylight, natural ventilation, and views makes a demonstrably better learning environment, and high performance building design can reduce operating costs substantially. In a building about inquiry, innovation, and resourcefulness, a school’s connection to the earth’s natural systems frames those efforts. A critical part of discipline in this information age involves disconnecting from the myriad stimuli and allowing the information to be absorbed, considered, and understood. As a necessary complement to educational spaces that promote collaboration and community, schools must provide quiet spaces and places that foster REFLECTION and personal introspection.

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INN


OVATION 9 L | F PLACES FOR LEARNING


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“Lake|Flato’s creative team was able to capture the blend of form and function, utility and beauty that is so important to a modern academic institution.” Les Frost, Headmaster St. Matthews Episcopal School


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21st centur y learning environments inspire and nurture innovation in the curriculum schools share with students. They catalyze students to think creatively, work with peers in cross disciplinar y ways, apply knowledge, and share this created content with the world. To create unique, innovative environments requires an equally specific process within which to design. Lake|Flato facilitates interactive community workshops, personal inter views, and online blogs that allow fertile communication among the school community and with the project team. This dialogue creates unique, timely solutions that reflect a school’s culture.

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CO


MMUNITY 17 L | F PLACES FOR LEARNING


“Lake|Flato provided a campus that celebrated itself as we celebrate each student…unique and special, but part of the integrated school community. When prospective parents and students come to campus and jaws drop, all the parents wish they could come to school here…” Kevin Yaley, Head of School Francis Parker School

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Much of what students learn is in preparation of placing them within a global community. We think they are most comfortable doing this if their learning environments are anchored to the place in which they reside. We strive to create modern solutions that connect to a school’s community, culture, histor y, climate, landscape, and building craft. Our designs for schools are never imported from another school design — they are unique and specific. While the outside of the campus should fit a specific place, the interiors need to foster a sense of community . These hubs can be active and contemplative as gathering spaces for group learning and celebration.

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ECOLOGY

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Number Sense. Francis Parker School’s High-Performance Buildings netted over $100,000 in rebates and a projected $60,000 annual energy savings compared to code-compliant buildings.

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We see our team as stewards of your precious resources — families, financial, environmental — such that design and sustainability are inseparable. We seek to use what comes to us freely — daylight, views, natural ventilation — to make demonstrably better learning environments. We also expect it to make a better bottom line for our clients. Recycling, water savings, and high performance energy design yield significant, tangible results. We expect to exceed codes by 30%, 50%, or even produce net-zero projects with a blending of good design, efficient systems, and on-site energy generation. These successes create projects that become integrated with the learning ethos of the school. 31 L | F PLACES FOR LEARNING


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EXIBILITY 33 L | F PLACES FOR LEARNING


“… t hey skillfully wove our new structures in amongst the historic, creating a campus that is contextual and contemporar y  …   a modern, progressive architecture that is reflective of its youthful spirit.” David Robinson, Chairman Carver Academy

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Schools of the 21st centur y have to be places of flexibility and adaptability — this is imperative for absorbing new or changing learning modalities. We look to program and design spaces that have long life by having a loose fit. Spaces that are easily and comfortably changed to support a variety of settings. We accomplish this by opening spaces to one another, or outdoors, to extend learning environments. We also design mutable building systems, allowing spaces to evolve with the needs of the school.


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REF


LECTION 41 L | F PLACES FOR LEARNING


“…Lake|Flato integrated this beautiful site into the heart of the school with an abundance of light, wood features, views, and landscaping…warm and inviting to young parents and children looking for a ‘home’ away from home.” Jerry Christian, CEO Sunshine Cottage School for the Deaf 43 L | F PLACES FOR LEARNING


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Architect Louis Kahn once remarked, “Architecture starts with the immeasurable, proceeds through the measurable, and then returns to the immeasurable.” We think that may also define the arc of a student learning experience in the 21st centur y — moving from aspirations, through demonstration, to a trajector y into an ever-changing global community. If we create learner-centered environments at a school, we will empower lifelong learners with roots to the school and a view of the world.


