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Volume 2, Issue 51

Community

Another tournament victory for Encinitas Juniors. A6

Lifestyle

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Protests held against two trustees

BY KAREN BILLING Teachers, parents and community members put on a small protest before the San Dieguito Union High School District board meeting on July 14, calling out trustees Mo Muir and John Salazar for voting against the budget for the next school year. Bob Croft, San Dieguito Faculty Association president, led the “informational, peaceful, lawful picketing” on the sidewalk in front of the district office on Encinitas Boulevard. Posters read that Salazar and Muir fail to understand critical district issues, voted against fiscal solvency and have “undermined and driven out” key district leadership. “It is dangerous, irresponsible leadership,” Croft said. “We’re concerned that their actions are harmful to the district, and it’s about time they are exposed to the greater community.” With an election upcoming, Croft said it is even more imperative to inform the community about Muir’s and Salazar’s actions. He said many voters are not connected to the schools and often vote by their political party’s recommendations. Two seats will be up for grabs in November — SDUHSD Board President Beth Hergesheimer’s and Vice President Joyce Dalessandro’s — and Croft said if Muir and Salazar get an ally on the board and no votes become SEE PROTESTS, A14

■ See page A10 for photos of the 2016 Don Diego Scholarship Foundation Gala.

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KAREN BILLING

Protesters outside of the San Dieguito Union School District office on July 14.

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Aviva Paley, middle, chats with two other young social innovators at the ROI Global Summit last month in Israel. Paley, who lives in Encinitas, was selected for the summit because of her work with the Kitchens for Good organization.

Encinitas woman returns from global innovators summit Paley’s organization uses kitchen to do good for the community BY CHRIS SAUR viva Paley, a 25-year-old Encinitas resident, got the opportunity of a lifetime last month when she traveled to Jerusalem to meet and interface with 150 young Jewish innovators from around the globe. And Paley’s name wasn’t just picked out of a hat for the ROI Global Summit, held June 26-30, she was selected for her extraordinary work with Kitchens for Good, a profitable catering service that uses those profits to provide job training and careers for hard-to-employ people as well as funding other social programs. Paley, now the organization’s Director of Programs after working with founder Chuck Samuelson from its inception in 2014, also was honored recently when the University of California announced its Global Food Initiative 30 Under 30 Awards on June 14.

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“It was a really fantastic recognition of leaders in the areas of food and agriculture trying to make a difference in our food system,” Paley said of the award. “It’s provided a lot of great press and notoriety to the cause I’ve been working on, so in that way it’s been really great.” Being picked for the ROI Summit, however, was more than just an honor, it was a great learning experience and one that will continue to be beneficial as Paley is now part of the ROI Community, an initiative of the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation. “They call it ROI, which is return on investment, so they are really investing in each of our individual leaderships to make the world a better place through all of our various projects and causes,” explained the Baltimore native who moved to Encinitas three years ago and originally SEE SUMMIT, A14

Encinitas citizens, city council talk Rail Trail at meeting BY CHRIS SAUR Although the July 20 meeting of the Encinitas City Council was scheduled as a quick hitter — simply a vote directing staff to fix a clerical error in the documents related to the Housing Element question that will be put to voters in the November election — public comment allowed four members of the No Rail Trail citizens group to have some harsh words for the council.

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Meanwhile, after public comment and the procedural vote, Deputy Mayor Lisa Shaffer gave a report on the July 15 meeting of the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) Transportation Committee, during which the Coastal Rail Trail and the controversial segment, which runs through Cardiff-by-the-Sea, were discussed. SANDAG has been trying to work with the city

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to get a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) passed as its attempts to build the portion of the 44-mile Rail Trail that would run along the railroad tracks near Highway 101 between Chesterfield and G Street. In May 2015, the council originally selected an alignment on the east side of the tracks, closer to San Elijo Ave, but community feedback and the SEE TRAIL, A14

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PAGE A2 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

SDUHSD $62 million Apuzzo fills vacancy on bond sale a success Planning Commission Projects to be funded by bonds include new peforming arts center

BY KAREN BILLING San Dieguito Union High School District completed the sale of $62 million in general obligation bonds on June 28, the third issuance of the $449 Prop AA approved by voters in 2012. “It is by every measure the most successful sale of all three general obligation bond series,” said Interim Superintendent Eric Dill at the July 14 board meeting. “Thanks to historically low interest rates and also the financial market flux related to the Brexit vote, there was quite a lot of demand for these bonds.” The bonds kept the same structure as the previous two series, with a term limit of 25 years and no capital appreciation bonds were sold as per board policy. The terms will stay within the estimated tax rate of $25 per $100,000 of assessed value. The district has now issued a total of $339 million of the voter-authorized $449 million. Dill said as they look at projects to be funded by “series C” bonds, the focus is on academics and long-overdue projects. In the north-end, two middle schools will

get some attention with new science classrooms at Oak Crest and Diegueno. “Rooms will be refurbished and modernized to bring them on par with classrooms at Pacific Trails and what you’re going to see at Earl Warren,” Dill said. “We’ll have some consistently great science classrooms throughout the district.” With this issuance of bonds, the district has also set aside funds for a second classroom building at Pacific Trails. The district is having the building designed now and is set to get it approved by the Division of State Architects so when the district sees the development happening out in the Pacific Highlands Ranch area, it will be ready to go and meet the needs for future students. Dill said perhaps the biggest project funded by this round of bonds is the long-awaited performing arts center at Torrey Pines High School — replacing the black box Torrey Pines has had for 42 years. Construction on the new performing arts center is expected to begin in winter 2017. On July 14, the San Diego Taxpayer’s Educational Foundation released its 2016 School District Transparency Scorecard, which rates how well districts provide information to taxpayers on school bond fund spending and oversight. SDUHSD and its independent citizens oversight committee received a perfect 100 percent score.

At its July 13 meeting, the Encinitas City Council heard from several candidates and eventually chose Al Apuzzo to replace Ruben Flores on the Planning Commission. Flores, who was in attendance, stepped down from the Planning Al Apuzzo Commission without controversy, citing a busy schedule with his new job. Apuzzo, 43, is a commercial real estate broker who has lived in New Encinitas since 2011, and been a city resident since 2006. He earned his master’s degree in real estate

from San Diego State in 2002 and now works as a principal at Lee & Associates. “I believe that my years of experience in the private sector can provide practical and valuable planning insight focused on eliciting quality and promoting thoughtful design, to protect and enhance the overall character of the existing communities of Encinitas,” Apuzzo told the Encinitas Advocate. Apuzzo and his wife, Sarah, have three children, Forest, 7, Parker, 5, and Hazel, who is almost 2 years old. It’s his first official foray into public service, but Apuzzo has “extensive volunteer experience with a variety of organizations.” His first meeting was July 21.

Opening Doors project looks to fight Encinitas homelessness BY BARBARA HENRY Encinitas will attempt to find housing for much of its homeless population through a $108,000, city-funded pilot project. When the Encinitas City Council approved the 2016-17 budget on June 22, money was designated for the Encinitas Opening Doors

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ENCINITAS ADVOCATE - JULY 22, 2016 - PAGE A3

Whale carcass completely removed from Encinitas beach The carcass of a deceased whale that washed up on Encinitas’ Grandview Beach over the weekend was completely removed by Monday morning. The carcass is suspected of being that of a whale given the name “Wally the Whale” by commenters online. An attempt to remove the carcass, which had been slowly drifting south from Los Angeles County for a few weeks, was made over the weekend, but the whale’s size (approximately 45 feet and 44,000 pounds), tidal conditions and equipment issues extended the process. Removal of the carcass was done by separating the carcass into four pieces before loading them into dumpsters to take them to the Miramar landfill in San Diego. The approach, which is supported by National Marine Fisheries officials, was the only feasible option as towing the carcass far out to sea would be nearly impossible after the beaching. “An Encinitas Lifeguard crew and a contract removal company recently completed the swift and safe removal of the whale carcass,” said Encinitas Fire

Sheriffs hoping public recognizes burglary suspect Investigators from the North Coastal Sheriff’s Station, along with San Diego County Crime Stoppers, are seeking assistance from the public to help identify and locate an unknown male suspect wanted in connection with a burglary. According to Crime Stoppers, on May 3, a couple living in the city of Encinitas, wrote and mailed the monthly rent check to its landlords. The following day, the victims were contacted by Bank of America inquiring about the check. The bank told the victims that an unknown man entered the bank, located at 1340 Encinitas

NELSON C. CEPEDA

The carcass of a whale that washed up over the weekend at Grandview Beach was completely removed by Monday. Department Acting Deputy Chief Jon Blumeyer. “In addition to removing the carcass, we’ll be ensuring the beach is clean and safe to be enjoyed by the community and visitors.” Residual odor may linger for a day or more after the completed cleanup until the tide fully flushes the area where the carcass was beached. -Submitted press release Boulevard in Encinitas, and cashed the check. The check was made out to Jose Antonio Quintero, who is not the landlord, for a different amount. The signature line of the check also appeared to be forged. The suspect is described as a Hispanic male, 5’10” tall and weighing approximately 215 lbs. He had a shaved head, mustache and goatee, and was last seen wearing a white T-shirt and unknown color pants. The surveillance video is available to download at https://goo.gl/tujCA6. Anyone with information on this case should call the North Coastal Sheriff’s Station at 760-966-3500 or the Crime Stoppers anonymous tip line at 888-580-8477. Crime Stoppers is offering up to a $1,000 reward to anyone with information that leads to an arrest in this case. Anonymous email and text messages can be sent in via www.sdcrimestoppers.org.

Public help wanted to identify veterinary clinic burglars San Diego County Crime Stoppers and investigators from the North Coastal Sheriff’s Station are asking for the public’s help to identify and locate two men wanted in connection with a March 21 burglary at a veterinary clinic in Encinitas. The burglary occurred just after 5 a.m. at the Pacific Coast Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery in the 500 block of Saxony Place. Two men were seen on surveillance cameras breaking the glass door of the business and stealing two Apple computers. The alarm sounded during the burglary, causing one of the suspects to drop a machine used for analyzing blood. Loss and damage to the business is estimated at more than $34,000. Surveillance video of the burglary is very clear and detectives are hoping someone will recognize the suspects. To download video for broadcast, visit https://goo.gl/OBqanq. You can

also follow the Sheriff’s Department on Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/174690740. Suspect No. 1 is described as a white male, between 25 and 30 years of age, 5’11” tall and weighing approximately 195 pounds. He was last seen wearing dark clothing and a black beanie. Suspect No. 2 is described as a white male, between 23 and 28 years of age, 5’9” tall and weighing approximately 160 pounds. He appears unshaven. He was last seen wearing a black beanie, plaid jacket and dark-colored jeans. Anyone with information on this case is encouraged to call the North Coastal Sheriff’s Station at 760-966-3500 or the Crime Stoppers anonymous tip line at 888-580-8477. Crime Stoppers is offering up to a $1,000 reward to anyone with information that leads to an arrest in this case. Anonymous email and text messages can be sent in via www.sdcrimestoppers.org.


