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VOL. 106, ISSUE 7 • FEBRUARY 16, 2017

Plan to landscape and add blinking crosswalk to Girard Ave. coming

Monday, Feb. 20

Presidents’ Day

INSIDE ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Sports, A10 Crime News, A12 Calendar, A14 Business, A18 News Nuggets, A24 Opinion, A26 Obituaries, A30 Natural La Jolla, A31

■ People in Your Neighborhood, B1 ■ Let Inga Tell You, B3 ■ Kitchen Shrink, B6 ■ Social Life, B12 ■ Best Bets, B14 ■ Service Directory, B16 ■ Classifieds, B20 ■ Real Estate, B22

LA JOLLA

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BY ASHLEY MACKIN A project to landscape and add a pedestrian-activated blinking crosswalk across Girard Avenue was introduced at the Feb. 8 La Jolla Village Merchants Association (LJVMA) meeting, and will soon make the rounds to La Jolla’s Traffic & Transportation advisory board, La Jolla Planned District Ordinance review committee and La Jolla Community Planning Association. LJVMA executive director Sheila Fortune presented the project as one that would “enhance the existing pedestrian crossing on Girard Avenue between Silverado and Wall streets with landscaping and adding a crossing signal,” she said. Paul Benton, of Alcorn & Benton Architects, spoke on behalf of an anonymous group that wishes to initiate and fund the project. “This is a concept found in the La Jolla Community Plan,” he explained, “but this is also something that can really affect the merchants and I want to get as much feedback as possible. I don’t want anyone to feel blind-sighted by a design concept you didn’t know about. “Girard is an extremely wide street and part of the problem with crossing in the crosswalk is, as soon as people step out, SEE GIRARD AVE., A8

Airplane noise protestors escalate community action BY MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN A group of La Jolla residents, who are fighting an increase in airplane noise in various neighborhoods in the community, were busy last week spreading information, taking the floor at community meetings, circulating a petition to “stop commercial jetliner noise in La Jolla” and drafting a document answering residents’ questions about the issue. La Jolla Light had access to one of the document’s final drafts, which reports how arriving aircrafts flying over La Jolla Shores have, over time, followed the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) procedure more closely. Flights used to enter the local airspace from different points up and down The Shores coast and now they are concentrated

La Jolla’s Black Pioneers

COURTESY OF LA JOLLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

La Jolla High School Spring Student Council 1948. Center: Student Body President Randall Epps

Part 3: An African-American community shaken by World War II BY MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN Editor’s Note: Each issue in February will contain a story from this four-part series on the life and times of those African-Americans who made La Jolla their home in the Village’s early days. We hope you find it as interesting and informative as we did bringing it to you.

I

n 1937, the two mules that worked Thad Epps’ mill died, and with them went his small molasses business in Newport, Arkansas. With six children and a wife in deteriorating health, Epps’ only alternative was to join his brother-in-law Ed Coleman in La Jolla. MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN

La Jolla Shores Association board member Dave Gordon discusses FAA regulations at the Feb. 8 meeting. in one straight line. “The long-term ‘concentration’ of tracks over The Shores is clear,” the document reads. However, the research didn’t find an explanation for the noise experienced by Bird Rock neighbors from San Diego International Airport departures. SEE AIRPLANE NOISE, A29

COURTESY OF DONALD EPPS

Cecile and Thad Epps in La Jolla

GREG NOONAN

“My dad was in a destitute situation and Coleman told him, ‘California is very nice and you can get work here.’ So my dad arrived in La Jolla on April 13, 1937,” said Donald Epps, who wrote the chapter “Ebony in La Jolla: The Fabulous Forties” in the book, “La Jolla, California Black Pioneers and Pioneer Descendants 1880-1974.” Thad Epps started his life in the community working for his brother-in-law, and finally earned enough to buy property on Eads Avenue, north of Pearl Street, circa 1943. By this time, La Jolla’s small African-American community was made up of domestic workers and a few entrepreneurs who rented rooms to other black people and ran hauling or gardening businesses. Donald Epps explained, “My dad started his own business, too, he patterned his after Coleman’s. Coleman was really kind of a pioneer for this area, SEE BLACK PIONEERS, A20

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PAGE A2 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A3

ASHLEY MACKIN

La Jolla Rec Center (now 102 years old) houses events for all ages at 615 Prospect St.

COURTESY

SuperStar Gymnastics will return to La Jolla Rec Center with summer camp programs.

Rec Center program changes ahead

Holiday dance canceled, kids gymnastics camp returns BY ASHLEY MACKIN Those who enjoy the activities offered at La Jolla Rec Center will see some changes in the program lineup in 2017, with the return of a gymnastics camp, the loss of the holiday senior dance, and more, as discussed during La Jolla Park & Recreation, Inc.’s Jan. 31 meeting. The board also helps manage the adjacent La Jolla Tennis Club, and reviewed a repair project necessitated by recent rains that it would embark on as soon as funding is available.

SuperStar is back

SuperStar Gymnastics, which offered

summer camps and regular classes at the Rec Center for 13 years, was recently cut due to scheduling conflicts and low turnout, but owner Katie Pentland made a presentation to the board hoping to be reinstated. The board approved the return, but for summer camps only. After showing a promotional video about the program that was filmed at the La Jolla Rec Center, Pentland explained, “I was devastated when my contract was cut, but I understand there was a conflict of dates and a miscommunication where I had another class and didn’t know I had a class scheduled here (so I didn’t show up) ... and the minimums weren’t always being met. But

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E ST

I’m willing to reduce my minimums as a compromise.” The summer camp will consist of two sessions: one for ages 3-5 in the morning and another for older children that lasts all day. “My camp includes gymnastics, dance and cheer, with performances at the end. There are also theme days, such as Diva Day and Pirate Day that the kids enjoy,” she said.

Farewell holiday dance

After a brief discussion on scheduling the Rec Center’s regular senior citizen dances — themed Cinco de Mayo, Aloha Luau, and Holiday — the board unanimously opted to do away with the December event.

“One of our biggest expenses, believe it or not, is party supplies for events we do throughout the year,” said Park & Rec chair Cindy Greatrex. “And we tend to overpay because we buy the supplies at the last minute to meet the theme. If you buy Christmas supplies in March, they are much cheaper than they are in November. I thought we should create a schedule of how many senior dances we want to have in 2017, and their themes, so we can shop in advance and publicize the event in advance.” However, member Bill Robbins noted, “The Holiday Dance has low attendance … in La Jolla, there are other Christmas events SEE REC CENTER, A15

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PAGE A4 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

ASHLEY MACKIN

La Jolla Village Merchants Association board members Krista Baroudi, Sheila Fortune, Brett Murphy and Tiffany Torgan Philips

Merchants board to partner with Breeders Cup horse race Local events would bring race-goers to La Jolla this fall

more people to visit and shop in La Jolla during its Feb. 8 meeting at La Jolla Riford Library. The board plans to host events in connection with the Breeder’s Cup event at the Del Mar Racetrack this fall, and has scheduled “merchant trade-shows” to begin in March. La Jolla Village Merchants Association shirts have been made, and will be used going forward at events. For the first time, the Breeder’s Cup will be

BY ASHLEY MACKIN The La Jolla Village Merchants Association (LJVMA) announced partnerships and projects it will embark upon this year to get

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A5

horse racing industry,” said LJVMA executive director Sheila Fortune. “(As part of the weekend) they are going to put on events up and down the coast from Encinitas to La Jolla. So we are looking at having three events in The Village.” Representatives from the Breeders Cup were not in attendance at the LJVMA meeting. (In thoroughbred racing, the Breeders’ Cup World Championships is the culmination of the horse racing season worldwide and the $6 million Breeders’ Cup Classic is the defining event of the international racing season. Learn more at breederscup.com) Although just concepts at this time, Fortune said the three events would likely be a Dick Enberg Boys & Girls Club recognition gala for 400 people (Enberg reportedly called the first Breeders Cup race, and because he lives in La Jolla and recently retired, organizers want to honor him); an art/food/wine walk along a yet-to-be-determined La Jolla street; and a viewing party, which could be at a few different bars. Venues for each of these events have not been determined. “People fly in from all over the world for this event … and we want to capture them after the races close at 5 p.m.” Fortune said. “These people are going to need a place to eat, work out, listen to music, shop and galleries to visit. They have a lot of income and we would love to show them where to spend it.” Acting chair Brett Murphy added, “La Jolla could be a big beneficiary here.” It would be up to La Jolla businesses to facilitate the events. For the proposed food/wine/art walk, board member Claude Anthony Marengo recommended taking an entire street, closing it off, and having the restaurants nearby provide the provisions. Fortune added that organizers reportedly also appreciate La Jolla’s density of galleries, so they would want to include local art vendors. Additional meetings have been scheduled with the Breeders Cup and more details are forthcoming.

held 5-7 p.m. on the third Tuesdays of the month. The first one will be March 21 and will continue in June, September and December. The blocks designated for the first trade show were not announced.

Trade shows

— La Jolla Village Merchants Association next meets 3 p.m. Wednesday, March 8 at La Jolla Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. lajollabythesea.com

As a secondary LJVMA project, mini-trade shows to highlight area businesses will be

In other LJVMA news:

Going, Going, Gone!!!

■ Eddie V’s represented: In accordance with recently revised bylaws, which allow the board to appoint a delegate in the event one of the board’s trustees can no longer attend meetings, the board sat Eddie V’s manager Rani Chatha. “Any sitting director who has changes in their employment situation or schedule can recommend another delegate in the company to take their place. Such is the case today, and Christophe Cevasco (of Eddie V’s), has written to petition and allow Rani Chatha to sit in his place,” Fortune explained. A motion to approve the change passed and she was promptly sworn-in. ■ T&T appointee: Laurnie Durisoe, manager of the Pantai Inn, will serve as one of the LJVMA representatives on La Jolla’s Traffic & Transportation advisory board. She replaces Richard Walker, who lost his T&T eligibility when his term ended this year. ■ DecoBike opposition: Like many other organizations in La Jolla, LJVMA opposed the installation of DecoBike bike share-kiosks in the Village in 2013. The board voted unanimously to re-affirm its opposition. “DecoBike does not belong in our Village because of safety issues (the kiosks do not provide helmets or bike locks), the violation of our Sign Ordinance with their advertising billboards and conflicts with local merchants,” Fortune said. But with the City planning to proceed with the installation of at least 12 kiosks in La Jolla, she added, “We drafted a letter asking that La Jolla not be included in the DecoBike program.” The letter will be sent to San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, City Attorney Mara Elliott and all City Council members.

Vegetation removed along I-5 to prepare for trolley construction In a project that began last week, contractors working on the Mid-Coast Trolley extension are removing trees and shrubs from the Caltrans right-of-way next to the southbound lanes of Interstate 5 (the west side of the freeway from the La Jolla Village Drive off-ramp to the Nobel Drive off-ramp) in the future path of the trolley project. This work will require traffic controls, including installation of temporary barricades along the west side of southbound I-5. The vegetation removal work is anticipated to last approximately two months. Upon completion of all construction activities required in support of the Mid-Coast Trolley project in this location, vegetation will be planted. Once complete, the Mid-Coast Trolley project will extend service from Old Town to the University City community, serving the VA Medical Center, UC San Diego, and the busy commercial and residential districts along Genesee Avenue. Major construction work began in 2016, with service expected to begin in 2021. For more information on Mid-Coast project construction, go to KeepSanDiegoMoving.com/MidCoast For transportation solutions during construction, visit ShiftSanDiego.com

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PAGE A6 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

COURTESY SAFDIE RABINES

Artist’s rendering of the 100-student forum and the second-story cafeteria to be constructed on the Scripps campus

An artist’s rendering of the remodeled Building ‘B’ on Scripps campus where the new 100-student forum, terraces and outdoor space can be appreciated.

Scripps Building ‘B’ expansion plans please Shores community BY MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN The expansion and renovation of the former National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) fisheries building on the north side of the Scripps campus — aka Building “B” — attracted the attention of the community during the La Jolla Shores Association (LJSA) meeting, Feb. 8. Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) Assistant Vice-Chancellor of Marine Sciences, Steven Gallagher, presented the project in front of an attentive room. “We are hoping to get you a sensitive proposal here, get your feedback and move forward with construction in the facility in the fall,” he said, adding that SIO personnel had been especially careful when planning the impact

on the view corridor from La Jolla Shores Drive. “Everybody learned from the MESOM building experience,” said La Jolla Community Planning Association (LJCPA) trustee Janie Emmerson, who was present at

the meeting, referring to the controversy that followed the construction of a a laboratory just south of the project’s site. In 2012, LJCPA requested SIO remove a story from the MESOM building when board members noticed the height of the construction was bigger than the project presented to the community. Gallagher went over several renderings, site plans and even offered a video to show that the expansion doesn’t affect the view corridor. “We wanted to spend a lot of time looking at the site impact, we drove down the site, walked down the site, so the impact on the views down the road was minimized.” The project calls for the reconversion of the NOAA fisheries building into

laboratories for SIO students, and the building of a 100-student forum and classroom, plus a café on the northern side. “The footprint of the café will be hidden behind plants and the existing facility is almost hidden, too, behind trees,” Gallagher said. The design by local firm Safdie Rabines Architects, Gallagher continued, follows the line of the Scripps Forum for Science (8610 Kennel Way), created by the same company. As for the existing building, which features a Mid-Century Modern style, the only changes will be the installation of safety glass rails and new doors. The seafood-inspired café will be open to the community and, according to Gallagher,

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Scripps Institution of Oceanography Assistant Vice-Chancellor of Marine Sciences Steven Gallagher presents the expansion and renovation of Building ‘B’ at the Scripps campus. will have outside seating with “the best view from the Scripps campus and probably this area of Black’s Beach.” The rest of the site will also be open to the community, with a “community science visualization facility” where citizens can learn more about the ocean and the research conducted at SIO. Also, the venue will be available for weekend events, chiefly weddings, Gallagher explained. “It will take some pressure off the Scripps Forum. I think this is going to be significant competition to the Forum because the view is stunning,” he said, adding that having an outside source of revenue will help the institution pay for the building’s maintenance. Where a concrete parking lot stands now, the project will feature an elevated terrace

LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A7

La Jolla Shores Association board members Izzy Tihanyi, Angie Preisendorfer, chair Nick LeBeouf, Susan Tschirn, Terry Kraszewski, Mary Coakley Munk and John Sheridan listen to a presentation during the Feb. 8 meeting. with underground parking. Native plants will serve as landscaping, and benches and other amenities will be installed. The site includes a lookout that will be improved and connected to a coastal trail that runs through the Scripps campus. “I live in La Jolla Shores, too, and I often walk up through campus with my wife. It would be lovely to go up (the coastal path) and continue through this site and then up to the top of the campus,” Gallagher said.

In other LJSA news: ■ Walter Munk Way: Trustee Terry Kraszewski announced the board’s intentions to designate the street that runs by the La Jolla Shores boardwalk as “Walter

1

Munk Way.” The internationally known SIO scientist will celebrate his 100th birthday this year. “Saying, ‘Thank you for being such a remarkable person’ is a challenge. (We hope this is) a remarkable way,” Kraszewski said. The sidewalk by Kellogg Park, which was recently discovered to be a public street, is currently known as La Vereda, Spanish for pathway. ■ Short-term rentals, Cove Stench: District 1 City Council member Barbara Bry told the Shores board that she’s working to move the short-term vacation rentals issue forward. “I’m fine if people rent a room in their house to make ends meet, as long as they’re onsite or the owner is on vacation. What I’m against is houses in residential neighborhoods

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becoming mini-hotels,” she said. Bry added that she’s been collaborating with Council member Lorie Zapf (District 2) to bring local regulations, and counts on the support of the City Attorney Mara Elliott. Regarding the sea lion issues at La Jolla Cove, Bry told the board, “The Mayor wants to see the Coastal Management Study by Doyle Hanan before the City takes steps toward dealing with the sea lions. That’s all I feel comfortable saying tonight. But you should know it’s a priority. I think about it almost every day. If we don’t have an answer by April, I have some other ideas.” — The next LJSA meeting is 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 8 at 8840 Biological Grade. On the Web at ljsa.org

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PAGE A8 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

FROM GIRARD AVE., A1 they are slowing down traffic and there are safety issues. So we propose the installation of a pedestrian-activated blinking signal similar to that found on La Jolla Boulevard near Westbourne and along La Jolla Boulevard in Bird Rock (to accompany the existing crosswalk lines in the street).” Benton added that the plans still need “to be worked out with engineering,” and rather than present formal renderings, he offered sketches of how the spot would look with some greenery. “This could also be an area of beautification … there is a little triangle area (created by the diagonal parking spaces where there is no parking) and we want to fill that with landscaping. Our goal is to not lose any parking spots.” Benton said the landscaping and irrigation would be funded by the group that wishes to install the crosswalk, “as long as they are in the community.” But if later on, it could be incorporated and managed by the La Jolla Business Improvement District, it might be something to explore. LJVMA member Jamie Dickerson said she liked the concept and jokingly asked if Benton “could do every block like this?” Several other board members seemed to agree, because when it came to make a motion to support the concept, several were quick to be the first. The motion passed unanimously. Benton said he expects to return to the Merchants board when plans are more finalized, but in the meantime, would present to other groups.

A rendering of the planned landscaping and lit crosswalk for Girard Avenue between Silverado and Wall streets in the Village.

Girard Avenue between Silverado and Wall streets in the Village could get a blinking lighted crosswalk and vegetation.

COURTESY

ASHLEY MACKIN

An unforgettable musical soirée to benefit San Diego’s New Americans Museum Deborah Szekely invites you to enjoy a concert by five of the world’s most acclaimed musicians & recording artists

Julian Milkis, Clarinet & Artistic Director

Konstantin Lifschitz, Piano • Alexander Rudin, Cello • Polina Osetinskaya, Piano • Mikhail Kopelman, Violin

Listen to, as though for the first time, Bach, Beethoven & Schubert Friday, February 24, 2017 Reception 6:30pm Concert 8pm

The Abbey 2825 Fifth Avenue San Diego 92103 RSVP (619) 756-7707 Credit card processing – email rsvp@namuseum.org

All proceeds after expenses will support New Americans Museum, programs of tolerance and education. A portion of your ticket(s) is a tax-deductible donation to the extent of the law.

N E WA M E R I C A N S M U S E U M . O R G


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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A9

New Year. New Home. One Fixed Rate. Interest rates may be changing, but with this special promotion you can secure a competitive interest rate for the life of your loan! For a limited time, you may be able to lock in a 3.75% (3.947% APR), 30-year fixed rate loan through one of our preferred lenders. And to top it off, our preferred lender may be able to offer a temporary, first-year rate buy down program to save you even more! These incredible savings are only available on select neighborhoods and homesites through March 30th so we encourage you to act fast before the opportunity is gone.