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1984 35 Lake|Flato Architects was established in 1984 in San Antonio, Texas in an old auto dealership on 311 Third Street.

SCHOOL PROJECTS ACROSS THE NATION

The firm has collaborated with many independent schools and institutions of higher education for over 30 years.

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PROJECTS ARE LEED CERTIFIED/ REGISTERED

Lake|Flato has 35 LEED certified and LEED registered projects and is committed to ecologically responsible design.


HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY

Established in 1984, Lake|Flato has gained national recognition for architecture that is grounded in the belief that design and sustainability are inseparable pieces of a coherent, placebased approach to building that successfully merges with the landscape. In collaboration with our clients, Lake|Flato creates buildings that are tactile and modern, environmentally responsible and authentic, artful and well-crafted.

annual retreat at kickapoo ranch

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AIA COMMITTEE ON THE ENVIRONMENT TOP TEN AWARD

We believe that architecture should respond to its particular place and be a natural partner with the environment. By employing sustainable strategies to a wide variety of building types and scales, the firm designs architecture that conserves energy and natural resources while creating high performance buildings and healthy environments for the building’s occupants. Lake|Flato is a national leader in the design of independent school education environments. Our team approaches each school and its diverse issues in unique ways, searching for appropriate solutions that yield a purposeful connection between the school’s pedagogy, campus, and its architecture. Our designs balance visceral connections to place and culture with the science of high performance learning environments. By creating more cohesive campus communities, we seek to enhance students’ academic and social growth, as well as inspire faculty and families alike.

Eight of the firm’s projects have received the AIA’s highest honor for sustainable design in architecture.

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INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS BISHOP NOLAND EPISCOPAL SCHOOL Location: Lake Charles, Louisiana Construction Start: Summer 2014 Total Square Footage: Two Phases, 100,000 sq. ft. Team Members: Greg Papay, Cameron Smith, Jamie Sartory, Brandi Rickels

CARVER ACADEMY Location: San Antonio, Texas Year Complete: 2003 Total Square Footage: 84,000 sq. ft. Team Members: Ted Flato, David Lake, Greg Papay, Brandi Rickels, Darryl Ohlenbusch, Joseph Benjamin Contractor: Vaughn Construction Collaborators: Kell Munoz Architects Publications: “Texas Architect” Sept 2002 Photography: Paul Hester Awards: 2005 AIA Committee of Architecture for Education, 2004 AIA/HUD Community Building by Design Award, 2004 San Antonio Downtown Alliance Best Economic Development, 2002 Texas Society of Architects Honor Award, AIA San Antonio Design Award

CRANBROOK KINGSWOOD GIRLS’ MIDDLE SCHOOL Location: Bloomfield Hills, Michigan Year Complete: 2011 Total Square Footage: 47,000 sq. ft. Team Members: Ted Flato, Greg Papay, Brantley Hightower, Vicki Yuan, Meredith Contello Contractor: Frank Rewold and Son, Inc. Collaborators: Ghafari & Associates Photography: Frank Ooms

FORSYTH SCHOOL Location: St. Louis, Missouri Construction Start: TBD Total Square Footage: 37,500 sq. ft. Team Members: Greg Papay, Cameron Smith

FRANCIS PARKER SCHOOL Location: San Diego, California Year Complete: 2006 Total Square Footage: Three Phases, 119,000 sq. ft. Team Members: Greg Papay, Brandi Rickels, Betsy Johnson, Kristin Wiese, Matt Burton, Brantley Hightower, Vicki Yuan, Laura Kaupp, Lewis McNeel, Joe Farren Contractor: Rudolph Sletten


Publications: “Designing the Sustainable School” by Images Publishing, “Architect” Magazine Photography: Frank Ooms, Hewitt Garrison, Paul Hester Awards: 2009 AIA Committee of Architecture for Education Merit Award, 2008 AIA San Diego Committee of the Environment Award, 2008 AIA San Diego Design Award, 2008 AIA San Antonio Merit Award, 2008 AIA California Council Saving by Design Energy Efficiency Award, 2007 Orchid for Architecture, 2005 AIA Committee of Architecture for Education