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PAGE A4 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

Another tournament victory for Encinitas Juniors Big bats lead ELL to Section 6 championship on July 13 BY CHRIS SAUR Coming into last week’s Little League Section 6 All-star tournament riding high as the District 31 champion, the Encinitas Juniors squad hit a bit of a speed bump in the July 9 opener. But after holding on to win that game, over D32 champ Coronado, the ELL express cruised all the way through the finish line, capturing the Section 6 title. The July 13 championship contest against Oceanside American saw the locals score 11 consecutive runs in innings 3-5, capped by Pete Gagne’s walk-off-three-run homer that triggered the mercy rule and gave Encinitas the crown. It was ELL’s seventh dinger in three Section 6 games at Hidden Valley Middle School in Escondido. “It was a generous field for us,” said Encinitas coach Bob Buscher. “The left-field fence wasn’t too deep and we took advantage of it.

COURTESY PHOTO

The Encinitas Juniors All-stars celebrate with the banner after winning the Section 6 championship, their second tournament title of the summer. “We played very well as a team in the last two games (an 11-4 semifinal win over Tierrasanta/Kearney Mesa on July 10 and the 11-1 title-contest victory). We got a bit of a wake-up call in the first game and I think it helped us.” In that opener, Wyley Sharp knocked in JP Kraus in the bottom of the first inning, but

Coronado came back with two runs in the top of the third. Kraus answered in the bottom of the frame, blasting a home run with Cooper Dulich on first base. Up 3-2 at the point, ELL added three more in the fifth as Nathan Lawman singled, E.Q. Workinger reached on an error and Sharp smashed one over the fence. But Coronado had a little more

Potter wins his division at junior golf Worlds Encinitas youngster Luke Potter, a rising golf star even before his 13th birthday, survived a three-way playoff on July 15 to take first place in the 11-12 boys division at the IMG Academy Junior World Championships. Playing at the Sycuan Resort Oak Glen golf course beginning July 12, Potter got off to a blistering start with a 6-under 66 in the opening round, then shot 73s each of the next two days to finish at 4-under 212. That 73 in the July 15 final round came

thanks to a clutch finish that saw Potter bounce back from a forgettable front nine. After bogeying four of the first nine holes, with no birdies in that stretch, the Encinitas 12-year-old birdied Nos. 14, 16 and 18 to force the playoff against Chanachon Chokprajakchat (from Thailand) and San Diego’s Ryan Plodkowski. Potter also impressed with his bogey-less first day that included a three-hole run of birdies on Nos. 13-15.

Toddler reunited with parents after being found at Encinitas park 2-year-old found wandering in Cottonwood Park A 2-year-old boy left behind during a preschool outing at an Encinitas park on July 15 was located wandering alone and then reunited with his parents a few hours later. The boy’s parents called authorities about 6 p.m. to report the toddler missing when he was not at his preschool for pickup, according to Sgt. Colin Ingraham of the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department. “The boy and his sibling were dropped off

at the preschool at 9 a.m.,” Ingraham said. “The preschool had a ‘park day’ activity (that day).” The child did not return to the preschool with the rest of the children due to “a mix up in the head count,” Ingraham said. The boy was located at Cottonwood Creek Park on North Vulcan Avenue. “No charges will be filed against the parents,” Ingraham added. “The preschool is not being named at this time because the investigation is ongoing.” The California Department of Social Services is working with law enforcement to investigate the presechool. – Press release

gas in its tank, plating three in the top of the seventh to cut the lead to 6-5. With two runner still on base, and the tying run in scoring position, Lawman calmly got the final out of the game. In the close victory, Kraus was 2-for-3, scoring three times and Sharp went 2-for-3 with four RBIs. The offense came early for ELL

in the semifinal matchup as Gagne’s three-run homer finished off a four-spot in the top of the first inning. After Tierrasante/Kearny Mesa — the District 33 titleist — closed the game to 5-3 in the second inning, the Encinitas power display persisted. Sharp brought home Kraus and Workinger with his three-run blast in the fourth, then Workinger matched that with a fifth-inning long ball that plated Kraus and Dulich. With Lawman and Nick Sando on the mound, ELL had more than enough runs to secure a spot in the championship contest, where it would take on Oceanside American, holders of the D70 crown. Lights-out pitching by Gagne (two innings, one run) and Sando (three innings, no runs) made it easy for Encinitas on that day, though nothing could slow the offensive train as Workinger hit a two-run homer and Sharp and Jobe Cubillian smacked back-to-back, two-run doubles before Gagne’s game-ender. ELL is already a couple of games into the next postseason event, the Subdivision III tournament in Rancho Cucamonga. The locals are hoping to play for another title on July 23.

Free water and fire-wise landscape workshop scheduled for July 30 Olivenhain Municipal Water District has teamed up with the Rancho Santa Fe Fire Protection to present a free water and fire-wise landscape education event on July 30 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. The event, at Rancho Santa Fe Fire Protection District’s Station 2, 16930 Four Gee Road, celebrates the station’s newly completed fire-wise and water-smart garden, which OMWD helped construct. The garden was installed by Blue Skies Landscape Maintenance. Due to the multiple years of drought conditions California has experienced, the local threat of wildfires this year is high. To help alleviate concerns and increase awareness of home fire protection, a brief presentation from landscape professionals and the fire district’s urban forester will begin at 9:30 a.m. Topics to be discussed include landscape zones and hydration, plant selection and installation, and landscape maintenance, all designed to teach steps that will better prepare properties for fire as well as maximize water-use efficiency. The mini-workshop will be followed by a tour of the fire station and demonstration garden, and experts will be on hand to address questions or concerns. The demonstration garden is free and open to the public every day. “Defensible space around your home or business can save lives and property,” said Ed Sprague, president of OMWD’s board of directors, “and it is important that our customers learn and employ workable fire protection goals while also minimizing the amount of water required to do so. We want people to know that there are many drought proof plant options that can help protect your home from wildfires.”


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ENCINITAS ADVOCATE - JULY 22, 2016 - PAGE A5

WWII spy, survivor shares story at Rancho Santa Fe event BY KRISTINA HOUCK arthe Cohn was an unlikely World War II spy. At just 4 feet, 11 inches, Cohn was petite with blonde hair and blue eyes. She was also Jewish. With her fair features and flawless German language skills, however, she was able to convince Nazi officers she posed no threat. In fact, she successfully crossed into Germany with a mission to gather important information on April 11, 1945, two days before her 25th birthday. “Seeing the soldiers come and go, I became so terrified,” remembered Cohn. She was crouched in a forest with Georges Lemaire, the Swiss intelligence officer who accompanied her to the German-Swiss border. “I was absolutely paralyzed by fear and it took me a very long time to overcome that fear. But suddenly, something clicked in my brain.” Cohn thought about her previous 14 missions to infiltrate enemy territory. They were all unsuccessful. Those memories motivated Cohn. She stood up and walked to the road. “Heil Hitler,” she said, raising her right hand and greeting the soldier coming toward her. She presented him with her papers and he gave her permission to proceed. “I was now in Germany,” she said. Cohn had no compass, map, radio or weapons, only clothes without labels and German money and vouchers.

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“Everything I needed to know was in my memory,” she said with a smile. “I have a pretty good memory.” Now 96 years old, Cohn said she feels compelled to travel around the country to share her story with others. As part of the Benedek Lecture Series of Chabad Jewish Center of Rancho Santa Fe, the Rancho Palos Verdes resident recently shared her story at the Benedek residence in Rancho Santa Fe (see event photos at www.rsfreview.com). Although her experience took place decades ago, Cohn vividly recalled every detail during an interview with this newspaper just prior to the June 30 event. “It’s important that people know that Jews fought,” she said. “We were not just waiting to be arrested.” Cohn grew up miles from the German border when Hitler rose to power during World War II. She was born Marthe Hoffnung on April 13, 1920, in the French Lorraine city of Metz, just 36 miles from the German border. Cohn was the fifth of Fischel and Regine Hoffnung’s eight children — one of her siblings had died before she was born. Although her parents, both orthodox Jews, spoke only German, Cohn grew up bilingual. She spoke fluent French and German. During the war Cohn’s brothers joined the resistance. She and the rest of her family helped guide French Jews and other war refugees to safety. Although Cohn tried to join the

Gary Martin C a l B R E L i c ens e # 0 0 9 6 2 1 0 4

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Host Andrew Benedek, Dr. Major L. Cohn, guest speaker Marthe Cohn, Rabbi Levi Raskin resistance, too, she was repeatedly rebuffed. “They didn’t take me seriously,” she recalled. “They felt that I was a bimbo, so they never accepted me.” It was also difficult to join the military. When Paris was liberated in August 1944, Cohn immediately tried to join the French army. “It was extremely difficult because there were thousands of people who wanted to join,” she said. Without a birth certificate, Cohn could not prove her identity. She was finally

helped by the woman who would have become her mother-in-law. Madame Delaunay was respected by the resistance fighters as she had lost both her sons — including Cohn’s fiancé — and her husband during the war. “She vouched to the army that I was a decent person,” said Cohn, who joined the army as a nurse in November 1944. “So I was finally accepted.” Cohn later agreed to help with intelligence work during a chance meeting with a commanding officer who had been seeking German-speaking personnel. She said she felt a duty to serve her country because so many people sacrificed their lives during the war. “Many, many French non-Jews helped us tremendously at the risk of their lives and every member of their family,” said Cohn, pointing out that 75 percent of Jews in France survived. On June 17, 1942, Cohn’s younger sister, 20-year-old Stephanie, was arrested and later died in the Auschwitz concentration camp for protecting the identity of a farmer helping Jews and other refugees. Her fiancé, a medical student who worked for the French resistance, was captured and executed by the Germans in 1943. “So many French people had risked their lives to save us that it was absolutely normal to do our part,” Cohn said. Cohn posed as Marthe Ulrich, a German nurse who was traveling along the battle lines looking for her lost fiancé. Even though SEE SPY, A17

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PAGE A6 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

EVENT BRIEFS Dog Obedience training at Encinitas Community Park Encinitas Parks and Recreation will provide a pair of five-week group classes in dog obedience this summer at Encinitas Community Park, 425 Santa Fe Drive. The classes, which will be held outside of the dog park, just east of the skate park are scheduled for Saturdays, July 23 to Aug. 20, from 9 to 10 a.m. and Tuesdays, July 26 to Aug. 23, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The classes will be put on by Dog Sense Dog Training. To register online, visit www.encinitasparksandrec.com (search key word “dog”).

Bikes on Tap talks Coastal Rail Trail Bikes on Tap, a function through the Bike Coalition, is set for July 28 at The Confessional, a Lost Abbey tasting room at 2007 San Elijo Ave, Cardiff at 5:30 p.m. Each month, the bike-in happy hour features a brewery in a different San Diego County neighborhood and invites the community to learn about bike improvements in its own backyard. The July event will introduce and allow discussion on the planned Coastal Rail Trail.