3.75% (3.947% APR)* 30 -Year Fixed Rate Limited Time Only! Buy now to take advantage of the 1-year buydown** 1st year buydown rate 2.75% Talk to our preferred lender about their promotions at select neighborhoods and homesites

For more information, please contact Stephanie Norris at (949) 751-8951 or Stephanie.Norris@calatl.com

*The interest rate and APR offer is available only on the purchase of select homesites in the Andalucia, Avery Pointe, Avondale, Canteridge, The Estates, Kingston, Seabreeze, Stratford, Summer House, and Triton Square communities when you sign a contract on or between January 17th, 2017 and March 1st, 2017 and you close on or before March 30th, 2017. Interest rates, terms and availability of this loan program are examples only and are subject to change without notice. Interest rates may not be available at time of loan commitment or closing. Loans are subject to credit approval. Restrictions and conditions may apply. Loan program is only available through Seller’s preferred lender. **The 1-year Buydown offer is eligible for new sales only in the Andalucia, Avery Pointe, Avondale, Canteridge, The Estates, Kingston, Seabreeze, Stratford, Summer House, and Triton Square communities. Mortgage is a Non-conforming 30 year fixed loan with a 1-0 Buydown with a Note rate of 3.75% (3.947% APR). Buyer must have a minimum credit score of 720 and qualify for financing at the Note rate of 3.75%. The interest rate is temporarily reduced to 2.75% for Year 1 and is 3.75% for Years 2-30. Interest rates, terms and availability of this loan program are examples only and are subject to change without notice. Interest rates may not be available at time of loan commitment or closing. Loans are subject to credit approval. Restrictions and conditions may apply. Loan program is only available through Seller’s preferred lender. Prices, plans and terms are effective on the date of publication and subject to change without notice. Depictions of homes or other features are artist conceptions. Hardscape, landscape and other items shown may be decorator suggestions that are not included in the purchase price and availability may vary. CalAtlantic Group, Inc. California Real Estate License No. 01138346. 1/17


SPORTS

PAGE A10 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

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Bishop’s Destiny Littleton selected for All-American Game More than 800 vetted for national team

BY ASHLEY MACKIN The Bishop’s School hoop-star Destiny Littleton has been selected from a national pool as one of 24 girls to compete in the 40th annual McDonald’s All American Game, which will be held and televised on ESPNU (check local listings for the channel) on March 29, when Destiny will compete against “some of the greatest talent” in America. At a special ceremony at The Bishop’s School Feb. 9, Destiny was recognized by McDonald’s and School officials, and given an honorary jersey to commemorate her selection to the All American Games. Hosted in the big gym, the stands were packed with supporters and classmates to celebrate her achievement. “I just want to thank my classmates, teachers, coaches, friends and family for the love and support. This means a lot to me to be one of the 24 selected for this team. It’s a dream come true,” Destiny briefly said. “Every year, 24 boys and 24 girls are selected from a nominee group of more than 800, and are selected to play in the Games. These are the most talented student athletes in

The Bishop’s School basketball star Destiny Littleton

Because ‘achieving dreams would not be possible without a support system,’ Ryan McKay (right) presents Littleton’s basketball coach Marlon Wells with the American Family Insurance Dream Champion Award. the country and they are going to compete on the grand stage, at the United Center in Chicago,” said Hometown Heroes program rep Ryan McKay. “Since 1978, the McDonald’s All American Games have hosted some of the highest talent across the nation — including the likes of Magic Johnson, Kevin Durant, LeBron

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James and Michael Jordan. And now, your own Destiny Littleton.” Since 2013, Destiny has consistently been an asset for The Bishop’s Knights. She has been named Max Prep’s Player of the Game a whopping 70 times, Player of the Year for the 2015-2016 season and Player of the Week three times in the last four years.

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SPORTS

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A11

Destiny Littleton receives a commemorative jersey from San Diego County McDonald's representative Gale Nickerson.

Bishop’s School students offer Destiny a standing ovation.

Her coach, Marlon Wells added, “I don’t think everyone realizes or understands the records this kid has broken. She is the all-time leading scorer in the history of California, and the first one in California — boy or girl — to go over 4,000 career points. That didn’t happen easily. There were a lot of late nights in this very gym, a lot of sweat and hard work. (We are so proud that) Destiny is about

where Destiny is headed. We should be proud of this girl.” Destiny, a 5-foot-9 senior, will attend USC this fall. Bishop’s School athletic director Joel Allen said, “On behalf of the school, teachers, athletic department, we want to thank Destiny for taking us on this ride. It has been four years of coming to basketball games and being proud of what’s on the court, and proud of

to join the ranks of the one of the most elite basketball players in the United States.” Anecdotally, he said, Destiny used to watch the 2000 film “Love and Basketball,” starring Omar Epps and Sanaa Lathan, all the time. “It’s about girl who plays high school ball and fulfilled her dream of going to USC and making it to the WNBA, and she lives happily ever after,” he said. “That’s

PHOTOS BY ASHLEY MACKIN

for not only the player, but also for the friends, family and community that have loved, supported and mentored them every step of the way,” it reads. “The feeling of representing those who have guided each All American will help support these players in their future aspirations, while those in their hometown — young and old — will beam with the pride that, ‘they’re one of ours.’ ”

what you and the team have put in. As a school, you have allowed us to be part of the journey. We love you and we thank you. We know the best is yet to come.” According to press material, each All American has been recognized in their community to showcase the mutual support impact. “Earning that distinction can be an unparalleled source of joy

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Q: WHAT’S INCLUDED IN THE KIT? A: Injury prevention is all about having loose joints, relaxed muscles and good balance. The products included are designed with this in mind and include items like movement sliders that aid in mobility, resistance bands which assist in deeper, safer stretching, and my own Thimblex self-massage product.

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PAGE A12 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

CRIME AND PUBLIC-SAFETY NEWS

Ask the Financial Expert by Aubrey Morrow, Certified Financial Planner®

How to WRECK Your Retirement by overlooking possibility of need for Long Term Health Care LONG-TERM CARE is the #1 Financial Risk faces by retirees. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, at least 70 percent of people over 65 will eventually need long-term care, either at home or in a nursing home, and that can be very expensive. The average stay for a woman entering a nursing home is almost four years; if she’s in a semiprivate room that costs in San Diego is about $375,000. For married couples, the chances that one spouse will need long-term care rises to 91%.

Below are Annual Care Costs in San Diego: Home Health Care

Annual Costs

Monthly Costs 5-year Growth in costs

Homemaker services

$51,000+

$4,200+

2%

Home Health Aide

$51,000+

$4,300+

2%

Adult Day Health Care

$20,000+

$1,700+

0%

Assisted Living Facility

$42,000

$3,500+

1%

Semi-Private Room

$94,000+

$7,800+

5%

Private Room

$128,000+

$10,600+

7%

Nursing Home

Genworth 2015 Cost of Care Survey, conducted by CareScout®

Options to pay for Long-Term Health Care Costs ✔ Deplete Savings. How long can your funds last considering costs above? ✔ Use Your Retirement Income sources – what about spouse on-going financial needs? ✔ Sell Assets – deplete your investments and retirement nest egg ✔ Borrow – if possible ✔ Ask Children to provide financial help ✔ Reverse Mortgage – getting more difficult to qualify. ✔ Sell home – terrible decision to make ✔ Cash Value of Life Insurance – depletes the death benefit ✔ Purchase Long Term Health Care Insurance individual policies – problem of increasing rates. ✔ Purchase Certificate of Deposit Type Policy which provides substantial LTC benefits, life insurance to heirs if LTC is not needed and return of original deposit if requested ✔ Count on Medicare. Medicare only covers up to 100 days of rehabilitation following hospitalization. Then, nothing.

Learn More - Join us at our upcoming educational luncheon workshops Wednesday, February 22nd 2017 |12:00 – 1:30 pm Bistro West | 4960 Avenida Encinas, Carlsbad, CA 92008 Thursday, February 23rd 2017 |12:00 – 1:30 pm Butcher Shop Steakhouse | 5255 Kearny Villa Road San Diego, CA 92123 Make Reservations at Financial Designs, Ltd. at (858) 597-1980 Or at www.MoneyTalkRadio.com - see workshop link Unfortunately, Individuals requiring medical devices such as a walker, cane, wheelchair or oxygen are not eligible for the insurance-based solutions which will be discussed. As a matter of courtesy to others we ask that you do not attend and take up the seat of someone who could benefit from the information.

Aubrey Morrow, President of Financial Designs, Ltd. is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ practitioner with over 30 years of experience. He is a Registered Representative offering securities and advisory services through Independent Financial Group, LLC, member FINRA and SIPC.

LIGHT FILE

To report a non-emergency crime, call the San Diego Police Department at (619) 531-2000 or (858) 484-3154. In an emergency, dial 9-1-1.

Woman rescued near La Jolla Cove by lifeguards, bystander

over $950, 1100 block Prospect Street, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 31 ■ Vandalism (less than $400), 1100 block Van Nuys Street, 9 a.m. Feb. 2 A Good Samaritan and lifeguards rescued a ■ Grand Theft, 1800 block Caminito woman who was swept off a reef by a wave Monrovia, 11:20 a.m. near La Jolla Cove on Feb. 8. A 9-1-1 caller ■ Vehicle Theft: Take vehicle without said the woman was struggling in the water owner’s consent, 5400 block Calumet off Coast Walk Trail, screaming for help, Avenue, 12:30 p.m. about 5:30 p.m. Feb. 5 A bystander jumped into the ocean and ■ Petty Theft, 900 block Pearl Street, kept the woman afloat until lifeguards arrived. The 30-year-old woman, who doesn’t 6:40 p.m. Feb. 6 know how to swim, was having trouble ■ Vandalism ($400 or more), 7700 breathing when lifeguards got to her in the block Draper Avenue, 11:50 a.m. water, said Monica Muñoz, San Diego ■ Commercial burglary, 7900 block Fire-Rescue Department spokeswoman. Ivanhoe Avenue, 7:40 p.m. The woman was brought to shore, where ■ Fraud, 2500 block Ardath Court, lifeguards started CPR. She recovered her 10 p.m. breath and was hoisted up a cliff, then taken Feb. 7 to a hospital, Muñoz said. ■ Vandalism (less than $400), 900 An update on her condition was not block Loring Street, 2:30 a.m. available as of Feb. 14. ■ Vandalism ($400 or more), 400 — The San Diego Union-Tribune block Palomar Avenue, 4 p.m. ■ Commercial burglary, 5000 block Cass Street, 10:30 p.m. Feb. 8 ■ Residential burglary, 2600 block Costebelle Drive, 6:23 p.m. A minor injury was reported in a collision Feb. 9 that left a car overturned on Torrey Pines ■ Misdemeanor vandalism, Malicious Road. The accident, which took place around mischief, 6800 block La Jolla Boulevard, 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 8, involved two 10 p.m. vehicles — one experienced damage to the ■ Drug/Alcohol violations: Use/Under front and the other was flipped to its side. the influence of controlled substance, 6900 But San Diego Police Officer Billy block La Jolla Boulevard, 10:18 p.m. Hernandez reports there were only minor Feb. 10 injuries and one person was taken to a nearby ■ Residential burglary, 7800 block hospital. No additional details were available Roseland Drive, 1 p.m. by press time. Feb. 12 ■ Vandalism ($400 or more), 300 block Bonair Street, 3:02 a.m. ■ Residential burglary, 5500 block Coral Reef Avenue, 5:25 a.m. Jan. 23 ■ Vehicle break-in/theft, 6400 block ■ Fraud, 7700 block Lookout Drive, 8 a.m. Avenida Cresta, 7:45 a.m. Jan. 27 ■ Grand Theft: Money, labor, property — Compiled by Ashley Mackin

Minor injury sustained in Torrey Pines Road crash

Police Blotter


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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A13

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA Stunning 7 bed 10 bath oceanfront estate 6 bedrooms, 8+ baths, $23,388,888

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA Contemporary home with ocean & bay views 5 bedrooms, 5+ baths, $5,995,000

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA Panoramic views of coastline. 5 bedrooms, 6+ baths, $4,536,000

Represented by: Dan & Brenda Wyatt T. 858.775.7333 | Brenda@SanDiegoBeachHomes.com

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LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA Gorgeous ocean view home! 4 bedrooms, 3+ baths, $3,495,000

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LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA Newly renovated bright single level home 4 bedrooms, 2+ baths, $1,995,000

LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA Recently remodeled, great family home 3 bedrooms, 4+ baths, $1,949,000

POINT LOMA, CALIFORNIA Panoramic ocean views. 3,991 square feet 5 bedrooms, 3 baths, $1,725,000

Represented by: Laleh & Niloo T. 858.864.6464 | Lalehm@gmail.com

Represented by: Thomas Moran T. 858.405.7609 | tomaso61@yahoo.com

Represented by: Craig Hulbert T. 858.459.3851 | craig@sellingsd.com

©2017


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PAGE A14 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

16

Group meets, 10 a.m. Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Center Auditorium, 10905 Road to the Cure. Patients and loved ones welcome. ipcsg.org ■ Children’s Virtues Class, 10:30 a.m. La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. childrensclass.webs.com or hedyy19@gmail.com ■ Dog adoption event with Operation Greyhound, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Ark Antiques, 7620 Girard Ave. (858) 459-7755. ■ Writer’s Block writing group meets, noon. La Jolla Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. ■ Dog adoption event with Second Chance Rescue of San Diego, 2-6 p.m. Unleashed by Petco, 8843 Villa La Jolla Drive, Suite 203. (858) 457-2036.

Sunday, Feb. 19

■ La Jolla Open Aire farmers market, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Girard Avenue at Genter Street. (858) 454-1699. ■ E-clinic, 1 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org

Thursday, Feb. 16

■ Sunrise Rotary Club of La Jolla meets, 6:55 a.m. The Shores Hotel, 8110 Camino Del Oro. $20. (619) 992-9449. ■ Exercise class for adults, 9:30 a.m. United Methodist Church of La Jolla, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. jbale@sdccd.edu ■ Small business consulting, 9:30 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Qi Gong, 9:30 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. Gentle exercises for all ages and abilities. (858) 453-6719. lajollalibrary.org ■ Pen to Paper writing group meets, 1 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Poetry Workshop, 2 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 412-6351. lajollalibrary.org ■ American Legion La Jolla Post 275, 6:30 p.m. The Shores Hotel, 8110 Camino Del Oro. (619) 572-1022.

Friday, Feb. 17

■ La Jolla Golden Triangle Rotary Club breakfast meeting, 7:15 a.m. La Jolla Marriott, 4240 La Jolla Village Drive. $20. (858) 395-1222. lajollagtrotary.org ■ Exercise class for adults, 9:30 a.m. United Methodist Church of La Jolla, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. jbale@sdccd.edu ■ Tai Chi, 10 a.m. beginner, 10:45 a.m. advanced, La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1658 ■ Computer Help Lab, 11 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Kiwanis Club of La Jolla meets, noon, La Jolla Presbyterian Church, 7155 Draper Ave. First three meetings free, then $15. (858) 900-2710. kiwanislajolla.org ■ Lunchtime Guided Meditations, noon to 12:50 p.m. PDG Health, 909 Prospect St. $8, first time free. Drop-ins welcome, RSVP requested: (858) 459-5900.

Saturday, Feb. 18

■ Ikebana flower arranging, 9:15 a.m. advanced, 11:30 a.m. beginning/intermediate, Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Seniors Computer Group, 9:30 a.m. Wesley Palms, 2404 Loring St., Pacific Beach. How to use computers and smartphones safely. Free for guests, $1 monthly membership. (858) 459-9065. ■ Informed Prostate Cancer Support

Monday, Feb. 20

■ Ico-Dance class, 9 a.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. $7 members, $12 non-members. amandabanks.com/ico-dance ■ Exercise class for adults, 9:30 a.m. United Methodist Church of La Jolla, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. jbale@sdccd.edu ■ Writing Workshop for San Diegans living with cancer, “When Words Heal,” 9:30 a.m. Six-week workshop runs Mondays through March 13 at 10666 North Torrey Pines Road. (858) 554-8533. ■ iPad class, 10:30 a.m. La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. (858) 459-0831.

Tuesday, Feb. 21

■ La Jolla Shores Planned District Advisory Board meets, 9 a.m. La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. info@lajollacpa.org ■ Exercise class for adults, 9:30 a.m. United Methodist Church of La Jolla, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. jbale@sdccd.edu ■ Lunchtime Guided Meditations, noon to 12:50 p.m. PDG Health, 909 Prospect St. $8, first time free. Drop-ins welcome, RSVP requested: (858) 459-5900. ■ Rotary Club of La Jolla meets, noon, La Valencia Hotel, 1132 Prospect St. Lunch $30. Guests welcome. lora.fisher@usbank.com ■ Hatha Chair Yoga, 12:30 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552–1657. ■ Development Permit Review Committee meets, 4 p.m. La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. info@lajollacpa.org ■ Community Balance Class, learn techniques to walk safely and maximize independence, 6 p.m. Ability Rehab, 737 Pearl St., Suite 108. Free for MS Society members, $10 non-members. (858) 456-2114.

Wednesday, Feb. 22

■ Exercise class for adults, 9:45 a.m. United Methodist Church of La Jolla, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. (858) 459-3870. ■ Torrey Pines of La Jolla Rotary meets, 11:30 a.m. Rock Bottom Brewery, 8980 La Jolla Village Drive. Jeff Wieman of Angels Foster Family Network, speaks. $20. (858) 459-8912. gurneymcm@aol.com ■ Tapping To The Stars, a multilevel adult tap class (some previous tap required), noon. Ooh La La Dance Academy, 7467 Cuvier St. $70. nancy@tappingtothestars.com ■ La Jolla Park & Rec meets, 5 p.m. La


www.lajollalight.com Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. (858) 552-1658. ■ Lecture, “Post-Castro Cuba: Impressions from former National Security Assistant to President Clinton, (Richard Feinberg)” 6 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Kiwanis Club of Torrey Pines meets, 6:30 p.m. Mimi’s Café, 10788 Westview Parkway. First two meetings free, then $15. tbilotta1@gmail.com

Thursday, Feb. 23

■ Sunrise Rotary Club of La Jolla meets, 6:55 a.m. The Shores Hotel, 8110 Camino Del Oro. $20. (619) 992-9449. ■ Exercise class for adults, 9:30 a.m. United Methodist Church of La Jolla, 6063 La Jolla Blvd. jbale@sdccd.edu ■ Small business consulting, 9:30 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org ■ Qi Gong, 9:30 a.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 453-6719. lajollalibrary.org ■ Pen to Paper writing group meets, 1 p.m. Riford Library, 7555 Draper Ave. (858) 552-1657. lajollalibrary.org All events are free unless otherwise noted.

Did we miss listing your community event?

■ E-mail information to: ashleym@lajollalight.com ■ The deadline is noon, Thursday for publication in the following Thursday edition. Questions? Call Ashley Mackin at (858) 875-5957.

LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A15

FROM REC CENTER, A3 and people travel. There are also New Year’s Eve parties and we don’t want to compete with other similar events. If the events are expensive and we are catering to a very small crowd, we need to stick with specialty events that only we do, like the Cinco de Mayo and Aloha.” Added member Carolyn Parrish, “I’ve been wanting to cut down on the number of dances for some time. I absolutely agree to keep the two big ones, focus on those, grow them and shop for them in advance.”

Mad Science on the chopping block?

Prompted by low turnout and high rate of refunds, Greatrex suggested canceling the annual Mad Science summer camp. “The problem is the curriculum is dated ... think creating friction with a balloon to make your hair stand up,” she said. “Kids today don’t want that anymore.” She further pointed to competition from the frequent, free science programs offered at the nearby La Jolla Library. Greatrex said, as a possible science alternative, she is working with UC San Diego to bring a coding camp to the Rec Center. “I often ask people what they want to see here, and I’ve heard more than once that kids want to learn coding, so I’m exploring how to bring that here.” The fate of Mad Science was tabled to next month’s agenda.

