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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

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ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

Citing a state supreme court order, a Baldwin County resident cut down a barrier to public access and deposited it in a County Commissioner’s office.

COMMENTARY

It’s time we have a governor who takes South Alabama seriously.

BUSINESS

Franklin, Tennessee-based franchise D1 Sports Training & Therapy recently held a grand opening for its new location in Mobile.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

In Mobile’s former Automobile Alley, The Cheese Cottage goes boldly where no gourmet deli has gone before.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA MATTEI Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com DAVID GRAYSON Advertising Sales Executive david@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

As hundreds of luxury apartments are being constructed in downtown Mobile, a shortage of affordable housing is looming.

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ARTS

NEU DAWN is a fashion and art installation event featuring more than 50 local creatives working separately yet together.

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: J. Mark Bryant, Asia Frey, Gabi Garrett, Brian Holbert, Randy Kennedy, John Mullen, Jeff Poor, Ken Robinson, Ron Sivak ON THE COVER: MERCHANT’S PLAZA BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@ lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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American electric blues singer, guitarist and songwriter Seth Walker talks about his recent projects prior to opening the Harvest Nights music series at Weeks Bay Plantation.

FILM

The locally produced microbudget feature film “Bo McGraw & The Legend of the Alabama Bigfoot” debuts at the Crescent Theater Saturday.

MEDIA

FMTALK 106.5 hits the nine year mark in full stride.

SPORTS

The National Collegiate Beach Volleyball Championship returns to Gulf Shores May 4-6 and will be televised by ESPN networks.

STYLE

The fishy, feathery scoop from Boozie and her spies.

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GOING POSTAL

Readers react to Waffle House commentary Editor: I don’t read the Lagniappe every week but enjoy it when I do. I really had to applaud you on the only column (“Scattered logic in comparing Waffle House to Starbucks,” Damn the Torpedoes, April 25-May 1 issue) that really explained the true story of the now-infamous Waffle House story of the grossly over-publicized actions of Chikesia Clemons. You did it with facts and humor and said it exactly like it was instead of how the media and NAACP wanted it to be portrayed. If the same thing had happened to a white, drunk Mardi Gras patron (as it probably has many times), there would not have been a word said or written about it. The drama people cause with their overreaction to every situation is what causes the unrest all over the country; it is very disturbing. Of course, the media is also to blame for spreading and enlarging the facts just to sell their stories. That’s why I’m praising you for telling it like it was instead of how the troublemakers like for it to be portrayed.. Thank you for your honesty, humor and truth. Linda Foy Mobile Editor: It is a sad comment on the state of our culture and public discourse that, given the times, I find your piece this past week “courageous.” I am sure it generated some pushback, but it was a reasonable and sensible analysis. Of course, there are two sides to every issue, and apparently there is some disagreement among witnesses as to what actually happened at the Waffle House. Perhaps footage from the surveillance camera will provide some objective evidence as to what actually transpired. Racism, in all its forms, is wrong. But logic would dictate

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that not every incident that occurs has a racial component. We live in a very “in your face” time in our culture. There is nothing wrong with daring to defend one’s rights. In fact, it is a laudable practice. Rights, however, generally come with responsibilities and civility may well be a responsibility which is not well attended these days. We also live in a time of shameless self-promotion, and there are those who are not above using any incident which occurs to advance an agenda. While I do not pretend to know what is in his heart or his mind, I see where Rev. (Al) Sharpton is coming to town this week to discuss this incident. One has to wonder if it is really worth his time. Perhaps it is; I do not know. If the facts show the police acted wrongly, that should be addressed. We should seek to right wrongs. But stoking societal conflict and division does not serve the greater good. Ms. Clemons’ attorney is quoted in Jason Johnson’s related article using the description “unarmed black woman” four times in a single sentence. It does not appear we will have a color-blind society anytime soon, and more’s the pity. Over the years, I have had several interactions with various law enforcement agencies. I realize I was born about the middle of the last century, but I was taught from kindergarten on to trust and respect the police. As an adult, I learned that the police are as human as anyone else, and do not always act rightly. But I have always found a low-key, respectful approach to work best. Maybe I lack courage, but a “butt-whipping” or being arrested was something I wished to avoid. It just seemed like a counterproductive waste of time to me. As I have said, the police should be held accountable for their actions. But there does seem to be a national “attack” on policing agencies. I would submit that if we do not return to some degree of reasonableness in our interactions with law enforcement, the quality of individuals attracted to the profession will degrade over time. And that serves no one’s best interest. We do live in interesting times. Greg Potter Mobile

The April 25 cover story, “Statewide election could lead to South Alabama power vacuum,” included an incomplete list of candidates for the Alabama Legislature. The complete list is below. MOBILE COUNTY House District 97 Adline Clarke (D) Levi Wright Jr. (D) Stephen McNair (R) House District 98 Napoleon Bracy Jr. (D) House District 99 Gregory Harris (D) Henry Haseeb (D) Sam Jones (D) Burton R. LeFlore (D) Franklin McMillion (D) Gregory Parker (D) Herman Thomas (D) Rico Washington (D) Charles W. Talbert (R) House District 100 Victor Gaston (R) House District 101 Chris Pringle (R)

House District 102 Willie Gray (R) Belinda H. Shoub (R) Shane Stringer (R) House District 103 Barbara Drummond (D) House District 104 Arlene Cunningham Easley (D) Margie Wilcox (R) House District 105 Matthew J. Bentley (R) Chip Brown (R) Cody Dockens (R) Janet Oglesby (R) Senate District 22 Greg Albritton (R) Senate District 33 Michael R. Cooley (D) Victor Tshombe Crawford (D) Vivian Figures (D) Senate District 34 Mark Shirey (R) Jack Williams (R) Senate District 35 Tom Holmes (D) David Sessions (R)

BALDWIN COUNTY Senate District 22 Greg Albritton (R) Senate District 32 Jeff Boyd (R) Chris Elliott (R) David Northcutt (R) Bill Roberts (R) House District 64 Stephen Sexton (R) Harry Shiver (R) Amber Selman-Lynn (D) House District 66 Alan Baker (R) House District 68 Thomas Jackson (D) House District 94 Joe Faust (R) Danielle MashburnMyrick (D) House District 95 Steve McMillan (R) House District 96 Maurice Horsey (D) Web Whiting (D) Matt Simpson (R)


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Point taken

MAN CHAINSAWS PUBLIC BARRICADE, DUMPS DEBRIS IN COUNTY OFFICE

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BY JASON JOHNSON

ast week a man walked into Baldwin County Commission Chairman Chris Elliott’s office and dumped debris from a piece of county property he had chainsawed down earlier that day. It was a rather dramatic escalation in a long battle over waterfront access in Point Clear, but Michael Hutchison said he’s tired of history repeating itself on Zundel Road — an area Baldwin County’s government has repeatedly tried to limit public access to over the years. “They built the little pier down there with steps going down to the water,” Hutchison said. “I’m sure they’re getting constant complaints about people going down there and fishing and stuff.” Alabamians using Zundel Road to access Mobile Bay likely predates Baldwin County itself, but the legal history of the area goes back to a 1971 lawsuit that went all the way to the Alabama Supreme Court after a private landowner sought to have the county vacate its claim to the land.

THAT IS WHY WHEN COUNTY EMPLOYEES PUT ANOTHER BARRICADE UP ON ZUNDEL ROAD ON APRIL 24, HUTCHISON CONTINUED HIS FAMILY’S TRADITION OF TEARING IT RIGHT DOWN. When the county agreed, the landowner put up a wall restricting public access to the waterway — one Hutchison’s father-in-law, John Metzger, promptly knocked down. He was arrested for doing so, but the high court ultimately ruled that the public’s right trumped private preference. “[This isn’t] a vacation of a street initiated by public authority to better serve the public interest, where the rule of public necessity must override private convenience, but on the contrary, we deal with a statutory provision whereby private interests may, under prescribed circumstances, deprive others of the use of a portion of an existing street in order to further the personal desires of such private interests,” the court wrote. “Such a statute should be strictly construed so that it not be an agency for oppression or misuse.” Despite the ruling, Hutchison said there have been several attempts by Baldwin County over the last 15 years to construct a barricade to limit public access to the water— or at the very least vehicular access — using Zundel Road. He also provided Lagniappe several certified letters sent to commissioners in 2005 and again in 2009 to verify those claims. Each letter informed the commission that any such barricade would be “in direct violation” of the state court’s order, and so far each plan to build a barricade has been abandoned. That is why when county employees put another barricade up on Zundel Road on April 24, Hutchison continued his family’s tradition of tearing it right down. “Knowing what we’ve been through in the past, I just said, ‘that’s it.’ I chainsawed the

whole damn thing down and I went up there and dumped it in [Elliot’s] office,” he said. “I sent them a letter saying the same thing — ‘You’re in violation of the Alabama Supreme Court’s 1972 decision, and the remains of your illegal barricade are on the floor in Chris Elliott’s office.’” Only Commissioners Charles Gruber and Frank Burt were in office the last two times similar barricades were considered, but Elliott’s district includes Point Clear and Fairhope. Elliot did not respond to emails seeking comment on Hutchison’s claims — he’s campaigning for the State Senate seat being resigned by Trip Pittman — but Commissioner Tucker Dorsey confirmed debris from the county barricade, mostly lumber and chains, was dumped in Elliott’s office last week. He also said he was somewhat taken aback by Hutchison’s response. “It’s not OK to do that. That’d be like you not liking a stop sign, so you cut it down and bring it over to the police station,” Dorsey said. “I’m really surprised at the way they’ve handled this with a knee-jerk, flying-off-the handle reaction. This wasn’t up 12 hours before they cut it down.” Nevertheless, Dorsey said there aren’t currently any plans to pursue criminal charges against Hutchison. He also said the barricade was relatively inexpensive to construct. According to Dorsey, county attorneys are in the process of reviewing the legal history of Zundel Road, which he wasn’t personally familiar with before. However, Dorsey did say the county’s goal was not to limit access to the waterfront but to make sure it can be accessed safely. County engineer Joey Dunley made the call to put a barricade that allowed for access by foot or on something the size of a golf cart, but restricted vehicular access. There is a public parking lot adjacent to the road off Scenic Highway 98 and Dorsey said “there’s still plenty of room” to walk or take a kayak or canoe to water. He claims the road “is too narrow” for cars to turn around safely. “We’re happy for people to use it. We just built a new pier and have a parking lot over there at the old Brodbeck store,” Dorsey said. “They’re trying to say this is an attempt to keep people out for rich people on the water, but we’re trying to make sure people don’t drive into the bay.” Hutchison claims the 46-year-old court decision ensures the right to vehicular access. While the actual order issued on April 20, 1972, doesn’t explicitly mention vehicles, the decision is based on property owners being able to access to the water as well as U.S. Route 98. While it’s unclear how the county may proceed, Hutchison said the County Commission has repeatedly made attempts to violate or circumvent state law and he and his wife, Robin, are fed up with it. Earlier this week, he told Lagniappe Baldwin County District Attorney Robert Wilters’ Office had gotten involved at his request, though he didn’t elaborate. “We went to them with a letter because of the continued disregard of the law,” he said. “It’s the second time we’ve had to intervene and stop Baldwin County from breaking the law.”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

One door closes … CITY LOOKS FOR BUILDING MAINTENANCE FUNDING STREAM BY DALE LIESCH

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ayor Sandy Stimpson would like to deal with a backlog of building maintenance costs in a way similar to how the city dealt with an infrastructure backlog, but with one glaring difference. This time he doesn’t want to use a tax increase. Stimpson admitted the capital improvement plan, which uses some $30 million from a sales tax increase to put toward infrastructure costs, has been a popular way to deal with a $250 million backlog. Using the program as an example, he told a gaggle of reporters at Central Fire Station in late April he’d like to find a funding stream to deal with $224 million in maintenance costs on city facilities. Various structures, including the Civic Center, recreation centers, fire stations and other buildings, are currently in need of $83 million in deferred maintenance. The city owns 367 buildings and 1,159 parcels of land, Stimpson said. Another $142 million needs to be set aside for future maintenance costs over the next 10 years, according to a facilities assessment completed by the CBRE Group. “The goal at the end of the day is to have vibrant spaces for our citizens when they go into a recreation center, when they go into a park or they come into a city office or fire station … we want it at a standard higher, certainly, than where we are today,” Stimpson said. “So, as we set that standard, that’s going to require us to look at lots of things we’re doing today because coming up with a funding stream, like we did for CIP, where we did a penny sales tax — raising taxes to solve this problem is not going to happen.” Instead, the city would look to cut non-essential