Passport To France Celebrate French culture with San Diego’s finest French artists. Enjoy regional French cuisine, wine and beer, and artisan items in the Marketplace. With performances by Fern Street Circus, Dragon Knights Stilt Theatre, Encinitas Ballet, Can Can dancers, and dancing to the band Jessica Fichot. Plus, art, film and opportunity drawings. (Encinitas Friends of the Arts) Saturday, July 23, 6:30-9 p.m. Encinitas Community Center, 1140 Oakcrest Park Drive. $20, $25; $35. Tickets, or at the door. 760-298-1708.

Insect Festival This one-of-a-kind festival is sure to intrigue bug-devotees of all ages featuring thousands of fascinating creepy-crawlies, including live lizards, snakes and the famous Madagascar hissing cockroach. Saturday and Sunday, July 23 & 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. San Diego Botanic Garden, 230 Quail Gardens Drive. Free with paid admission or membership. Kids 12 and under free. 760-436-3036.

Families Make History: Summer Seascape Sculptures San Dieguito ancestors fished in the ocean and rivers and gathered shellfish and seaweed on the beach. During the month of July, create brightly colored seascape sculptures featuring marine life, seashells, and surfboards. Your imagination and personality will make them come to life. You’ll have oceans of fun! Every Saturday and Sunday, 12-4 p.m. San Dieguito Heritage Museum, 450 Quail

Holly with a new friend at a previous Insect Festival. Gardens Drive. Free. 760-632-9711.

Chamber Music Concert: Musical Melange

PHOTOS BY MCKENZIE IMAGES

Library, 540 Cornish Drive. Free. 760-753-7376.

Looking Back Lagoon tour

Six ensembles from the North Coast Symphony will perform, including a string quartet: Eine Kleine Nachtmusik by Mozart, a wind quintet: Spanish Encores arranged by Silvia Coricelli, London Trios by Haydn for two flutes and cello, and more. Saturday, July 23, 2:30 p.m. Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive. Free. 760-753-3003.

Coastal wetlands are naturally dynamic. So is our intertwined history with them. Learn more about ways both nature and humans have altered the landscape of the lagoon over time in this Conservancy naturalist-led tour. Sunday, July 24, 3-4:30 p.m. San Elijo Lagoon Nature Center, 2710 Manchester Avenue. Free.

Ovation Theater: The Music Man Sociable

Bollywood Dancing for Adults

Join Ovation Theatre (formerly North County School of the Arts) for excerpts from the upcoming production of The Music Man. With strolling barbershop quartets, old fashioned carnival games, Apple Pie Bakeoff, picnic dinners, performances and ice cream! Saturday, July 23, 6-8 p.m. Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive. Free, tickets for food/games available at the door. 760-487-8568.

A fusion of Indian and Western dance styles. The session will also provide a cardio workout. All levels are welcome. Bollywood Steps is an established Indian dance company with locations all over San Diego County. Payal Nanavati, Instructor. Sundays, July 24 and 31, 4-5 pm. Performing Arts Workshop, 1465 Encinitas Blvd, Suite A102. $60/month (4 classes). 215-327-8691.

Coastal Club at Temple Virtuosi Concert: Annelle Gregory, Solel music event violin, Alexander Come sing along on Tuesday, July 26: The Vidals will sing and play music. They are a Sinchuk, piano husband and wide duo - he plays keyboard,

trumpet and sings, and she is a talented vocalist. This experienced duo delights audiences with renditions of classics from the 1930s to the 1960s and are headliners at many dances around town. $5 and open to all. 11 a.m. at Temple Solel JFS Coastal Club, 3575 Manchester, Cardiff. Enjoy a hot, plated, kosher lunch at noon. $5. (Stuffed cabbage) call 858-637-7320 to reserve your spot. Also on July 26 at the JFS Coastal Club, Temple Solel: 10 a.m.: Feeling Fit with Danyll.

SRC Dance for the win Experience the fun of line dancing with easy instruction provided by Dance North County. Sunday, July 24, 2-3 p.m. Encinitas

Featuring two outstanding young artists, Annelle Gregory, violin, and Alexander Sinchuk, piano. They will perform works by Beethoven, Liszt, Prokofiev and Dousa. (Virtuosi USA). Sunday, July 24, 7:30 p.m. Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive. $30, $20 senior, student, military.858-207-6967.

La Paloma Theatre Now Showing: Love & Friendship, The Lobster, Rocky Horror Picture Show. Tickets: $10, $9 (cash only). 471 Coast Hwy. 101. Show Times 760-436-7469.

Luau and Legends The 23rd annual Luau and Legends of Surfing Invitational returns to the beach

Dylan and Molly at a previous Insect Festival. near Scripps Pier in La Jolla, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 21 to support cancer research and patient care at UC San Diego Health. A San Diego tradition, the Invitational brings together surfers, scientists and community members to compete in the contest to support the fight against cancer. The luau follows at 11:30 a.m. with live entertainment and a tropical buffet. The surf tournament is free for viewing, tickets to the luau are $200; sponsorships available. (858) 822-5630. auandlegendsofsurfing.org.

Del Mar Beer Fest is July 23 More than 100 local and international brews will be served at the Del Mar Beer Fest to be held Saturday, July 23 from noon- 6 p.m. at the Del Mar racetrack’s Seaside Concert Area. Del Mar’s racing season runs through Sept. 5. For more information, visit www.dmtc.com.

Birch Aquarium swims Birch Aquarium naturalists will lead swims with schooling leopard sharks, smoothhound sharks and guitarfish in La Jolla Shores, 8-10 a.m. July 30, Aug. 14, Aug. 27-28, Sept. 9, 11, and 18. See rays, flatfish and sand-dwelling invertebrates, too. Previous snorkeling experience preferred. Bring your own gear. Cost: $30. Ages 10 and older with adult. 2300 Expedition Way. RSVP: (858) 534-7336. aquarium.ucsd.edu Check out the city’s newsletter at http://bit.ly/29Otq0V for more information.

Visual Arts classes by Linda Luisi Thursdays, Aug. 4, 11, 18, 25, 10 a.m.-noon. Art Lounge on 101, 816 S Coast Hwy. $110. Linda Luisi: Acrylic Painting Class. Learn to paint with individual attention for all levels. Beginners welcome. Use brushstrokes and textures to have fun creating realistic and abstract art. Expand your observation skills to see like an artist. Transfer this skill to painting. Choose subjects provided, or bring photos from your travels. No prior experience needed. www.lindaluisi.com. Visit http://bit.ly/29OyGCQ or call 858-442-8666.


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ENCINITAS ADVOCATE - JULY 22, 2016 - PAGE A7

Retired local doctor helps foster youth get start in dentistry BY KRISTINA HOUCK ot long after Dr. Sherri Muchnick retired, she began looking for ways to give back to the community. That’s when the local resident learned about Just in Time for Foster Youth, a San Diego nonprofit that provides resources and support to young adults aging out of the foster care system. “I really loved the idea that these are transitioning foster youth,” said Muchnick, who worked as a marriage and family therapist, professor and consultant for 40 years before recently retiring. She continues to teach online courses at Capella University. “These are young people who have aged out of the system and are trying to get their lives started.” As a mother to two grown sons and a granddaughter, Muchnick knows first-hand just how much support young adults need to succeed. Often with little or no support, 40 to 50 percent of former foster youth become homeless within 18 months after emancipation, according to the Cities Counties Schools (CCS) Partnership, a collaborative effort of the California School Boards Association, California State Association of Counties and League of California Cities. In addition, only 1 to 3 percent of former foster youth go on to graduate from college, while 25 percent end up in prison within two years of emancipation, according to the CCS Partnership. “I know how much emotional support,

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financial support and the kind of connections it takes for young people to get started, become responsible adults and find their way in the world,” Muchnick said. “These youths don’t have that type of support.” Muchnick first held a fundraising party at her home in support of Just in Time’s “My First Home for the Holidays” campaign. With support from the community, Just in Time transforms empty apartments into warm homes filled with new and gently-used furnishings through its My First Home program. Muchnick’s November 2015 fundraiser raised $1,700 in cash and gift cards in one night. She also collected a garage full of in-kind donations. “The response was so overwhelming,” Muchnick said. “It didn’t take a whole lot of effort to do, it was just a fun thing to do. People were just so generous.” Not long after, Muchnick volunteered with Just in Time on a Saturday, helping former foster youth “shop” and select free household items for their new homes. “It was so much fun and so exciting,” she recalled. “It was amazing.” Today, Muchnick serves as a mentor to Lahana Velez through Just in Time’s Career Horizons program. She signed on for a 10-month commitment to serve as a career coach not long after the New Year. “We were paired with each other, and I think it’s a really good match,” Muchnick said. “I’ve had a wonderful time working with her and I think she’s an amazing young woman.”

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Lahana Velez and Dr. Sherri Muchnick Since signing up for the program, Muchnick has helped Velez further her career. After learning that the 23-year-old wanted to work as a dental assistant or dental hygienist, Muchnick contacted her dentist and asked if Velez could interview husband-and-wife team John Koett and Megan Olson. Instead, the Encinitas couple ended up interviewing Velez and today she works at Koett & Olson Dental three days a week. “It’s a very exciting beginning of her career path,” Muchnick said.

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Although Muchnick and Velez are only required to meet monthly to work on improving self-esteem, resume writing and interviewing skills, the pair often spend much more time together. Muchnick’s friends have also supported Velez. Known as “the aunties,” the local group of friends took Velez to the salon prior to her interview. They’ve also taught Velez how to cook, hooked up her computer and printer, and often schedule lunch dates. “They love her,” she said. “She’s so darling, you love her the minute you meet her.” Once homeless, today Velez currently studies at MiraCosta College, trains as a dental assistant and also works at a retail shop, in addition to her Just in Time commitments. “She’s learning a lot of things about herself,” Muchnick said. “It’s a big deal to have stability in her life. She’s done an amazing job.” Just in Time for Foster Youth is currently accepting volunteers for Career Horizons and other programs. To volunteer or donate, visit www.jitfosteryouth.org. “It takes a lot for a young person to get started, much more than people realize,” Muchnick said. “I’m a big believer that people have more strengths and more abilities than they realize,” she added. “If they can get some support and some direction, people do amazing things. So having the opportunity to work with young people and do that has been pretty amazing.”