Tennis Club assistance

La Jolla Tennis Club manager Scott Farr

ASHLEY MACKIN

Rain water got between the layers of surfacing material at La Jolla Tennis Club, causing it to chip and create an uneven court. presented two repair projects caused by the recent rains that are “out of our budget” and needed to be handled promptly. One of them, which involves repairing or resurfacing a wall that is shared with La Jolla Rec Center playground, was tabled pending the larger redevelopment of the playground. “The rains did major damage to a single tennis court, and normally to resurface it would be $4,500, but to resurface this one after such rain damage would be $12,000,” Farr said. “We actually have someone who wants to contribute to this project, but they can only contribute to a 501(c)3, so

we are hoping this board can accept the donation and pay the contractor.” Greatrex said to accrue the balance, the board would have to look at what it could contribute, what it could get from a beautification fund from the San Diego City Council and what could be raised from donations in the community. The board later voted “to see if we can help the Tennis Club with their grounds area” and will hear, and vote on, final numbers at next month’s meeting. — LJP&R next meets 5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22 at La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. bit.ly/ljreccenter

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REDUCED: Lower Hermosa 6 Beds/4.5 Baths, 4,034 Sq. Ft. $3,400,000 - $3,695,000

NEW CONSTRUCTION: Windansea 3 Beds/3 Baths, 2,322 Sq. Ft. $2,850,000 - $3,295,000

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PAGE A16 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

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PAGE A18 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Neurogenx treats nerve pain at the source

BY DAVID L. CODDON Surgery-phobes (and you’re probably one of them), take heart. If you suffer from neuropathic symptoms or neuromuscular pain, you’ve got the option of a non-invasive treatment that its proponents say is 87 percent effective. “The concept is called electro-signal therapy, or EST,” says Dr. Amirhassan Bahreman, medical director at the Neurogenx NerveCenter in La Mesa, part of a nationwide chain that has been open since October. The FDA-approved and patented Neurogenx Treatment employs high-frequency electronic waves that penetrate muscular tissue where pain and discomfort persist. According to the Neurogenx website, “The treatment creates changes at the body’s cellular level that reduce swelling, remove excess fluids and waste products, alter Ph levels and increase cellular metabolism.” “Inflammation of the nerve is the major reason for nerve damage,” explains Bahreman, who is the only board-certified neurologist in San Diego County who offers this treatment as an alternative to narcotics or invasive surgery. “With this technology, the (developers of Neurogenx Treatment) were able to prove that the inflammation can be reduced.”

some private insurers have made exceptions. But he points out that the cost over time is not prohibitive. “It differs from case to case, of course, but when you break it down to the number of treatments, I think it’s less than what you’d pay for a chiropractor or for massage therapy.” Since some patients may be new to EST or perhaps even wary about it, Bahreman offers complimentary consultations to each prospective new patient. Because its patients come into the office so often during the treatment program, “they know us by name and ask us what’s going on in our lives, and we do the same,” says Eileen COURTESY Craker, who is Bahreman’s physician liaison Neurogenx is a medical treatment that makes diabetic neuropathy treatable without and who works with other physicians on surgery or prescription medications. For more than four out of five patients, Neurogenx referrals for this treatment. “We want to create doctors say it helps reduce or eliminate the tingling, burning, pain and numbness of almost a family with our patients.” diabetic, peripheral neuropathy. Bahreman said he believes that the future is promising for patients of Neurogenx The ideal candidate for this treatment, he months, all of it on an outpatient basis. Treatment on both a financial and a medical says, is a person suffering from peripheral “The response rate is very high,” says level. “In the next five years,” he says, “it’ll be nerve damage. It has also been available to Bahreman, who has more than 14 years of even more effective and more affordable.” patients with diabetes, fibromyalgia and experience in neurology and whose regular — Neurogenx NerveCenter is at 8851 Center even vitamin deficiency. practice in the office is called the Drive, Suite 608, La Mesa. Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 Treatment is not a one-time-only Neurological and Pain Institute. “The day and p.m. Monday-Friday. (619) 667-2700 or (619) proposition. “You have to be committed to night difference we see in some patients is 741-2328. neurogenx.com/lamesa the program for it to be effective,” Bahreman there.” stresses. That program generally entails Presently, Neurogenx Treatment is not Business Spotlight features commercial 40-minute sessions twice a week for three covered by insurance, though Bahreman said enterprises that support La Jolla Light.

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A19

MAX/LUX—TURN-KEY

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This 3BR/2.5BA villa with expansive ocean views from the private rooftop terrace is the pinnacle of chic coastal living. Elegant design and craftsmanship wash over every corner of the interior. Combined with Village location, this home is truly desirable. Offered at $1,980,000

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This home beautifully remodeled features top-of-the-line finishes. The beautiful kitchen with custom cabinetry opens up to an ocean-view deck. The upstairs features vaulted ceilings and an extraordinary master suite. Dining, shopping, beach and more all very close. Offered at $2,900,000

A rarely available top-floor unit in the oceanfront building of 100 Coast Blvd. Offering 2BD/2.5BA/1950 sf, the upper level opens to an ocean view patio. Located in the heart of La Jolla with pool, spa and secure parking. Offered at $1,895,000

Alida & Vincent Crudo

Scott Appleby & Kerry Appleby Payne

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SANTA BARBARA COASTAL CLASSIC

Remodeled to perfection, this 4BD/2BA nearly 1800 sf home offers endless features. Well-designed floorplan features expansive family room with open flow. Granite countertops, smoked-glass tile backsplash in kitchen. Spacious backyard creates ideal getaway. Offered at $689,999

New 6BD/8BA custom on approx. one acre with unparalleled quality and design. Entry gate leads to courtyard with fountain. Open floorplan connects to covered veranda and resort-living in backyard. This Smart Home features all the latest energy efficiencies. Offered at $9,500,000

Willis Allen Real Estate

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877.515.7443 | info@willisallen.com | willisallen.com

877.515.7443 | info@willisallen.com | willisallen.com


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PAGE A20 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Lorenza Pace, unknown, Lois Epps, Catherine Hayek, Norma Johnson-Epps (bride), Randall Epps (groom), unknown, Donald Epps, Luke Epps, Joe Epps FROM BLACK PIONEERS, A1

Donald Epps’ Memories of La Jolla

setting up entrepreneurial opportunities, and my father followed that with a hauling business, and he started making money.” However, to add to the family’s income, the older siblings contributed to the mortgage payments. Joe Epps, who was one of them, was interviewed by members of the La Jolla Historical Society in 2011. La Jolla Light got access to a transcription of that conversation, where he stated, “My two oldest brothers, when they were early teens, started delivering the Los Angeles Times, which was the most popular newspaper here in La Jolla.” The Epps family had nine children. Donald was the youngest. The two eldest and most popular at school were Luke and Randall Epps. “Luke and Randall graduated from La Jolla High in 1948. Randall was football star. He made All-San Diego City team, he was student body president 1948, which was a tremendous (accomplishment), because this is way before desegregation,” said Donald Epps.. Schools in La Jolla were never segregated, neither were the beaches or movie theaters. However, whether or not there was discrimination, is a different topic.

■ “Growing up here mostly in the 1960s was just a wonderful experience. There were tremendous opportunities, it was a neat neighborhood. There were, at one point, three restaurants (in the African-American neighborhood).” ■ “The Rec Center was a very big part of our development as kids. We came home after school and we went there for activities, like the Rec Center plays, musicals or playing sports there.”

Discrimination

In his 2011 interview, Joe Epps described the “Black Quarters” as follows: “It was a ghetto. Because I looked up the word ghetto. And it was a ghetto. I mean, I don’t know what else you would call it. … When my father bought the place on Eads Avenue, the drainage coming down from the hills was all covered and enclosed until it got through that block from Draper to Eads Avenue. And there it was open sewage. And that went on for years.” Although he said he didn’t feel discriminated against or suffered any negative treatment, Joe Epps said, “There were some things. Like in the summertime when we would go to the beach, we always went to the Casa Bach (aka Children’s Pool). Now nobody ever said it, but we kind of understood that we weren’t welcome at The Cove. That was the white beach. But I never heard anybody say that.” Cristin McVey, author of “Traces of Black San Diego” reported discrimination in access to the housing market in La Jolla from the 1920s to 1950s, mainly when African-Americans tried to buy property outside of the “Black Quarters.” “It was against this backdrop that blacks in La Jolla found themselves struggling to secure a foothold in a town they help to found. To circumvent deed restrictions, restrictive covenants, and discriminatory real estate practices, black La Jollans were forced to create alternative routes for home buying, and felt the heat when such purchases ‘offended’ neighbors. In one case, a white employer of a black cook stepped in and purchased a home for a black worker when the employee was told that the home could not be sold to blacks,” she wrote. Mildred Lee Bell, a then-resident of La Jolla, was interviewed by Jamie Ginsberg on behalf of the La Jolla Historical Society. She also reports very little or no

COURTESY OF DONALD EPPS

COURTESY OF LA JOLLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

La Jolla High School 1948 yearbook pictures of Charles and Randall Epps discrimination in her early life in the coastal community. “The blacks, per se, were such a small segment of the school population, and I personally felt pretty well accepted. The white majority, they were always willing to accept one or two (African-Americans), but don’t come in droves (laughs).” As McVey has theorized in her research about African-Americans in La Jolla, the group felt the quality of life in La Jolla to be “unsurpassed,” but “black residents in La Jolla were undoubtedly recipients of racial prejudice,” she wrote.

World War II

The involvement of the United Stated in the Second World War (1939-1945) had an effect on the then-sleepy community of La Jolla. Joe Epps said it was a “really, really fearful time.” He remembered rumors of fighting on the West Coast against the Japanese, which turned out not to be true. “And then they used to have the blackouts and the sirens. They’d start the sirens and everybody had to turn the lights out,” he said. But the fear wasn’t the only consequence for African-Americans in La Jolla. Many black workers, Barbara Waters wrote in “A Unique Black Community: La Jolla, California 1920-1940,” found jobs outside La Jolla in the defense and aerospace industries. “A few managed to get jobs on the assembly line, but the majority were hired to perform janitorial work. The money was good, more than what they had made previously. Carpools were formed to take people into San Diego to work,” she reported. This created extra income for the community, Waters

■ “It was a very structured lifestyle. All the kids knew each other very well, played together very well. I would say it was a very unique experience. It was a healthy environment.” explained, which continued to work as domestics for Caucasian families in the evenings and on weekends. “When the defense industry laid off workers after the war, black (people) returned to La Jolla seeking their old jobs,” she added. Some of them succeeded and others didn’t; due to the increase in population in the Black Quarters, many of the old jobs were already taken. “This slight increase in population caused the Black Quarters to spread one block on the south side of Pearl Street, and small houses and apartments were built in the backyards of some original houses,” Waters stated. The proximity of Camp Callan (3.5 miles north of La Jolla) made the community closely involved with war efforts, Waters theorized. “Black soldiers, too, found welcome in the community,” she wrote. After World War II, things got worse for African-Americans in La Jolla, McVey reported: “Black families, who came to La Jolla after the Second World War, found it more difficult to buy homes, especially homes not previously owned by another black family. The town’s vision for La Jolla was changing from a self-supporting community to an exclusive suburb for white elites.” Waters said the lack of housing in La Jolla was the beginning of the end of the African-American community that once lived there: “They felt they could rent a better house or apartment in another part of San Diego for less money. Landlords found that more Mexican-Americans were willing to crowd into the premises that black tenants vacated.”


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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A21

San Diego City Council tackles housing affordability

Dismantling local advisory boards and historical preservation, among proposals BY MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN The skyrocketing cost of housing in San Diego has been an ongoing conversation in both political and non-political circles for the past 30 years. Now, the City Council’s Smart Growth & Land Use (SGLU) committee has taken the lead to re-start the dialogue at the community planning groups level. During the SGLU meeting Jan. 25, the issue was long discussed by various stakeholders, including references to proposition memos City Council members on the committee sent out. The suggestions included in these documents could have great impacts on citywide policies and affect the future of La Jolla and its decision-making processes and organizations. Some of the most controversial came from City Council member Scott Sherman (District 7). One of his memo propositions is to reform community planning groups to “achieve higher professionalism,” with policy changes that include additional training, increased diversity among members and “consolidating community planning groups into larger regional groups.” David Moty, chair of the Community Planners Committee, spoke against merging community planning groups into larger organizations. “Currently, community planning groups range in size from towns to mid-size cities, and their point is to provide local knowledge gained from direct daily experience in the neighborhoods,” he explained. Matthew Adams, vice-president of the San Diego County Building Industry Association, advocated for making the construction process “as timely as possible.” He argued that development projects that conform with community and zoning plans should be moved forward, “and you would think that they would, but if there’s one little variance, if there’s a setback that’s smaller (then projects get delayed in the community process).” Save Our Heritage Organisation (SOHO) board member David Swarens also addressed the topic during public comment. He advocated for members of the community groups to be included in construction conversations. “There’s the feeling that community groups, including community planning groups, are viewed as an obstructive impediment,” Swarens said. La Jolla Light reached out to District 1 City Council member Barbara Bry (who is not a member of the SGLU committee) for her view on these policies. She replied in a statement: “District 1 has unique communities and each planning group plays an important role. I do want to ensure that planning groups include voices from all parts of the community and encourage public participation.” The proposition to shrink community input in construction projects has roots in a bigger policy direction: Stripping away the local building regulations and fees, which according to a study from Point Loma Nazarene University — the most-cited document in the meeting — make up 47 percent of the total cost.

Housing affordability and building costs

Council members and meeting attendees agreed that there are two problems to tackle in this discussion — housing affordability (housing costs compared to medium salaries) and affordable housing (housing that’s affordable to low-income families). The latter has traditionally been addressed with different forms of subsidized housing, and meeting attendees advocated for continuing in that direction. To achieve a production of market-rate homes that will level off the costs of housing for medium-income families and solve the home-affordability problem of the region, the suggestions heard involved reducing taxes, fees, contributions and time constraints for developers. La Jolla planning consultant Joe LaCava gave a heartfelt speech focused on the necessity of deeper changes than the ones proposed. “With all due respect, the table has been set this afternoon not to tackle the crisis, but to nibble around the edges. Making little changes that will make us feel good

With all due respect,

the table has been set this afternoon not to tackle the crisis, but to nibble around the edges.

— Joe LaCava

PHOTOS COURTESY CITY OF SAN DIEGO CITYTV

La Jolla community advocate

Under the law, which took effect in January, ADU (aka “granny flats”) should be easier to build. The SGLU committee intends to ease restrictions to facilitate the building of these extra units for San Diegans. According to Sherman, this would mean “supplemental income for homeowners and affordable in-fill housing for residents.” Sherman also proposes building Junior Accessory Dwelling Units (units less than 500 square feet within existing homes) that feature a kitchenette and a door to the exterior of the house and an amnesty to existing unpermitted ADU.

Historical Preservation

Council members David Alvarez (District 8) and Scott Sherman (District 7) at the Jan. 25 Smart Growth & Land Use committee meeting might make a little bit of improvement, but will any of them jumpstart us to 9,000 units a year, our natural growth demands?” he said, adding that re-writing the land development code is a necessity. SOHO director Bruce Coons told La Jolla Light, “Most people seem to think that if we allow the development industry to build as many houses at market rate (as they want), it will balance out. The developers always move to the highest profit item; they keep claiming they’ll drive housing prices down, but I don’t think that’s really possible anymore.” However, Adams stated that rolling back buildings costs can be positive. “Even with modest changes, you can have a significant impact in housing availability, affordability and economic activity,” he said, adding that a 3 percent decrease in building regulations could sprout a $3 billion growth to the gross regional product. One of the proposed “roll backs,” included in the memos by City Council members Sherman and David Alvarez (District 8), is reducing parking requirements for residential developments. But Sherman goes further, asking for expanded self-certification programs on building projects, reducing the possibilities for California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) appeals, the building of Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU) and taking away the historical preservation decision power of the Historical Resources Board (HRB) in favor of the City Council.

Accessory Dwelling Units

In September 2016, Gov. Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill 1069 that allows accessory dwelling units in single- or multi-family residential zones. “(ADU) provide additional rental housing stock, and these units are an essential component of housing supply in California,” the bill reads.

Sherman’s memo references a handful of policy changes in historical preservation policies. It reads, “Specific reforms include: mandating Council approval on any new historic or potentially historic district, allowing an appeal of a historic designation on any grounds, bifurcating HRB hearings into two per month, separating the agendas of DSD referral and voluntary designation, increasing the designation to 75 years, amending the criteria used to designate (eliminate wildcard criteria and require two criteria be met), and capping the limit by which Mills Act tax credit recipients may receive such a credit — once the threshold of property value is met, homeowners must pay taxes on the remaining value.” However, Coons said, “This is probably barking up the wrong tree … especially because historical preservation is so small, less than 1 percent (of the existing homes in San Diego).” He argued that most of Sherman’s suggestions were either pointless or come from a misunderstanding of how the HRB really works. “If they were to enact these requirements and somehow get it through, we just go to the State and keep the City out,” Coons continued, suggesting that a good way to help developers would be to run a countywide or citywide historical “map.” “What’s more important for builders to know is where property that has potential constraints is, and identifying the historic resources is one of the greatest things we could do to speed things up,” he said. Bry, who ran on a platform of maintaining the unique character of neighborhoods, wrote, “La Jolla has many historic homes and buildings, and these structures are part of what makes our community so special. I will continue to support the Mills Act and historic preservation.”

■ Want to know more? Council members Scott Sherman and David Alvarez will discuss their plans for housing affordability moderated by Joe LaCava during the Citizens Coordinate for Century 3 breakfast dialogue, 7-9 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 23 at The Loggia Room in the House of Hospitality, 1549 El Prado in Balboa Park, San Diego. Tickets: $30 members, $40 non-members, continental breakfast included. c3sandiego.org/event-2458731


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PAGE A22 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

La Quinta Arts Festival marks 35 years, March 2-5 FROM LQ ARTS FOUNDATION REPORTS For the 35th consecutive year, art lovers and collectors will gather at the La Quinta Arts Festival, Thursday, March 2 through Sunday, March 5, for the ultimate annual fine art and culture experience. Produced by the non-profit La Quinta Arts Foundation, La Quinta Arts Festival hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, and admission is $17 for a single day ticket, $22 for a multi-day pass, and free for children 12 and under. Tickets may be purchased online at lqaf.com, the best option to avoid long lines — or at the Festival gates. Set at the stunning site of the La Quinta Civic Center Campus, 220 La Quinta Arts Festival artists will arrive from 40 States, Argentina, Canada and Czech Republic to display their amazing original art on lush grass, surrounded by sparkling lakes with a majestic backdrop of the Santa Rosa Mountains. Named the “No. 1 Fine Art Festival in the Nation” by Art Fair SourceBook (2013, 2014, 2015) and No. 3 in 2016, the La Quinta Arts Festival annually serves over 22,000 discerning art patrons — with more than 46 percent making the event a destination, traveling from around the nation and internationally, while 56 percent are repeat attendees. Drawing from the 35th Anniversary Festival Poster by artists Signe and Genna Grushovenko (South Carolina), the 2017 Festival theme is “Make A Splash.” Look for new, fun and unique experiences and art installations in the Splash Lounge and throughout the event, presented by La Quinta Arts Foundation’s visual and performing art scholars. La Quinta Arts Foundation has awarded $1.23 million in college

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COURTESY

Works such as ‘Defying Gravity’ will be for show and sale at the 35th annual La Quinta Arts Festival, March 2-5. scholarships to 300 emerging art professionals from La Quinta Arts Festival proceeds. What’s a festival without superb food and drink? As usual La Quinta Arts Festival delivers with specialties from Ruth’s

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Chris Steakhouse, Fisherman’s Market & Grill, E & E Pels Italian Ices, Brandini Toffee, and more. Stella Artois is the event official beer sponsor, served beside fine wines, specialty coffees from IW Coffee Company and other libations which are sure to delight. Live entertainment and performances will be enjoyed 2-5 p.m. in the amphitheater with notable headliners Horace & the KG’s bringing upbeat R&B on Friday, the ever popular Mike Costley crooning jazz and standards on Saturday, and Steve Madaio & Friends will have the crowds swinging closing out the event on Sunday. Milton Merlos and Scott Carter will delight audiences with their classical guitar stylings each day. IAMNOTADJ will be spinning eclectic “house” music in the Splash Lounge. La Quinta Arts Festival is proud to announce a new partnership with Tesloop, offering a first-class stress-free transportation experience in Teslas for patrons traveling to the Festival from Los Angeles and Orange County. A link for more details can be found at lqaf.com Membership with La Quinta Arts Foundation has its privileges – including festival tickets and invitations to member’s-only events. (760) 564-1244. lqaf.com ■ IF YOU GO: The 35th La Quinta Arts Festival runs 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 2-5 at La Quinta Civic Center Campus, 78495 Calle Tampico, La Quinta, California. Tickets: $17 single day, $22 multi-day, children age 12 and under are free. (760) 564-1244. lqaf.com Business Spotlight features commercial enterprises that support La Jolla Light.