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government services while consolidating and even selling some city buildings based on the recommendations from the assessment. The city would look to create a funding stream of roughly $20 million per year for maintenance. “That will not be a one-time conversation; that will be an ongoing conversation,” Stimpson said. “All of this will be an ongoing process.” Stimpson didn’t completely rule out using the CIP

VARIOUS STRUCTURES, INCLUDING THE CIVIC CENTER, RECREATION CENTERS, FIRE STATIONS AND OTHER BUILDINGS, ARE CURRENTLY IN NEED OF $83 MILLION IN DEFERRED MAINTENANCE. THE CITY OWNS 367 BUILDINGS AND 1,159 PARCELS OF LAND. ” money currently earmarked for each of the seven City Council districts for building maintenance costs. “I think that CIP dollars would be a last, last, last resort,” he said. “I mean, CIP is a very popular program and I think the citizens will find out this is going to be a very popular program, too. So, if the City Council — they love the CIP program — they will do everything

they can to protect it, but that’s going to mean they have to do some other things differently.” While recommendations range from consolidating city-owned buildings housing different offices of the Mobile Police Department to a plan Stimpson hinted at during a meeting of the Mobile City Council to bring together police and Mobile Fire-Rescue headquarters, none of those decisions have been made, city spokeswoman Laura Byrne said. For example, maintenance costs for the police and fire headquarters alone over the next 10 years could top out at more than $7 million, according to information released by the city. Currently, the city budgets $1.2 million per year to maintain all of its facilities, Stimpson said. Stimpson did mention some properties that could be easier to part with. “There are probably a number of small properties that we don’t need to own that we’re having to mow them and take care of them,” he said. “We need to be creative as other cities have, and if you’ve got a property that for some reason the city ended up with and the city is having to maintain the lot, we’d be better off figuring out a way to give it to the next-door neighbor who’s willing to maintain it.” However, to sell property there has to be mutual interest. Georgia-based developer Pace Burt, who once toured Central Fire Station with an eye toward turning it into apartments, said the ability to sell city-owned property would be based largely on its location. He admitted the process can be “tricky” when bidding is involved. “It depends on the building,” he said. “It depends on where it’s located.” In Mobile’s case, access to historic tax credits helps, Burt said. Dianne Irby, executive director of engineering and development, said while the report makes a number of recommendations, the city may not act on all of them. The assessment produced 139 reports on structures totaling 3.4 million square feet. The assessment looked at overall conditions of the roofing, windows, interiors, HVAC systems and plumbing, as well as life safety and structural components. The report estimated repair costs for each deficiency, according to information from the city. As for a timeline to get things started, Stimpson said the sooner, the better. “If I could do something tomorrow, I’d do it,” Stimpson said. “If I had the sole ability to do anything to start the process tomorrow I’d do it. That’s how quickly I believe it needs to start happening.”


BAYBRIEF | BAYOU LA BATRE

‘Nothing but a mudhole’ BAYOU LA BATRE BUSINESSES DISPUTE PROPOSED REZONING

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BY JASON JOHNSON

ensions are rising in Bayou La Batre over a set of proposed zoning changes that have longtime business owners fearing the worst and some city officials at their wits’ end. Members of the City Council are gearing up to consider a 200-page zoning ordinance the city planning board has spent the past 18 months developing with assistance from the South Alabama Regional Planning Commission. Yet many residents are concerned the proposed changes might create hardships for some of the industries that earned the city its nickname as the “Seafood Capital of Alabama.” Those concerns have been aired in the open at recent public meetings, but things came to a head last week. As a handful of citizens were speaking out against the proposed zoning overhaul at an April 26 meeting, Mayor Terry Downey reportedly referred to the city he leads as “nothing but a mudhole.” “It was the most ludicrous thing I’ve ever heard any elected official say in my life. I’ve had some good times and bad times here, but to say the city’s ‘nothing but a mudhole,’ it was truly shocking,” Councilman Henry Barnes recalled. No Lagniappe reporter attended the April 26 meeting where Downey is said to have made that comment, but Barnes and at least three others who did have confirmed the allegation. Many others residents attended the meeting as well, and the social media backlash was swift. Less than 24 hours after it was made, a Facebook post about Downey’s “mudhole” comment had been shared more than 300 times, with the vast majority of posters criticizing the remark. Downey, who “doesn’t do Facebook,” said he believes

the context of his statement has been incorrectly portrayed. He told Lagniappe the statement “wasn’t meant to be mean spirited,” only “factual,” adding he has no problem with the city he calls home. “We know we dwell at four feet above sea level, but I’m not saying we’re going to run away from it. People used to say, ‘You get that Bayou mud between your toes.’” Downey said. “We’re a wetland zone … let’s build something. If Bayou La Batre is a mudhole, we’ll fix it.” Others, however, don’t seem ready to believe that. Barnes told Lagniappe the mayor seemed to be upset that the zoning plan crafted by the planning board he and his wife serve on was not receiving much support from the community or from the members of the council. “He could see he wasn’t going to get this zoning ordinance passed and just seemed to get frustrated,” Barnes said. “I know I’m not going to vote in favor of it. I can’t speak for the rest.” Whether residents are prepared to move past Downey’s comment remains to be seen, but the city is still headed for a debate on what could be the first changes to its zoning laws since 2005. Most opposition so far has focused on land use and particularly how existing businesses will be affected by the changes being considered. If approved as written, it does appear the ordinance would impact the approved uses in areas currently housing some long-standing local businesses. Areas previously used by waterfront industries could be rezoned and repurposed in favor of ecotourism-based businesses such as kayak and canoe rentals. However, it would also move those areas previously used by industry out of federal flood plains expected to expand in 2019.

Steiner Shipyard, which has built vessels in South Mobile County for decades, could see its facility on Hemley Street rezoned into an area for “single residential” homes as opposed to the new “working waterfront” zone that would permit similar operations under the new plan. While the ordinance allows businesses to be grandfathered in as “nonconformities,” several stipulations could revoke that status and some are outside of an owner’s control. For example, if a hurricane were to damage more than 50 percent of a building allowed as a “nonconformity,” the business would be unable to rebuild and operate in the same area because the new structure would have to then comply with the new zoning ordinances moving forward. At a recent meeting, Russell Steiner said a hurricane could easily set back businesses like his. “I’ve been there since 1976, and we’ve built around 400 boats. You can imagine how many people I’ve worked with over the years and how much has gone into this town,” he added. “I’d like to be able to stay in business. I’ve felt we’ve always been an asset to this city.” Speaking with Lagniappe last week, Downey said there’s “no ill intent” toward any industry in Bayou La Batre hidden in the zoning ordinance, especially those that have traditionally generated a large portion of the tax revenue keeping the city afloat. He did say the changes are aimed at finding a balance between residential and industrial areas and diversifying the businesses in the city, but said he and the council are happy to work with any business that feels it could suffer hardship under the new ordinances. “We’d be foolish to try to put somebody out of business. We know what the businesses mean to us, but also I represent the people that live there,” he said. “We have to try to be balanced and look for other sources of revenue. We’re not Gulf Shores or Orange Beach — we know who we are, but I feel like we have to start somewhere.” Some opposed to the changes, including Barnes, have said they have no problem with increasing recreational tourism opportunities or diversifying the types of local businesses — they just don’t want to bring hardship to the industries the city was built on that continue to generate a substantial portion of its tax revenue. “Bayou La Batre is and will always be the ‘Seafood Capital of Alabama,’” Barnes said. “If you can’t buy something in the Bayou for a commercial boat, it can be found. If it can’t be found, there are people in the Bayou that can build it.” A public hearing to address the proposed zoning changes has been scheduled for 6 p.m., May 14, at the Bayou La Batre Civic Center on Padgett Switch Road.

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BAYBRIEF | BUSINESS

Grand tour

GRAND HOTEL WINDING DOWN $32 MILLION RENOVATION BY JOHN MULLEN

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he Grand Hotel at Point Clear is in the middle of a grand reveal as officials there are unveiling $32 million worth of renovations begun two years ago. Some things have been moved around, just about everything has been spruced up and several new amenities await guests. “This is really a resort where you can find anything to do,” General Manager Scott Tripoli said. “You can go golfing, you can go to the spa, you can have a great meal in up to four different restaurants and two or three others across the way, all while enjoying your favorite drink. And all of it can be done while sitting on the water.” Guests will likely notice the most changes in areas along the shore of Mobile Bay, where pool attractions were expanded, recreational options added and the hedgerow that formerly blocked views of the bay from the pool have been removed. “We knew when we started the renovations of the resort the pool area was going to be one of the more popular areas with the revisions that we made,” Sales and Marketing Director Kevin Hellmich said. “For younger children, we also added a splash pad when you walk in. These items are open and guests have already enjoyed them.” The hotel is adding 90 new bicycles, including bikes for kids, six paddle boards, two Hobie Cat sailboats and two water cycles. Cabanas have also been added on the bay and around the pool area. The pool cabanas will have TVs, drapery for privacy and bar service, and will be

available for daily rental. The recreation lawn has added a putting green to go with croquet, cornhole, horseshoes and a pingpong table. Lighting will enable guests to play on the lawn at night. All of the 400-plus guest rooms saw some renovations, refurbishing with paint, furnishings and/or expansions. Many of the rooms will be available to guests by mid-May as will the restaurants Bucky’s and The Local Market in the lobby. The restaurants Southern Roots, Bayside Grill and 1847 Bar are planned for Aug. 1 openings. Jubilee Point restaurant is serving breakfast, lunch and dinner and providing nightly entertainment while construction winds down. When Bucky’s reopens it will have outside dining as well as four fire pits for guests to enjoy. Construction continues on the lawn outside Bucky’s and will have additional fire pits. Only one tree was removed during the project, Tripoli said, but it is still on the grounds and being used in the renovated lobby of the main building. He said it’s part of preserving the traditions of the hotel, which first opened in 1847. “All of that wood is being repurposed,” he said. “Our front desk where you check in, the furniture at that front desk was made out of that tree.” With the summer season coming fast, Tripoli said the resort is hiring for positions in all areas and has hundreds of openings. He said during the offseason the resort has 500 employees but needs about 850 during the summer.

BAYBRIEF | ELECTION 2018

Baldwin County District 1

LONG-TIME INCUMBENT, POLITICAL FIRST-TIMER SEEK COMMISSION SEAT

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BY JOHN MULLEN

rank Burt has had many careers over the years and served on numerous boards, committees and panels. But what he considers his most important job is the District 1 seat on the Baldwin County Commission. Burt is seeking his ninth term representing north Baldwin County and will face political newcomer Jeb Ball in the June 5 Republican primary. There is no Democratic opposition for the seat. “I am presently serving my eighth term on the commission and devote myself full time to my commission duties,” Burt said. He said he was first interested in running for the seat after the death of his father in 1988 and has served ever since. Ball, a lifelong resident of the county, currently works as program director for Baldwin Substance Abuse Services supervising courtordered classes. He says Burt has served the county well, but residents have told him new leadership is needed. Both cite transportation and job recruiting as vital to Baldwin County in the coming years, including landing a tenant at the South Alabama Mega Site in District 1. “I believe that we must complete the Baldwin Beach Express from I-65 to I-10 and bring good quality manufacturing industries to our Mega Site in North Baldwin County,” Burt said.

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Ball says recruiting new industries to the Mega Site will lead to growth on the northern end of the county to counter the burgeoning population and housing boom in South Baldwin. “I will work in making sure we land the right type of industry to the Mega Site that will stimulate the much-needed growth in North Baldwin,” he said. “This will bring jobs and families to the area, which in turn will alleviate some of the strain we are experiencing in the south end of the county and on the Eastern Shore.” Burt said during his earlier terms he helped the county get back on sound financial footing, and he and other commissioners have helped the school board in the same ways. “However, much remains to be done to maintain our quality of life, protect our environment, our abundance of high-quality water in our streams, rivers and bays,” Burt said. “We need to continue to pave the unpaved roads, upgrading road safety, improve our access to quality internet service and keep public safety at the forefront.” Ball said he is running for the seat to make a difference in the county he’s called home for 46 years. “I have come to a point in my life where I feel called to serve my community,” Ball said. “I understand how important it is to have a commissioner who understands our area and will fight to make sure our voices are heard.”