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PAGE A8 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

C3, Carlsbad Causes for Community, Village Scavenger Hunt is July 29

La Jolla Cultural Partners

Carlsbad Causes for Community is holding its annual Village Scavenger Hunt July 29 at the Carlsbad Village Yoga Co-op. The event begins at 6 p.m. and runs until 8:30 p.m. Prizes will be awarded at 9 p.m. Proceeds from this fundraiser will be used to sustain C3 programs such as Senior Chair Yoga and the Holiday Food Drive. The Village Scavenger Hunt is a fun community event for all ages. “Teams perform a variety of fun and wacky quests throughout the village. There will also be some bar specific quests for ages 21 and over,” said Deb Ferraro, C3 founder. It’s a smartphone-based event in which the teams email photos of their quests to the judges during the hunt. The event kicks off at the Carlsbad Yoga Village Co-op with snacks, raffles, silent auction items and a cash donation bar. After the scavenger hunt, teams will return to the yoga studio where they will be entertained with live music by The Elements, a teenage rock band, and treated to refreshments provided by C3 while the judges tally the scores. Prizes will be awarded to the two teams with the most points and the team with the best costumes. First Place wins a Prize Package valued over $350, Second Place wins a Prize Package valued over $200, and the team with

the Best Costume gets a Prize Package valued over $100. The Prize Packages feature a variety of gift certificates from some of C3’s business sponsors that are located in the Carlsbad Village. Participants can sign up for the Village Scavenger Hunt as a team or as an individual and be paired up with others to create a team. The cost is $120 for a team of four to six people, or $35 for an individual. Tickets can be purchased online at carlsbadcauses.org. Teams are advised to arrive early and bring cash and phone chargers, along with a creative mind. C3, Carlsbad Causes for Community, is a nonprofit consisting of local businesses, nonprofits and local residents who collaborate to raise money for various community causes by organizing and implementing events and projects that serve the community. C3 focuses on providing social, athletic, recreational and wellness services and activities for those who live, work and play in the Village of Carlsbad. For more information on the Village Scavenger Hunt, visit carlsbadcauses.org, or contact Deb Ferraro at carlsbadcauses@gmail.com or (760) 893-9251. C3 is located at 2801-B Roosevelt Street, Carlsbad, inside the Carlsbad Village Yoga Co-op.

Circulate San Diego releases tips for enjoying Pokémon Go safely Following a series of dangerous incidents around the country — including in Encinitas where two people were transferred to the hospital after one of them fell from a bluff while playing the game — Circulate San Diego has released some tips to enjoy Pokémon Go safely. Circulate San Diego, an organization that promotes pedestrian safety and teaches thousands of school children each year how to be safe on busy streets, recognizes that “the immense popularity of the Pokémon Go mobile app is inspiring an unprecedented amount of walking and healthy physical exercise. Augmented reality games like Pokémon Go can be fun ways to inspire more

physical activity and a healthy lifestyle.” However, a small number of Pokémon Go users have injured themselves while using the game, which reinforces the need for pedestrians to be aware of their surroundings, and to be safe on streets. To safely use Pokémon Go, the organization recommends that players, stay alert and stop to catch the Pokémon; put the phone away while crossing the street; when playing at night wear bright colors and walk with your phone flashlight function activated so they can be seen; don’t wear headphones as the game is distracting enough; cross at designated crosswalks and try to make eye contact with drivers before crossing.

BLM issues shooting regulations in S.D. County

Due to the fire threat in San Diego County, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has issued shooting guidelines, designating all federal land closed to all firearms shooting, effective July 1 and lasting until it advises to the contrary. The BLM Regulations will be placed on the San Diego Sheriff’s website and expand on the directive that other than in defense of person, it shall be unlawful for anyone to discharge any pistol, revolver, shotgun, rifle or any other firearm or device fired or discharged with explosives during any period in which a high-fire hazard has been declared by the California Department of Forestry. Toward this end, the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department will increase patrols around known shooting areas to include BLM land; apply appropriate ordinances and penal codes as they relate to shooting, firearms, ammunition, magazine capacity etc. to assist in proactive fire prevention, educate shooters of the potential fire dangers and advise them of the Cal Fire suppression costs associated with an accidental fire; rural deputies will physically respond to all calls of shooters on or around BLM land; and the San Diego Sheriff’s Department will work with Fish and Game as well as the U.S. Forest Service to support successful prosecution of state offenders. Questions may be directed to Captain Hank Turner at the San Diego Sheriff’s Alpine Station, 619-659-2600.

Athenaeum Summer Festival with

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Sundays, July 10, 17, 24, 31, at 4:00 p.m.

The Auditorium at TSRI Celebrated pianist Gustavo Romero will return this summer for a four-part concert series, performing the works of Schumann. Series Tickets: $132-172 Individual Tickets: $35-50 www.ljathenaeum.org/summer-festival

CHECK OUT WHAT’S HAPPENING Snorkeling with Leopard Sharks

July 9,17, 30: 8-10 a.m.

Join aquarium naturalists and visit leopard sharks in their underwater home off the La Jolla coast. Discover the abundant variety of animals that make their homes among the kelp, sandy bottom, and rocks. Intermediate swimming ability is required and previous snorkeling experience is recommended. Participants supply their own gear. Ages 10+. Members: $25, Public: $30 RSVP: 858-534-7336 or at aquarium.ucsd.edu

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SummerFest 2016 30th Anniversary August 3 -26

Mark your calendars for SummerFest Under the Stars featuring Time for Three - the FREE outdoor concert kicks off SummerFest on Wednesday, August 3 at 6:30pm at Ellen Browning Scripps Park/La Jolla Cove. (858) 459-3728 WWW.LJMS.ORG

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ENCINITAS ADVOCATE - JULY 22, 2016 - PAGE A9

Auto dealer’s philanthropy a pact with God

Bob Baker has given millions to Catholic, veteran and homeless outreach groups BY PAM KRAGEN ixty-three years ago, Bob Baker was a young Army corporal stationed at Outpost Harry during the Korean War when he embarked on what his commanders warned would be a suicide mission. When he ended up in the middle of a minefield during the night patrol for Chinese soldiers, he decided it was a good time to make a deal with God. “I told him, if he spared me that night, I would go home, get married, have six children, become a success and do whatever he wanted me to do,” Baker said. “With all the millions of dollars I’ve given away over the years, I believe that’s what God wanted me to do.” During the past 10 years, the founder of San Diego’s Bob Baker Auto Group has donated from $500,000 to $1.7 million a year for projects that have included Catholic churches and schools, programs for military veterans and underwriting for Solutions for Change, a nonprofit that helps get North County homeless families off the streets. Baker, 84, said he’s drawn to causes where he feels a personal connection. The Rancho Santa Fe resident was homeless as a boy, his faith saw him through years of hardship, and he witnessed the horrors of war and knows how it can impact veterans trying to reintegrate into society. “Bob is a hands-on kind of donor,” said Chris Megison, founding president for Solutions for Change in Vista. “A lot of philanthropists will want to see our audited financial statements and study our plans, but Bob is the kind of philanthropist who wants to get in the car with me and drive out to see what we’re doing firsthand.” Baker’s rags-to-riches story, detailed in his 2005 autobiography, “Against All Odds,” began in 1931 Los Angeles, when he was born into an unhappy, Depression-era home. His father, the first-generation son of Lebanese immigrants, was a used car salesman. He was also an abusive alcoholic and a gambler. To help his struggling family make ends meet, 8-year-old Bob sold magazines (purchased for 8 cents and sold for a dime), then took on a newspaper route. When he was 10, his parents divorced and Bob spent the rest of his childhood in foster homes and boarding houses and on the streets. The only

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Bob Baker, founder of the Bob Baker Auto Group, is especially interested in helping veterans reintegrate into society. constants in his life were his faith and his grandmother, Monnie. “I credit her with saving me,” he said. “I don’t know what I would’ve done without her.” From ninth grade, his dream was to become a Catholic priest, but sons from divorced families weren’t allowed to enter the priesthood. Instead, right after high school in 1951, he and two buddies enlisted in the Army to fight in the Korean War. During his service overseas, Baker went on 27 night patrols, earned two Bronze Stars and avoided getting shot or killed on at least seven occasions. When he returned home to L.A. in 1953, he married his sweetheart, Sherrill King, and signed up to attend a business college on the GI Bill. But with no income, he reluctantly agreed to follow in his estranged father’s footsteps and sell cars at a friend’s downtown Ford dealership. He vowed he would sell cars only for a little while, but when Sherrill got pregnant with their first child, he agreed to stay. A born salesman with a quick smile, he became an instant success. From sales (first in L.A., then San Diego), he moved up to management. Then in 1965, he moved his

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family to Indiana, where he bought a share in his first dealership with their life savings and a $20,000 loan from his mother-in-law. Just three years later, he was able to buy out his partners. Over the next decade, he grew his business to more than 25 dealerships in California and Indiana, but the bicoastal business put a strain on his wife, who was raising their five

children mostly alone. In 1977, they returned to San Diego and he sold all of the dealerships that were more than 100 miles from their home in Rancho Santa Fe. At its peak, the Bob Baker Auto Group had $450 million in sales, but there were hard times ahead for Baker, both financially and emotionally. When he tried to combine his Chrysler and Ford franchises at one dealership in the 1980s, he spent eight years in a legal battle with Chrysler. Much worse was to come. In August 2009, a family of four was killed while riding in a loaner car from Baker’s Lexus dealership in El Cajon. Baker said he was devastated by the deaths, which occurred when the car’s accelerator pedal became stuck and the car raced out of control. Family members of the victims — CHP Officer Mark Saylor, his wife, daughter and brother-in-law — sued Baker and Toyota for wrongful death. Local and federal investigations found that improperly installed floor mats in the Lexus model could cause the gas pedal to stick. Since then, Toyota has recalled 10 million cars for repairs and has paid more than $1 billion in fines and lawsuits. Baker paid an undisclosed sum to relatives of the Saylors last March and he is still in litigation with Toyota. Baker called the Saylor tragedy one of the lowest points of his life. It happened when he was going through a series of personal SEE BAKER, A17

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PAGE A10 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

2016 Don Diego Scholarship Foundation Gala

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he 2016 Don Diego Scholarship Foundation Gala, “Rock and Roll With Us,” was held June 30 at the Del Mar Fairgrounds. Scholarship recipients were honored at the event, and attendees enjoyed a gourmet dinner and a concert by Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys, who presented “Pet Sounds: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary” with special guests Al Jardine and Blondie Chapin. The Don Diego Scholarship Foundation “provides scholarships to deserving San Diego youth who are associated with activities at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, including the San Diego County Fair, and are pursuing their educational interests. The Don Diego Scholarship Foundation also provides grants for agricultural education.” For more information, visit dondiegoscholarship.org. Online: www.delmartimes.net.

Nena Haskins, Treasurer Roxana Foxx, Carol Shaffer

Russ and Carol Penniman, Kathy and Phil Henry

Sara Newmiller, scholar Ray Rapue, Lisa Rapue

Julie Uribe, scholar Sarah Uribe 2016 Scholarship recipients and board members. Back row: Sophia Mock, Amy Gload, Ryan Beraredelli, Ray Rapue. Middle row: Courtney Ouellette, Sarah Uribe, Bubba Sugarman. Front row: Frederick Schenk, Yessica Vargas Navarro, Carney Flinn, gala co-chair Juanita Hayes, Susan Farrior. Seated: Jon Liss, Roxana Foxx, Stephen Shewmaker. Not pictured: Sofia Davis, Helen Jin, Taryn Sehnert.