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A23

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PAGE A24 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

LA JOLLA NEWS NUGGETS Cove odor appeal denied, attorney suggests making air-quality complaints The recent La Jolla-based Citizens for Odor Nuisance Abatement (CONA) appeal, which argued that the City of San Diego is responsible for the sea lion stench at La Jolla Cove and requested the City clean up the sea lion excrement therein, has been denied. In an opinion filed Feb. 9, the Fourth Appellate District Court of Appeal affirmed the ruling of Judge Timothy B. Taylor that the City is not responsible for the odors. The opinion states, “We sympathize with CONA, but agree with the trial court that any resolution likely lies in the political sphere.” Oral Arguments in the appeal were delivered Jan. 10 by La Jolla Shores-based attorney Norm Blumenthal, who has been representing CONA since it filed the lawsuit in December 2013. Blumenthal argued for an appeal of the trial court’s ruling, which granted the City summary judgment and dismissed the CONA case. In March 2015, CONA filed claims against the City of San Diego for what they viewed as public officials’ failure to rid La Jolla Cove of its pervasive odors from bird and marine mammal waste. The judge ruled the City doesn’t have a duty to control any nuisance caused by wild animals, and that the City isn’t the cause of the odor. This month’s appeal ruling confirmed this decision. As an alternative source of action, Blumenthal’s office recommends concerned citizens call the County Air Pollution Control District at (858) 586-2650 and lodge a complaint about the air quality.

Sea lions have made La Jolla Cove their home and are one of the main causes of the ‘Cove Stench.’

LIGHT FILE

Hundreds rally in La Jolla to support refugees More than 800 people gathered at Congregation Beth El in La Jolla Feb. 2, for a demonstration of solidarity and alliance by the Jewish community in support of refugees and immigrants. Organized by four San Diego Jewish nonprofits — the Anti-Defamation League of San Diego County, Jewish Family Service of San Diego, Jewish Federation of San Diego and Leichtag Foundation — attendees heard from prominent religious and community leaders about taking action against the recent travel ban, and were reminded of the Jewish community’s history as refugees and immigrants. Speakers included Rabbi Yael Ridberg from Congregation Dor Hadash, Rabbi Nadav Caine from the San Diego Rabbinic Association, Rabbi Scott Meltzer from Ohr Shalom Synagogue, Rabbi Avi Libman from Congregation Beth El, City Council member Barbara Bry and California State Assembly member Todd Gloria. Bry said the event, “brought together hundreds from different backgrounds to condemn the misguided executive order banning some refugees from our country” and added that she attended because “as a mother and grandmother, I want to leave the world a better place for the next generation. I want my children and grandchildren to know that I stood with refugees in these uncertain and divisive times.” After the speeches, attendees worked their way around the room filling out postcards, learning about Senate Bill 54 that prevents the use of California resources for mass deportations, getting the facts on the refugee screening and resettlement process in the U.S. and learning about volunteer opportunities. Jewish Family Service of San Diego (JFS) CEO Michael Hopkins said, “We resettle refugees from war zones around the world not because they’re Jewish, but because we are. There are 129 people who were already positioned to be resettled by JFS and have had their immigration process halted.”

Postal service station at ‘The Shops’ on the move

COURTESY

California State Assembly member Todd Gloria (at the podium) speaks to the more than 800 people that gathered at Congregation Beth El in La Jolla to demonstrate support of refugees and immigrants. The U.S. Postal Service will move the La Jolla Village Station services to a new location within the same shopping center in early March. The La Jolla Village Station will close on Friday, March 3 and reopen 9 a.m. Monday, March 6 at the new location, 8861 Villa La Jolla Drive, Suite 505 in The Shops at La Jolla Village. Post Office (P.O.) Box numbers will remain the same, but customers will be issued new keys. Keys will be available for pick up at the current location Feb. 27-March 2. Identification will be required to receive new P.O. Box keys.

Monarch Arrendon gallery changes address Monarch Arredon Contemporary art gallery has moved to a new, smaller Village location at 862 Prospect St., Suite A, and will fully transition by March 1. This new location will support the gallery in its 2017 goal of expanding into national art shows, collaborating with online venues and organizing installations outside the gallery walls. The current, 7629 Girard Ave. location will remain open until Feb. 28, exhibiting “Conducting a Symphony: A Rhythm of Visual Perception” by Lei Tang. The first exhibit

in the new location will be, “Dancing Shadows” by Randy and Carol Cooper, open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday-Sunday and by appointment Monday-Wednesday. (858) 454-1231. monarchfineart.com

Library seeks ‘family’ photos for next art exhibit The La Jolla Library Art committee is accepting entries for its third single-subject photo show, “Families.” The entry deadline is April 14. Artists may submit up to five images, in black and white or color, with image sizes no smaller than 8x10 or larger than 30x40. All accepted photos must be framed simply in black or wood frames. According to committee reports, “Families exist in broad interpretations, from a pet rabbit adopted by a cat, to a night shift group of dedicated nurses, or a neighborhood of families established over years! There are no other image requirements or expectations, only that the word ‘families’ is interpreted personally by each photographer.” Entry forms are available at the library and also online at lajollalibrary.org/your-library/art-exhibits/ SEE MORE NEWS NUGGETS, A30


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OPINION

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OUR READERS WRITE

LA JOLLA

LIGHT 565 Pearl St., Suite 300 La Jolla, CA 92037 (858) 459-4201

lajollalight.com La Jolla Light (USPS 1980) is published every Thursday by Union-Tribune Community Press. Adjudicated as a newspaper of general circulation by Superior Court No. 89376, April 1, 1935. Copyright © 2016 Union-Tribune Community Press. All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this publication may be reproduced in any medium, including print and electronic media, without the expressed written consent of Union-Tribune Community Press. Subscriptions available for $125 per year by mail.

President & General Manager • Phyllis Pfeiffer ppfeiffer@lajollalight.com (858) 875-5940 Executive Editor • Susan DeMaggio susandemaggio@lajollalight.com (858) 875-5950 Staff Reporters • Ashley Mackin ashleym@lajollalight.com (858) 875-5957 • María José Durán mduran@lajollalight.com (858) 875-5951 News Design • Michael Bower, Lead, Edwin Feliu, Crystal Hoyt, Daniel K. Lew Vice President Advertising • Don Parks (858) 875-5954 Media Consultants • Jeff Rankin (858) 875-5956 • Jeanie Croll (858) 875-5955 • Sarah Minihane (Real Estate) (858) 875-5945 • Dave Long (858) 875-5946 Ad Operations Manager • Colin McBride Advertising Design • John Feagans, Manager Laura Bullock, Maria Gastelum, Bryan Ivicevic, Vince Meehan Obituaries • (858) 218-7237 or inmemory@ myclassifiedmarketplace.com Classified Ads • (858) 218-7200 ads@MainStreetSD.com

LIGHT FILE

The eyesore, off La Jolla Parkway at Ardath Road and Hidden Valley, as seen in 2015

Two years later, same sad situation Here’s an update to a letter published in the La Jolla Light two years ago … Nothing! The same “patch,” the same apathy, the same incompetence! Mark Pretorius Editor’s Note: Here is the letter to which Mr. Pretorius refers: Tarnishing Our Jewel: City’s patch job falls apart — “The quick repair the City made for the construction area off La Jolla Parkway at Ardath Road and Hidden

MARK PRETORIUS

In February 2017, the junkyard and dilapidated fencing remains. Valley has become an eyesore again. Instead of replacing fence covering with a whole new piece, last time they simply patched it. Now it is ripping apart again and all the junk in the construction yard shows through. Another thing to note is the sidewalk is overgrown by the bushes and this is a real safety problem! That is a blind corner and it is difficult to push a stroller through there forcing the use of the street as a walkway. Cars come flying around there accelerating to get onto the parkway and it is only a matter of time until there is an accident.”

Here’s a curious mystery to solve! After years of walking over this landmark, my curiosity has finally driven me to find an answer to its mystery. In the concrete sidewalk (on the coast side of the street across from 939 Coast Blvd.) is a remnant of the past. But what is it? “Faultline” is written next to the series of slightly offset semicircles. I’ve made inquiries with many longtime residents, as well as the La Jolla Historical Society, but no one seems to have a definitive answer. I’m thinking this question must have been asked and answered before, so I’m hoping someone out there remembers the answer and submits it to the La Jolla Light for publication. Rusty Runholt

Who has thought out some traffic plans for Fay Avenue’s future? We have watched with excitement all of the building activity on Fay Street in recent years. Although we still miss Jonathan’s market, the addition of The Lot is a community win. Now we see the La Jolla Music Society’s “Conrad” has broken ground, with an assisted living center adjacent. With all of this development, additional traffic is inevitable. We have a concern about the potential for a pedestrian injury or death on Fay Street. People jaywalk. Some of these jaywalkers are children, some elderly, some disabled. We would suggest that the risk management personnel of The Lot, The Conrad, Vons and the new assisted living center meet with City of San Diego traffic officials to devise a plan to prevent a pedestrian accident. For once, let’s get ahead of a potential tragedy. Kathleen K. Edwards Daved L. Frerker

RUSTY RUNHOLT

‘Faultline’ is written next to the series of slightly offset semicircles ion this piece of sidewalk along Coast Boulevard.

The time has come to relocate the pinnipeds This is in response to the letter written about La Jolla Children’s Pool in last week’s paper. The author offered a choice. I choose the first proposal: Move the seals. The seals and sea lions are inhabiting developed beaches that have cost the taxpayers of San Diego millions of dollars for lifeguard stations, stairs, walls, walkways and restrooms. The seals and sea lions can legally be displaced from the developed beaches and they can find undeveloped beaches to lay on. Maybe they will be go to the Coronado Islands. That would be great, as they wouldn’t be bothered by anyone. They’re animals. They’re adaptable. They’ll do fine somewhere else. They were somewhere else before the City of San Diego allowed them to take over Children’s Pool and La Jolla Cove. The seals and seal lions do pose threats to humans. Their waste pollutes the beach sand and ocean water. They carry diseases such as tuberculosis, leptospirosis, brucellosis, mycoplasmosis, blastomycosis, lobomycosis,

mycobacterium marinum, calicivirus, influenza, poxvirus and others. And they can attract predators, such as sharks. If you had rats or mice or termites living in your house, would you move out and let them have the house? Or would you kick them out of “their home?” Or would you even kill them? After all, they have a right to live! And they need a place to have babies … and rest. Since you “swam in The Cove a few times and got cold,” you should get a wetsuit and try again. Because you don’t swim in The Cove, your opinion on what other people should do there is not relevant. A lot of people swim in The Cove every day of the year, even in winter, and without wetsuits. I agree that The Cove is a great place to enjoy 360-degree views of La Jolla. The Cove is one of the best beaches in California. Thousands of people swim there in the summer. The Cove is a great place to swim, snorkel, dive, body surf, picnic and lay on the beach … as long as it’s not contaminated with pinniped poop. Dan Truitt


OPINION

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A27

OUR READERS WRITE (CONTINUED) What’s behind ‘productive’ meeting with the Mayor? In the Feb. 9 edition of the Light on page A30, it was reported that District 1 City Council member Barbara Bry had a meeting with the Mayor and his staff regarding the stench at La Jolla Cove. Her staff said the meeting was “productive,” but just what does that mean? Ms. Bry should tell her constituents what took place behind closed doors that would make it “productive.” We need specifics, not more political double-speak, so there can be accountability from our City because so far, there is little of that. So sad! Lou Cumming

Enjoyed the letter on grammar last week After reading Patricia Weber’s letter in the Feb. 9 issue, I was moved to reflect that each of us has his favorite grammatical miscues. “Chaq’un a son gout” (“to each his own taste”), but my view is that ending a sentence with a preposition is but a venial sin against good usage compared to some others that are real whoppers — “Me and him went to the beach,” for example. As for the misplaced prepositions, let me remind readers of Winston Churchill’s rejoinder to being chided for doing just that, “This is the kind of arrant pedantry up with which I shall not put!” Fred Boynton

It’s OK to end a sentence with a proposition While I enjoyed reading Patricia Weber’s letter “Don’t kill the English language,” in last week’s issue, I do not believe it is a grammar imperative to avoid ending a sentence with a preposition. In addition, one can split their infinitives as well and still be literate and grammatically correct. Emily Brewster, associate editor at Merriam-Webster, states, “A preposition is perfectly appropriate word to end a sentence with.”

The rule of not ending a sentence with a preposition is supposed to have come from the 17th century writer John Dryden. He castigated such writers as Ben Johnson and William Shakespeare for ending sentences with prepositions because Dryden thought English should be more like Latin. So this rule is purely arbitrary and as Winston Churchill supposedly said, “This is just the kind of nonsense up with which I will not put.” The point being that language is fluid and changes over time, and again, according to Brewster, “While many aspects of Latin have made their way into the English language, this particular grammar rule is not suited for English usage.” So I ask you if I had submitted this sentence to my English teacher in a high school writing assignment, “We are such stuff as dreams are made on,” would s/he have been correct to insist it be re-written as, “Dreams are made on such stuff as we are.” (If so, Shakespeare would be turning in his grave.) Avalee Cohen

What would Sir Winston say? Regarding the recent letter by Patricia Weber, the issue of prepositions at the end of sentences has been contentious for years. No less a figure than Winston Churchill was reprimanded for ending a sentence with a preposition, to which he replied, “That is a criticism up with which I will not put.” Quite the “put-down.” The other grammatical rule that seems to be falling by the wayside is the stricture against split infinitives, which have been enshrined in popular culture by such memes as the Star Trek motto, “To boldly go where no man has gone before.” Jane Dyson

People in Your Neighborhood stories are fun to read I loved the People in Your Neighborhood article about Scott Farr in the Feb. 9 issue. I took his Bridge class but had no idea about his magic career. Thanks for are great interview! Carolyn Shadle

Students are compiling list of health-related resources I am the co-president of a student-run organization at UC San Diego whose goal is to compile a list of various free and reduced-cost health resources (such as health clinics, dental clinics, optometry clinics, shelter homes, etc.) and present the information to the less fortunate as they may not have access to a computer or phone to find resources they need. In collaboration with San Diego 2-1-1, we travel to two different food banks every week to get in touch with the less fortunate and present them with information that is unavailable to them without our help. I am reaching out for an article about my organization in the La Jolla Light. Not only would this allow for my organization to expand its boundaries and collaborate with other people and/or organizations to better accomplish our goal, but would also bring awareness to an issue in today’s society that every individual can help to make better by volunteering or donating their own time. Liam Shweyk lshweyk@ucsd.edu

CORRECTIONS ■ The phone number to the Prostate Center of San Diego is (866) 883-8262. ■ In the Feb. 9 article, “FAA: Changes could decrease jet plane noise in La Jolla,” it should have stated that the airport and airlines determine flight schedules, and not the San Diego Airport Authority.

What’s on YOUR mind? ■ Letters published in La Jolla Light express views and comments from readers in regard to community issues. To share your thoughts in this public forum, e-mail them with your name to editor@lajollalight.com or mail them to La Jolla Light Editor, 565 Pearl St., Suite 300, La Jolla, CA 92037. Letters reflect the writer’s views and do not necessarily represent opinions of the newspaper staff.

VALENTINE’S DAY ACTIVISM

A sign reading ‘Resist’ accompanied by pink-and-red hearts, appeared on the footbridge over Torrey Pines Road near La Jolla Shores Drive on Tuesday, Feb. 14.

MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN


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PHOTOS BY ASHLEY MACKIN

City Public Works Department project manager Ed Fordan answers questions about the La Jolla Heights Reservoir Project on Feb. 2 at the La Jolla Rec Center.

LJCPA trustee Patrick Ahern explains the Environmental Impact Report process, and the questions that could be answered with the document.

Planners re-affirm request for EIR in reservoir project

BY ASHLEY MACKIN La Jolla Community Planning Association (LJCPA) re-affirmed its request that an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) be filed for the La Jolla Heights Reservoir Project, during its Feb. 2 meeting at La Jolla Rec Center. The board initially heard about the reservoir replacement project in March 2015. The three-pronged project entails demolishing the existing above-ground La Jolla View Reservoir in La Jolla Heights Natural Park and decommissioned Exchange Place reservoir/pump station near the corner of Country Club Drive and Pepita Way; constructing one 3.1 million gallon underground tank to replace the two that will be demolished; and replacing the current 16-inch Country Club Drive pipeline with a 30-inch pipe. It is expected that 300 truckloads will come and go to excavate the area and maneuver on a temporary access road to be built through the park over two years. The project is paid for through water rate payers and once complete, the La Jolla Heights Natural Park will be re-vegetated with native plants. Reflecting on the last time it was discussed, LJCPA vice-president Helen Boyden said, “We didn’t want to hear it again until there had been an Environmental Impact Report drafted.” However, LJCPA president Cindy Greatrex explained that, “The City of San Diego Department of Public Works has asked us to hear this again … as an action item where trustees, if they so choose, have the ability to request the action that an EIR is created.”

LIGHT FILE

Beginning in 2018, City plans call for the above ground La Jolla View Reservoir in La Jolla Heights Natural Park to be demolished and replaced with an underground 3.1 million gallon to be constructed. Arguing for that action, trustee Patrick Ahern made a presentation on behalf of Friends of La Jolla Heights Natural Park (of which he is a founding member) to showcase the questions that could be answered with an EIR, and which have not otherwise been addressed. An EIR identifies and examines the likely environmental effects of a proposed project, and proposes measures to avoid, mitigate or offset them. “This is an important project and there are different ways of looking at it. What we’re wondering is, is this necessary? We recognize that it probably is, but is this the best way to go about it?” he opined. Ahern went on to cite that the La Jolla Community Plan shows La Jolla Heights Natural Park (perched atop Encelia Drive near the La Jolla Country Club) is a dedicated park, and therefore should be preserved as open space without disruption. “Our Community Plan advocates for protecting environmentally sensitive habitats, which this is,” he said. “Our guidelines and the City’s guidelines for making decisions for the community (of La Jolla) suggest the City should ensure, to the fullest extent possible, natural resources such as shrub and chaparral, and the critters that live there, are protected.”

He suggested that with an EIR, these issues and how they would be mediated, would have to be explored. Other questions that arose from the room and board included restriction of access to public spaces and environmental impacts on the community, such as traffic mitigation; street safety and noise remediation. “We want all this to be looked at and decided upon with input from this group (all EIRs have a public comment period) and the general public,” he said. The City’s position has been that potential environmental impacts could be easily resolved and the project would therefore only need a Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND), which suggests there would not be major impact, or lesser environmental review. Attempting to prove this point, City Public Works Department project manager Ed Fordan answered questions piecemeal, and through an informational video. The video explained that due to their age and condition, the City maintains the reservoirs have reached the end of their service lives and need to be replaced to protect water quality and provide appropriate water storage volume for water supply and fire protection. The project is 100 percent designed, and construction is expected to

begin in 2018, and be finished by summer 2020. Fordan explained the reservoirs were built in 1949 and 1962 respectively, and are no longer able to keep up with water usage demands. “During construction, there will be dust control, erosion control and noise limits that the contractor will need to adhere to. And we have City inspectors who will ensure contractor compliance,” he said. One meeting attendee noted the “unpleasant history” with the City contracting process (referencing the infrastructure work in La Jolla Shores that has taken three years off and on), and asked what guarantees they have that this City project would be done right. Fordan replied, “We are going to hire a construction management firm (to partner with) the City, so construction goes smoothly.” As for the Exchange Place pump station property — which many have advocated be converted into a park — Fordan explained that it’s owned by the City Public Utilities Department and it’s not known what would happen to the property. “At this point, our direction is to demolition the pump station and replace it with native vegetation.” Lastly, he said a temporary access road would be built to accommodate the trucks excavating the dirt to limit the number of trips on City streets, and that “flag-men” would help facilitate traffic, and plans were in development to fix any damage to the roads after the fact. All said, LJCPA moved to re-affirm its recommendation that an EIR be required for the La Jolla View Reservoir Project in the La Jolla Heights Natural Park, in accordance with the requirements of California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), and the City of San Diego’s Multiple Species Conservation program … due to the potentially significant adverse impacts of the project on sensitive natural resources, and residential neighborhoods. The motion carried unanimously. — La Jolla Community Planning Association next meets 6 p.m. Thursday, March 2 at La Jolla Rec Center, 615 Prospect St. lajollacpa.org


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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A29

FROM AIRPLANE NOISE, A1 The document references factors, such as the increase in airplane size, increase in the number of flights and the possibility of a change in the air traffic controllers operations that contribute to the overall feeling of “living in an airport.” “It may be that we have reached a ‘tipping point’ due to many of the above factors,” the document states. Last week, protesters attended the meetings of the La Jolla Village Merchants Association (LJVMA), La Jolla Shores Association (LJSA) and La Jolla Town Council (LJTC). During the latter, they set up an information booth in front of Rec Center Room 1, where the meeting took place, and requested signatures for their petition. Bird Rock resident Beatriz Pardo said the petition has 500 signatures so far and they intended to reach 1,000 by Wednesday, Feb. 15 when the Airport Noise Advisory Committee meets. During the LJTC meeting, resident Len Gross encouraged attendees to sign the petition, adding that the goal is “to make the FAA and the Airport Authority aware that we have an increasing noise issue in La Jolla and we would like them to help us understand why the noise is increasing and what the options are that the airport and the FAA may have for reducing the noise.” Residents are dealing with the fact that the FAA’s Southern California Metroplex Project changes (which will affect the area) won’t kick in until March 2, while witnessing the uproar generated by those who’ve noticed an increase in airplane noise that began in the fall of 2016. At the LJTC meeting, resident Margo

Schwab said, “(People) have compared the airplane noise with a heavy metal band. If you like that kind of music, good for you, not me. Wait for summer when the windows are open.” A factor for the increased noise, according to FAA personnel at past meetings, was the unusual overcast weather that magnifies the sounds produced by air traffic.