BAYBRIEF | SELF-HELP

Compulsive consumption OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS CONFERENCE DRAWS HUNDREDS TO MOBILE BY GABRIEL TYNES

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t was lunchtime at the Overeaters Anonymous conference and almost everyone had a plate of food. A single plate. But J.C. was walking around the footprint of the Mobile Marriott two weekends ago, getting in the amount of daily steps she accounts for with a smartwatch. Retired from a career in the federal government, the 68-year-old was in town for the annual SOAR 8 Recovery Convention and Business Assembly. “I’ll eat a big breakfast, have a snack for lunch and then eat a healthy dinner between 7 and 8 o’clock,” she said. “I used to eat almost every hour I was awake and thought about eating almost every moment I was awake. On top of that, I often dreamed about eating when I was asleep. I was always surrounded by food and if there wasn’t food in sight or I couldn’t smell the aroma of food, I would have a panic attack.” For her, rock bottom came with a diabetes diagnosis and inability to be active with her grandchildren. But compulsive eating wasn’t easy to leave behind. “I went to my first OA meeting in 1993 but didn’t go back until 2002,” she recalled. “I weighed 312 pounds when I had gastric bypass surgery, lost 112 pounds in the months after the surgery, then put on 85 pounds after I relapsed. “Eventually I started working the program, got a sponsor, then another sponsor, then made sure everyone knew I had a problem, then started being accountable to myself and everyone else … if I relapsed again, I knew that was going to be the end of me.” She still has several “triggers,” including large

amounts of food such as at a grocery store, buffet or luncheon, like the one that was taking place inside the hotel. To manage her compulsion, she shops for groceries online, sits in booths at a restaurant so she can’t see other people’s plates and never, ever goes to buffets. “I’ve fallen asleep at a buffet after 11 or 12 plates of food before,” she said. “Imagine how humiliating it is for a 300-pound woman to be awakened by the waiter and told ‘the food’s gone — it’s time to go.’” Overeaters Anonymous is a 12-step program styled after Alcoholics Anonymous seeking to confront binge eating disorder and other eating disorders. SOAR 8 governs OA meetings in the Southeast United States as well as Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and the Caribbean. There are at least five regular meetings in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Back at the luncheon, nothing seemed amiss. Attendees were young and old, male and female, white, black and Hispanic. There was a man walking with the help of a cane and a woman breathing with the help of an oxygen tank, but otherwise this group could have been part of any convention. “Sarah,” one of the organizers of last weekend’s event and a member of the SOAR 8 board of directors, said people with compulsive eating disorders are not necessarily obese or sickly. “Many of us have had gastric bypass or bariatric surgery and still struggled with weight,” she said. “But OA isn’t about weight loss and exercise. It’s about loving your life and learning how to have a healthy relationship with food … it’s about support.”

She noted compulsive overeaters come from all walks of life, but are generally perfectionists, egotistical and people pleasers. “But most of us are also damaged in one way or another … there is usually an underlying issue.” For “Phoenix,” a 5-foot “retired lady” with rainbow-colored streaks in her gray hair, that issue was rooted in childhood, when she said she couldn’t meet her parents’ expectations. “There was a lot of competition in my family and I always felt like I wasn’t good enough,” she said. “I sort of raised myself and kept my nose stuck in fantasy novels, and that lonely little girl sent me to the food. Eating became a ritual and the most important part of my life.” On a necklace around her neck was a photo of her 28 years ago, almost unrecognizable at more than 250 pounds and with a sour look on her face. “I tried every doctor and fad diet and health spa you can imagine before I came to my first meeting, and it was OA that made me realize the amount of guilt and shame I was carrying. So I kept coming back and it taught me to interact with food in a way that’s not off-putting. Plus there was unity … I still struggle with compulsion today, I think we all do, but it’s manageable and I’ve turned my life around.” Like alcoholics or drug addicts, OA participants use such words as “abstinence” and “sobriety” to describe their recovery. They introduce themselves with their first name and admit they are a compulsive overeater. There’s cursing. Then they hold hands and recite the Serenity Prayer. The luncheon speaker said it was easier for her to overcome an amphetamine addiction than to stop eating compulsively. “Gene,” who reads Lagniappe regularly and extended an invitation to the conference, keeps a daily weight log and calorie counter on his phone. He’s completed all 12 steps of the program and has attended meetings regularly since 1991. “If you buy into the program you come to believe in miracles,” he said. “Alcoholics can still drink non-alcoholic beverages but food addicts don’t have the option of eating non-food food. You need to eat to survive, but in our case, food can consume you.” He took notes on scrap pieces of paper and quoted self-help book passages from memory. “I had completely lost the ability to make any decisions about food and it affected every relationship in my life,” he said. “But this is a big part of my life now and I’m probably alive because of it.”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Outside ‘the box’ MOBILE CITY COUNCIL HEARS EMPLOYEE CONCERNS OVER TREATMENT AND PAY BY DALE LIESCH

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ublic works employees demanded better pay and better treatment during the Mobile City Council meeting Tuesday. Wesley Young, a retired public works employee and president of the City of Mobile Public Services Workers advocacy group, told councilors of alleged harassment by a supervisor of workers within the department. He said a group of 13 employees brought those concerns to a city attorney in 2016 and requested a meeting with Mayor Sandy Stimpson. He said they still haven’t heard back from the administration. “He knows about it,” Young said of Stimpson. “His staff knows about it.” One of the allegations, backed up by Councilman Fred Richardson, is a department supervisor’s use of “time out” for employees. Following the meeting, Young and a current department employee explained the “time out” was known by employees as “the box.” The employee said “the box” was used as punishment for employees who didn’t do exactly what “the master” wanted. The employee described it as a room made purposely dark by drawing the curtains, but with a television. While employees weren’t locked in the room, “the box” was monitored and they weren’t allowed to leave. “It seems these employees don’t have any value,” Young said. “I’m here to tell you they do have value.”

The treatment has led some employees to retire earlier than they wanted to, as other employees have quit and not been replaced, Young said. For instance, the city has lost 13 garbage truck drivers and hasn’t replaced them, Young said. The attrition is leading to long hours for those who remain. Young told councilors sanitation employees are working 12- to 14-hour days and coming in on weekends just to get the job done. The reduction in force, Young said, is a calculated move toward privatization of the service, which he said has already begun. As an example he used comments Stimpson recently made about cutting non-essential government services to help pay for building maintenance. “This is nonsense,” Young said. “I’m not going to watch these people go down because of some politician.” The public works employees also asked councilors to consider them for the same type of raises the city gave first responders last year. Young said public works employees wanted a $5,000 raise, as well as a step raise for each five years each employee has been with the city. While police and firefighters were given $5,000 raises and step raises last year, other employees making less than $45,000 per year were given $250 bonuses. “They didn’t receive anything but a pacifier,” Young said. “They’re just as important as any other employee in the city. They deserve to be treated like it.”

Council Vice President Levon Manzie said the employees’ complaints don’t “fall on deaf ears,” adding if Stimpson puts a raise in the budget, he and his colleagues would support it. Manzie said it was he and Richardson who had adjusted fiscal year 2018’s budget to give employees the bonus. “I’m in support if the administration brings forth an item that does what you’re looking for,” he said. “I’ll support it.” Richardson said he was concerned about the allegations of abuse and called for an investigation into the claims. “He’s made this allegation,” Richardson said. “Even if it’s not true, we need to know.” City attorney Ricardo Woods told councilors administration officials would look into the harassment allegations and report back to council what they legally could. Administration officials made no other comments on the issue during the meeting. Lagniappe reached out to city spokeswoman Laura Byrne for a statement, but hadn’t received one as of press time. In other business, the council discussed possible policy changes in regard to food trucks after attorney William Casey said a food truck owner he represents was told he couldn’t sell at Herndon-Sage Park. Casey said in March his client was told by someone identifying himself as a coach that he couldn’t serve food out of his food truck because an unlicensed vendor was already there. “My client checked in with the authorities and got permits to sell food at Sage Park,” Casey said. “He was told by another vendor to leave. It’s obviously inappropriate.” Parks Superintendent Shadrack Collins told the food truck operator and the other vendor that food truck sales of any kind were not allowed at the parks. As Assistant City Attorney Flo Kessler and a number of councilors pointed out, ice cream trucks are at various park locations on an almost daily basis. The problem, Kessler said, is the ban on food truck sales was a verbal policy that wasn’t often enforced. The so-called “on-the-books” policy is to allow food trucks to serve food at parks not already served by a contracted concession stand vendor. A request for proposals for such a vendor has been put out for Sage Park, but no vendor has been signed. The council plans to discuss the issue further, a stance Kessler agreed with. In the meantime, acting Chief of Staff Paul Wesch told councilors the administration would come up with a more formal policy and make it publicly known.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Use of force WAFFLE HOUSE ARREST CONTINUES TO DRAW NATIONAL ATTENTION BY JASON JOHNSON

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he arrest of 25-year-old Chikesia Clemons at a Saraland Waffle House is continuing to envelop the arresting officers’ department and the corporate restaurant chain in controversy. An African-American woman, Clemons was arrested by three white officers from the Saraland Police Department after an early morning disturbance April 22 that left Clemons in handcuffs and the 24/7 breakfast chain facing calls for a national boycott. Footage of Clemons’ arrest quickly spread online, perhaps because it ended with her partially nude on the restaurant floor after she was wrestled to the ground by two unidentified SPD officers. In the scuffle, Clemons’ breasts became exposed over the top of her shirt and an officer told her “I’m about to break your arm.” According to SPD, police were called to the Waffle House at around 2 a.m. because Clemons and two others brought in an outside beverage, which the wait staff believed to be alcoholic. They also say Clemons threatened employees with physical violence after the group was asked to leave. To the contrary, Clemons’ family maintains she was only trying to file a corporate complaint after a disagreement about a 50-cent charge for plastic utensils. Waffle House has since acknowledged this isn’t a company practice. Investigators with SPD say they spoke with eight witnesses, two of whom were black, about the events leading to Clemons’ arrest. They also presented a recording of an employee’s call to police apparently corroborating the allegation Clemons’ group “came in with alcohol.” However, Clemons’ attorney, Benjamin Crump, released signed statements from two other witnesses — both white women — who say the waitress was “just as loud” as Clemons when the pair was arguing and heard no threats by Clemons or her friends.

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Her supporters have also noted the call to police mentioned nothing about threats of violence, a gun or Clemons’ alleged statement that she could “come back and shoot this place up.” “The first officer came in, he went straight for [her], pushed her against the glass window and sat her down by force. He did not say anything to her, nor did he extend her the courtesy of asking her to step outside so he could understand what was going on,” a witnesses wrote. “The way they tossed her to the ground was extremely hard and completely unnecessary.” Calls for a national boycott of all Waffle House restaurants picked up steam after the company issued two statements standing by its employees and the actions of the Saraland police. The corporation’s public relations nightmare grew after another video surfaced online last week depicting an African-American locked outside of the famously always-open restaurant while several white customers ate inside. On Tuesday evening, after this publication’s press deadline, national civil rights activist and television show host Rev. Al Sharpton was in Mobile for a community meeting about Clemons’ arrest and what he billed as other concerns with the actions of local police — the third such meeting since the April 22 incident occurred. At another meeting held April 26 by the Mobile County Chapter of the NAACP, President David Smith sought information about other incidents involving the SPD. No one made specific allegations against SPD, but many raised concerns about police officers’ treatment of minorities in general. Clemons made her first public appearance on Sharpton’s MSNBC cable program, “PoliticsNation,” over the weekend along with her attorney. She did not speak to the details of her encounter with SPD because she still faces charges for

disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. However, she did discuss the effects of the arrest. “It’s just so hard on me. I can’t eat. I can’t sleep,” she told Sharpton on the program. “I’m constantly crying. I have a 6-year-old daughter I’m trying to be strong for, but she sees me crying and she starts crying.” As he has before, Crump said the SPD’s handling of the situation violated his client’s “civil and human rights” — claiming the officers involved “assaulted, threatened, choked and body slammed an unarmed black woman” over 50-cent plastic utensils. On the same program, Sharpton decried discussions about Clemons’ arrest record as an “assault” on her character, though he did — as several others have online — bring up the criminal history of the woman many believe to have called the police on Clemons. That woman is Goldie Faye Tindle, 48, who has several previous criminal charges in Mobile County for the possession and distribution of controlled substances. Her mugshot and record have been shared widely, but neither Waffle House nor SPD have confirmed her employment. Clemons does mention a “Goldie” by name in the video of her arrest, though it sounds like the female employee in the recording released by SPD identifies herself by another name. As for Clemons, she has also been arrested several times locally on misdemeanor charges, at least two of which appear to have stemmed from incidents similar to the April 22 incident in Saraland. According to the Mobile Police Department, Clemons was arrested in 2011 after a fight at an Applebee’s on Airport Boulevard and was later charged with third-degree assault. In 2017, she was charged with theft and harassment after a fight at a BP service station on Dauphin Street. “The victim stated she and suspect Chikesia Clemons got into a verbal altercation and began fighting,” MPD spokeswoman Charlette Solis wrote. “The victim stated after she and Clemons ceased fighting, Clemons then stole her cell phone and wallet off the hood of her vehicle.” The only other significant charge on Clemons’ record is a third-degree domestic violence arrest from 2016 where “the victim sustained a minor injury.” According to MPD, the circumstances leading to that arrest are unclear. Though an initial arrest report included a second misdemeanor labeled as “menacing [knife],” Clemons was never formally charged in the incident. Records that may help determine the conclusion of those charges weren’t available in the state’s online judicial filing system, Alacourt. So far, SPD has given no indication it intends to take disciplinary action against the officers who arrested Clemons. The department also has yet to identify the officers involved or respond to requests from Crump to have an independent third party investigate the arrest as well. Coverage of this story will continue as it develops at lagniappemobile.com.