Patrick Mock, Alexandra Mock, scholar Sophia Mock, scholar Bubba Sugarman, Elizabeth Sugarman

Don Diego Scholarship Foundation Vice Chair Stephen and Francie Shewmaker Don Diego Scholarship Foundation Chair Jon Liss, Stacy Simons, Executive Director Chana Mannen, Deana Ingalls, Nancy Crosby

David Berardelli, scholar Ryan Berardelli, Joanne Berardelli

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ENCINITAS ADVOCATE - JULY 22, 2016 - PAGE A11

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PAGE A12 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

Come fly with the San Diego Aviators Pillars of Hope Tennis Smash opening day event set for July 31 BY CHRIS SAUR When San Diego County residents talk about Opening Day, it’s usually in reference to Del Mar or Petco Park. It’s time to add San Diego Aviators World TeamTennis at the Omni La Costa Resort & Spa in Carlsbad to that list. The Aviators, in their third year as a Mylan World TeamTennis franchise, will open the season with a bang on July 31 with the Pillars of Hope Tennis Smash. While the 7 p.m. match with the Orange County Breakers is the main attraction — San Diego’s roster that night will feature tennis superstar James Blake, once ranked as high as No. 4 in the world — the event runs from 4 to 9 p.m. and includes dinner, live music, and silent and live auctions benefiting the Mitchell Thorpe Foundation. But the excitement of Opening Day is just the beginning for tennis fans, sports fans or San Diegans just looking for a great night out. The Aviators roster is stocked with exciting players, and the rules of play make for up-tempo, drama-filled matches. Blake, San Diego’s “Marquee Player” who will suit up on July 31 only, is an American

who has won 10 ATP World Tour singles titles and is perhaps best known for his 2005 run to the U.S. Open quarterfinals. That run included a win over Rafael Nadal and a memorable five-set loss to Andre Agassi, who had to come back from a 2-0 deficit. Blake is living in Encinitas while he builds a home in Solana Beach. With the Aviators for all 12 matches — six of which are on their home court at the Omni La Costa — are Americans Ryan Harrison and Shelby Rogers, along with South African standout Raven Klaasen and Croatian crusher Darija Jurak. Head coach John Lloyd, a former captain of the British Davis Cup team from 2006-2010 and the 1990 World TeamTennis Coach of the Year, will guide the squad for the second straight season. Harrison, 24, was signed July 15 after British player Dan Evans was drafted by San Diego, then pulled out of his contract at the last minute. The newest Aviator has been ranked as high as No. 43 in the world and has won matches at all four Grand Slam events. Harrison, who lives in Austin, Texas, has

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played for the United States in the Davis Cup, facing Switzerland and France in 2012, so he will be familiar with the team tennis format when he makes his league debut on July 31. “He is a great addition, a great team player who is really good at doubles,” said San Diego General Manager and Assistant Head Coach Jim Ault. “It will be a lot of fun to have him on the team.” Rogers, just 23 but a professional since 2009, is No. 59 in the WTA singles rankings, reached the third round of the 2015 U.S. Open and gained acclaim this summer with an impressive French Open run. On the way to the quarterfinals, the Charleston, South Carolina resident eliminated No. 17 Karolina Pliskova (Czech Republic), took out Russian Elena Vesnina in straight sets, defeated 10th seed and two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic, then topped No. 25 Irina-Camelia Begu (Romania) in straight sets. Klaasen, meanwhile, is a three-year veteran of the San Diego squad who has won nine career ATP World Tour doubles titles and is No. 6 in the ATP doubles rankings.

COURTESY GRAPHIC

The San Diego Aviators open their season on July 31 at the Omni La Costa Resort & Spa in Carlsbad. Klaasen, 33, reached the doubles final at the 2014 Australian Open and recently played in the Wimbledon semifinals. Jurak is a 31-year-old who is in her fourth World TeamTennis campaign, including playing a key role for the Aviators last season. She’s been ranked as high as 32nd in doubles and has a third-round Wimbledon appearance under her belt. SEE AVIATORS, A18

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PAGE A14 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

FROM PROTESTS, A1 the majority, “It will be too late.” Croft said putting aside the “no” vote on the 5.5 percent salary increases this year, Salazar and Muir have also voted against “fantastic” Prop AA projects that benefit students and schools, such as adding a new building at Canyon Crest Academy that will help the school deal with capacity issues. Croft said Salazar often says his decisions are based on supporting taxpayers, but Croft said it should be noted that taxpayers supported Prop AA and have welcomed projects such as new science classrooms at Torrey Pines High School. “To delay construction is defying the will of the taxpayers,” Croft said. “They’re doing a disservice to this district.” In December, both Salazar and Muir voted against the agreement for the two-story CCA building, now under construction. Salazar was not present at the May 12 board meeting in which the guaranteed maximum price was voted on for the CCA building, but Muir did vote against it. In November 2015, Salazar and Muir voted against the Torrey Pines classrooms due to the construction company’s contribution to the Prop AA campaign. In March 2015, Muir voted against the second issuance of the Prop AA bonds because she said she did not agree with the bond’s structure. Both voted against the increase in salaries. In response to the protestors questioning his vote against the 2016-17 budget, Salazar said he would make his “very sane” “no” vote on the budget again if he was given the opportunity. “I am actually very glad that the organized union boss and his members came out and

Life Tributes

protested my and Mrs. Muir’s ‘no’ vote on the budget because it shines a light on the fact that we have an unsustainable school budget,” Salazar said in a statement. “We are nearly $7 million in the red, and in two years (unless we change course) our district will be bankrupt.” He said his fellow board members who voted for raises did not recognize that the district did not have the funds to pay for them. “Organized labor only care about themselves (those that pay union dues) and not the students or the taxpayers,” Salazar said. “I represent everyone in our district and will be voting ‘no’ again on any similar deficit budget. I hope the voters pay attention this November and only support a candidate who supports a balanced budget.” In response to Salazar’s comments, President Beth Hergesheimer said San Dieguito has been “very conservative” in its budget calculations. “It is our job to actually spend available funds providing district students with an education in safe, modern facilities. Some years we spend more than our current revenue, but we are prepared to do that because we have solid reserves from prior year revenues,” Hergesheimer said. “Current multi-year projections show the district with approximately $9 million in reserves in two years, over double the required state minimum reserves. We fully expect those reserves to be even better than projected.” Some from the protest attended the board meeting, although they did not bring in the signs. Protester Tim Staycer, a Torrey Pines High School teacher, spoke up during public comment about Muir’s “inaccurate rhetoric” misrepresenting class size averages increasing. He said despite her being corrected and given

Everlasting memories of loved ones

Janet (Elizalde) Davis

november 26, 1969 - June 30, 2016 Encinitas — Janet (Elizalde) Davis, from Encinitas, california, passed away at Loma Linda University Hospital surrounded by her family after a brief illness. Janet was born in 1969 to John and Judy (Pearsall) Elizalde at Broadway Hospital in Vallejo. she graduated from st. Patrick’s - st. Vincent’s Hs in 1988 and got her degree in 1993 from the University of california, Davis. also in 1993 she married Mike Davis and had three beautiful children, John Ryan, 26, who preceded her in death, Jessica 21 and Michelle 20. Janet was an unbelievable wife, mother, daughter, sister, aunt, cousin and friend. Her

uncanny way of asking you about the things that mattered most immediately drew you in. she was and is, truly, one of a kind. Please sign the guest book online at legacy.com/ obituaries/encinitasadvo cate.

accurate information, she continued to use increased class sizes as her justification to vote against the budget. “It is shameful that Muir continues to shirk her responsibility to be an informed school board member and that she continues to misrepresent such important information,” Staycer said.“Had that irresponsible, misinformed vote carried the day, it literally would have resulted in shutting down the district financially. Both Muir and Salazar should be ashamed for their willingness to hurt the district in this manner.” The board members remained silent after his comments as they are not allowed to engage in discussion during public comment. “It’s unfortunate that the teacher’s union is speaking out against fiscal responsibility and sustainable best management practices,” Muir said in a statement after the meeting. “It appears that they don’t understand that deficit spending is not a prudent or responsible way to prepare a budget. I couldn’t support a plan or budget that doesn’t adequately address the district’s significant financial shortfall, while increasing class size.” While district staff have reiterated that class sizes will not increase and are at historically low levels, Muir said that the verbiage of class size in the teachers’ contract changed from a “maximum” of 38 students to an “average” of 38 students, and her interpretation is that there is a big difference between those two words. “I’m not, nor have I ever been, a rubber-stamp board member. I don’t believe the board majority has ever voted against the teachers or staff,” Muir said. “Although I respect the teachers, I believe it’s my job to ask the tough questions and find real solutions to real challenges that face the district.”

FROM SUMMIT, A1 worked with the Leichtag Foundation. “We left (Jerusalem) with the ability to apply for future microgrants. And they are really supporting our professional development, so for future projects we launch or classes we want to take, training we want to do, they will support us through all of that. I feel really spoiled.” The summit itself brought together social entrepreneurs from more than 30 different countries to learn and share experiences. Throughout the four-day event, the innovators interacted through Brain Dates —small-group meetings where one person would share a skill or lesson (Paley taught lessons on volunteer management, starting a social enterprise and cooking) — TED Talks-style presentations by one of the young changemakers to a larger group and programed presentations for the entire group. Paley said she learned something different from each one, especially noting the larger program on “looking at power structures and how to work with them and against them … to make change in a modern digital age” as one she really valued. In the smaller group presentations, it was the details of each innovator’s specific experience that blew her mind. “There was a big aspect of getting to know one another and I think that was my favorite aspect of the conference,” Paley said. “People were just working on some incredible things, from a woman

FROM TRAIL, A1 prospect of lower cost persuaded it to change its mind in March of this year. At that time, the council chose a west-side alignment, closer to Highway 101. SANDAG in the MOU asked the city to shoulder some financial burden should a situation arise — namely a block from the Coastal Commission — that halts progress on the west-side version of the trail. The city council, however, was uncomfortable taking on that risk and voted against accepting the MOU at the July 13 meeting. At the SANDAG Transportation Committee meeting two days later, Shaffer said direction was given for SANDAG staff and city staff to continue to negotiate an MOU and “find a way to address the issue of risk in the event that the Coastal Commission declines to find that the west-side alignment is compatible with their Public Works Plan.” Shaffer went on to say that she has initialed an agenda item for the July 27 Encinitas City Council meeting “to allow us to hear a report back from the city manager on the negotiations, and to allow us to take action if we are at a point where action is appropriate.” But before Shaffer’s July 20 report, four members of the No Rail Trail group expressed their displeasure in the process the council went through to choose the Coastal Mobility and Livability Working Group, which was finalized after council discussion at the July 13 meeting. That working group will be tasked with getting feedback from the community, discussing that feedback and giving advice to the city council on a number of coastal mobility issues, with the Rail Trail having the most current importance.