Controversy continues

At the LJSA meeting, disagreement arose when board member David Gordon gave a presentation that showed, according to his research and own experience, there have been no changes in flight paths or the levels of noise in La Jolla. “There is one exception, the (FAA) changed a standard arrival route slightly, but that’s 5 miles off the coast,” he said. Gordon, who is a pilot, said that even though Shores neighbors swear they are constantly bothered by the airplanes arriving at San Diego International Airport from the east, he hasn’t noticed any changes, nor is he disturbed by the passing flights. “When it’s cloudy, you’re going to hear the jet noise a lot more. When it’s sunny, the noise dissipates in all directions. From what I’ve seen and the air traffic controllers tell me, there has been no significant change,” he explained. Bird Rock resident and attorney Jan Chatten-Brown took the floor after Gordon. “I’ve been very anxious to hear what people are experiencing. I’m four houses away from the ocean and I now must sleep with ear plugs. At 6 a.m., when (the airplanes) start, I put a pillow over my head,” she said. Chatten-Brown told attendees that the increasing noises were a consequence of the FAA’s Metroplex Project implementation,

Does airplane noise affect health and well-being? International research has showed that air traffic noise isn’t just an annoyance for residents, it can also be dangerous: ■ “Aircraft noise and cardiovascular disease near Heathrow Airport in London: Small area study,” (2013, Imperial College London) investigated the association of aircraft noise with risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, and cardiovascular disease and concluded: “Hospital admissions showed statistically significant linear trends of increasing risk with higher levels of both day time (7 a.m. to 11 p.m.) and night time (11 p.m. to 7 a.m.) aircraft noise.” ■ “Residential exposure to aircraft noise and hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases: Multi-airport retrospective study,” (2013, Francesca Dominic, Harvard) researched whether exposure to aircraft noise increases the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases in older people (age 65 and up), and found a link between exposure to airplane noise and risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease. — María José Durán

“which started in November.” However, FAA personnel have assured that changes in San Diego International Airport routes will be implemented starting in March 2. “Any time a federal agency takes action that has a significant impact on the environment, they have to prepare an environmental analysis,” Chatten-Brown continued, adding that the reports prepared for the Metroplex Project weren’t enough. “Basically, they modeled what they were going to do,” she said. In a press release, the FAA stated, “During

our environmental analysis for this project, we modeled noise at about 300,000 locations throughout Southern California. Our modeling found that some areas will experience slight noise decreases, some will experience slight noise increases, and some will experience no changes.”

Lawsuits pending

Chatten-Brown said the deadline to file lawsuits against the Metroplex Project has passed. The period to sue the FAA is 60 days after the agency reveals its final decision, which happened Aug. 31, 2016. That made the last day for filing complaints Oct. 30, 2016, just before La Jolla residents started feeling a spike in airplane noise and long before they became organized. “There is a very short statute of limitations, but we could conceivably intervene, although it would be difficult,” she explained, adding that some options for jumping on the lawsuits, would be to file a Friend-of-the-Court brief or just have somebody coordinate with the three jurisdictions that have already filed suits. La Jolla Light spoke to attorney Steven Taber, who specializes in community representation on aviation and airport development cases, and who has filed a Petition for Review against the Southern California Metroplex Project on behalf of a Point Loma resident. Taber said the FAA noise calculation system is outdated and needs to be updated. “(The FAA) needs to realize that their actions are having real effects on people on the ground — especially in situations like this when their interest is the efficiency of aircraft in the sky without respect to the people they may be affecting,” he stated.

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PAGE A30 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

LA JOLLA NEWS NUGGETS (CONTINUED) FROM NEWS NUGGETS, A24

Six candidates up for La Jolla Planning Association election The La Jolla Community Planning Association (LJCPA) will hold its yearly trustee election to fill six vacant trustee seats, 3-7 p.m. Thursday, March 2 at the La Jolla Recreation Center, Irving Gill Room, 615 Prospect St. The following five candidates will run for re-election and are on the March 2 ballot: Bob Collins, Cindy Greatrex, Sheila Palmer, Bob Steck and Brian Will. Although it was previously reported that James Ragsdale would re-run, he retracted his candidacy during the LJCPA’s Feb. 2 meeting. That same night, La Jolla Shores resident Dave Gordon announced his candidacy, and will be listed on the ballot. Write-in candidates are allowed at the Special Election but must meet eligibility requirements pursuant to the LJCPA bylaws. Only active LJCPA members will be allowed to vote. If you have a question regarding your membership status, e-mail info@lajollacpa.org or visit lajollacpa.org The last opportunity to attend a meeting and maintain membership (and eligibility to vote in the election) was the Feb. 2 LJCPA meeting. In the March election, after polls close at 7 p.m., the ballots will be counted, and the tally will be presented to the president who will certify and announce the results that evening. A challenge to the elections must be filed within one week of the announced results. The newly elected trustees will be seated at the beginning of the April meeting.

La Jollan appointed Convention Center Corporation board chair La Jolla resident Candace Carroll has been elected chair of the 2017 San Diego Convention Center Corporation board of directors. Carroll is an appellate lawyer with more than 40 years’ experience handling appeals in the federal, state and bankruptcy appellate courts. She has served on the San Diego Convention Center Corporation board of directors since 2014; in 2016, she served as vice-chair. She has also chaired the boards of the San Diego County Bar Association and California Women Lawyers. The Corporation’s mission is to generate economic benefits for the greater San Diego region by hosting national and international conventions and trade shows in the world-class facility.

Bloodmobile drive at Koi Wellbeing, Friday The San Diego Blood Bank will accept blood donations from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 17, at Koi Wellbeing, 5632 La Jolla Blvd. Donors must be age 17 and older, weigh at least 114 pounds and be in good health. A photo ID must be presented upon signing up to donate. Donors are encouraged to schedule an appointment, but walk-ins are also welcome. (619) 469-7322. sandiegobloodbank.org COURTESY

Have a La Jolla news tip?

■ Call the La Jolla Light at (858) 875-5950 or e-mail details to editor@lajollalight.com

JeNeal Nebeker Hatch

Chester Howard Doty

July 8, 1922 - December 26, 2016

October 29, 1930 - February 6, 2017

La JOLLa — Chester Howard Doty died peacefully on February 6, 2017. He was born on October 29, 1930, in Reading, Pa. He grew up on his aunt’s farm and in White Plains, NY. after high school, he went into the army as a jumper for the 82nd airborne. He attended Lehigh University for one year and then moved to Los angeles where he attended UCLa, then went on to USC to obtain his degree in

medicine. He met his beautiful wife, Claree, at Good Samaritan Hospital. They were married on July 1, 1961 and the next day they took a train to New Orleans and caught a boat to Panama, where he did his residency at Gorgas Hospital. To return to the United States, they bought a VW bug and drove from Costa Rica on the Pan american Highway. Their first daughter Lisa, was born on February 11, 1963, in Los angeles. In 1965, he and

Claree moved to La Jolla and their second daughter Carol was born. Howard and Claree resided in La Jolla and were together 51 years until her death. Howard was a well-respected and accomplished otolaryngologist. He was a well-known surfer, his favorite break being Windansea. He also was a long distance cyclist, riding several times in the Tecate-Ensenada bike race. He loved playing the ukulele and dancing the hula and spending time in Hawaii. He and his family spent a great deal of time on the north shore of Oahu at Sunset Beach. He loved to read and play bridge keeping his brilliant mind sharp until the end. Charming and handsome, he was the most genuinely nice guy around. He was humble, fun-loving and always ready for anything. When asked how he was,

La Jolla resident Candace Carroll is the new chair of the 2017 San Diego Convention Center Corporation board of directors.

he would say “tip top”! He loved life and always had a mischievous twinkle in his beautiful blue eyes. Howard took amazing care of his family, adored his wife and their daughters. He cherished his grandchildren, Torrey and Storm and loved his son-in-law, Greg. He also loved his dog Hank. Howard said he was the luckiest guy on Earth and never missed a chance to live life and enjoy the beauty of the world around him. He loved, he lived and his legacy lives on in all of the people he touched. The family will hold a celebration of life, potluck, at his home on Sunday, February 26, from 2pm to 6pm. There will be a paddle out at Windansea this summer to scatter Howard and Claree’s ashes. Please sign the guest book online at legacy.com/ obituaries/lajollalight.

La JoLLa — JeNeal Nebeker Hatch passed away on December 26, 2016, with her loving family at her side. JeNeal was born on July 8, 1922 in Salt Lake City, UT, where she met Calvin Shipley Hatch. They married on December 23, 1945, and enjoyed 61 beautiful years together before Cal died in 2006. She was a gracious and devoted corporate wife. our “precious Non” will be greatly missed by her family and all who knew her. Nonny loved chocolate, golf, cards, dancing and singing – she was the life of the party until the end. JeNeal is survived by her two daughters, Julie Hatch and Marcia Thomas (Keith); and six grandchildren whom she loved very much: Becky McClellan (Chris), Cody Thomas (Tara), adam Thomas (Stephanie), Molly Schmidt (Mike), Emily Chaidez (Sergio) and John Skrdla. She was also blessed with

eight great-grandchildren. our family wishes to thank her wonderful doctors for their incredible care and everyone at Casa de Manana, where Mom lived for the last 10 years. a memorial service will be held in april. Should friends desire, contributions may be sent to the Moran Eye Center, in memory of our mother: Moran Development office, 6 Mario Capecchi Dr Salt Lake City, UT 84132 Please sign the guest book online at legacy.com/ obituaries/lajollalight.


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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE A31

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PAGE A32 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

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Playhouse gala wins applause

B12

LIFESTYLES

Thursday, February 16, 2017

‘Freaky Friday’ musical fun

B16

lajollalight.com

SECTION B

PHOTOS BY MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN

To regulate the body’s energy, yoga teacher Jaruska Solyova recommends a ‘mudra’ (symbolic hand gesture) in the shape of a flower. She said, ‘Remember a flower that you really enjoy looking at and smelling. Then put your hands together close to your heart. Start separating your fingers and palms, leaving the upper part of your fingers connected.’

Take A Breather

Beauty, yoga join forces at Woman’s Club event BY MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN he Feb. 6 members luncheon at La Jolla Woman’s Club (LJWC) featured a special Valentine’s Day presentation by local yoga teacher Jaruska Solyova on the topic “Valentine Inner & Outer Yoga Beauty Secrets.” Solyova spoke about beauty and the benefits that ancient knowledge from India and other parts of Asia can have on the soul and body. She used the letters that make up the word “Beauty” as an acronym to suggest healthy behaviors to LJWC members. For example, Solyova said the B stands for Breathing. She recommended working on the breath to connect the mind and body and bring awareness to one’s anatomy. The “breath

T

of fire,” as she calls it, is a deep, fast breath with inhaling and exhaling intervals that last less than a second. This breath, Solyova said, could be a useful tool for glowing skin. The E, Solyova added, stands for Energy. “The energy relates to beauty, and it’s either stored in your head and not too much in the heart; or too much in the heart and not so much in the head,” she said. She recommended the use of “mudras” (a symbolic hand gesture used by Hindus and Buddhists in ceremony or to concentrate) that can help increase or channel the body’s energy. Acceptance was the meaning she gave the A, adding that some health problems related to lack of acceptance could

lead to complications in the digestive system or trouble sleeping. To solve those, meditation and inverted postures (when the head is below the heart) can be of help, according to Solyova. Many yoga postures feature inversion, but she chose to show LJWC members one that could be done from the very chair where they were seating, just shifting the upper body forward and letting the head hang between the knees. “Just close your eyes, imagine that you’re looking at a coin, and you turn it upside down,” she said. “And then, (the coin) is completely different. That’s an inversion, it’s the reverse, a look from a complete different point of view. If SEE WOMAN’S CLUB, B4

PEOPLE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD

Meet shoreline observer, retired Navy Lt. Commander Richard Smith BY MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN Editor’s Note: Welcome to La Jolla Light’s “People in Your Neighborhood” series, which shines a spotlight on notable locals we all wish we knew more about! Light staff is out on the town talking to familiar, friendly faces to bring you their stories. If you know someone you’d like us to profile, send the lead via e-mail to editor@lajollalight.com or call us at (858) 875-5950.

R

etired U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Richard Smith has observed the changes along La Jolla’s shoreline for the past 60 years. In his frequent coast walks, he notices when a rock detaches or a cliff collapses and he documents it with pictures.

MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN

Retired Navy Lt. Commander Richard Smith at his home on Camino de la Costa

Where are you from?

“I was born in Saint Louis, Missouri. My

mother had tuberculosis before there were drugs to treat it, back then you just went to a better climate. So when I was 6, we moved to Phoenix, Arizona and lived there for four years. But my mother couldn’t handle the air conditioning, so we moved to Coronado where we had been spending our summers. About that time, my parents got divorced. My mother was from New Jersey, and she moved back there. We children spent the school years with our mother and the summers with our father. And the first time that happened, while we were back East for school, my father, who was a banker, was transferred to the La Jolla branch, so that next summer (1952) we came out to La Jolla. I continued to spend summers here until I graduated from the Naval Academy in 1962. I was stationed out of San Diego, my younger siblings were still at home and my SEE RICHARD SMITH, B5


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PAGE B2 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE B3

Getting an ‘A’ in Uber

I

La Jolla Cultural Partners

recently saw an article on MSN about how you can find out what rating Uber drivers have given you. There wasn’t any doubt in my mind that it would be a perfect 5. I only get A’s. I do not do B+. I am also an Uber driver’s dream: I’m standing out front when they arrive, regardless of the weather. I chat it up with them, am insanely cheerful, always give THEM a 5 and never fail to write a message of praise for their Ubering skills in the comments section. So I was stunned — and stunned is actually way too mild a word — to discover that my rating from drivers was 4.89. WHAAAAAT????? I’d love to get my hands on that driver (or drivers) who gave me less than a perfect score. I even gave a 5 to the driver who blasted Christmas music in my ear at 120 decibels AND the one who took me 10 miles out of my way. I demand an explanation! But the app doesn’t provide explanations. Just an average score. Seriously, this is haunting me. I take Uber a lot. My driving parameters definitely narrowed after a serious auto accident several years ago, and I also don’t like to drive at night. Personally, I think Uber (and Lyft) are the best ideas of the new millennium. Unlike taxis who aren’t inclined to show up for short

hauls, Uber is relentlessly reliable. Over the years, I’ve given many elderly women rides home from the supermarket after the cab that the store manager has called for them failed to show up. Normally these women would never have gotten into a car with someone they didn’t know, but by the time they’ve been sitting on a folding chair for two hours watching their groceries thaw, stranger murder doesn’t sound too bad. But now there’s Uber. My whole outlook on aging has changed knowing I will not have to be a supermarket folding chair lady. And Uber has so many applications! I love to tell the story of my son and daughter-in-law going to a dinner party in L.A. and forgetting the chocolate soufflé that my daughter-in-law, a fabulous cook, had promised to bring for dessert. My son thought he’d end up missing the whole party while he drove back home in L.A. Friday night traffic to retrieve it. But in an inspired moment, he sent an Uber car to his home where the babysitter handed off the soufflé to the driver who delivered it to the dinner party. (For the record, the soufflé gave the driver five stars.) So now I’m second guessing myself. Am I TOO chatty? Should I be sitting in the front seat? Usually I automatically climb in the

Personally, I think Uber (and Lyft) are the best ideas of the new millennium. back except for one time this past December when my uber-friendly woman Uber driver with the heavy Southern accent patted the front seat as I got in and said, “Come sit up here with me, honey!” Learning that I was headed to a medical center for a scary test, she suddenly raised her head skyward (I was kind of wishing she’d keep her eyes on the road), and began a prayer for me that lasted pretty much the whole trip. “Lord Jesus, I am here with your servant Inga and I pray that in your infinite wisdom you will spare her!” (I figured I could use all the help I could get.) But then the prayer took an ominous turn: “But it’s all up to you, Lord, so if you should decide it’s Inga’s time to join you in heaven then —” WTF? “Wait!” I said. “Stop talking!” As far as I was concerned, we were good with amen-ing after the sparing part. And fortunately, I was indeed spared. (That driver got the War & Peace of good comments from me.) So why don’t I have a perfect 5? Could it be

about the tip? (Or lack thereof?) I confess I do tip sometimes but not always. Uber makes such a big deal about not needing to tip. And it really IS nice not to have to be carrying bills in tip denominations. (Like most people, I live by my debit card.) But maybe this was at least one driver’s way of expressing his unhappiness that I live in La Jolla and couldn’t cough up a tip, my sparkling personality notwithstanding. I’ve even tried to figure out the math of my 4.89. Was it just one driver who really just wished I’d shut up and gave me a 2? Or maybe a couple of mildly tip-disgruntled 4’s? But now that I know my score, I’ll be rigorously checking my rating after every ride. Goes down and that driver is toast. I have a reputation to maintain. — Inga’s lighthearted looks at life appear regularly in La Jolla Light. Reach her at inga47@san.rr.com

CRITIC’S CHOICE!

– DC Theatre Scene Emma Hunton and Heidi Blickenstaff in FREAKY FRIDAY; photo by Jim Carmody.

EXTENDED AGAIN!

COURTESY

NOW – March 19

– San Diego Union-Tribune

LaJollaPlayhouse.org

CHECK OUT WHAT’S HAPPENING TIDEPOOLING

February 26: 2:30–4:30 p.m.

Visit a local tide pool to learn how these amazing habitats and their inhabitants truly survive between a rock and a hard place. Sign up for a Tidepooling Adventure where our trained naturalists will show you how to tread lightly during your visit, identify hidden creatures, and help you discover the wonderful world of tide pools. Pre-purchase required.

Members: $13 Public: $16 Visit aquarium.ucsd.edu for tickets.

BAMBERG SYMPHONY

Christoph Eschenbach, conductor Ray Chen, violin Saturday, February 18 at 8 p.m. Jacobs Music Center - Copley Symphony Hall Tickets: $99, $75, $50, $30 Charismatic conductor Christoph Eschenbach leads the Bamberg Symphony in Beethoven’s evocative and powerful Symphony No. 3 and the Overture to Mozart’s Don Giovanni. Ray Chen, one of the most compelling young violinists today, joins the orchestra for Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G Minor.

(858) 459-3728 www.LJMS.org

WE’RE EXPANDING

The Museum of Contemporary Art’s La Jolla location is undergoing an extensive expansion and renovation project that will quadruple current gallery space, making room to show MCASD’s 4,700-piece collection of world-class contemporary art. During the closure, MCASD will continue to deliver high-quality exhibitions and programming at its Jacobs and Copley Buildings at MCASD Downtown, located at 1100 Kettner Blvd. Visit www.mcasd.org for more information about downtown exhibitions.

MCASD DOWNTOWN 1100 Kettner Blvd. 858 454 3541 www.mcasd.org

CHAMBER CONCERT

The Wednesday, March 8, performance of Trio Con Brio Copenhagen (Jens Elvekjaer, piano, Soo-Jin Hong, violin, and Soo-Kyung Hong, cello) with guest artists Ivo-Jan van der Werff, viola, and Timothy Pitts, double bass, will feature the Schubert “Trout” Quintet—Schubert at his most natural, unaffected and carefree.