GREENHILL SCHOOL Location: Dallas, Texas Year Phase III Complete: 2005 Total Square Footage: 202,000 sq. ft. Team Members, Phase One: Ted Flato, David Lake, Matt Morris, Billy Johnson, Francisco Lopez, Kenny Brown, Javier Huerta, Joseph Benjamin, Craig McMahon, Brandi Rickels, Daniel Gonzales Contractor: Browning Const. Co. Collaborators: Hidell Architects, F&S Partners Inc. Publications: “Education Construction Review” 2006; “Texas Architect” Jan 2001 Photography: Paul Hester Awards: 1999 AIA San Antonio Merit Award

INDIAN SPRINGS SCHOOL Location: Birmingham, Alabama Construction Start: May 2014 Total Square Footage: 80,500 sq. ft. Team Members: Greg Papay, Brandi Rickels, Ashley Heeren, Ana Lozano Collaborators: ArchitectureWorks

SAN ANTONIO ACADEMY Location: San Antonio, Texas Year Complete: 1995 Total Square Footage: 10,000 sq. ft. Team Members: Ted Flato, Matt Morris, Kim Monroe, Jonathan Card, Craig McMahon Contractor: Browning Construction Photography: Lake|Flato Architects

SAN ANTONIO MONTESSORI SCHOOL Location: San Antonio, Texas Construction Start: Summer 2014 Total Square Footage: 25,000 sq. ft. Team Members: Greg Papay, Cameron Smith, Jamie Sartory

SAYRE SCHOOL Location: Lexington, Kentucky Year Complete: 2003 Total Square Footage: 54,500 sq. ft. Team Members: Ted Flato, Craig McMahon, Brandi Rickels, Joseph Benjamin, Javier Huerta Contractor: James N. Gray Construction Collaborators: Parti Architecture Photography: Paul Hester, Tim Arvin Awards: 2008 AIA Kentucky Merit Award

ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL Location: Louisville, Kentucky Team Members: Brantley Hightower, Brandi Rickels, Matt Morris

ST. LUKE’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL Location: San Antonio, Texas Year Complete: 2001 Total Square Footage: 9,700 sq. ft. Team Members: Ted Flato, Karla Greer, Billy Johnson Contractor: Keller Martin Collaborators: Thorn Graves Architects

ST. MATTHEW’S PARISH SCHOOL Location: Pacific Palisades, California Year Complete: 2006 Total Square Footage: 12,000 sq. ft. Team Members: David Lake, Matt Morris, Jay Pigford, Trey Rabke, Tenna Florian, Kenny Brown Contractor: Winters-Schram Collaborators: Gensler Publications: “Architectural Record” July 2009 Photography: Benny Chan

SUNSHINE COTTAGE SCHOOL FOR DEAF CHILDREN Location: San Antonio, Texas Year Complete: 2011 Total Square Footage: 50,000 sq. ft. Team Members: David Lake, Greg Papay, Joe Benjamin, Betsy Johnson, Brandi Rickels, Graham Beach, Meredith Contello, Rebecca Bruce, Laura Kaupp Contractor: Kopplow Construction Collaborators: Hill Mechanical Group, JQ Engineering, Pape Dawson Engineers Photography: Frank Ooms

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L AKE | FL ATO ARCHITECTS, INC. 2014 311 3RD S T REE T S A N A N TONIO T E X A S 782 05 P 210.2 27. 3 3 3 5 W L A K EFL ATO.COM For more information on schools, contact:

GREG PAPAY, FAIA P 210.679.2 3 4 0 E GPA PAY@L A K EFL ATO.COM

Endsheet Drawings by Francis Parker Intermediate School Students Catherine Brandon, Myla Andrews, Alison Carey, Maria Azcarraga, Ted Sullivan, Hailey Stuart, Jack Dodge, Nicole Magbanua, Cole Landolt, Jaime Robbins, Riley Faulk, Erin Szabo, Caroline Edwards, Jennifer Wineholt, Tara Naficy 55 L | F PLACES FOR LEARNING


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