who flew to Lesbos (Greek Island) to do refugee work to another woman who had been a victim of rape and created a rape recovery toolkit via youtube that has reached millions of people. “You’re meeting people from 30 different countries, so looking at what those projects look like, whether it is India or Poland or Chili or Uruguay, just the landscapes in these places are so drastically different so our opportunities and challenges are often similar and also worlds apart.” Though there wasn’t much time left over for sight-seeing, the group did visit the Jerusalem Botanical Gardens and hear from the mayor of Jerusalem. While the conference organizers are looking to invest in Jewish changemakers, Paley estimated that two-thirds of the projects highlighted by conference attendees did not specifically focus on supporting and engaging the Jewish community. “I think they see an opportunity to use Judaism as an organizing tool,” Paley said. “For me, it’s part of my cultural heritage, my father is Israeli, and it’s part of my local community here in Encinitas. My work is separate but I’m sure in some way also informed by (my heritage).” That work, for the past few years, has been alongside Samuelson on Kitchens for Good. The organization is based around the fact that a kitchen can be used to do a lot of social good, including job creation, food waste diversion, health and hunger relief. “The core of what we do is food rescue

and meal prep for hunger relief programs, but we also provide a culinary and job training program for hard-to-employ populations to help launch their careers in the culinary industry,” Paley explained. “We primarily work with youth aging out of foster care and formerly incarcerated individuals.” Paley said her heart as well as Samuelson’s are in North County and they originally hoped the Kitchens for Good headquarters would be here. However, an opportunity for a great kitchen location in southeast San Diego (at the Jacobs Center) was too good to pass up. Still, Kitchens for Good provides farm to fork style catering for the Encinitas Senior Center and is looking to expand further into North County. The Kitchens for Good program started with those two and, after signing the lease for its headquarters in September 2015, has grown to have a staff of 37. The budget has gone from $200,000 to almost $2 million. “We run a large catering and events enterprise that is the core of our social enterprise operation, so it generates a lot of revenue to help support the programs we run,” Paley said. “And it creates really great opportunities for the graduates of our job training program. “We do about 500 catered events a year and are still looking to grow because the more events we can do, the more services we can provide for the community.” For more information on the organization, visit www.kitchensforgood.org.


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ENCINITAS ADVOCATE - JULY 22, 2016 - PAGE A15


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PAGE A16 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

CRIME LOG July 18 • Felony assault with a deadly weapon: not firearm 400 block Santa Fe Drive, 11:45 p.m. • Residential Burglary - 600 block Atherton Street, 4:10 p.m. • Misdemeanor vandalism ($400 or less) - 300 block Santa Fe Drive, 3 p.m. • Vehicle break-in/theft - 1600 block Pleasant Place, 5 a.m. July 17 • Misdemeanor simple battery - 1000 N. block Coast Highway 101, 8:30 p.m. • Residential burglary - 1700 N. block Highway 101, 8 p.m. • Vehicle break-in/theft - Dublin Drive/Manchester Avenue, 10 a.m. • Misdemeanor simple battery - 800 block Birmingham Drive, 3:30 a.m. July 16 • Misdemeanor possession of controlled substance paraphernalia - Encinitas Boulevard/I-5 SB, 7:05 p.m. • Grand theft: money/labor/property - 1900 block Manchester Avenue, 9:30 a.m. • Misdemeanor drunk in public: alcohol, drugs, combo or toluene - S. Coast Highway 101/ E. E street, 2:14 a.m. July 15 • Vehicle break-in/theft - 1000 N. block Coast Highway 101, 5:30 p.m. • Vehicle break-in/theft - 400 block Santa Fe Drive, 4:15 p.m. July 14 • Misdemeanor use/under the influence of controlled substance - Leucadia Boulevard/Passiflora Avenue, 9:47 p.m. • Misdemeanor use/under the influence of controlled substance - Leucadia Boulevard/Passiflora Avenue, 9:37 p.m. • Misdemeanor drunk in public: alcohol, drugs,

combo or toluene - 400 block Santa Fe Drive, 7:37 p.m. • Misdemeanor shoplifting - 1000 N. block El Camino Real, 4:25 p.m. • Misdemeanor burglary shoplifting - 7600 block El Camino Real, 1:15 p.m. • Misdemeanor simple battery - 100 W. block D. Street, 12:55 p.m. • Felony threatened crime with intent to terrorize 6300 block Caller del Alcazar, 10:15 a.m. July 13 • Felony take vehicle without owner's consent/vehicle theft - 400 block Fulvia Street, 10 p.m. • Other sex crime - Hummock Lane/Village Center Drive, 7 p.m. • Misdemeanor vandalism ($400 or less) - 2nd street/W. D Street, 4:33 p.m. • Fraud - 1300 block Encinitas Boulevard, 11:07 a.m. • Misdemeanor drunk in public: alcohol, drugs, combo or toluene - 200 N. block Coast Highway 101, 10 a.m. • Residential burglary - 400 block Santa Alicia, 7:30 a.m. July 12 • Misdemeanor possession of controlled substance paraphernalia - W B Street/N. Coast Highway 101, 10:50 p.m. • Vehicle break-in/theft - 900 block Bonita Drive, 6:30 p.m. • Vandalism ($400 or less) - 1900 block Dove Lane, 5 p.m. • Misdemeanor use/under the influence of controlled substance - 100 block Encinitas Boulevard, 4:50 p.m. • Vehicle break-in/theft - 1600 block San Elijo Road, 4:45 p.m. • Misdemeanor use/under the influence of controlled substance - 100 block Encinitas Boulevard, 3:59 p.m. • Vehicle break-in/theft - 700 block Garden View Court, 5:35 a.m. • Driving under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs - 7300 block Rancho Santa Fe Road, 12:42 a.m.

Yellow Ribbon Handicap winner BY KELLEY CARLSON Graded stakes action kicked off last Saturday, July 16 at Del Mar with a title defense by She’s Not Here in the Grade II, $200,000 Yellow Ribbon Handicap. The 5-year-old mare captured this year’s edition by a neck over Fresh Feline (pictured), while favorite Nancy From Nairobi finished a half-length behind in third. The 5-year-old She’s Not Here covered the 11/16 miles on the grass in 1:42.70, and KELLEY CARLSON gave jockey Drayden Van Dyke She’s Not Here won this his first graded stakes win at the year’s Grade II, $200,000 track. Yellow Ribbon Handicap by “I spoke to Phil Oliver (a a neck over Fresh Feline. trainer himself and husband of She’s Not Here’s trainer Vicki Oliver) on the phone about an hour before the race,” Van Dyke said. “He told me to get her out of there and see if I could lay fourth or fifth – then get her to relax. He said she had been training great, had a good kick, and liked the track. So I rode to orders, and it all worked out great. This place (Del Mar) is one of my favorite racetracks, so to win a graded race here is special.” She’s Not Here is owned by G. Watts Humphrey Jr. and the St. George Farm Racing stable of Ian Banwell. Also on the Saturday card was the $77,900 Wickerr Stakes, won by Toowindytohaulrox. Sunday’s stakes victors were Midnight Storm in the Grade II, $250,000 Eddie Read Stakes, and Barleysugar in the $85,425 Sandy Blue Handicap. Among those expected to race during the next week at Del Mar is the nation’s top-ranked runner, California Chrome, who is entered in the Grade II, $200,000 San Diego Handicap on Saturday, July 23.

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What Profile? When Spider Veins Happen to Young People Spider veins—the bane of elderly women, or so the myth goes. But the truth is that anyone can get spider veins, including younger women and even men. So what are they, exactly? Spider veins aren’t quite the same thing as varicose veins, which are the more dilated and ropelike veins under the skin and which can be quite painful (and possibly harmful to the health if left untreated). Instead, spider veins, known as telangiectasias, are enlarged venules, which are the very small veins and blood vessels. Fortunately, in most cases, spider veins are painless. There are many reasons people get spider veins—they are caused by increased pressure on the veins. As we age, our venous walls weaken and then blood can pool (the

typical cause of varicose veins, for example). But what about in younger people? Most commonly, spider veins are associated with pregnancy, as the body undergoes a tremendous amount of pressure. But who else is at risk? Similarly, people who are obese are more prone to them as their blood vessels are also under greater pressure, as the body has to work hard to circulate the blood up from the feet and to the heart. But the truth is that perfectly healthy and even fit people can get these pesky veins. Young athletes are often prone to them, especially behind the knees, as their strenuous workouts will elevate the blood pressure, and their legs often take a pounding. Spider veins appear when the body’s vascular system is under stress. The extra pressure in the veins makes them bulge and expand. In fact, even though they may be unsightly, they are quite normal. For some people, spider veins are genetic, which means nothing you can do can truly prevent them from occurring, and they can show up at any time. It’s part of your makeup. And if your parent had spider veins as a teenager, there is a good chance you will, too.

The appearance of spider veins is not something that should worry you, and in general, there are no health risks associated. However, there are some very rare cases of genetic conditions that can cause spider veins to appear in multiple patches on the arms and torso, so if you spot these, have them checked out just to be safe. It’s always good to have any type of venous condition on your medical record, and you’ll always want to know of any genetic predisposition that can lead to something more harmful than a cluster of dark veins. But you shouldn’t live in fear of spider veins; in most of the cases, they are completely benign. You should be aware, though, that they won’t go away on their own. To actually remove spider veins, you will need to undergo the very simple laser therapy. When treating spider veins with laser therapy, the laser damages the blood vessels, making them clot and dry up, at which point, they will get reabsorbed by your tissue. This non-invasive treatment can be done in the office on a very short lunch break, for instance, or after track practice or yoga class. This treatment is different from sclerotherapy, generally used for the

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treatment of varicose veins, which entails an injection of medicine directly into the blood vessel. The difference with laser therapy is that after treatment, you should avoid sun exposure for up to ten days to prevent a browning or discoloration of the skin. As with any laser treatment to the skin, there may be a small amount of spotting that appears in the area of treatment, but this will go away in a short amount of time and is nothing you should worry about. Be aware, though, that once you’ve gotten spider veins, they are likely to return, especially if you continue the same activities that caused them in the first place. If your veins are prone to swelling and bulging when under pressure, the rest of your veins will continue to do so; treatment is not a cure or prevention. For some people, spider veins can cause insecurity—they aren’t called “butterfly veins,” after all—and there is nothing wrong with wanting them removed. The key with laser therapy—as with every treatment—is to choose a doctor or specialist who is board-certified and experienced in the procedure.