Wednesday, March 8, 7:30pm TICKETS: $40 member $45 nonmember 858-454-5872 ljathenaeum.org/chamber-concert-series


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PAGE B4 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Yoga teacher Jaruska Solyova demonstrates a ‘mudra’ during her presentation at La Jolla Woman’s Club Tuesday, Feb. 7. FROM WOMAN’S CLUB, B1

La Jolla Woman’s Club members and luncheon attendees practice healthy stretches.

PHOTOS BY MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN

there’s a situation in life when you’re not happy, you can do this and then it goes out to the surface and it becomes very beautiful.” Through their monthly lunches, LJWC provides members with a place to meet and listen to educational and entertainment speakers who touch on issues related to the mission of the club, such as women’s health and women in the workplace. LJWC also offers a yoga program at their Irving Gill-designed hall at 7791 Draper Ave. ■ Want to join La Jolla Woman’s Club? The club house grounds are at 7791 Draper Ave. at Silverado Street. Membership is $75 per year. Find more details at lajollawomansclub.org or contact membership chair Debbie Williams at (858) 454-2354.

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE B5

Falstaff

FROM RICHARD SMITH, B1

GIUSEPPE VERDI

parents put up with me when I got off the ship. So I essentially lived in La Jolla, except a lot of that time I was deployed overseas. And then from 1971 to 1978, I was stationed in Hawaii. But then I came back for my final tour of duty before I retired in San Diego. We bought this house (on Camino de la Costa), and I’ve been here ever since.”

Y! A D R U T A S S N E P O

What have you been doing since retiring?

“When I retired in 1982, it was a hard time, coming out of the Carter years. You can’t live off your retirement, but I’d put aside enough money we could get by on and I didn’t want to take a job from somebody who really needed it. So I got active in community affairs for quite a while, spent a lot of time doing that. At one point I was vice-president of the La Jolla Town Council, and I was in the Bird Watchers, a community group that preceded the Bird Rock Community Council.”

What got you interested in volunteering?

“A sense of obligation ... somebody had to do this, and I wasn’t doing anything else. I certainly had a lot more time to devote to my community than others, so I did it.”

What projects were going on at that time? “A lot of coastal development permits, development issues.”

Are you a surfer?

“I tried surfing back when I was 13 or 14. The surfboard was an 8- or 9-foot board, and you took off from your knees. I didn’t have the balance to master kneeling (laughs), so I body surfed and skin dived. I was in the ocean every day, but never surfing.”

What has changed in La Jolla?

“The biggest change is that when we moved here, almost everybody who worked in La Jolla lived in La Jolla. My father was a bank branch manager, and his tellers lived here. But you didn’t need the level of income that you need nowadays (to live in La Jolla). I can remember in my early 20s, it was easy to find a place to rent in La Jolla for $100 a month, which with inflation would transfer to $1,000. But still, you don’t find that now in La Jolla. It was a different world. It was hard to see the Whaling Bar go ... but the environment that supported it doesn’t exist anymore. A lot of the local businessmen would go there to have a few drinks before they went home in La Jolla, and a lot of business was done there, too.”

How did you become interested in shoreline erosion?

“I was always interested in the sand and how it moved. Sometimes the north of WindanSea would have a lot, sometimes the south would. And the texture of the sand! Any La Jollan would tell you that The Shores’ sand is the worst sand in the world. It’s sticky, you can’t get it off ... but I noticed that once you get away from The Shores, which has very fine grains, it gets coarse, and The Cove used to be the coarsest. In 1982 to 1983 and 1984 to 1985, we had a lot of really heavy surf storms that took out the sand at The Shores, at Torrey Pines, and what they call Blacks Beach now, that was

MARÍA JOSÉ DURÁN

Richard Smith observes the cliffs off of Palomar Avenue in 2017. down to cobbles, and I had never seen it like that. I wondered if it would ever come back. Well, it hasn’t come back to what it was in the 1950s and ’60s in the summer. But the cliffs have changed radically. There is some erosion from the top down. Some of the problems are man-made or City-made by poorly designed or poorly maintained storm drain outlets.”

Do you have memories of your early years in La Jolla?

“I was a substitute lifeguard at La Valencia Hotel pool during high school for a couple of years. There was a lady who was the lifeguard, but they needed someone for the weekends. And then their insurance company probably told them they were better off with no lifeguard and a sign that read, ‘Swim at your own risk’ (laughs), because there is no lifeguard there now, and there hasn’t been for many years.”

Old, large, and lecherous, Sir John Falstaff can’t resist the ladies—but they can resist him, and have tons of fun at his expense— and you can have fun, too!

What are some of your routines?

“I used to jog to stay in shape, but in my late 60s, my ankles and knees started saying, ‘You need to do something else,’ so I started swimming. I’d go in down by Bird Rock and I’d swim around, and there are few places to come in, so once you start you have to go all the way until you finish. I did that until the water got down to 60 degrees. Then my back started giving me problems, and I got too old to do that. Now I just swim around WindanSea.”

How did you meet your wife?

“She’s lived in La Jolla since she was 6. We knew each other (back then), because her parents knew mine. She was at my house when I got the news that I had been accepted to the Naval Academy. But I was 18 at the time, and 18-year-olds don’t notice 12-year-old girls. (Years later), I was on leave back from Vietnam, and this friend of mine and I were walking on WindanSea, and she and her cousin where sitting up on the rocks at the Surf Shack, and he went over to say hello, introduced me, and that’s how we met. We started dating in 1967 and we got married in 1969. We have two kids, one is in Hong Kong now, he’s a surfer, and the other one works in television.”

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PAGE B6 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

The Kitchen Shrink’s Vegetarian Copycat Cobb Salad

Plant-based pastrami, anyone?

W

hen my Ottawan cousin recently visited San Diego for a few days of paradise and an escape from her Arctic winter peeked into my refrigerator, her jaw hung open. What happened to her carnivorous cuz, the charcuterie queen? Growing up on the East Coast, we practically sucked in cured, salted and smoked meats intravenesouly, everything from spicy pastrami, marbleized corned beef and pickled tongue to bratwursts and sausages of all manners. Instead, my clean, green fridge was now filled exclusively with organics, including plant-based meats and cheeses, probiotic pickled delights and meatless pates galore. Maybe some of these healthier vegan charcuterie (cured meats — i.e. cold cuts) offerings will convert a few fellow diehard carnivores too.

Mock meats

For those with delicate palates, tofu — also known as bean curd — has been a staple of Asian diets for centuries. These solid white blocks of compressed, coagulated soy curds come in soft, firm and extra firm textures, all having the chameleon qualities of adapting to an array of sweet or savory dishes with a fairly neutral flavor profile. Having a mother

lode of bone-boosting calcium, protein, blood-enriching iron and magnesium, tofu makes a healthy meat alternative whether blended in soups or sauces, tossed in stir-fries, salads, egg scrambles, lasagnas, or as a pan-fried patty chowed down burger style. Tempeh is an ancient Indonesian food made from fermented soybeans and shaped in a densely-packed wedge. A gustatory sponge, this vegan protein with a rich store of calcium, essential minerals and stress-busting Bs seamlessly absorbs flavors, making it an ideal add-in for stews, curries and sauces. Tempeh’s firm texture and zesty flavor lend well to meat and fowl substitutions in chopped and Cobb salads, grilled sandwiches and kebobs. For those who don’t do soy, seitan — nicknamed “wheat meat” — is comprised of gluten, the protein found in wheat and other grains that gives it a chewy heartiness. Reminiscent of luncheon meat in texture, taste and appearance, seitan does a good Reuben, pastrami or other deli fake out sandwich. Other popular knockoff meat products like Tofurkey and vegan bacon called “facon,” usually blend tofu and seitan with smoky flavors to closely imitate the real McCoy.

■ Ingredients (Serves 4): • 1 head Romaine lettuce (cut into strips) • 1 head watercress, torn into bite-size pieces • 16 ounces organic tempeh, cut in slices or wedges • 1/4 pound cooked vegan bacon, crumbled (or turkey bacon if you must) • 1 vine-ripened tomato, diced • 1 avocado, diced • 3 hard-boiled eggs, sliced • 1/2 red onion, diced • 1/4 pound cashew or other non-dairy cheese, crumbled • 1/4 cup vinaigrette dressing ■ The dressing: 1/4 cup vinegar (champagne, red wine or balsamic), 2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil, 2 teaspoons spicy mustard ■ Method: Blend vinegar with mustard. Whisk in oil and seasonings. Toss with the lettuces and cheese. Place the mixture on a large platter. Decorate with the remaining ingredients making mounds or strips across the greens. Finally, coconut jerky from young coconut meat produces a chewy, zippy carnivororous alternative, especially for those with gluten or soy sensitivities.

In a pickle

When assembling a vegan charcuterie board, expand your sour dill pickle horizons with other crunchy and colorfully fermented foods. Load up on a variety of toothsome probiotics like a heap of fermented cabbage. Fresh refrigerated sauerkraut trumps jarred or canned with a bigger bang of friendly flora. For an Asian riff, try spicy kimchi, a Korean

staple of the fermented crucifer, one of the highest probiotic sources on the planet; also rife with Vitamins A to amp up ocular health, stress-balancing B and antioxidant C. Or simply pick a peck of pickled peppers, green tomatoes, cauliflower florets and baby carrots to add an oomph of healthy eye candy to your table. Now, you can veg out on this recipe for a meatless Cobb salad, feeling indulged without the guilt. — For additional plant-based charcuterie recipes, e-mail kitchenshrink@san.rr.com

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The Non-Popping, Non-Cracking, Gentle Chiropractic Experience One of my personal favorite experiences in the office is to watch patients fight an illness and win, without getting sick. Here's how it works: The immune system including the lymph nodes drain the ear, nose throat, sinuses and head. This fluid has to flush down through the neck to work correctly. If there is a blockage to the flow, it backs up and stagnates. When the bones are twisted, and the muscles are spastic it blocks the lymphatic fluid that comprises a major part of the immune system. Restoring balance physically through the body literally clears a stuffy head. Personally, an adjustment makes me feel better, my body comes back online, and the self-healing power inside does the rest. Dr. Collan Koeppen, D.C., of Active Rest, knows what it’s like to have chronic pain. As a child, he suffered a sports injury that knocked his neck out of proper alignment. The ripple effects of this injury caused headaches, behavioral changes, back and leg pain, muscle spasms and more. Not realizing the underlying cause of these symptoms, he treated them with traditional medicine, without a resolution. It was 20 years before Dr. Koeppen found the true healing, an upper cervical adjustment. His chronic pain was relieved, and his mood, energy and performance dramatically improved. Dr. Koeppen now offers this same healing treatment to others. In a relaxing clinic, he specializes in upper cervical care, using a gentle manual adjustment to the vertebrae of the neck and spine without any cracking or popping. He treats patients of all ages, even infants. Dr. Koeppen also utilizes Active Release Techniques® (A.R.T.). A.R.T. is a soft tissue management system that breaks up scar tissue, knots, muscle tension, and nerve entrapment. Many things can lead to body imbalance: a sports injury, repetitive movements, long hours sitting at a desk, driving, a fall, an auto accident, and more. If you are experiencing symptoms or have suffered with them, visit Active Rest to discover how Dr. Koeppen can help you. Learn why Active Rest is voted “Best Chiropractor” in La Jolla. 858-736-4056 www.ActiveRestChiropractic.com We accept Personal Injury cases from motor vehicle accidents with no out of pocket

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‘The Illusion’ set to make mystic magic at North Coast Rep BY DIANA SAENGER The drama “The Illusion,” by Tony Kushner (adapted from Pierre Corneille’s “L’illusion Comique”) will take North Coast Repertory Theatre (NCRT) audiences on an extraordinary journey. NCRT Artistic Director David Ellenstein said he first experienced Kushner’s work when he played an actor in the production years ago at the Arizona Theatre Company. “Kushner actually wrote this before he wrote ‘Angels in America,’ ” Ellenstein said. “It was one of his breakout plays that didn’t have the notoriety ‘Angels in America’ had. But it was successful and played in theaters all over during the early 1990s. Because it’s very unique (and a somewhat complicated play to do), it’s not often done, so people have somewhat forgotten about it.” The plot surrounds a father who is not doing well and so goes looking for the son he hasn’t seen in 15 years after a falling out divides them. When he can’t find his son, as a last resort he sets out to find a magician. The magician conjures up three illusions of his son. Each illusion is a little different. “In essence, the audience is seeing three different plays in one play,” Ellenstein explained. “That was a challenge to stage because if you do it full on — like we are doing — you have each illusion stylistically different with a completely different feel to it. It’s a demand on the North Coast Rep staff, and we rarely put on such a work from the technical design standpoint. It’s almost like doing four plays — one in the cave and then the three illusions. Our scenic designer,

COURTESY

NCRT calls the production ‘a wildly inventive tour de force, which celebrates the magic and illusory nature of theatre.’

Director David Ellenstein works with Andrew Ableson and Christina L. Flynn for Tony Kushner’s ‘The Illusion’ at the North Coast Repertory Theatre, as other cast members look on.

Marty Burnett, has done it again in turning the stage into a big magician’s cave. It’s more than he thought it was going to be, but he’s always up for the challenge and really enjoys what he does.” Performing a production of this caliber required a seasoned cast which NCRT found in Andrew Ableson, Kandis Chappell, Christina L. Flynn, John Greenleaf, John Herzog, Michael Polak, Sharon Reitkerk and Paul Turbiak. “I needed actors who could handle not

only the heightened language but also had the stature and groundedness ... to go not only deep, but also handle the frivolous. I sought experienced actors who would not be scared-off by the demands of this play,” Ellenstein said. “When I was thinking about casting Kandis Chappell, I did my research and found out I was not the first to choose the magician be female. She’s great and does what we like to do in the theater — reach people’s hearts and souls and make them experience things in a more open way.”

AARON RUMLEY

Ellenstein said audiences will surely appreciate the production’s dramatic, comedic, romantic and passionate moments, along with the themes of betrayal, reconciliation and, of course, the sword fighting. ■ IF YOU GO: “The Illusion” is on stage Feb. 22-March 19 at North Coast Repertory Theatre, 987 Lomas Santa Fe Drive, Solana Beach. Tickets from $46. (858) 481-1055. northcoastrep.org

Pay Tribute to a Loved One

OBITUARIES

Your loved one spent a lifetime making an impact in the community. Let us help you honor their memory and share their accomplishments by creating a lasting tribute.

Life Tributes James Peter Gravendyk August 16, 1951 – July 1, 2015

James Peter Gravendyk passed away peacefully at home in La Jolla, California, surrounded by loved ones on June 23, 2015. Jim was born to John and Dorothea Gravendyk on May 10, 1922. Upon the death of his father in 1935, Jim at age 14 was forced to pack up his mother, brother and sisters and with a special drivers license in hand, drove the family from Grand Rapids to Los Angeles in an aging Model A Ford. During WWII Jim, with his younger brother by his side, crisscrossed the Pacific in the service of the U.S. Merchant Marines. After the war Jim joined the Southern California Aircraft Industry. He and Joyce married and had two children, their son John, and later, daughter Jan. Jim and Joyce led an active social life from their home in Manhattan Beach, California. He was known for his wonderful sense of humor and love of family. They spent many happy times snow skiing, boating, bicycle riding, scuba diving and various equestrian pursuits involving the family horses. Upon retirement as a Chief Engineer from Northrop Aerospace Company, Jim

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Abigail Haskell Redfern August 16, 1951 – July 1, 2015

LA JOLLA – Abigail “Gail” Redfern died peacefully at home surrounded by family after a lengthy illness. She was an intelligent, generous and good humored La Jollan who will be deeply missed. With a ready smile, Gail always brought a positive outlook and made all feel welcome in her home. She believed in the power of education to counteract ignorance and bigotry and quietly supported causes to this effect. Gail was born in Tucson, Arizona, to Bess and Fletcher Haskell. She graduated from Tucson High School in 1950. Gail obtained both BA and MA degrees in education at Stanford University. She met her husband-to-be, John Redfern, on a summer vacation in La Jolla and they married in 1954. She taught at the Bishop’s School, but later dedicated herself to raising her three

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(aka “Gravy”) relocated to Cambria, California, where he and his second wife, Marjanna, launched many travel adventures in their motorhome. After Marjanna’s passing, Jim continued to live in his beautiful Cambria “home in the pines” and rode his bicyd Jan Crr Stevens and Scarlett Wilke. He was preceded in death by his wives, Joyce Arcelia Gravendyk and Marjanna Freeman; sisters, Florence and Dorothy; brother, John; and granddaughter, Hillary. and Scarlett Wilke. He was preceded in death by his wives, Joyce Arcelia Please sign the guest book online at www.legacy.com/ obituaries/lajollalight.

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children. She maintained an interest in the arts, particularly the opera and Spanish literature Gail is survived by her children, Donald, Tamlin and Charles; and grandchildren, Grace, Gabrielle, Chloe, Avery, Alma and Karl. An account has been established in her memory at La Jolla Public Library: Please sign the guest book online at www. legacy.com/obituaries/ lajollalight.

Everlasting memories of loved ones

Alan David Sapwith August 16, 1951 – July 1, 2015

Alan David Sapowith was born on February 20, 1925, and passed away on May 20, 2015. He was born in Delaware, the son of Reba and Harry Sapowith. But for short stints in the Air Force and a family business, Alan’s career spanned over 30 years in the aerospace industry. A graduate of West Point with a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University, he managed multi-disciplined R & D programs in a number of fields ranging from nuclear weapons effects to stealth, contributing papers and creative designs in many of them. He had a passion for tennis, skiing, bridge and politics and in his younger years white water canoeing. He will be missed and remembered for his satire and wit, his

great sense of humor, his strong moral values and his dazzling smile. Alan is survived by his loving wife, Carolyn Blumenthal; one son, Mark; three daughters, Andrea, Amy and Lisa; two stepchildren, Robin and Bill; four grandsons, Heath, Taylor, Brett and Mathew; two granddaughters, Emma and Annelies; one great-grandson, Rainen; and two greatgranddaughters, Layla and Lauren. A memorial to celebrate his life was held on May 29, 2015, at 11:30 AM at Congregation Beth Israel, 9001 Towne Center Drive, San Diego, CA. Please sign the guest book online at www. legacy.com/obituaries/ lajollalight.

Moylan Feild “Tony” Garth August 16, 1951 – July 1, 2015

LA JOLLA – Lifelong La Jolla resident, Moylan Feild Garth (known as “Tony”), passed away unexpectedly from illness May 23, 2015, at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, CA. Growing up in La Jolla Shores he spent his youth attending The Gillespie School, Scripps Elementary (now The Children’s School), San Miguel’s (now Bishop’s), and graduating from La Jolla High School class of ’66. He went on and graduated from the University of California Santa Barbara and became a successful stock broker for Dean Witter before deciding to fulfill a passion for the Law. He went to the Thomas Jefferson School of Law where he was Editor in Chief of the Law Review and graduated Magna Cum Laude and became a member of the bar in 1990. After working in the public defender’s office and for several top firms he started his own practice becoming a top criminal defense attorney. He believed in the law and everything it stood for. He represented clients from all walks of life and all circumstances and stood tall believing that everyone deserved a proper defense. Jerry Streichler, retired Dean of the College of Technology

at Bowling Green State University (BGSU), Bowling Green, Ohio, passed away peacefully on July 2, 2015, in his home in La Jolla. Born on December 8,1929, on the Lower East Side of New York, he grew up during the Depression, then moved to New Jersey during his teen years, moving later to Ohio and then retiring in California. From these humble beginnings, he became one of the leading university educators of his generation. His early career as a mechanical designer in Montclair, New Jersey, was interrupted when his Air National Guard unit was called up for duty during the Korean War. He served at Turner Air Force Base in Georgia, Godman Air Force Base at Fort Knox in Kentucky, and the Air-

Judith Miller George August 16, 1951 – July 1, 2015

Skip was born in Aberdeen, South Dakota, on January 4, 1929. He passed away on June 12, 2015, from pulmonary fibrosis. His parents were Vivian Foncanon Ward and Alonzo L. Ward Jr. Skip served two years in the U.S. Army from 1951 to 1953 and was a graduate of the School of Hotel Admin. at Cornell University in 1955. He went on to have a career in the hotel industry including 15 years with Hilton hotels, as well as held management positions with Radisson hotels and the Hospitality

Management Company. In retirement, Skip was an active golfing member of the La Jolla Country Club and past president of the Super Seniors Golf Group, at LJCC. He volunteered at Mercy Hospital, Scripps Clinic and delivered Meals on Wheels for 10 years. Skip was preceded in death by his parents and sister Sarah. He donated his body to UCSD Medical Research. Please sign the guest book online at www. legacy.com/obituaries/ lajollalight.