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

South Alabama needs a champion as governor ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

OR PERHAPS THE NEXT TELEVISED DEBATE COULD FEATURE THE CANDIDATES LINED UP, KNOCKED OUT AND READY FOR A GROUP SCOPE. PEOPLE DO LOVE REALITY TV. ”

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year before. True, it’s not a big deal and the results were the same, but it does make you feel a little like the ugly stepchild. What we need in this part of the state — the second largest population center in Alabama, by the way — is a governor who can look south and see more than the port and the gubernatorial beach house. We haven’t had that. Frankly, I have to wonder if it isn’t time for the political Balkanization of Alabama. We need to look at Montgomery as a battleground and the leadership from the rest of the state as unconcerned about our needs at best. Is a governor who won’t sign mimosas at brunch into law going to do anything to get the I-10 bridge built? So far this election season, a few gubernatorial candidates have sat in the hallowed Lagniappe conference room and talked about how important this area is to the state. We’ll take them at their word until proven otherwise. Perhaps at some point before the primaries in June, Gov. Ivey will become available to the press and the public in this neck of the woods and we can ask her about her plans for South Alabama, and maybe even why she didn’t sign that bill or stand up for us getting our fair share of BP money when she was lieutenant governor. And maybe we’ll get her latest dental records as well. Somebody needs to become the candidate for the southern part of the state, whether it’s Sen. Hightower or a carpetbagger who realizes there’s no way to win without us. We need candidates to show us the love, not their colonoscopy results.

THEGADFLY

reasons for giving us all a peek where only his gastroenterologist has gone before is clearly an attempt to knock a chink in the sitting governor’s armor. As she sits back avoiding debates and launching one ad after another making absurd claims about the wild successes of her year-old governorship, Kay Ivey is seen by most political observer as simply coasting to the Republican nomination. Whether that will happen or not, she’s been a tough one to engage. Hightower seems to be attempting, in not-so-subtle fashion, to draw attention to Ivey’s age — 73. He bluntly makes the point that we don’t want to have another governor who can’t finish his/her term, which kind of does make me want to have a peek at her colon, liver or heart — whichever the senator feels is most likely to sputter out over the next four years. But in an age when we can’t even see the president’s tax returns, the chances of buffaloing Ivey into telling us how much high blood-pressure medication she eats each day (if she, in fact, does) are slim. The frustration is understandable, though. Smart politics for Ivey in this primary is to make it as dull as possible. Showing up to a debate and possibly getting your clock cleaned is never a great idea for the frontrunner, but ducking them doesn’t give voters much opportunity to kick the tires when all the models are on the same showroom floor. Following the hurricane of ridiculousness and corruption that was the Robert Bentley administration, it makes sense Ivey has a high approval rating. So far, at least, she hasn’t had affairs with advisers, created secret payment schemes for top aides or called upon the head of ALEA to act like a mafia goon. But over the past year Ivey also hasn’t really given us much oomph. She’s promoted sort of a feel-good, maw-maw-is-cooking-you-Sunday-dinner type of vibe, but I do think it’s worth asking ourselves if a 40-year denizen of Goat Hill politics is really who we want leading this state into the future. And maybe that’s what we should all be focused on more than liver spots and cholesterol levels. Most certainly for the people of Southwest Alabama, continuing to support candidates who treat this part of

the state like captured territory is obviously not in our best interest. We have repeatedly been trampled by the Legislature and heard nary a word from whichever governor was sitting in office. The theft of millions in BP money that rightfully should have come to Mobile and Baldwin counties is a prime example. The rest of the state simply wanted the money and we didn’t have the clout to do anything about it. Bentley went right along, and so did Kay Ivey. The result was our two counties — which were actually physically and economically affected by the spill — ended up with $120 million, while about $540 million was scooped up by the Legislature and the Luv Guv to pump into the financial holes created by their poor management. It’s amazing to think Mobile and Baldwin didn’t even rate getting half of the BP money. If you need a more recent example of this kind of dismissive treatment, look no further than the recently enacted “brunch bill.” Retiring state Rep. James Buskey put together a bill that would simply bring Mobile County in line with most of the state and allow our municipalities to decide whether they would allow alcohol sales in restaurants on Sundays before noon. Ivey wouldn’t sign it. She just quietly let it become law without it carrying her Jane Hancock. For some reason, though, she quickly signed a similar bill into law for Jefferson County. How strange. If drinking alcohol goes against Gov. Ivey’s personal moral code I could perhaps understand her desire not to sign either of these bills, but in both cases they were giving the counties the same rights almost every other county got the

Cartoon/Laura Mattei

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he fast-approaching election for governor finally hit its stride this week when state Sen. Bill Hightower threw a curveball and released his medical records while calling on other gubernatorial candidates to do likewise. Included in the 15-page dossier on Hightower’s health were notes from his doc about his excellent health and the enviable results of his latest colonoscopy. Hopefully Hightower’s example will lead to voters being able to lay out the colonoscopy results of all gubernatorial candidates for side-by-side comparison before heading to the polling booths. Or perhaps the next televised debate could feature the candidates lined up, knocked out and ready for a group scope. People do love reality TV. I’m going to skip the obvious joke about how such a procedure would definitively tell us which candidates are most full of (expletive deleted), and just note Hightower’s

ANOTHER LATE NIGHT AT WAFFLE HOUSE...


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

When did ‘facts’ stop mattering? ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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realize the world is becoming more and more polarized. Since the last presidential election (which seems like a century ago), people have retreated into their own “camps,” watching only their preferred television networks, reading only publications or websites that confirm their views, staying in their own social media bubbles by hiding all of the “libtards” or “RepubliKKKans” who disagree with them and the like. These “camps” are generally divided along political, racial and/or socioeconomic lines. I totally get that human beings have strongly held beliefs and convictions. We should! It’s one of the things that separate us from the rest of the animal kingdom. And people should absolutely be proud to stand up and defend those beliefs. Sadly, we used to be able to do that in a civil and respectful manner. Maybe we disagreed with our friends, family members or neighbors on an issue or had a different candidate’s campaign sign planted in our front yard, but we didn’t think they were “evil” because they thought differently than us. There have been a number of factors that have pushed us away from civil discourse over the years. It’s not just one election or one president. I hope we will one day get back to a place when our leaders are applauded for reaching across the aisle and making compromises, rather than being run out of town for it. And I hope we can one day have discussions with our friends with differing viewpoints without it ending up in the dissolution of that friendship. I hope. But while I can understand folks feeling strongly about their beliefs, what I find most troubling is the blatant disregard for facts. Or even the want or desire to seek them out. It seems if the facts don’t support our own beliefs/case/

narrative, we have no need or use for them. This disregard for truth happens in all the various “camps” or sides of the aisle, and two examples of this happened right here in our own backyard recently. The first is the now-infamous Saraland Waffle House incident, where a 25-year-old black woman, Chikesia Clemons, was wrestled to the ground and arrested by white officers after employees called and complained she and her friends were being disorderly. The video went viral, and without any context it did look very disturbing. Making matters worse, the reports that first surfaced made it seem this woman was simply arrested as a result of asking for a manager’s name when she was told she would be charged for plastic “to-go” utensils. Clemons and her attorney, Benjamin Crump, and supporters, including the Rev. Al Sharpton, continue to advance this narrative that her life was worth less than plastic utensils, a sentiment Sharpton expressed on his “PoliticsNation” show on MSNBC last Sunday. The Saraland Police and Waffle House have stood behind the officers, saying she was drunk, disorderly and threatening. Crump claims he has witness statements saying otherwise. OK, so with all of the differing accounts, maybe it’s hard to know who to believe, but in this case, there is a surveillance tape of the moments leading up to the arrest, which we can all watch with our own eyes. And it clearly shows Ms. Clemons getting aggressive and threatening the staff and returning after being asked to leave. Maybe it doesn’t answer every question or show all the angles, but it clearly shows that this wasn’t merely over being charged for a spork. And that is an argument Mr. Crump and Rev. Sharpton have to know in their heart of hearts is at least

somewhat disingenuous. She acted in a manner that usually gets people arrested no matter what they look like. Does institutional racism still exist? Absolutely. The Starbucks incident in Philly recently is a perfect example of it. Will a white girl like myself ever fully appreciate what it must be like? Absolutely not. But after watching Crump and Sharpton totally ignore some of the inconvenient facts of this case and try to turn this into more than it was, I do know all that will ultimately do is make righting the actual wrongs in this world so much harder. At the same time, many of the very same people who have been screaming for folks to examine the facts and review the tapes in this Waffle House incident were the same ones who immediately dismissed accusers of Judge Roy Moore, many of whom did so without reading a single word of the Washington Post report they were so quick to disregard as a conspiracy propagated by the left

BUT WHILE I CAN UNDERSTAND FOLKS FEELING STRONGLY ABOUT THEIR BELIEFS, WHAT I FIND MOST TROUBLING IS THE BLATANT DISREGARD FOR FACTS. OR EVEN THE WANT OR DESIRE TO SEEK THEM OUT. ” and George Soros. How can you dismiss something you have never even bothered to read? I just don’t get that. After reading the very heavily sourced initial story and the subsequent follow-up pieces, I personally felt some of the stories and women were more credible than others. There was no videotape to watch in this case, but common sense can be just as illuminating. Judge Moore filed a lawsuit this week against three of his accusers and a man named Richard Hagedorn, who he seems to credit as the mastermind behind the “conspiracy” against him. Hagedorn, he says, has connections to the women and to the Washington Post. Moore also claims Leigh Corfman, the most high-profile of his accusers, was compensated for her story. It will be interesting to see where this leads. And both “sides” should listen to the evidence presented in this case. The truth, as if often does, probably falls somewhere in the middle. But we should all want to know what that truth is, even if we don’t like it.

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COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

Alabama continues to refuse sound policy advice BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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December 2017 Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta publication titled “Atlanta Fed Explores RuralMetro Economic Divide” begins by noting, “In the Southeast, the Sun Belt [economic] boom feels as distant as the polar ice caps.” In other words, in our region of the country two economic worlds exist: one urban, the other rural. One prospering, the other languishing. Metropolitan Statistical Areas or MSAs — a county or counties with a core urbanized area of at least 50,000 people — throughout the Southeast are turning into hubs of economic growth and activity. As these urban economies expand, they are becoming population magnets as well. According to the Atlanta Fed, 86 percent of the Southeast region’s population live in MSAs. This is up from 75 percent in 1990 and 53 percent in 1970. Yet despite the significant increase in urbanization and the attendant positive economic gains, there are still more than 7 million people living in rural areas. These areas are far from being places of economic opportunity and growth — quite the opposite. Alabama and Mississippi, the Atlanta Fed notes, “remain uncommonly rural.” As a consequence, the economic despair in the rural areas of these two states is particularly acute. Poverty hovers over them like a cloud. Held in place by low education levels and meager incomes, this cloud of poverty shows few signs of dissipating. In rural locales throughout Alabama, the rays of economic opportunity and advancement are perpetually hidden. However, methods for breaking through the dense cloud of economic hopelessness have become clearer. According to Atlanta Fed Economic policy analysis specialist Ellie Terrey, “It appears that an important factor in keeping rural residents out of the workforce is poor health.”