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ENCINITAS ADVOCATE - JULY 22, 2016 - PAGE A17

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FROM BAKER, A9 losses. In 2008, he battled prostate cancer, lost his brother (and fellow auto dealer) Ron Baker and learned that his son, Michael, had health problems that would prohibit him from taking over the family business. Then in 2009, his wife of 55 years, Sherrill, died of liver cancer just four months before the Saylor crash. The heartbreak and loneliness took a toll, but Baker said things brightened about five years ago when he met his second wife, Dita, who sold him lotion at a local Nordstrom. These days, he’s semi-retired. He recently sold his Toyota dealership to Greg Miller, an heir to the Larry H. Miller Dealership Group in Utah, and within two years he plans to be retired. Then he’ll devote all of his time to philanthropy and enjoying life. Past projects have included St. Vincent de Paul Village downtown, where founder Father Joe Carroll describes him as “always very generous.” He also donated more than $1 million to the construction of St. Therese of Carmel Catholic Church in Carmel Valley (which is named for Baker’s patron saint) and the building of a chapel at Cathedral Catholic High. He discovered the Solutions for Change charity in 2013 and has since become one if its champions. Most recently, he signed on as title sponsor for its 2015 gala, which honored military veterans. He said he was drawn to the cause because the Vista nonprofit helps find homes for the families of veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and addictions. “It helps service people who are on drugs or who can’t live with themselves after what they experienced in war,” he said. “I was spared, but so many people are not, and they have a hard time when they get back.” Megison, a Marine veteran, said he turns away 17 veteran homeless families a month because his organization doesn’t have enough room for them in its apartment complexes. To qualify for housing, applicants must attend Solutions University, a 1,000-day program that includes counseling, classes on parenting, household finances and work experience. The goal is to stop the patterns of behavior that will land participants back on the streets. “He fell in love with our model,” Megison said of Baker. “He loves that we go deeper to help people and solve problems. But we can’t do it without social purpose investors like Bob. He said he hears a lot of promises from other charities, but not a lot of change, and here he sees action. I think it appeals to his entrepreneurial spirit.” – Pam Kragen is a writer for The San Diego Union-Tribune

FROM SPY, A5 her alibi was questioned several times, she was always quick to come up with an answer. “Every time I had the right answer,” Cohn said. “I just found the right answer very fast.” During one undercover mission across the border, for instance, a woman who Cohn stayed with asked her if she was an imposter. “She looked at me straight in my eyes and she said, ‘Are you a spy?’ “I bent forward with my arms stretched out and said, ‘Do I look like a spy?’ I started laughing and she started laughing, too, and said no. “I don’t know why I answered that way,” Cohn said. “That was my reaction.” With a chuckle, she added that she “drives her husband crazy.” Cohn has been married to retired Dr. Major L. Cohn for 58 years. “Because he’s a scientist, he has to ponder things and discuss things,” she said. “I make decisions right away, and that’s how I did it. That’s my nature.” Cohn detailed her story in her 2002 memoir “Behind Enemy Line: The True Story of a French Jewish Spy in Nazi Germany.” She has received numerous awards for obtaining vital information for the Allied advance, including France’s highest military honor, the Medaille Militaire, a relatively rare medal awarded for outstanding military service. “Be engaged and do not accept any order that does not agree with your conscience,” Cohn often advises high school and college students. “These are the two things I tell kids.”


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PAGE A18 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

FROM HOMELESSNESS, A2

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COURTESY

The Grauer School – Class of 2016

The Grauer School celebrates Class of 2016 The Grauer School celebrated the graduates of the Class of 2016 at their annual graduation ceremony on June 10 in Encinitas. This year marked a major milestone for Grauer, as it was the 25th “Silver” Anniversary of the school’s founding in Encinitas. Dr. Stuart Grauer, founder and Head of School, described the evolution of Grauer’s graduation ceremonies through the years, saying, “The first Grauer School Graduation and Commencement was held in the spring of 1992 wherein a single student among the 14 in enrollment at the time, surrounded by her peers and their families, marked her readiness to begin university life. This year we graduated 30 seniors. Since the first graduation, The Grauer School graduation exercises have incorporated what our school leadership considers to be the most relevant and beautiful ceremonial practices from many great institutions worldwide, and these exercises continue to evolve.” Dr. Grauer also noted that “The Grauer School uses the motto ‘vereor non imagination’ at each graduation to inspire its scholars to ‘fear not imagination’ throughout their lives, an essential founding value of our School.” At Grauer’s graduation ceremony, faculty members gave tributes for each of the 30 graduates. The tributes demonstrated the close relationships that the graduates had formed with many of their teachers,

FROM AVIATORS, A12 But it isn’t just watching the best players in the world compete that makes World TeamTennis matches so exciting. First of all, unlike most tennis events, cheering is encouraged. “You don’t have to be too quiet. Fans can act the same way they would at a Padres or Chargers game as far as cheering,” Ault explained. Additionally, the scoring is in total games, not just sets, so every point counts in the five matches contested. Strategy comes into play as the home team can choose what order to play men’s singles, women’s singles, men’s doubles,

and the depth of emotion felt by the graduates, faculty and family members in the audience was profound. Dana Abplanalp-Diggs, Grauer’s principal, remarked to the graduates, “We will miss you for all that you have accomplished in your time here at The Grauer School, but more importantly, we will miss the genuinely good-hearted, kind, helpful and fun people that you are. You have succeeded in building a beautiful team from a group of strong-willed individuals — surfers, filmmakers, campers, humanitarians, actors, writers, musicians, athletes, photographers, chefs, social activists, outdoors people, engineers, scientists, meditators, performers, global citizens and leaders. At The Grauer School, our students mean the world to us. Please know that each and every one of you in the Class of 2016 mean the world to us — you will always have a home here with your Grauer family.” The Grauer School would like to express gratitude to the city of Encinitas where it has been located for a quarter century, noting, “there is no place we’d rather be.” Congratulations to all of The Grauer School’s Class of 2016 graduates, as they prepare to enter colleges and universities across the United States and around the world in the fall. To learn more about The Grauer School, visit www.grauerschool.com or call 760-944-6777.

women’s doubles and mixed doubles. “The big difference is, it is a team so every game counts and every player contributes to the score,” Ault continued. “It is very heavy on doubles, which is super exciting and so fun to watch.” Another rule that adds to the fan experience is the overtime possibility. No matter how many points a team is behind, if it can win the final set the match goes on until the leading squad wins a game, or the losing teams wins enough games to overtake its opponent. In short, this means there is never a reason to leave early. The Aviators — who have home

matches on Aug. 2 (Orange County Breakers), Aug. 5 (New York Empire), Aug. 6 (Washington Kastles), Aug. 7 (Springfield Lazers) and Aug. 8 (Philadelphia Freedom) — are owned by local residents Fred Luddy and Jack McGrory, and took third place in the Western Conference last season. Ault, Luddy and McGrory are proud to work with the Mitchell Thorp Foundation for the July 31 Pillars of Hope event. The Foundation’s mission is to help families in the region who have children suffering from life-threatening illnesses by providing financial and emotional support and resources.

“Housing Navigator” — a full-time social worker who meets with homeless individuals on the streets, identifies their needs through a specific assessment tool and walks them through the steps to obtain housing. Rental-assistance programs already exist, particularly for homeless veterans, but what’s lacking are trained case workers out on the streets, Interfaith Executive Director Greg Anglea told the Union- Tribune in April. In addition to paying for the social worker, the project has set aside money for one-time payments to landlords who agree to accept new tenants that were formerly homeless. The city is putting $15,000 into that program to incentivize landlords to participate. “The expectation and the hope is that this pilot project can be replicated (in other neighboring communities),” said Rebecca Palmer, the Community Resource Center’s director of programs. Each year, the Regional Task Force on the Homeless conducts a one-day count of the homeless population in San Diego County. The most recent report, from January, showed Encinitas having 93 homeless people, of which just 39 were living in shelters. Six percent of the 54 unsheltered homeless were veterans. Plans call for at least 50 of the city’s homeless people to be matched with the navigator, including all of the “homeless veterans seeking housing,” Palmer said. The second goal will be to obtain housing for at least 25 homeless people before the trial period ends, she said. Opening Doors is part of a national effort known as the 25 Cities Initiative, a federal Housing and Urban Development agency program to end homelessness in 25 cities with high concentrations of homeless people, including the city of San Diego. Encinitas Mayor Kristin Gaspar told the Union-Tribune she was glad to support the proposal and that it offers hope to what can seem like an overwhelming problem. With issues like this, people “feel defeated before we’ve even started,” she said. Packages cost $125 per person and include dinner, entertainment and the auctions until 7 p.m. A $250 VIP package includes those perks plus VIP seats to the Aviators match. To purchase tickets, visit www.mitchellthorp.org/events. Also at the event, the foundation will give out its Pillars of Hope award, which honors top doctors, educators, therapists and practitioners who go above and beyond the call of duty. For more information on the Aviators, or to purchase tickets, visit www.sandiegoaviators.com. —The Business Spotlight features commercial enterprises that support this newspaper.


www.encinitasadvocate.com

ENCINITAS ADVOCATE - JULY 22, 2016 - PAGE A19

OPEN HOUSES

Bracero Plan 2 in Encinitas.

COURTESY

Start living the North County coastal lifestyle in a Hallmark Communities home Hallmark Communities has beautiful new homes, in 4 desirable North County Coastal locations ready for you to move in before summer’s end. The luxury 4- and 5-bedroom homes at Meadowood are the best value in Pacific Highlands Ranch. Priced in the mid $900,000s. Only 5 homes left! Special summer move-in incentives! Purchase during Hallmark’s July 30 and July 31 Open House, and get a $5,000 upgrade allowance. (Contact agent for details and appointment.) Bracero 3 is an Encinitas enclave of 3 luxury homes less than a mile from the beaches. The 4-bedroom, 4.5-bath floor plans range from 4,485 to 4,961 sf, and breathtaking ocean views. Prices start in the high $1,000,000s. Only 2 homes left! Walk to Downtown Oceanside and the beach!

HOME OF HOME OFTHE THEWEEK WEEK

414 Cleveland Townhomes bring modern urban flair to beach living. These 2-bedroom, 2.5 bath homes offer 2 floors of chic living space, over a private 2-car garage. Prices start in the mid $500,000. Only 2 townhomes left! Dixie Village is a 5-bedroom 3-bath Oceanside home with 2,471 s.f. of living space, 2-car garage, and premium fixtures. Just minutes from the beach, this wonderful home is priced to sell, and ready for you to move in. Buy now and move in this summer! Schedule your personal showing today, with Sandy at 760-532-6242 or sandy@hallmarkcommunities.com or Tom Archbold at 760-644-1299 or tarchbold@hallmarkcommunities.com. Join our Interest List, at www.HallmarkCommunities.com. Follow us on Facebook!

BRACERO 3, 805 Bracero Road, Encinitas

NOW SELLING

SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT ONLY ONLY 2 Homes Left!