Judith Miller George August 16, 1951 – July 1, 2015

Judith Miller George, 80, died peacefully on May 25, 2015, at home in La Jolla, CA, surrounded by her family and supported by her many friends. Judith was born on February 1, 1935, in Cincinnati, Ohio, to Arthur A. and Eleanor (Fletcher) Miller. She grew up primarily in Chicago, Illinois, and was graduated from the Convent of the Sacred Heart in Chicago in 1952. After high school, Judith attended the University of Colorado at Boulder, where she earned a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science in 1956. She was interested in art history and architecture and was a member of the Tri Delta Sorority. After graduation from college, Judith worked for the Skidmore, Owens & Merrill architectural firm in Chicago and eventually WBBM television. In 1962, she married Clark Brower George in Las Vegas and after several years in Greenwich, CT, and Antigua, West Indies, the family settled in La Jolla, CA. Over the ensuing decades, Judith reared her children, became an accomplished tennis player, explored yoga, completed a half-marathon, nurtured her friendships and travelled to six of the seven continents. She also worked in the financial services industry as an associate at Loeb Rhodes, Inc., which, after many mergers and name changes

over the course of her career, eventually became Wells Fargo Advisors. Judith remained keenly interested in the Arts throughout her life and she was active in the Asian Arts Council of San Diego and the Garden Club of La Jolla. Judith was an intelligent, curious, and optimistic person who lived with grace and dignity. Judith is survived by her three children, Lisa Hukari of Mill Valley, CA, Jeffrey George of Safety Harbor, FL, and Susan George of Phoenix, AZ. She is also survived by her four grandchildren, Kallie and Jackson Hukari of Mill Valley, CA, and Devon and Hayden George of Safety Harbor, FL; and her daughter-in-law, Heather Peshak George of Safety Harbor, FL. She was preceded in death by her parents and her husband, Clark Brower George. Please sign the guest book online at www. legacy.com/obituaries/ lajollalight.

Your loved ones obituary will be published in the Del Mar Times, Solana Beach Sun, and Carmel Valley News and will also appear on the National Obituary website, Legacy.com. Your loved ones family and friends can sign a guestbook online, include pictures, videos, order flowers or make donations to their favorite charity.

To place a Life Tribute call Monica Williams at 858-218-7237 or email inmemory@mainstreetmedia.com

Call Monica Williams at 858-218-7228 or email, Monica at inmemory@mainstreetmedia.com


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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE B9

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PAGE B10 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

PHOTOS BY MAURICE HEWITT

Bonnie Jones and Suzanne Thorpe, aka TECHNE, lead a workshop in which participants make musical instruments out of circuit boards and then play them — in the dark, super-activated by flashlights — in a Flashlight Orchestra. Jones is an award-winning, Baltimore-based composer and improviser; Thorpe, a much-recorded musician/composer, is a Ph.D. candidate at UCSD. TECHNE teaches tech-driven art-making and musical improvisation to women and girls nationwide.

MARGARET NOBLE

Ashley Davies and Jake Wylie, two of the High Tech High School seniors show their work at the festival, posing with their project, ‘Interference’ — ‘an interactive decision-making media piece in which people for a moment step into the shoes of the President.’

First AMT Fest kicks off art and science collaborations LET’S REVIEW BY LONNIE BURSTEIN HEWITT The weekend of Feb. 2-4, an ambitious undertaking took place, the brainchild of three local organizations: one art-centered, one scientific and one academic. The first Art/Music/Technology (AMT) Festival was a creative collaboration between San Diego Art Institute (SDAI), the Fleet Science Center in

Balboa Park and Southwestern College in Chula Vista, and included a mix of high-tech demos, panels and performances by experimental artists, musicians, scientists and students. The festival opened Thursday evening with electronic music and video under the Fleet’s state-of-the-art IMAX dome and went on to a Friday full of presentations and hands-on workshops combining art and technology at SDAI. On the last day, at

Southwestern, the focus was on trends in visual and sonic media, including work created by twelfth-grade students at High Tech High School in Point Loma, under the leadership of their teacher, sonic/kinetic artist Margaret Noble. In and around all this, there was plenty of time for networking at breakfasts, lunches and after-parties. In an interview before the festival, SDAI executive director Ginger Shulick Porcella said she and Southwestern College art

professor Perry Vasquez wanted to stage an event to raise awareness of the world-class work in art, music and technology being done in the San Diego area. “We felt there should be more collaborations between art and science, and a strong representation of women, since most high-tech events are overwhelmingly male-dominated,” Porcella said. “So we had community discussions with artists, scientists, musicians and programmers from

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The Collaboration Continues

Jeff Kaiser at play in the TECHNE workshop. Kaiser, a musician and ‘music technologist’ himself, was part of a panel on Data Visualization and Sonifaction the following day.

Before presenting his synthesizer modules under the IMAX dome, Tom Erbe, a synthesizer designer/sound engineer who teaches computer music at UCSD, poses with his instrument case. Pointing to one of the stickers on it, he said: ‘The Pannikin in La Jolla — this is where I get most of my inspiration!’

both sides of the border, asking what they thought we should highlight.” Fleet Science Center CEO Steven Snyder was someone Porcella wanted to collaborate with, ever since he started the popular “Two Scientists Walk into a Bar” program in 2014, offering opportunities for everyday folk to interact with scientists in casual, pub settings. The result of this three-way collaboration was a three-day event that was part conference and part showcase of tech-driven music and art. Many of the presenters were MFAs and Ph.D.s from UC San Diego, some

now living and working far away. “It went incredibly well for a first-year program,” Porcella said, after the festival. “We had about 75 attendees, and the presenters and audiences all were happy. Everyone, myself included, really loved the hands-on workshops, so we’ll have more of them next year. We’re welcoming people of all ages and backgrounds, we’re keeping prices low, and I’m confident that, as the program grows, we'll get more attendees.” Next year, they said they are planning to partner with San Diego Opera and the University of San Diego.

■ A Scientist and an Artist Walk Into a Bar: On March 9, Fleet Center will again partner with San Diego Art Institute to include artists in their popular ‘Two Scientists’ mix. They invite the public to ask them anything at selected pubs around the county and post the happenings on social media. Most of the participants will be part of SDAI’s upcoming exhibition ‘Extra-Ordinary Collusion: Art & Science Collaboration.’ More details at rhfleet.org/events/two-scientists-walk-bar

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PAGE B12 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

SOCIAL LIFE

www.lajollalight.com

Playhouse Gala sends ‘Come From Away’ to Broadway

L

a Jolla Playhouse’s 2017 annual gala, “Come From Away,” was held at the Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Feb. 4. The event honored La Jolla Playhouse Artistic Director Christopher Ashley’s 10 years at the helm and provided a one-night-only, last chance to see the Playhouse-born “Come From Away” before it heads to Broadway.

Howard and Barbara Milstein, Susan and Ron Heller

Mayor Kevin Faulconer and Katherine Faulconer, Christopher Ashley, event co-chairs Lynelle and William Lynch and Vivien and Jeffrey Ressler

David Hein and Irene Sankoff (‘Come From Away’ co-creators), Marsha Berkson, Jack Berkman, Emily and Daniel Einhorn

Jeanne Herberger, Reena Horowitz, Molli Wagner (seated) , Jeanne Jones, Don Breitenberg, Mike Thrift

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Steve and Lynne Wheeler, Tom and Jane Fetter, Nina and Bob Doede

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE B13

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PAGE B14 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Timken Museum of Art presents ‘Witness to War.’

Four Art Displays ■ Opening Feb. 17, “Sum of the Parts,” a curated selection of artists working in collage, and “17 Collages from the Athenaeum’s Permanent Collection,” will be on view through March 25 at Athenaeum Music & Arts Library, 1008 Wall St. The opening reception is 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17. Free. (858) 454-5872. ljathenaeum.org

Two collage exhibits are on view at Athenaeum Music & Arts Library starting Feb. 17.

■ Timken Museum of Art presents “Witness to War,” an extensive collection of more than 100 etchings and lithographs, cataloguing the brutality and fatal consequences of war in a stark, confrontational and unflinching manner, on view through May 28, 1500 El Prado in Balboa Park, San Diego.Exhibit features the works of Jacques Callot, Francisco Goya and George Bellows, documenting the Thirty Years War, Napoleonic War and First World War. See it during museum hours 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; noon to 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Free. (619) 239-5548. timkenmuseum.org ■ The title of Donald Martiny’s second solo exhibition,

Work by Donald Martiny “Pittura A Macchia,” refers to the disparagement of Italian Renaissance Master Titian’s late career works as “patchy pictures” or pittura a macchia. His interpretations of this concept will be on view through April 2, with an opening reception 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 at Madison Gallery, 1055 Wall St. Free. (858) 459-0836. madisongalleries.com ■ Celebrating 45 years of wildlife carving and art, the California Open Wildlife Art Festival runs 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 18-19 at Liberty Station, 2875 Dewey St., Point Loma with more than 100 carvers from the United States, Canada, Europe and Japan and premier wildlife painters and photographers from throughout California. Free. pswa.net

UCSD Concerts ■ Camera Lucida — a San Diego-based, chamber-music collaboration between various musicians — presents a concert of three composers 7:30 p.m. Feb. 20. Program

SPONSORED COLUMNS STEPHEN PFEIFFER, PH.D. Clinical Psychologist 858.784.1960

Shedding Light on the Age of Endarkenment In January of 2017, over a thousand psychologists convened at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology’s annual conference to discuss the recent uptick in the public’s rejection of scientific data, especially regarding man-made climate change, vaccine safety, and even Darwin’s 150-year-old theory of evolution. Despite the years, decades, and even centuries of research and data and the almost universal scientific backing, so many people are denying the validity of scientific discovery at rates so extreme that the psychologists have termed this the “Anti-

Enlightenment Era.” Psychologists are only beginning to study this phenomenon that leads otherwise intelligent people to reject data that is specifically data-driven or scientific in origin and predates the recent presidential campaign and election. Psychologists want to know why people are resisting science, although it is recognized that fear and anxiety are factors that lead people to react emotionally rather than rationally. The new administration, which boasts high-ranking members who have openly rejected scientific data, can’t be solely to blame. Under the previous administration, which was known to heavily weigh and promote scientific data, public skepticism of science reached the same kind of fervor that led Galileo to publicly recant his findings, which had confirmed the earlier theories of Copernicus that the earth revolved around the sun. It seems preposterous to us now that Galileo was tried by the Inquisition for heresy and forced to renounce his scientific findings since science has helped us to chart the solar system and beyond, unequivocally

validating Galileo’s 17th century findings. But that may be central to how we view this question of whether we’re in a post-fact, antienlightenment era. For one thing, people will hold to what they believe is true even in the face of evidence that proves those beliefs to be wrong. They pick and choose facts that reinforce their place in the group with which they identify. Dan Kahan calls this cultural cognition, a protective mechanism that comes into play and which gives people an emotional predisposition to reject a claim that, if they accepted it, would drive a wedge between them and their group of peers. The current problem is twofold: people don’t want their beliefs challenged and will actively seek out sources—reputable or not—that confirm their beliefs. The second problem is the recent proliferation of lies as part of mainstream culture, so mainstream, in fact, that we have a sitting president who was elected despite masses of provable evidence that he regularly lies. He has even employed the term throughout his career, created by his ghostwriter—“truthful hyperbole,”

which sounds awfully close to the phrase “alternative facts.” Lies play tricks on the brain, because when processing a lie, the brain must first accept what it hears as true, or possible, before being able to refute it. But that’s where the problem lies, so to speak: refuting the lie is a choice, and one that can be easily disrupted. Some people want to believe the lie if the truth disrupts the familiarity and comfort of their worldview. There is another problem with lies and the human brain: the brain isn’t well equipped to process lie after lie, especially one that gets repeated in the force and frequency of a machine-gun barrage. The brain can grow weary and give up processing the lie from the fact, accepting the lie as true in what’s known as illusory truth. Hence the effectiveness of fake news. Column continued at http://www.lajollalight.com/ourcolumns/sponsored-columnists/ sd-shedding-light-on-age-ofendarkenment-20170206-story.html

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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE B15

2017 California Open Wildlife Art Festival features works by carvers, wildlife painters and photographers. includes Schumann’s “Fantasy Pieces for Cello and Piano, Opus 73,” Mozart’s “String Quartet in D major, K. 575, ‘King of Prussia,’ ” and Elgar’s “Piano Quintet in A minor, Opus 84.” Conrad Prebys Concert Hall, UC San Diego campus, 9500 Gilman Drive, off Russell Lane. Tickets: $33, with discounts available. (858) 534-8497. sdcamlu.org or music.ucsd.edu/concerts ■ Recently dubbed as “the young American string quartet of the moment,” the Dover Quartet performs 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17 at Conrad Prebys Concert Hall, UCSD campus, 9500 Gilman Drive. With special guest Avi Avital, Dover Quarter’s program includes Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Chaconne in D Minor (for solo mandolin),” David Bruce’s “Cymbeline (for string quartet and mandolin),” Bedrich Smetana’s “Quartet No. 1, ‘From My Life,’ ” and Sulkhan Tsintsadze’s “Six Miniatures (for string quartet and mandolin).” Tickets from $40. (858) 534-8497. boxoffice.ucsd.edu ■ Featuring two classics and one world premiere, red fish blue fish (comprised of a rotating set of current graduate

Camera Lucida

Dover Quartet

students) performs 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22 at Conrad Prebys Music Center Experimental Theater, UCSD campus, 9500 Gilman Drive. Program includes “Percussion Suite” by Johanna Beyer (1933), “A song of grecis” by Justin Murphy-Mancini (world premiere), “Persephassa” by Iannis Xenakis (1969). Tickets $15.50, discounts available. (858) 534-3448. musicweb.ucsd.edu/concerts

Pass the Opera Glasses ■ San Diego Opera season continues with four performances of “Falstaff.” An international cast of opera stars brings the story of Shakespeare’s belovedladies man Sir John Falstaff (from his plays “The Merry Wives of Windsor” and “Henry IV”) to life in Giuseppe Verdi’s final opera and second comedy. Performances 7 p.m. Feb. 18, 21 and 24 and also 2 p.m. Feb. 26. Tickets $47. San Diego Civic Theatre, 1100 Third Ave., downtown San Diego. (619) 533-7000. sdopera.org

RELIGION & spirituality

Music History Study ■ Exploring “600 years of music in 60 minutes,” Chris Burns will present a music appreciation class, 1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17 at La Jolla Community Center, 6811 La Jolla Blvd. Includes pre-Medieval Europe, Renaissance, Baroque and Classical through Beethoven, and soundtracks from the movies. Registration required: $12 members, $15 non-members. (858) 459-0831. ljcommunitycenter.org

Soroptimist Luncheon ■ The annual Soroptimist International of La Jolla luncheon and awards ceremony “Dream, Believe, Achieve” will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, with location given upon registration. The women’s empowerment group will award the Live Your Dream and Dream It Be It awards and present a keynote speaker, Karen Flammer, co-founder of Sally Ride Science education company. $76. soroptimistlj.org

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PAGE B16 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Emma Hunton and Heidi Blickenstaff

PHOTOS BY JIM CARMODY

David Jennings, Heidi Blickenstaff, Jake Heston Miller and Emma Hunton in La Jolla Playhouse’s production of Disney’s ‘Freaky Friday,’ running through March 19 in the Mandell Weiss Theatre.

‘Freaky Friday’ is terrific fun at La Jolla Playhouse

BY DIANA SAENGER The 1976 comedy film version of “Freaky Friday” was nominated for three Golden Globes — for Best Actresses Jodie Foster and Barbara Harris, and Best Original Song. All the music, humor, fantasy and family film elements that made it a favorite are captured onstage in La Jolla Playhouse’s production of Disney’s “Freaky Friday,” book by Bridget Carpenter, music and lyrics by Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey, and directed by Christopher Ashley. Ashley’s casting was perfect. Heidi Blickenstaff portrays Katherine, mother of daughter Ellie (Emma Hunton) and son Fletcher (Jake Heston Miller). Katherine is about to marry Mike (David Jennings), and the kids are not very

actually engage her in conversation. Likewise, Ellie is now speaking and thinking like her mom, which is a problem when she is around friends and making plans. The young Jake Heston Miller does a good job as son happy about it. and brother Fletcher and trying to figure out what’s going on. While Katherine and Ellie are having a discussion about The production has captured all the magic of Mary Rodgers’ family members and recent events, an hourglass being held original novel, and the wonderful singing talents of the cast between them magically switches their personalities. Katherine provide laughs and great entertainment for the entire family. is now feeling and thinking like Ellie, and vice-versa. For Katherine, this is an overwhelming incident at one of ■ IF YOU GO: “Freaky Friday” is on stage through March the most important times in her life. Yet Blickenstaff brings 19, in the Mandell Weiss Theatre at La Jolla Playhouse, 2910 laugh after laugh to her character when people — especially La Jolla Village Drive on the UC San Diego campus. Tickets Ellie’s friends and male admirer Adam (Chris Ramirez) — start at $20. (858) 550-1010. lajollaplayhouse.org

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PAGE B18 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

COURTESY

‘This was our wedding day. The two people on the right of us are Diane and Jerry Rothenberg, who were our witnesses at City Hall in New York where we were married. I believe it was Dec. 1961. David was better at remembering dates than I am.’ — Eleanor Antin

Diane and Jerome Rothenberg at the Getty memorial

MAURICE HEWITT

David Antin’s Words Live On

Hundreds pay tribute to local poet at The Getty Center BY LONNIE BURSTEIN HEWITT avid Antin, poet, art critic, performance artist and one of the founding professors of UC San Diego’s Department of Visual Arts, died October 2016 at age 84. In his honor, his son, Blaise, established the David Antin Endowed Prize for Excellence in Visual Arts at UCSD. Another great tribute took place at the Getty Center in Los Angeles on Feb. 4, when hundreds gathered for a memorial honoring Antin with what he was known and loved for — a torrent of words. Born and raised in Brooklyn, Antin made a home here in what is now Carmel Valley, but traveled widely, performing the improvised “talk poems” he later turned into written works. His New York Times obituary ended with a quote from one of his books, “Talking at the Boundaries” that reads “if robert lowell is a poet then i don’t want to be a poet if robert frost was a poet I don’t want to be a poet if socrates was a poet i’ll consider it.” The Getty Research Institute hosted the memorial, since Antin had been a scholar-in-residence there, and they owned his archives. They screened old photos, played one of the tape-recorded poems, and 30 former students and colleagues stood up to share their memories — about 3-5 minutes each — a definite challenge for the gifted, articulate folks who were his friends. They rose to the challenge, and his wife of 55 years, performance artist/filmmaker/writer Eleanor Antin, didn’t have to stop them with the cowbell she’d brought along. Among the words spoken: Enthusiastic. Inspiring. Compassionate. Generous. Gracious. Insightful. Eloquent. Original. Clashing intelligence. A bracing, provocative voice. Tremendous humor and brio. A phenomenon. “Talking with David always made you feel you were on the verge of an epiphany,” one said. “His mind was magic,” noted another. His oldest friend, poet Jerome Rothenberg, offered a poem: “Can it be fair to write a love song to a friend? ... And does the poem exist when there is no one there to hear it?... Here is the death we feared/Infinite space to every side ... O my friends, there is no friend.” Artists Debby and Larry Kline called for audience participation in “Cacophony,” asking everyone to read out loud, and at the same time, a poem of Antin’s folded inside their programs. Each piece was different, and the blend of voices created a grand orchestration of his work. At the end, there was family: grandson Zachary and his father, Blaise, sharing personal anecdotes, and Eleanor

D

David Antin, 1973 concluding with Antin’s poem “History,” a catalog of deaths, wrecks and disappearances. In an interview earlier, Eleanor had talked about their life together: The two New Yorkers — he from Brooklyn, she from the Bronx — first met at New York’s City College. They shared immigrant-parent backgrounds, February birthdays (he an Aquarius, she a Pisces) and an abiding love for art and each other. “He was a philosopher-poet, not only brilliant, but anecdotal and amusing,” she said. “He’d think of something that interested him, talk about it, move around it like he was lost in a forest, but he always found his way out. Then he’d turn the tape recordings of his talks into a literary art form.” He was an athlete, too, she said, going from high school football to running and weightlifting. Diagnosed with

COURTESY FRED LONIDIER

Parkinson’s disease 10 years ago, Antin gradually stopped doing performances, but he went on writing and working out until his very last days. His personal trainer summed things up at the memorial, “He gave his all, until there was nothing left in the tank.” This month, Eleanor will be in New York, reading from her latest book, “An Artist’s Life, by Eleanora Antinova,” a memoir of the former Ballets Russes star she created as a video alter ego decades ago. She will also be at the opening of “100 BOOTS: The LOST Picture Show,” an exhibit of photos from her famed 1970s postcard narrative that never fit into the original exhibitions. “I’ll survive,” Eleanor said, on her husband’s birthday, two days before the Getty memorial. “David helped make me tough, but ‘missing’ is too mild a word for the situation.”