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Concurring, Lesley McClure, outgoing regional executive at the Atlanta Fed’s Birmingham branch, observed earlier this year, “Alabama’s rural areas continue to struggle. In fact, it’s hard to see much of an [economic] recovery at all in many places. Several rural hospitals have closed, and it’s really hard to attract business when you can’t offer health care.” Fifty-three of Alabama’s 67 counties are considered rural. More than 40 percent of Alabamians live in rural areas. Throughout our state, quite a few have to contend with formidable obstacles when it comes to seeing their prospects for economic opportunity and upward social mobility realized. To change their fortunes and seriously tackle the entrenched poverty in our state, research has shown three crucial areas must be comprehensively and strategically addressed: health care, education and safety-net programs. Done well, these can serve as a ladder out of the deep poverty with which many Alabamians contend. Done poorly, they can make their plight worse. It seems as though we are pursuing the latter. Take health care, for example. When the Affordable Care Act was passed, it offered states the option to expand Medicaid, with the federal government picking up the lion’s share of the tab. Groups such as the Alabama Hospital Association implored state leaders to adopt the expansion. However, these entreaties have been met with steadfast refusal, with predicted outcomes. Since 2011, six rural hospitals have closed in Alabama and others are currently operating on life support. Remember, the Federal Reserve has noted, as have other governmental entities and public policy organizations, the critical role that access to health care plays in lifting

individuals out of poverty. Donald Williamson, M.D., the former state health officer, stated, “rural hospitals not only contribute to the health and wellness of their local residents, but also to the overall strength of the community’s economy. Hospitals are usually one of the largest employers in their counties … and every hospital job creates additional jobs in the local area.” Despite such counsel, we refuse expansion. According to the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation, Medicaid expansion in Alabama would allow an extra 200,000 Alabamians to receive health insurance. These would be low-income workers who make too much to qualify for Medicaid yet can’t afford private plans. The expansion would provide them the access to preventive care and other medical services that are so critical to ensuring workforce participation and overall longevity in the workforce. These are key components of economic stability and future upward mobility. Despite such facts, we refuse expansion. Now, in a move that seems utterly counterproductive and will undermine health care opportunity for those in areas that need it most, the state of Alabama is looking at adding work requirements for those who meet the already stringent requirements to receive Medicaid here. On the surface it appears cut and dry. Yet, as many policy observers have pointed out and the data show, such a change would significantly impact female heads of households in rural areas. As it is, able-bodied adults who are single with no kids or couples with no kids cannot qualify for Medicaid in Alabama. Parent(s) of children who do qualify must make 18 percent of the federal poverty level or less. For a family of three, that equates to a yearly income of no more than $3,676, or $312 per month. The new work requirement does not include funding for child care, transportation or job training services, which will most surely be needed if the goal is to truly provide a path to economic self-sufficiency. In their current form, the new requirements would serve to drive many Alabamians deeper into the abyss of economic despair. As Arise Citizens’ Policy Project officials told state leaders: “Because Alabama has not expanded Medicaid to cover adults with incomes below the poverty level, the state’s work requirement plan would create a Catch-22 that forces people into the coverage gap. … That would leave thousands of Alabama parents in a no-win situation: they would lose their Medicaid coverage if they don’t work — and also if they do. … Threatening loss of health care in an attempt to force work efforts, without providing the supports that would make those work attempts successful, is flagrantly cruel and will result in no outcome other than poorer, more desperate and less-healthy Alabama families.” If our goal is to truly bring economic opportunity, upward mobility and selfsufficiency to areas of Alabama and citizens of the state that have been deprived of it, let’s implement sound policy — not policy that only perpetuates misery and despair.


COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Understanding national politics’ semi-pro wrestling nature BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

WASHINGTON, D.C. — It’s 9 a.m. on a Wednesday. There’s a line outside the Rayburn House Office Building waiting to get through the building’s security. It’s nothing unusual. Whenever Congress is in session, it’s a routine feature of a weekday morning. Waiting in this line are House staffers, a few lobbyists and a journalist or two. Also in this line are many out-of-towners far removed from any of the usual congressional proceedings. They’re here for the tour of the U.S. Capitol or the White House with the idea of getting a glimpse at how their government operates. That glimpse is more theoretical than practical. It’s how we’re taught to view the federal government — a system of checks and balances that operates with a backdrop of stately buildings and monuments memorializing the greats in our country. Stationed nearby at the corner of Independence Avenue and Capitol Street is a camera crew with political adviser turned TV producer Mark McKinnon in tow. He is the brains behind Showtime’s “The Circus,” a show about all the interminglings of Washington. That is a show watched by some of the people wanting to get a glimpse of how their government operates. That glimpse is mostly for entertainment purposes. It’s the infotainment view of how we view the federal government — a system that thrives on power and narcissism. A lot is going on for this episode of “The Circus” because it’s a big week in Washington. French President Emmanuel Macron had been in town meeting with President Donald Trump. Later in the day, Macron addressed a joint session of Congress. Also, later this week is the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, which is called “Nerd Prom” by people that find a red-carpet event showcasing the glitz and glamour of the nation’s capital just to be nerdy, and not needlessly grotesque. That’s just one of the many sideshows in Washington, which exists to feed those who consume news as if it were a combination of cheering for their favorite and having a favorite character in a made-for-TV mini-series. It’s supplemented by the hot-button-issue-of-the-day coverage that airs on cable news. That might be Russia collusion, Hillary Clinton’s emails, a Cabinet secretary’s expense account or who said what at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner. None of this is irrelevant. It keeps people engaged, and that’s the point. Often the feigned outrage borders on the realms of professional wrestling. In baseball, there are what is known as semiprofessional leagues, which are baseball teams with amateur players and a professional player or two who gets paid for playing. It falls into a category somewhere between amateur and professional baseball, and hence the moniker “semi-professional.” Thus, “semi-professional wrestling” is an appropriate metaphor for American politics. It’s not all fake, as is the case with professional wrestling. However, a lot of it is.

What if there were no drama of Russian collusion? What if Sean Hannity wasn’t on Fox News every night relaying the same talking points he has about Clinton’s emails for the last two years? What if the federal government just sort of functioned the way it was probably meant to, which is in the background until an election came up every two years? This enormous beast of an industry that has sprouted up around our politics would starve. There would be no need for all the consultants employed to perform public relations and marketing. People would be less inclined to donate money to a candidate or a cause outside of an election year. People might even not pay as much attention to their pet causes, such as the environment and gun rights. It also might hurt big special-interest players such as Greenpeace and the National Rifle Association. Meanwhile, behind the scenes away from all of this, hardly any it of matters. Once in a lifetime, something like “Obamacare” gets passed into law, which has a distinct impact on people’s lives. Otherwise, the federal government lives spending bill to spending bill to stay open, and much of the negotiating for that has nothing to do with any of the previously mentioned things going on in the background. However, it does motivate people to participate in elections, which is the actual fuel for the whole machine. Keeping one side more motivated than the other is the new name of the game. If that means getting into the ring and offering up a metaphorical sleeper hold with a stem-winding speech on the floor of the House of Representatives, then so be it. That Washington D.C. game takes place in what has come to be known as the “swamp.” Trump vowed to drain that “swamp.” With so many livelihoods at stake and the need to feed these “swamp” inhabitants, it’s probably never going to happen entirely. Last year, then-Sen. Luther Strange was going to be the guy to help Trump achieve this goal. He campaigned as being a Washington, D.C., political outsider, given the only office he had held before being appointed was attorney general at the state level. He was reluctant to mention he had spent decades in our nation’s capital as a lobbyist. But things were going to be different. If he had won the GOP nomination, and beaten Doug Jones in the U.S. Senate special election, he would do what it took to end the swamp-like atmosphere in Washington, D.C. He lost and left his appointed U.S. Senate seat later that year. Last week, Strange returned to the District of Columbia to work for a regulatory consulting firm. It’s possible Strange thought, if you can’t beat the swamp, join it. The lesson: Strange’s pledge last year to work to drain the swamp appears to be nothing but the act of a semi-pro wrestling character wanting to be elected. Otherwise, if he were sincere in his convictions, he wouldn’t have gone back to Washington. M a y 2 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 8 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 15


BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

D1 Sports Training & Therapy opening in Mobile BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

F

ranklin, Tennessee-based franchise D1 Sports Training & Therapy recently held a grand opening for its new location in Mobile. The center focuses on sports training and physical therapy for local athletes. The 9,000-square-foot building, situated at 3309 Old Shell Road directly across the street from Dreamland BarB-Que, works in partnership with Mobile-based Alabama Orthopedic Clinic (AOC) and Exos Physical Therapy, headquartered in Gulfport. The new venture is co-owned by Mobile native, St. Paul’s and University of Alabama football alum and current Los Angeles Rams NFL linebacker Mark Barron. Additionally, QB Country founder and Mobile native David Morris also works with D1 as a quarterbacks coach on the collegiate level for local-area athletes. His current stable of quarterbacks includes AJ McCarron, Jake Fromm and Eli Manning. Outside and adjacent to the facility is a 50-yard training area for quarterback drills and skill assessments. Across the street is an affiliated 800-square-foot property dedicated to mixed martial arts training for high-level local athletes competing in the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC). Other sports include football, volleyball, lacrosse and golf. Physical therapy and rehab for the facility centers on football, soccer and volleyball in partnership with AOC. On the sports rehabilitation and therapy side, D1 works with Saraland High School, Blount, MGM, Cottage Hill Christian Academy, Bryant and St. Paul’s in Mobile County and with Spanish Fort High School in Baldwin County. In partnership with AOC, D1 collectively employs 35 trainers spread throughout all schools in the area. The

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facility has five full-time trainers at the Old Shell Road location, including general manager and Mobile native Rich Myers. Presently the local franchise has five trainers holding Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) credentials, commonly required on the collegiate as well as professional sports levels for athletic training. This is the third site to open in Alabama, with two other facilities located in Huntsville and Birmingham. Expansion plans tentatively include opening another facility in Baldwin County in the Daphne or Spanish Fort area in the next 18 to 24 months. For more information about D1 Sports Training and Therapy, contact Rich Myers or visit their website.

Windmill Market under new ownership

According to Jeremy Friedman, broker with Katapult Properties, Windmill Market, located at 85 N. Bancroft St. in downtown Fairhope, was recently sold for $940,000 to Wells and Elizabeth Hammock, owners of Fairhope-based Bay Pediatric Dentistry. Originally the site for Klumpp Motors’ Chevrolet dealership in the 1960s and 1970s, the property now known as Windmill Market was purchased in 2008 by architects Mac and Gina Walcott. At that time, Friedman’s construction company was hired by the Walcott family to build Windmill Market. The former owners advanced Windmill Market’s business with the addition of restaurant tenants, such as Mary Ann’s Deli and more recently the Ox Kitchen. It has also reportedly evolved over the years to become a gathering

place for resident artists, craftsmen and musicians to sell their products. “We have enjoyed helping develop Windmill Market from a former auto dealership location to an open-air market to what it is now. We are excited to see this property evolve even further through new ownership,” Mac Walcott said. “Broadly, the venue will remain a family-friendly, indoor-outdoor space that features food, drink and entertainment. We hope to complete our renovations and launch our rebrand in early fall. Ox Kitchen and Mary Ann’s Deli will remain open throughout the renovation process,” Elizabeth Hammock said. Walcott Adams Verneuille Architects is the contracted architectural firm for the renovations. Business partner Ryan Baker of WAV Architects is also working on upgrades for the eateries. “We are glad that our firm can continue to play a part in the evolution of this special place,” Walcott said. Jaime Lyon Cooper of Exit Realty Lyon, represented the buyers in the transaction. Friedman worked for the sellers.

Commercial real estate moves

• Bucky’s Lounge, located onsite at the Grand Hotel Marriott Resort in Point Clear, will be hosting a grand reopening Thursday, May 3, at 5 p.m., according to a news release. The signature lounge is named after Bucky Miller, a well-known, longtime associate of the 171-year-old resort hotel. Amenities will include a piano bar, updated fire pits and several upgrades to the interior. Restaurant renovations are part of a $32 million upgrade for the entire property. Local Market, also located on the hotel site, will be holding a soft opening sometime in May after renovations are complete. Specific dates were unknown as of press time. New hours of operation are tentatively expected to be 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. The eatery will offer barista-inspired drinks, pastries and coffeecake as well as on-the-go specialties for lunch and light dinners. The pastry team will feature bonbons, macrons, truffles, tortes and cakes. Renovations of the coffee house are also part of a $32 million upgrade for the entire Grand Hotel Resort property. More information about opening dates on both eateries can be found on the Grand Hotel Marriott Resort website. • According to Tim Herrington with Herrington Realty, some five acres of property at 850 I-65 Service Road W. was acquired for $1.65 million by an Enterprise Rent-A-Car franchise, car rental and sales division. Plans are in place to build a truck and car rental retail site at the location sometime this year, per Herrington, who represented the buyer in the transaction. • A 4,400-square-foot office site, located at 6170 Omni Park Drive in West Mobile, was recently bought by local area speculators for $530,000, according to Joe Steen with Joe Steen Real Estate, who managed the transaction.