From the high $1,000,000’s • 3 elegantly designed 4,485 - 4,961 sq. ft. homes • Near award winning schools • Ocean views and large lots • Large Great Room w/Gourmet kitchen • Covered Outdoor Ca. Room • Oversized lots ts Call Tom at (760) 644-1299

tarchbold@hallmarkcommunities.com hallmarkcommunities.com

CARMEL VALLEY

$498,800 2BD / 2BA $850,000 3BD / 2.5BA $880,000 - $1,050,000 4BD / 4.5BA $930,000 4BD / 3BA $978,000 4BR/3BA $985,275 4BD / 4.5BA $998,025 4BD / 3BA $1,098,000 4BD / 3.5BA $1,248,800 4BD / 3BA $1,298,000 - $1,398,000 4BD / 3.5BA $1,349,000 5BD / 3BA $1,399,000 4BD / 4.5BA $1,399,000 - $1,429,000 5BD / 4BA $1,479,000 4BD / 3.5BA $1,490,000 6BD / 7BA $1,595,000 5BD / 3.5BA $1,599,000 5BD / 4.5BA $1,599,999 4BD / 4.5BA $1,649,000 4BD / 3.5BA $1,799,000 4BD / 4.5BA $2,375,200 5BD / 4.5BA $2,495,000 5BD / 6BA $2,899,246 $999,000 3BD / 2BA $1,950,000 4BD / 3BA $2,100,000 5BD / 3BA $3,195,000 6BD / 7.5BA $3,995,000 4BD / 3.5BA

12368 CARMEL COUNTRY DEVON BOULON, COLDWELL BANKER 12590 CAVALLO ST JEN DRENNAN, COASTAL PREMIER PROPERTIES 13855 KERRY LANE DAN CONWAY, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 6764 MONTERRA TRAIL DAN CONWAY, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 13559 SAGE MESA ROAD ERIC MATZ TEAM, WINDERMERE HOMES & ESTATES 7030 VIA AGAVE DAN CONWAY, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 13973 CENTELLA WAY DAN CONWAY, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 4775 TARANTELLA LANE SUSAN MEYERS-PYKE, COASTAL PREMIER PROPERTIES 6351 SILVERBUSH CREEK DEVON BOULON, COLDWELL BANKER 5487 VALERIO TRAIL SUSAN MEYERS-PYKE, COASTAL PREMIER PROPERTIES 5537 CARRIAGE CT CHARLES & FARRYL MOORE, COLDWELL BANKER 5233 SEAGROVE PL CHARLES & FARRYL MOORE, COLDWELL BANKER 6332 QUAIL RUN STREET DAN CONWAY, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 5797 ASTER MEADOWS DAN CONWAY, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 7819 VISTA LAZANJA EILEEN ANDERSON, WILLIS ALLEN REAL ESTATE 10634 HUNTERS GLEN DRIVE ROSIE GROSS, COLDWELL BANKER 13454 LIGHTHOUSE WAY CHARLES & FARRYL MOORE, COLDWELL BANKER 5111 SEAGROVE COVE COLLEEN ROTH, COLDWELL BANKER/HOST: GENE VALLANTE 13335 GLENCLIFF WAY CHARLES & FARRYL MOORE, COLDWELL BANKER 13493 WYNGATE PT CHARLES & FARRYL MOORE, COLDWELL BANKER 6266 BELMONT TRAIL DAN CONWAY, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 8238 RUN OF THE KNOLLS EILEEN ANDERSON, WILLIS ALLEN REAL ESTATE 8175 DOUG HILL DEL MAR 13371 BARBADOS WAY JENNIFER ANDERSON, WILLIS ALLEN REAL ESTATE 2115 HEATHER LANE ANITA BROWN, SEA COAST EXCLUSIVE PROPERTIES 14241 RECUERDO DRIVE JENNIFER ANDERSON, WILLIS ALLEN REAL ESTATE 5511 MEADOWS DEL MAR MARC & CRAIG LOTZOF, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INT’L REALTY/HOST: BETTY HALL 209 TORREY PINES TERRACE JEAN LOGAN, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY

$685,000 3BD / 2.5 BATHS $1,159,000 4BD / 3.5 BATHS $1,495,000 - $1,550,000 4BD / 3 BATHS $1,850,000 5BD / 5.5 BATHS

1724 WILLOWSPRING JOHN LEFFERDINK, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY/HOST: DIANA HADDAD 688 CYPRESS HILLS DRIVE JODI DUNHAM , COLDWELL BANKER 1798 SIENNA CANYON DRIVE BARBARA MARTIN, COLDWELL BANKER 1337 SKYROS WAY BECKY CAMPBELL, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

$868,000 3BD / 2.5BA $1,259,000 3BD / 2BA $1,395,000 - $1,495,000 4BD / 4.5BA $1,490,000 6BD / 7BA $1,550,000 4BD / 3BA $2,099,000 6BD / 5.5BA $2,445,000 4BD / 4.5BA $2,495,000 5BD / 6BA $2,498,000 4BD / 4.5BA $2,545,000 5BD / 5.5BA $2,545,000 5BD / 5.5BA $2,899,246 6BD / 8BA $3,195,000 5BD / 5.5BA $3,600,000 5BD / 6.5BA $4,125,000 6BD / 4BA $4,190,000 8BD / 7 BA $4,380,000 5BD / 5.5BA $4,395,000 3BD / 4.5BA $4,495,000 5BD / 6.5BA $12,900,000 - $19,500,000 6BD / 8BA

16042 VIA GALAN SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. SARA ALAVI, COLDWELL BANKER 858-405-9941 16936 VIA DE SANTA FE SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. GLORIA DOINOFF, COLDWELL BANKER 858-204-4667 16925 CRESCENT CREEK DR. SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. SUSAN MEYERS-PYKE, COASTAL PREMIER PROPERTIES 858-395-4068 7819 VISTA LAZANJA SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. EILEEN ANDERSON, WILLIS ALLEN REAL ESTATE 858-245-9851 16905 VIA DE LA VALLE SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. SUE CARR, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 858-353-3242 7932 KATHRYN CROSBY COURT SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. ROBERT MYRON, ROBERT MYRON BROKER 858-756-9972 8224 CAMINITO SANTALUZ WEST – SANTALUZ SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. GLORIA SHEPARD & KATHY LYSAUGHT, COLDWELL BANKER 619-417-5564 8238 RUN OF THE KNOLLS SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. EILEEN ANDERSON, WILLIS ALLEN REAL ESTATE 858-245-9851 7778 DOUG HILL CT – SANTALUZ SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. GLORIA SHEPARD & KATHY LYSAUGHT, COLDWELL BANKER 619-417-5564 7732 TOP O THE MORNING WAY – THE CROSBY SAT 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. JOHN LEFFERDINK, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY/HOST: LORENZO SORANO 619-813-8222/858-356-8088 7732 TOP O THE MORNING WAY – THE CROSBY SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. JOHN LEFFERDINK, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY/HOST: ANDI VAN HOOSEAR 619-813-8222/805-478-8285 8175 DOUG HILL SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. EILEEN ANDERSON, WILLIS ALLEN REAL ESTATE 858-245-9851 6011 LAGO LINDO SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. LARRY RUSSELL, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 858-361-4915 6048 LA GRANADA SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. ROSEMARY LOGAN RODGER, BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 619-985-6701 5905 LAGO LINDO SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. GEORGIANA STRATE, STRATE’S ESTATES 858-705-1618 17615 VIA DE FORTUNA SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. CECILIA G ZAVALA, BHHS CAL/HOST: LORENZO SORANO 858-699-6646/858-356-8088 7909 ENTRADA DE LUZ EAST – SANTALUZ SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. CECILIA G ZAVALA, BHHS CAL 858-699-6646 6172 PASEO VALENCIARANCHO SANTA FE SAT 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. SHANNON HAGAN, COLDWELL BANKER/HOST: VICKIE BURGESS 858-755-0075 16078 RAMBLAS DE LAS FLORES SAT 12 P.M. - 4 P.M. & SUN 12 P.M. - 3 P.M. K. ANN BRIZOLIS, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 858-756-4382 18127 VIA ROSWITHA SAT & SUN 2 P.M. - 5 P.M. K. ANN BRIZOLIS, PACIFIC SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY 858-756-4382

ENCINITAS

RANCHO SANTA FE

SAT 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-335-2008 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-205-3077 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858 243-5278 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858 243-5278 SAT/SUN 1-4 PM 619-733-8087 SAT & SUN 10 A.M. - 5 P.M. 858 243-5278 SAT & SUN 10 A.M. - 5 P.M. 858 243-5278 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-395-4068 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-335-2008 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-395-4068 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-395-7525 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-395-7525 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858 243-5278 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M 858 243-5278 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-245-9851 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-775-7355 SAT 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-395-7525 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-357-6567 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-395-7525 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-395-7525 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858 243-5278 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-245-9851 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. SUN 2 P.M. - 5 P.M. 858-524-3077 SUN 12 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-395-5919 SUN 12 P.M. - 5 P.M. 858-524-3077 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 619-994-7653 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-442-049 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 619-813-8222/310-740-5153 SAT & SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-756-4481 SUN 1 P.M. - 4 P.M. 858-756-4481 SAT 12 P.M. - 3 P.M. 858-449-2027

SOLANA BEACH

$912,000 640 W SOLANA CIRCLE #19 SAT 2 P.M. - 5 P.M. 2BD / 2BA JENNIFER ANDERSON, WILLIS ALLEN REAL ESTATE 858-524-3077 For the most up-to-date list of open houses, mapped locations, and premium listings with photos, visit rsfreview.com/open-houses-list/

Contact April Gingras | april@rsfreview.com | 858-876-8863


www.encinitasadvocate.com

PAGE A20 - JULY 22, 2016 - ENCINITAS ADVOCATE

OLIVENHAIN

ENCINITAS

LEUCADIA

Beautiful sgl. level 4br, 3ba nestled on a quiet cul-de-sac. .5ac lot with sparkling pool.

Panoramic Ocean views from this updated, beautiful custom home located in gated community.

Private true view home on approx 1.28 acre lot. Architectural details abound. Wood floors.

Barbara Martin (760) 271-2710

Ruth Broom (760) 815-1870

Lorie Brakas (760) 822-4433

ENCINITAS

LA COSTA

ENCINITAS

Amazing opportunity have it all. High quality amenities throughout. Close to beach, shops.

Great cul-de-sac location with views & 2 community pools. Approx. 2655 square feet.

Amazing extensively remodeled single level gem in desirable Village Park area.

Kelly Howard (760) 419-1240

Randee Moonjian (760) 522-4145

Ebin Smith (760) 717-4676

CARLSBAD

ENCINITAS

Panoramic easterly views in a great private location. Updated w/ an expansive back yard.

Highly upgraded 2br, 2.5ba plus bonus loft. Private yard w/built-in BBQ. Spa/Pool/Tennis.

4 BEDROOMS, 3 BATHS, $1,495,000-$1,550,000

4 BEDROOMS, 3 BATHS, $1,199,000

5 BEDROOMS, 2.5 BATHS, $849,000

Mickey Booz (760) 505-5554

3 BEDROOMS, 3.1 BATHS, $1,545,000

3 BEDROOMS, 3 BATHS, $995,900

3 BEDROOMS, 2.1 BATHS, $1.35M - $1.395M

3 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS, $819,000-859,000

OCEANSIDE

2 BEDROOMS, 2.1 BATHS, $679,500

3 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS, $525,000

Lorie Duncan & Jan Jarboe-Greider (760) 994-8993

Portia Metras (760) 644-6492

Updated single story in Rancho Del Oro. Spacious, light & bright. Very private backyard.

Encinitas advocate 07 22 16  

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