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LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE B19

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100 - LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-002008 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. T1 Properties Located at: 8650 #214 927724 Genesee Ave., San Diego, CA 92192, San Diego County. Mailing Address: Po Box 927724, San Diego, CA 92192. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Theresa Gondolfo, 8650 #214 927724 Genesee Ave., San Diego, CA 92192. b.Andrew Bobb, 8650 #214 927724 Genesee Ave., San Diego, CA 92192. This business is conducted by: Joint Venture. The first day of business was 10/16/1998. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/23/2017. Theresa Gondolfo. LJ2310. Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-000007 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. SeaMakers & Co., LLC. Located at: 7660 Fay Avenue, Suite J, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 7660 Fay Avenue, Suite J, La Jolla, CA 92037. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Mary Beltrante, 7575 Eads Avenue, Unit 305, La Jolla, CA 92037, California. b. Marc Beltrante, 7575 Eads Avenue, Unit 305, La Jolla, CA 92037, California. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. The first day of business was 11/12/2016. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/03/2017. Mary Beltrante, President. LJ2306. Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 9, 16, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-001841 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Asian Egg Bank Located at: 4910 Directors Place, suite 320, San Diego, CA 92121, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 4910 Directors Place, suite 320, San Diego, CA 92121. Registered Owners Name(s): a. California Fertility Experts, Inc., 4910 Directors Place, suite 320, San Diego, CA 92121, California. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. The first day of business was 09/10/2016. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/20/2017. Peter Fuzesi. LJ2313. Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-003380 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. A.D.L.S. LLC. b. A.D.L.S. Lightning Fast Located at: 5847 Gullstrand Street, San Diego, CA 92122, San Diego

San Diego, CA 92122, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. American Database Labeling Systems, LLC., 5847 Gullstrand Street, San Diego, CA 92122, California. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. The first day of business was 05/23/2016. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 02/06/2017. Greggory P. Carpenter, Managing Member. LJ2321. Feb. 9, 16, 23, Mar. 2, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-001529 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Neal Esterly Yacht Sales, Inc. Located at: 4990 N. Harbor Dr., suite 201, San Diego, CA 92106, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 3635 Dupont St., San Diego, CA 92106. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Neal Esterly Yacht Sales, Inc., 3635 Dupont St., San Diego, CA 92106, California. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. The first day of business was 01/25/1980. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/18/2017. Neal R. Esterly, President. LJ2307. Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-002644 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Mandarin Wok Located at: 4227 Balboa Ave., San Diego, CA 92117, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 4227 Balboa Ave., San Diego, CA 92117. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Mandarin Wok, Inc., 4227 Balboa Ave., San Diego, CA 92117, California. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. The first day of business was 06/1/1997. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/30/2017. Joanne Yin Han Lee, President. LJ2314. Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-001366 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. San Diego Therapy Located at: 7752 Fay Ave., #B, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Lily Kotila, 3969 Charles Street, La Mesa, CA 92037. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business was 07/15/2016. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/17/2017. Lily Kotila. LJ2305. Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 9, 16, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-001918 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Victoria M Steele Located at: 2192 Via Don Benito, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Victoria Pearce, 2192 Via Don Benito, La Jolla, CA 92037. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business has not yet started . This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/23/2017. Victoria Pearce. LJ2308. Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-003521 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Namenyi’s Restoration Located at: 11780 AlpsWay, Escondido, CA 92026, San Diego County. Mailing Address: Same. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Gabor Namenyi, 11780 Alps Way, Escondido, CA 92026. This business is conducted by: an Individual. Jan 1, 2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 02/07/2017. Gabor Namenyi. LJ 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9/17

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-002766 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Soble Dance Movement Located at: 13255 Luckett Court, San Diego, CA 92130, San Diego County. Mailing Address: PO Box 2570, Del Mar, CA 92014 Registered Owners Name(s): a. Jessica Soble, 13255 Luckett Court, San Diego, CA 92130. b. Jacob Soble, 13255 Luckett Court, San Diego, CA 92130. This business is conducted by: a General Partnership. The first day of business was 01/01/2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/30/2017. Jessica Soble. LJ2317. Feb. 9, 16, 23, Mar. 2, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-002836 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Tecolote Realty b. Tecolote Real Estate Located at: 7752 Fay Ave. #3, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 5580 La Jolla Blvd., #70, La Jolla, CA 92037. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Michael Scrivener, 1863 Caminito Quintero, La Jolla, CA 92037. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business was 01/31/2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/31/2017. Michael Scrivener. LJ2319. Feb. 9, 16, 23, Mar. 2, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-003329 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Bella Jolla LLC Located at: 1250 Prospect St #B20, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 1250 Prospect St #B20 La Jolla, CA 92037 Registered Owners Name(s): a. Bella Jolla LLC, 1250 Prospect St #B20 La Jolla, CA 92037, California. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. The first day of business was 02/03/2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 02/03/2017. Hafedh Chaabane, Member. LJ 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9/2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-001696 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Inner Core Capital Locatedat:4275ExecutiveSquare#200, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 4275 Executive Square, suite 200, La Jolla, CA 92037. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Robert Wilken, 7428 Rowena St., San Diego, CA 92119. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business was 06/01/2016. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/19/2017. Robert Wilken. LJ2316. Feb. 9, 16, 23, Mar. 2, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2107-002604 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Delta Tax Relief and Preparation d del

reparation Located at: 2667 Camino del Rio S., #201, San Diego, CA 92108, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Global Business Investment, Inc., 2667 Camino del Rio S., #201, San Diego, CA 92108, California. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. The first day of business was 06/06/2016. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/27/2017. Ismail Sam Shar, President. LJ2318. Feb. 9, 16, 23, Mar. 2, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-002800 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Green Gardens Fertility Acupuncture Located at: 7655 Girard Ave., suite 130, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 3619 3rd Ave, San Diego, CA 92103. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Emily R. Nichols, 3619 3rd Ave, San Diego, CA 92103. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business has not yet started . This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/31/2017. Emily R. Nichols. LJ2320. Feb. 9, 16, 23, Mar. 2, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-001918 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Love Like Harry Photography Located at: 2192 Via Don Benito, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 2192 Via Don Benito, La Jolla, CA 92037. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Victoria Pearce, 2192 Via Don Benito, La Jolla, CA 92037. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business was 01/01/2013. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/23/2017. Victoria Pearce. LJ2309. Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-000769 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Scott Free Services Located at: 1241 Prospect St., #5, La Jolla, Ca 92037, San Diego County. Mailing Address: 1241 Prospect St., #5, La Jolla, CA 92037. Registered Owners Name(s): a. John Scott, 1241 Prospect St., #5, La Jolla, CA 92037. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business was 01/10/2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/10/2017. John Scott. LJ2311. Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2017

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PAGE B20 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-001731 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Cognitive Balance Center Locatedat: 7734HerschelAvenueSuite D, La Jolla, CA 92037, San Diego County. Mailing Address: PO Box 86346 San Diego, CA 92138. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Kimberly Lauro, 3733 La Cresta Drive, San Diego, CA 92107. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business has not yet started . This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/20/2017. Kimberly Lauro. LJ 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9/17 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-003474 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Char-Coco Located at: 4395 Cartagena Drive, San Diego, CA 92115, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Amerisoto LLC, 4395 Cartagena

a. Amerisoto LLC, 4395 Cartagena Drive, San Diego, CA 92115, California. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. The first day of business was 02/06/2017. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 02/06/2017. Alejandro Soto, CEO. LJ 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9/2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 2017-001538 Fictitious Business Name(s): a. Keyclone Technologies Located at: 6725 Mesa Ridge Rd., Ste. 100, San Diego, CA 92121, San Diego County. Registered Owners Name(s): a. Jun Yang, 9505 Gold Coast Dr., #124, San Diego, CA 92126. This business is conducted by: an Individual. The first day of business was 10/01/2016. This statement was filed with Ernest J. Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder / County Clerk of San Diego County on 01/18/2017. Jun Yang. LJ2315. Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, 2017

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www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE B21

Your Community. Your News.

Some of the self-published books by Jeffrey Crimmel

COURTESY PHOTOS

Former La Jollan publishes series of mystery novels

Online Daily. Print weekly. lajollalight.com

BY KAREN BRAINARD Jeffrey Crimmel said he has traveled the world and lived in many places, but it was a chapter of his life when he unexpectedly found himself staying in Ramona after a medical emergency, that led to his mystery series. Crimmel grew up in La Jolla and went to La Jolla Elementary School and graduated from La Jolla High School in the Class of 1963. “The whole series that I started back in 2012, began in Ramona,” he said. The 71-year-old is temporarily living in Ramona and preparing to publish his fourth mystery book. As he explained, he and his wife, Suzanne, were living in San Felipe, Mexico, when his leg started swelling. They traveled to El Centro, California to see a doctor Jeffrey Crimmel who discovered Crimmel had a blood clot in his leg. When medical staff informed him that he would be transported to Sharp Memorial Hospital in San Diego, Crimmel told his wife to go to Ramona where their niece lives because the community was one they had visited many times over the years. During his stay in the hospital, he had an tough experience. The medication he received caused a brain bleed, he said, describing it as a clot on the back of his skull that put pressure on his neck. But it also reportedly gave him the temporary ability to be aware of things before they happened.

Crimmel said for a day-and-a-half, he knew what the nurses were going to say before they said it. Lying in the hospital, Crimmel said he started thinking, “How can I turn this into a story?” He had been writing non-fiction but thought he could work this into a mystery — one where the character kept the ability to foresee things. That led to his first mystery, “Brain Bleed.” That was followed by the sequels “Ian’s Revenge” and “Nab Yoga.” “They’re interesting stories; they’re fun,” Crimmel said, adding that he takes his characters to various countries including Italy, France and Peru — places he knows from his travels. He said he spent nine years going around the world in the 1970s and that was the focus of his book “Living Beneath the Radar.” “I got into Afghanistan before the Russians were there,” he said, likening it to being in a medieval country. Crimmel said he later felt the calling to become a teacher and at age 40, earned a teaching credential. He taught Special Education and retired after 25 years. For him, writing has been a passion and he now has eight books published. “It’s called an addiction, I think, at this point,” he joked. An “indie writer,” Crimmel self-publishes his books, which are available on Amazon, and expects to release “The Hemp Papers,” another mystery, soon. Crimmel said he and Suzanne plan to eventually move to Portland, Oregon where his daughter lives.


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PAGE B22 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

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2017. Students selected from various San Diego high schools were invited to represent their schools by performing a scene or

• Single level living residence

monologue for a panel of judges and their peers. Robert Mackey and

• Ocean and sunset

Isha Raj-Silverman from La Jolla High School made it to the finals!

• Overlooking 3 fairways

— Pearl Preis

• Dual zoned heat & air conditioning • Distressed hardwood flooring • Skylights • New dual pane windows • Cathedral ceilings

Offered at $2,695,000

Cher Conner CAL BRE#00604382

858-551-7292

5950 AVENIDA CHAMNEZ La Jolla, California An architectural classic home of the late architect Loch Crane. Loch was a student of Frank Lloyd Wright (1940). The home features a hexagon form with five levels which offers a concept of spaciousness and freedom with many Japanese accents. Offered at $2,750,000

Represented by STEVE BREAULT 619-987-1414 San Diego Equities CalBRE# 00696695


www.lajollalight.com

LA JOLLA LIGHT - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - PAGE B23

Unparalleled Modern Stunner In The Village

JUST REDUCED

Elegance abounds in this bright and spacious "02%7 <!," '*-,02 81!-"%-7 '"%$(- ?!,'"%17 private pool, sumptuous master retreat, separate guest house and more. Enjoy ocean 3.%%9%- <"!>% %1,%.,4!1!1# 01 %;/41-!)% &%'?-6 +02/>%,% 3*-!1%--5"02%<0.? !1 0$8'%5>!3.4.: -*!,%-6 =1,%.,4!1 $42!>: 41& $.!%1&- !1 2*>,!/>% >!)!1# -/4'%-7 &!1!1# .002 41& 0/%1 ?!,'"%16 A must-see! 7 BD | 7 BA (+4 half) | 6,900 sqft. $4,295,000 - $4,495,000

THE BRETT DICKINSON TEAM 858.822.9699 brett.dickinson@sothebysrealty.com CalBRE# 01767484

Brett Dickinson and Deborah Greenspan of are pleased to announce their presentation of

TIMELESS MODERNISM 326E08I K022F/18F D? &?OCO$-C(A&A

602.. 3H4GHF/EF D? !(!C-A)C&--& @9*55C,">N"=7<=:7<5%*@J79*BM5JC><L

,*@<9B%C'9**=7;B=:7<5%*@J79*BM5JC><L

4BM602# A?$&$)!)

4BM602# A?$++-$)

OPEN HOUSES More open house listings at lajollalight.com/homes

$895,000 3BD / 2.5BA

2044 CAMINITO CIRCULO SUR,LA JOLLA SAT 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. GINA HIXSON & ELAINE ROBBS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES 858-405-9100

$971,000 3BD / 3BA

9605 CLAIBORNE SQUARE, LA JOLLA SUN 11 A.M. - 2 P.M. MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES 858-551-6630

$1,195,000 3BD / 2BA

5801 SOLEDAD MOUNTAIN ROAD, LA JOLLA SAT 12 P.M. - 4 P.M., SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. TEAM CHODOROW, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES 858-456-6850

$1,395,000 4BD / 3BA

2354 PINE STREET, LA JOLLA ELIZABETH COURTIER, WILLIS ALLEN

SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 619-813-6686

$1,650,000-$1,725,000 7901 AVENIDA KIRJAH, LA JOLLA 3BD / 3.5BA AMY SIMON, COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL

SAT 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 619-851-4084

$1,650,000-$1,725,000 7901 AVENIDA KIRJAH, LA JOLLA 3BD / 3.5BA BARBARA LEINENWEBER, COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL

SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 619-981-0002

$1,950,000 3BD / 2.5BA

SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-945-7314

5422 LINDA ROSA, LA JOLLA SERAFINI BUETTNER GROUP, COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL

$1,975,000-$2,075,000 7667 HILLSIDE DRIVE, LA JOLLA 3BD / 3.5BA DORIS DAY DIRKS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 619-813-9503

$1,995,000-$2,125,876 5788 LA JOLLA CORONA DRIVE, LA JOLLA SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 4BD / 3.5BA MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES 858-551-6630 $2,350,000 3BD / 3.5BA

201 COAST BLVD, LA JOLLA ROXY LAMBERT, COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL

SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-735-3109

$2,495,000 4BD / 3BA

8001 PASEO DEL OCASO, LA JOLLA YVONNE OBERLE, WILLIS ALLEN R.E.

$2,895,000 6BD / 5.5BA

6638 AVENIDA DE LAS PESCAS, LA JOLLA JOHN DUVAL, OWNER

$2,995,000 3BD / 3BA

7945 SAINT LOUIS TERRACE, LA JOLLA SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES 858-551-6630

$3,195,000 5BD / 4.5BA

7695 HILLSIDE DRIVE, LA JOLLA SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES 858-551-6630

$3,200,000 3BD / 2BA

842 MUIRLANDS DRIVE, LA JOLLA MOIRA TAPIA, WILLIS ALLEN R.E.

$3,395,000 5BD / 5.5BA

1768 EL PASO REAL, LA JOLLA TIM HINES, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

$3,475,000 5BD / 5.5BA

6645 AVENIDA DE LAS PESCAS, LA JOLLA SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. AMBER ANDERSON, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 619-840-3400

$3,880,000 4BD / 6BA

1395 PARK ROW, LA JOLLA SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES 858-551-6630

SAT 1 P.M. - 4 P.M., SUN 1:30 P.M. - 4:30 P.M. 619-316-3188 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-459-1700

SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-337-7269 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 619-316-2604

$3,999,000-$4,530,000 1222 MUIRLANDS VISTA WAY, LA JOLLA SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 4BD / 5.5BA AMBER ANDERSON, PACIFIC SOTHEBY'S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 619-840-3400 $4,499,000-$4,699,000 2641 COSTEBELLE DR, LA JOLLA SAT 12 P.M. - 3 P.M., SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 5BD / 7BA SCOTT RYAN, COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL 858-349-8272

858-859-2037

Huge price reduction! $3,195,000 Open Sunday 2-4 pm.

Chad Perkins | Cameron Volker | Sherry Shriver CAL BRE # 01941279 | CAL BRE # 00909738 | CAL BRE# 00804683

La Jolla Office : 858-926-3060 1111 Prospect Street | La Jolla, California | 92037

PacificSothebysRealty.com ©MMVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. CA DRE#01767484

$4,585,000 5BD / 7.5BA

1918 VIA CASA ALTA, LA JOLLA SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES 858-551-6630

$5,300,000 5BD / 6BA

7315 REMLEY PL, LA JOLLA VONNIE MELLON, WILLIS ALLEN R.E.

$5,340,000 4BD / 5.5BA

6309 HARTLEY DRIVE, LA JOLLA SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. MAXINE & MARTI GELLENS, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES 858-551-6630

$5,495,000 4BD / 4.5BA

6303 CAMINO DE LA COSTA, LA JOLLA TEAM CHODOROW, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES

SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-395-0153

SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-456-6850

For the most up-to-date list of open houses, mapped locations, and *premium listings with photos, visit lajollalight.com/open-houses-list/ Contact Sarah Minihane • sarahm@lajollalight.com • 858.875.5945


www.lajollalight.com

PAGE B24 - FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - LA JOLLA LIGHT

Peggy Chodorow

Eric Chodorow

Open Sunday 1-4 • 5801 Soledad Mountain Road • $1,195,000 Saturday and Sunday 1-4 • 6303 Camino de la Costa • $5,495,000 E D C I PR UCE D RE

OPEN SAT & SUN 1-4 • 6303 CAMINO DE LA COSTA

STEPS TO THE OCEAN Situated on La Jolla’s street of dreams-Camino de la Costa- with a sweeping panoramic view of the ocean and sunsets, this beautifully appointed two story home has an ineffable charm and is just steps to the ocean. Offered at $5,495,000

E D C I PR UCE D RE

PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP

A rare find in La Jolla-a four bedroom three bath single level home with distant ocean views which has been lovingly remodeled and maintained. There is a rose garden, spa with waterfall, gazebo, and a huge trex type deck where you could entertain approximately 100 guests. Offered at $1,999,000 7780 Girard Avenue, La Jolla, CA BRE #00992609 | BRE #00409245 ©2016 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. CalBRE 01317331


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