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FATHOMS LOUNGE

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($)

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 3694 Airport Blvd • 342-2352 5300-C Halls Mill Rd • 660-0995 3075 Government Blvd B105 • 461-6080 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730 6890 US-90 #6 • Daphne • 625-8723 9912 Dimitrios Blvd • Daphne • 626-7827 113 S Greeno Rd • Fairhope • 990-3970

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($)

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768 6860 US-90 • Daphne • 626-4278

NOURISH CAFE ($)

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($)

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

BRICK & SPOON ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

CAFE 219 ($)

119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BIG WHITE WINGS ($)

405 S Wilson Ave. • Prichard• 301-7880 3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 378-8378 SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$) CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 622-0869

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

12 N Royal St • 415-1700 107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

2159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) BREAKFAST, HOT LUNCH & GREAT DESSERTS 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 5701 Old Shell Rd Ste 100 • 442-4846 29160 US Hwy 98 • Daphne •621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

1956 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) 15 N Conception St. • 378-9377

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 Eastern Shore Center • Spanish Fort • 625-6544 HEALTHY WHOLE FOODS & MORE 101 N Water St. (Moorer YMCA)• 458-8572

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($) 562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

PANINI PETE’S ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($) TP CROCKMIERS ($)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($) LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-1689

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 7450 Airport Blvd. A • 634-3454 570 Schillinger Rd. • 634-3454 29740 Urgent Care Dr.• 626-1160

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

HOOTERS ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 29660 AL-181 • Daphne • 626-3161 3151 Daupin St• 525-9917 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 S Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-4334

JUBILEE DINER ($-$$)

A VARIETY COMFORT F00D. BREAKFAST ALL DAY. 6882 US-90 • Daphne • (251) 621-3749

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government Blvd. • 665-4547

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3915 Gov’t Blvd. • 219-7922 3226 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($)

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($) R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

ROLY POLY ($)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2904 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000 1539 US-98 • Daphne • 517-3963

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 219-7086 920 Industrial Pkwy • Saraland • 378-5314

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SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

LAUNCH ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155 GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • Daphne • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

NOJA ($$-$$$)

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98•Daphne • 273-3337

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

‘CUE

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$) BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 829-9227

BAY BARBECUE ($)

THE TASTE OF MOBILE 59 N Florida St. • 408-9997 A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001 DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824 INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$) EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$) INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

SOUTHERN NATIONAL ($$-$$$) 360 Dauphin St • 308-2387

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$) 4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

AROY THAI ($$)

966 Government St.• 408-9001

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$) TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

BENJAS ($)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

CHARM ($-$$)

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

CHINA DOLL ($)

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

MEAT BOSS ($)

A LITTLE VINO

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898 5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

DOMKE MARKET

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. • Daphne • 222-4120

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$)

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

POUR BABY

113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

7 SPICE ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

FIVE ($$)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853 OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

650 St Louis St. • (251) 308-8488

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

THE GALLEY ($)

THE CHEESE COTTAGE

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$)

AT FLY CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

THE BLIND MULE ($)

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

SOUTHERN NAPA

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

BRICK PIT ($)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

MAMA’S ($)

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 312 Schillinger Rd • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($)

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

WILD WING STATION ($)

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

FOY SUPERFOODS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

CARPE DIEM ($)

MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

320 Eastern Shore Shopping Center •Fairhope • 929-0055 3055 A Dauphin St. • 479-3200

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($) $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

DROP DEAD GOURMET BAY GOURMET ($$)

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

RED OR WHITE

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

FUJI SAN ($)

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$) QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

LIQUID ($$)

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367


STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$)

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($) 30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318. LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$) 751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 1108 Shelton Beach Rd •Saraland • 473-0757 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

BUSTER’S BRICK OVEN ($-$$)

1711 Main St. (Next to Manci’s) Daphne. • 264-2520

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$)

PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($)

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

GRIMALDI’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$)

OFF THE HOOK MARINA & GRILL ($)

THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

CAJUN INSPIRED/FRESH SEAFOOD & MORE 621 N Craft Hwy • Chickasaw • 422-3412

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

IS THE GAME ON?

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($) CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

MUG SHOTS ($$)

ISLAND WING CO ($) MANCIS ($)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

GUIDO’S ($$)

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA MURPHY’S

TAKE ‘N’ BAKE PIZZA 2370 Hillcrest Rd.• 251-661-4003 3764 Airport Blvd • 251-338-9903 3992 Government • 251-287-2345 7820 Moffett Rd. • Semmes • 251-586-8473 705 Highway 43 • Saraland • 251-308-2929 27955 US 98 • Daphne • 251-621-8666 2062 S. McKenzie • Foley • 251-970-7272

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

LA ROSSO ($$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 2409 Schillinger Rd S • 525-8431 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

MIRKO ($$)

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

LOS ARCOS ($)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

MARCO’S PIZZA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$)

JONELLI’S ($)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

LA COCINA ($)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

1252 Gov’t St. • 301-7556

TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$)

AZTECAS ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

DON CARLOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT($) 29669 Alabama 181 • Spanish Fort • (251) 625-3300

EL CAMINO TACO SHACK ($)

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

POOR MEXICAN ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

ISLAND VIEW:

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($) SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

MIGNON’S ($$$)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239 STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$) INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

TREASURE BAY:

BEAU RIVAGE:

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

THE DEN ($-$$)

AMAZING ARRAY OF MOUTH-WATERING FOOD.

CQ ($$-$$$)

LOCAL SEAFOOD AND 40+ BEERS

BLU ($)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

WIND CREEK CASINO:

THE BUFFET ($-$$)

COAST SEAFOOD & BREW ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

ITALIAN COOKING

TERRACE CAFE ($)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

HARD ROCK CASINO:

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

5713 Old Shell Rd.• 338-9697

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

3172 International Dr. • 476-9967

FUEGO ($-$$)

FUZZY’S TACO SHOP ($)

IP CASINO:

TAQUERIA CANCUN ($)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

quality food and simple unique cocktails

PALACE CASINO:

EL PAPI ($-$$)

615 Dauphin St • (251) 308-2655

ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

THE BLIND TIGER ($-$$)

C&G GRILLE ($)

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$)

ROOSTER’S ($)

EL MARIACHI ($)

212 Fairhope Ave. • 928-8108

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360

FIRE ($$-$$$)

PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SCARLET PEARL:

9380 Central Avenue D’Iberville • 800266-5772

CHEF WENDY’S BAKING ($-$$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE

MADE-TO-ORDER FESTIVE TREATS AND SPECIALTY CAKES.

SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

CLASSIC ALL-AMERICAN CASUAL CUISINE WITH OVER 100 OPTIONS.

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

UNDER THE OAK CAFE ($-$$)

WATERFRONT BUFFET ($$-$$$) SOUPS, SALADS, FRESH SEAFOOD, AND MORE

CHOPSTX NOODLE BAR ($-$$)

VIETNAMESE SANDWICHES, PHO, AND APPETIZERS.

M a y 2 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 8 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 19


CUISINE THE REVIEW

In Mobile’s former Automobile Alley, Cheese Cottage goes boldly

THE CHEESE COTTAGE 650 ST. LOUIS ST. MOBILE 36602 251-308-8488

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

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Photo | Daniel Anderson/Lagniappe

W

e see restaurants come and go. Some are poorly executed great ideas that don’t take off. Some are bad ideas that find their footing and do well for a while. I’m sure it’s the same all over the country that the restaurant scene is predictably unpredictable. Never ask the question, “What else could happen?” You may just find out. As we navigate this path of new restaurant after new restaurant, there are some we don’t pay much mind and others that are unique enough that we develop a cheering section for them. Such is the case of The Cheese Cottage. Open since January, these guys have made a splash not only as part of a revitalization of downtown’s St. Louis Street with their sharp-looking building, but also as a unique business model for a Mobile restaurant. I was at the grand opening but have waited to return, letting them get a few plates under the belt before I get knee-deep in the fromage. In case you’re unsure of what this place is, The Cheese Cottage is a specialty cheese shop/delicatessen that also serves sandwiches, salads, charcuterie and more. There is wine sold by the bottle (and in some cases half-bottle), craft beer and rarely found sodas. It has a nice-sized covered patio capable of shielding sun or rain, a few outdoor tables and a table or two indoors where the action is. But on this day I was flying solo and getting a mountain of food on wheels. I first noticed the chalkboard menu and decided I should start with a Green Apple Salad ($10) before going crazy with the cheese. Good choice. It was beautifully presented with nicely chopped greens, pecans and cranberries with diced apples and chèvre (goat cheese). Top this with a blueberry vinaigrette and you know these guys mean business. With a muffuletta on the menu, you know I can’t say no. I’m at the very least a minor enthusiast. At most I’m border-

The Cheese Cottage, one of downtown Mobile’s newest culinary destinations, offers salads, sandwiches and, of course, dozens of different cheeses from around the Southeast and other regions of the world. line expert on the subject so let’s meet in the middle and call me a fanatic. The Cheese Cottage goes nontraditional (as most in this area do) and have what they call the Mobile Muffuletta ($14). It does have the capicola, Genoa salami and olive salad with smoked provolone cheese, but the whole thing is more like a panini with Italian bread subbing for the famous muffuletta roll you would expect. The result is an excellent sandwich anyone would be proud to eat but it won’t appease the muffuletta snobs on a quest for traditional. I’m thankful they gave it their own name. Pimiento cheese is still a hot-ticket item across the South. The Cheese Cottage does a unique version in their Pimiento Cheese and Gouda Bacon Jam ($10). With pimiento cheese made inhouse using goat cheese from Alabama makers and aged Gouda, you can imagine the results are pretty good, especially with a bacon and onion jam. Sourdough bread was the best route to take with this sandwich, and the whole thing came together nicely. None of it punches you in the face. It’s a little sweet and subtle, but the kids will love it. For an extra charge I tried my first bag of Keogh’s Sweet Chili and Irish Red Pepper chips ($2). This brand is all about handcooked, gluten-free chips. You can even trace in which field your potato was grown. I also enjoyed one of my fru-fru favorites in Fentimans Rose Lemonade ($3.50). You can taste a hint of ginger in this fermented soda. Dessert was no less exciting with a slice of chèvre cheesecake ($4). From Alabama makers Belle Chèvre, this slice was thankfully on the small side. I say that because it was rich enough for two.

My slice had pecans and blueberry syrup atop the smoothly sweet “cake.” I’ve never used goat cheese in cheesecake. I may start. So Katie comes home to find styrofoam containers of partially eaten lunches, evidence of a visit to The Cheese Cottage without her. I felt a little ashamed I’d not included her, as she is a bigger cheese fan than I. Next thing you know, we load up the truck and head back for dinner. This time we kept it light and split a Ploughman’s Lunch ($14.95). This was a simple cheese board with two cheeses, one meat and all the amenities. The Beehive TeaHive cheese was mild and soothing, its rind rubbed with Earl Grey tea. As good as it was, we both preferred the BellaVitano Black Pepper with the hot capicola as our meat. Skinless almonds, white grapes and apple slices were highlights, along with honey that I believe came from Hurley, Mississippi. Katie drew on a ginger beer ($3.50) and I nursed a Peroni ($6). It was a nice evening finishing before sundown with time to spare. Yes, things can get a little pricey at The Cheese Cottage, but you get what you pay for. It’s great for a special lunch or a little wine and cheese before you go out for a main course. I love what they have going on and I think that neighborhood is about to explode with business. Keep an ear out for cheese tastings and specials, and know that this is the cool new place to be. Hours are seasonal, but they appear to close around dark. The Cheese Cottage has a lot of people cheering for them. They just earned another. Visit them soon.


M a y 2 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 8 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 21


CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

Wintzell’s dedicates its oyster bar to Willie Brown

Upon your next visit you’ll see that the “Oyster Bar” sign now reads “Willie’s Oyster Bar” as well as a 36 inch by 48 inch portrait of Mr. Willie created by artist Devlin Wilson and a shadow box of memorabilia celebrating his life put together by Cathy Collins of Ashland Gallery. “We hope that the dedication of Willie’s Oyster Bar establishes a special, historic place where many friends, fans, family and guests may continuously share memories and honor Mr. Brown,” said Clay Omainsky, communications manager for Wintzell’s. “Leaving a legacy of service and charm to oyster eaters, to our restaurant and team, and to our community, he was truly a once-in-alifetime icon and a significant figure in Southern foodways.” It’s the right thing to do.

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR

COASTAL is a chance to dine big

Photo | wintzellsoysterhouse.com

Longtime Wintzell’s Oyster House shucker Willie Brown passed away in December. Last week, the downtown staple renamed its oyster bar “Willie’s Oyster Bar.”

I

f Mobile is an oyster, Willie was our pearl,” penned Mayor Sandy Stimpson in a letter read at Mr. Brown’s funeral this past December. True Mobilians know who we are talking about, but for those unfamiliar, he was a character and famous shucker at Wintzell’s Oyster House

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for the past 47 years who recently met his end at the age of 70. In honor of his life, Wintzell’s Oyster House named its 80-year-old oyster bar after the man in a ceremony this past Friday at its 605 Dauphin St. location.

It won’t be long until most of us are flooding the sugar-white sands of Gulf Shores. The newest attraction may be just a bit inland, though. COASTAL Restaurant is a family-friendly place located next to the Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo complete with an amazing menu that almost has me playing hooky and headed south for lunch. There’s an ice cream and milkshake bar as well as a full-service bar open late with live music. Imagine seafood and veggie-heavy entrees and apps with tuna poke, smoked cauliflower, whole flounder, grouper, chargrilled oysters and, of course, enough shrimp to fill a lion’s den. If you’re not into seafood, then feast on the Boursinstuffed chicken or a choice 14-ounce ribeye. If you’re worried about execution, allow me to alleviate those fears. The master chef is Chris Sherrill, a name well known around Alabama waters, with rising chef Ethan England as sous-chef. I think you’ll be in good hands.

Yinzers opens to quick acclaim

I’ve been hearing a lot of chatter about Yinzers Brew & Grill in the old Papa’s Pizza place at 28850 U.S. Route 98, Suite 200. A creation by our own Mr. Pittsburgh, Mark Bentz, the restaurant just opened with a menu heavy with his succulent pizzas and sandwiches. Loaded pub chips, muffuletta cheesy bread, soft pretzels and wings are but a portion of the appetizer menu; sandwiches include Philly steak, Italian steak, Italian and muffuletta. Expect this menu to grow as Bentz moves onward and upward. Even when it does you’ll still get the pizza. It’s good. Recycle!


M a y 2 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 8 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 23


COVER STORY

As luxury living comes to Mobile, affordable housing shortage looms DALE LIESCH/REPORTER

A

new white house with dark trim stands where police claim the last “open-air” drug market in Mobile operated for more than three decades. At a ceremony Monday, April 30, the city officially turned around what had been a former drug hub into a new single-family residence. “This is a victory,” Mayor Sandy Stimpson said. “We can claim victory on this one lot, but we have to make sure this permeates. It’s a great, great day in the city of Mobile.” At one point neighbors of the property on the corner of State and Kennedy streets were scared to leave their homes, or even drive past for fear of violence, Stimpson said. Public Safety Director James Barber said before the previous house was demolished, officers with the Mobile Police Department monitored roughly 650 drug transactions made from the address within a two-month period. “It stood as a symbol for contempt of the law,” Barber said. “… The full-circle has now been completed.” The home will be given to Family Promise of Coastal Alabama for use by homeless families coming out of the organization’s emergency shelter, Executive Director Diane J. McCaskey said. “It’s an opportunity to work with families for a longer period of time,” she said. “It’s an opportunity to work on problems that take longer.” The house at 1076 State St. is the second in the Family Promise portfolio. The first is a duplex on Delaware Street built in 2015. Over the last few years the city has turned 50 blighted properties into new single-family homes. The vast majority of those have used funds from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development and must go to low- to moderate-income families, Senior Director of Neighborhood Development Jamey Roberts said. Despite those efforts, a shortage of affordable housing persists. At the same time, a number of new and proposed market-rate and high-end developments on the horizon in downtown and midtown are doing little to alleviate the issue.

New developments

With more than 500 units — both market-rate and high-end — leasing or planned for the near future in downtown and midtown, oversaturation of the market is a concern for some developers. Cory Thomas, co-owner of Thomas Properties in Fairhope, said he has some concerns of oversaturation of the market and is racing to break ground on his mixed-use condominium development called The Brickwell before other similar downtown developments come online. “We’re hoping to beat some of those,” he said. The Brickwell, planned for the corner of Washington Street and Springhill Avenue, is designed as a mixed-use development with retail and office space on the ground floor and six or seven two-story condos on top, Thomas said. Among the retail fixtures, he said, would be a coffee shop. “Right now, we’re finalizing the costs of development,” Thomas said. “Shortly thereafter we’ll begin pre-sales.” Thomas could not disclose the price of the condos, as the price depends on the number built, and that has yet to be determined. He said he’s confident in the market right now because of the excitement generated from the downtown area. “Everybody has seen a tremendous influx of money pouring into downtown,” Thomas said. “There are a lot of people who feel really good about it.” The Brickwell should be under construction later this year, Thomas hopes, with construction finishing up through the middle of next year. Taylor Atchison of Atchison Properties, a developer of several properties in Mobile, said he believes the demand is high for upscale apartment living. He credits strong leadership for an increase in demand. “I think downtown taking a step forward in amenities has really opened residents’ eyes up,” he said. “When you rent in downtown or midtown, the amenities have to be included.” A big amenity when living downtown is walkability and bikeability, Atchison said. Atchison is part of a team developing the old Red Cross building at Broad and Dauphin streets into a

OVER THE LAST FEW YEARS THE CITY HAS TURNED 50 BLIGHTED PROPERTIES INTO NEW SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES.

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mixed-use project. The development will include retail and office space below with a few apartments above. “The need is there,” he said. “We have a lot of jobs coming into the area all the time.” Despite his confidence in the market, Atchison admitted renters could be pulled from other areas, including other coastal cities. In addition to the new development, Atchison was part of a team that redeveloped older, vacant properties into the Marine Street Lofts, Broad Street Lofts and Old Shell Lofts. Developers will be adding a second phase to the latter, which will include 48 new units, Atchison said. Broad Street Lofts, which is the product of a redevelopment of the old Russell School building, is completely leased, he said. Still, the biggest development planned in downtown in decades is the 265-unit Meridian at the Port, a joint venture between Leaf River Group and Bristol Development, out of Tennessee. Stewart Speed, president of the Mississippi-based Leaf River Group, said the first units could come online on Water Street as early as May 2019. He said there are a couple of reasons why Mobile is seeing a luxury apartment boom right now. “There’s a lot of good momentum from a job growth standpoint and a downtown business activity standpoint and that’s tied to good leadership in Mobile,” Speed said. “It’s coupled with a lack of product. There’s no Class A multifamily product in Mobile.” The concept of high-end, luxury apartments has been successful in other spots regionally, Speed said, and there’s an opportunity here. Rent at Meridian will run between $1,100 and $2,000 per month, Speed said. “The timing seems right for this product in Mobile,” Speed said. “I hope we were right about that. I think we were.” Meridian, like almost all the newly planned developments in downtown, will be mixed use. A 3,000-square-foot outparcel building will include retail shops, Speed said. The development will also include a dog park. He said developers haven’t focused on the retail side yet. “It’s needed,” Speed said. “Downtown Mobile has been underserved. It’s playing catch-up right now.” Another player in the high-end, mixed-use development of downtown is real estate firm NAI Mobile and its work on Merchants Plaza. Josh Hall, director of property management for NAI Mobile, said the old Merchants Bank location on the northeast corner of Bienville Square would consist of multiple buildings for office space, with the existing tower converted into 84 apartments. Hall said the apartments would lease for $1,500 per month or more depending on floor plan. A penthouse on the 18th floor of the tower would run its occupant $2,500 per month, he said. NAI Mobile is also behind a development called the Temple Lodge on St. Francis Street. The development is fully leased. Another mixed-used development is planned at 450 St. Louis St., according to Stephen McNair, owner of McNair Historical Preservation. The space will consist of market-rate apartments as well as commercial office space and retail, he said. Much of the enthusiasm from developers can be attributed to the state’s renewal of historic tax credits, which allow builders to more easily renovate old buildings, like many downtown, into new developments. McNair called the renewal and the use of federal credits a “catalyst” for development downtown. In addition to the credits, McNair said enthusiasm comes from newfound investor confidence. “A mix of both local and out-of-state investors indicates a lot of confidence in the future of downtown expansion,” he said. “The Water Street and Broad Street redevelopment projects and the possibility of the [Mobile Regional] airport relocating to Brookley all has a positive impact on downtown.”


COVER STORY The city also recently made a deal to sell a building colloquially known as “City Hall north” to a developer to convert into a mixed-use development along Water Street. The Tower on Ryan Park is also planned for a renovation.

Need for housing

A residential market assessment commissioned by the Downtown Mobile Alliance shows more residential properties are needed downtown for the foreseeable future, spokeswoman Carol Hunter said. The draft study performed by Zimmerman/Volk Associates, out of New Jersey, indicated more than 250 new rental and forsale housing units can be accommodated per year over the next five years. The majority of those, between 155 and 186, would be lofts and other styles of apartments. The study also showed a need for 18 to 28 large condominiums or for-sale apartments per year over the same period. The study also supported adding 21 to 34 new row houses and 11 to 18 new cottagestyle homes or bungalows per year during that period. The Zimmerman/Volk study also showed the amount in rent the area could sustain. For microloft and studio apartments from 400 to 1,000 square feet, the rent suggestion is $625 to $1,500 per month. For one- and two-bedroom apartments from 550 to 1,100 square feet, the study suggested rents from $925 to $1,800 per month. The planned apartment units in downtown are not scheduled to come online at the same time, Hunter said. At the rate they’re planned, the units should fill a growing need outlined in the study. She said the organization believes demand for apartments will continue, as the study bears out. Hunter said demand is coming from two different groups. “We’re seeing young people who want to live downtown and empty nesters … who want to give up their yards,” she said. There is also the influence from Europe, which emphasizes urban living, Hunter said. To further accentuate the demand, she said, excluding The Tower on Ryan Park — which is about to undergo its own redevelopment — rental space downtown is “essentially 100 percent” occupied.

Affordable housing shortage

Despite the positive vibes of his Monday morning news conference, Stimpson highlighted the need to do more to help the housing situation for low- to moderateincome earners in the city. Specifically, he

mentioned the approach of turning over blighted property. “It’s got to be scalable,” Stimpson said. “One-offs are not going to do it.” He suggested the city look at additional ordinances to aid it in acquiring clear titles to abandoned property more quickly and lobbying on the state level for similar fixes. “Part of the blight program we’ve been working on is acquiring enough property to let a developer work on several lots at the same time,” Stimpson said. Housing First Executive Director Eric Jefferson, who admitted he and Stimpson weren’t the “best of friends” when it came to this issue, agreed. He said affordable housing must come to the city more quickly. For those on a fixed income or low- to moderate-income earners, Jefferson said affordable rent needs to be closer to $500 per month, not $1,200. “If a child gets sick, or you miss work and get behind the eight ball, $400 to $500 per month, you might be able to survive that,” he said. “You’re not going to survive at $1,200 for rent and utilities.” McCaskey agreed there is a shortage of affordable housing in Mobile and announcements about more stringent work requirements or limits on what families can receive from HUD aren’t helping. “This is a huge problem,” she said. The Mobile Housing Board (MHB) has a waiting list of thousands of applicants as it prepares for major redevelopments of some of its oldest properties. Replacement housing is under construction, but it may be years before it becomes available. Michael E. Pierce, executive director of the MLK Avenue Redevelopment Corp., who served as developer on the State Street house, agreed there is an affordable housing shortage because of changes made by HUD and MHB. “With public housing shrinking … anything we can do in concert with the city to put back affordable housing is helpful,” he said. “Public housing has taken a different approach; it’s more scattershot now. There’s less density, but it’s more spread out.” Atchison said he believes the market will even out as demand continues, with more affordable rents filling in gaps when more high-end renters leave for downtown. Neither Jefferson nor McCaskey see much benefit to low- to moderate-income families in large, high-end apartment complexes. “The city seems to see a benefit in huge apartment buildings,” McCaskey said.

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ART ARTIFICE

New arts mix dawns in downtown premiere BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

I

t takes a powerful presence to inspire new growth from the Great Beyond. Leave it to the High Priestess of Soul to make that leap. “I got the name from Nina Simone’s ‘Feeling Good,’ where she sings ‘It’s a new dawn, it’s a new day, it’s a new life,’” Courtney Matthews said. What it birthed was “Neu Dawn,” an artistic happening blending various creative forms on Sunday, May 6, 4-7 p.m. at Sway Downtown (10 S. Conception St.). The benefit for Mobile Arts Council’s Summer Arts Program will feature more than 50 local creatives. How the instigation got started is sort of circuitous. Matthews closed her bohemian curiosity shop Lunatix a few years ago to stick with her primary occupation as a makeup artist. While working a 2017 fashion show, she pondered the hours of planning and work poured into something seen for just a few minutes, if at all. She simultaneously mulled our creative community’s natural ebb and flow. Artists drop away as others emerge. “There’s so many [artists] in my own life, but in the last year I’ve realized how many don’t know each other. You would think they would have been entwined, but there were many who have heard of each other’s names or seen each other’s work but never actually spoken or met,” Mathews said. Post-Mardi Gras, “after everyone could think straight again,” she coalesced ideas. She imagined merging wearable art, paintings and music while prompting fresh acquaintances. “Everyone involved I’ve either known in real life or

Instagram land,” Matthews said. One painter, DJ Wildlife, came courtesy of his cousin Charlana Quivers, proprietor of Backflash Antiques. Another is mysterious graffiti artist Dumb, a new arrival to town whose face is understandably unknown. After compiling lists, Matthews matched more than a dozen painters with costumers and models. Scant instructions stemmed from her musical inspiration. “The specific lyric of ‘It’s a new dawn, it’s a new day’ is what I gave everyone, the power in her voice when she sings that line and what it means to them. It’s appropriate with all of the craziness in the world and how we’re forced to focus on ourselves and our own world,” Matthews said. She also directed participants toward Pantone’s 2018 Color of the Year, Ultra Violet. “It’s the most royal purple you can imagine but just turned up a little bit,” Matthews said. The paintings will be large — 7 feet tall by her description — and serve as backdrops for individual installations. Among the models Matthews recruited are familiar faces from Mobile life, some on stage, some behind bars, some from more workaday roles. The listed artists Matthews revealed included Mateo, Jordan Atchison, Holly Krause and Ryan Jetten among others. Amanda Solley-Wilson and Beezy Wright are coming down from their offices at Alabama Contemporary Art Center to participate. The wearable art designers listed included Mobile Fashion Week guru Richard McGill, costumer and performance

Salsa Saturday in the park

MAWSS hosts art contest

The Mobile Area Water and Sewer System is hosting the

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THE LISTED ARTISTS MATTHEWS REVEALED INCLUDED MATEO, JORDAN ATCHISON, HOLLY KRAUSE AND RYAN JETTEN AMONG OTHERS. AMANDA SOLLEY-WILSON AND BEEZY WRIGHT ARE COMING DOWN FROM THEIR OFFICES AT ALABAMA CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER TO PARTICIPATE. ” been excited. They feel like it’s pushing and challenging them,” Matthews said. Location was an initial hurdle. She looked at raw environs with urban grit, like the old Red Cross building at Dauphin and Broad, but reconsidered. “When those didn’t happen, it was kind of a relief because we wouldn’t have to worry about power and air and water in an industrial setting,” Matthews said. Previous yoga classes at Sway’s studios paved the way for propositioning owner Noel Hanley about hosting the multi-disciplinary affair. A personal happenstance worked in Matthews’ favor, too. “Turns out [Noel’s] older sister and I were best friends from 4 years old to 6 years when I lived in Greenville, Mississippi. I literally played at Noel’s house before she was born,” Matthews said. Entrance is free. Befitting a lazy, late-spring Sunday, visitors are encouraged to wander in and out at leisure. Portions of the installations will be for sale — not the models, folks. It seems her prime priority is boosting our cultural backdrop.

12th annual Fun with Water Watercolor Contest for students in grades K-12. Participants are invited to depict their favorite water-oriented activity, from watering the garden to beach trips to playing in the rain. All entries will be on display at The Shoppes at Bel Air, June 1-17. Prizes will be awarded in grade categories K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 and to an overall winner. All winners will receive $100 gift cards. The grand prize winner and their sponsoring school or community organization will receive $250 gift cards. Deadline for entries is May 18. Entries can be dropped at The Shoppes at Bel Air management office, the MAWSS payment center (1060 Springhill Ave.) or MAWSS Park Forest Plaza (4725 Moffett Road). To download rules and entry form, visit mawss.com.

ACA summer camps begin

The Alabama Contemporary Art Center (301 Conti St.) will hold five-day art camps for ages 5-17, running June through July. They will teach a range of skills from graffiti to animation to print-

making, and utilize the “Back to Havana” exhibit as inspiration. The offerings listed are: • Collage camp for ages 5-8, June 11-15, 8:30-11:30 a.m.; • Printmaking camp for ages 5-8, June 18-22, 8:30-11 a.m.; • Mini Masters for ages 5-8, July 9-13, 8:30-11:30 a.m.; • Recycled Art Camp for ages 5-8, July 16-20, 8:30-11:30 a.m.; • Graffiti Camp for ages 9-12, July 11-15, 8:30-11:30 a.m.; • Recycled Art Camp for ages 9-12, June 18-22, 8:30-11:30 a.m.; • Think Big! Collab Camp for ages 9-12, July 9-13, 8:30-11:30 a.m.; • Stop Motion Animation for ages 9-12, July 9-13, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; • Printmaking Camp for ages 9-12, July 16-20, 8:30-11:30 a.m.; • Art Sampler Camp for ages 9-12, July 16-20, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; • Graffiti Camp for ages 13-17, July 9-13, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; and • Fashion Camp for ages 13-17, July 16-20, 12:30-3:30 p.m. For more information, call 251-208-5671 or visit alabamacontemporary.org.

ARTSGALLERY

There’s been a lot of artistic synergy (remember that word?) flowing between Langan Park and downtown since Alabama Contemporary Art Center’s “Back to Havana” exhibit arrived. That continues when the Mobile Museum of Art (4850 Museum Drive) hosts its Cuban Festival on Saturday, May 5, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. To accompany the “Common Ground” exhibit in place, MMoA will feature tours and book signings with artists, a lecture on the history of Mobile and Havana as sister cities, sidewalk chalk activity, a live DJ, salsa dancing and a film screening of “Buena Vista Social Club.” Antique and classic cars will be on display as well. The event is free. For more information, call 251-208-5200 or visit mobilemuseumofart.com.

artist Lillian McKinney, sculptor and art instructor April Livingston, Angela Krause, the aforementioned Quivers, Jessica Price and more. Rachel Stringfellow made a name for herself as one of the most sought-after film costumers in the area but began college as a painter. Though relocated to New Orleans, she’ll be back for “Neu Dawn” with both a painting and a costume for display. Matthews has a small platoon of hairdressers and makeup artists ready. Trey Lane will curate music. “I have total faith in their creativity. It’s one thing to have thoughts, another to have people say yes and another to have them be excited, and everyone’s


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MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Seth Walker opens Harvest Nights at Weeks Bay Plantation BAND: HARVEST NIGHTS FEATURING SETH WALKER DATE: SATURDAY, MAY 5, WITH GATES AT 4 P.M. VENUE: WEEKS BAY PLANTATION, 12562 MARY ANN BEACH ROAD (FAIRHOPE), WWW.WEEKSBAYPLANTATION.COM TICKETS: $5 AT THE DOOR (FREE FOR BLUEBERRY PICKERS)

L

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Photo | Zack Smith

ive music devotees are always on the move. So the song just kind of fell out one looking for new experiences, and day. The pulse around Jazz Fest just added to that.” over the past two years Weeks As Jazz Fest brought artist after artist to the Bay Plantation has featured a Big Easy, Walker began searching for musicians number of unique live music to join him in the studio for the creation of “Spirits events in its beautifully agrarian Moving.” According to Walker, the final lineup setting. of session musicians was a personal dream team. This organic blueberry farm first brought music John Medeski (Medeski, Martin & Wood) injected to its organic setting through the multiday Blueberry the song with a hot dose of Hammond B3. Walker Jam Sessions. The resulting local enthusiasm led to says he was thrilled to have the Big Easy drumbeat new stages being built and the creation of The Blue- of John Vidacovich included on “Spirits Moving.” berry Sessions, which hosted Shelby Lynne, Allison Vidacovich came by way of Walker’s housemate, Moorer, Griffin House and many more. Doug Belote, who also provides his percussive With the blueberry season in full swing, Weeks talents on this track. Bay Plantation is incorporating the two things Jano Rix (The Wood Brothers) produced the for which this location is known. From May 5 to single. This multi-instrumentalist’s previous work June 16, they’ll combine blueberry harvest season with Walker includes producing “Gotta Get Back” with live music on “Harvest and performing on his album Nights’.” Each Saturday the “Sky Still Blue.” Walker says public is invited to spend Rix’s talent for both pushthe evening picking bluebering and relaxing him in the ries and enjoying live music. studio is a big reason why he These events will also feature continues to work with him. SOMETIMES WHEN YOU’RE food trucks and a local venEven though Rix’s impressive RECORDING, YOU CAN GET dors’ market. talent made him nervous in Singer-songwriter Seth the studio, Walker says the ‘RED LIGHT FEVER.’ THIS Walker will be Harvest group’s musical bond quickly Night’s first featured performWAS NOT THE CASE, AND IT took shape. er. The last time Lagniappe “We all speak a similar CAME OUT GREAT. IT WAS spoke with Walker, he was on language,” Walker said. “So, tour promoting his 2016 fullas soon as we got in that room TRULY A LIVE EXPERIENCE length recording, “Gotta Get together, it was unspoken Back.” His momentum has words that we all understood. WITH MISTAKES AND ALL. not slowed. I do remember the first take The following year, Walker that we did of that. It all felt released the single “Spirits great, but we had to get the Moving.” He says this raucous culmination of funky tune underneath us. By the second or third take, we jazz grooves came to life during the 2017 installhad it all down.” ment of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. After releasing his love song to New Orleans, However, the festive Crescent City march of “SpirWalker followed with the release of his first live its Moving” took form through Walker’s regular album, “Live at the Mauch Chunk Opera House.” visits to the Big Easy over four years. During those Walker said this is an album both he and his fans visits, Walker was filled with the music of the city, have been anticipating for a long time, but it ultiboth figuratively and literally. mately came to life through a “stealth, ninja record“The whole city is syncopated, and I’m not just ing” process. Walker recalls this particular show at talking about the music,” Walker explained. “The this venue in Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, was a “fun whole place is vibrating. I’ve always felt that when show with a great vibe,” but he had no idea it was I was down there, the spirit of inspiration has been being recorded.

Seth Walker will open the Harvest Nights live music series at Weeks Bay Plantation Saturday, May 5. After his performance, someone from the venue asked him to come “upstairs,” where he entered an impressive studio filled with in-house mics and pre-amplifiers that had captured the performance. “We didn’t know [the recording] was happening,” Walker said. “That’s always the best. Sometimes when you’re recording, you can get ‘red light fever.’ This was not the case, and it came out great. It was truly a live experience with mistakes and all.” Walker said the most vivid aspect of this impromptu recording is the way it captured the magical, symbiotic chemistry he shares with his audience. He notes this chemistry is the driving force behind his busy tour schedule and it echoes through his performance of such tracks as “Grab Ahold,” “Fire in the Belly” and “Gotta Get Back.” Walker also notes this chemistry shows itself in different ways with each performance. With his first live album out of the way, Walker wants to add more live shows to his catalog in order to capture the diverse aural vibes that emerge from each live show. “[Live recording] definitely worked that time,” Walker says. “I would like to put some other live music out. That was all one night. Each night is a different thing, depending on the venue and the energy of the evening and how we’re playing and how we’re acting. I would like to put more out, because each night has its own thing.” As he maintains his rigorous tour schedule, Walker is also beginning to record his next full-length album. He hopes this as yet untitled release will be ready for public consumption in early 2019. As far as what fans can expect, Walker says he’s experimenting with new lo-fi and hi-fi recording techniques. The singer-songwriter has been collecting samples of “sound checks and grooves” during pre-show sessions and plans to use these samples as looping tracks within his songs. Walker has also opted to track this album at home with his collection of gear. He says this aspect makes it seem like he’s “living in this record.” Hopefully he’ll be road-testing some of this new material with the blueberry pickers at Weeks Bay Plantation.


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Straight outta Dixie

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: The Vegabonds Date: Friday, May 4, 8 p.m. Venue: Callaghan’s Irish Social Club, 916 Charleston St., www.callaghansirishsocialclub.com Tickets: $8 at the door

Photo | http://thevegabonds.com

C

allaghan’s is bringing a batch of fresh Southern rock to the OGD, starting with the “Alabama-born, Nashville-bred” quintet, The Vegabonds. In 2009, this group began promoting its sound on the Southeastern college circuit and a year later released its debut album, “Dear Revolution.” Conjuring the spirits of Southern groups ranging from The Black Crowes to The Allman Brothers Band, The Vegabonds turned out guitar-heavy anthems filled with ambitious attitude. Last year, The Vegabonds released their twang-heavy tour anthem, “Partying with Strangers.” Now the group is giving fans a preview of its next full-length with “Everything I Need.” While demonstrating the band’s growth since “Dear Revolution,” “Everything I Need” maintains the group’s Southern formula. This upbeat track evokes deep tracks from Tom Petty’s early work. The single is filled with heavenly work on the fretboard and the Deep South lyrical poetry for which The Vegabonds are known worldwide.

The Force undresses Band: Star Wars: Return of the Tease Date: Friday, May 4, 10 p.m. Venue: Alchemy Tavern, 7 S. Joachim St., www.alchemytavernmobile.com Tickets: $12-$20, available through TicketBiscuit When the space opera “Star Wars: A New Hope” premiered in 1977, its creators and fans had no idea it would evolve into a worldwide phenomenon. Since first taking the public to “a galaxy far, far away,” this film series has inspired numerous sequels, merchandise, visual art and songs. In recent years, the “Star Wars” craze has even cited May 4 (“May the Fourth be with you”) as a pseudoholiday for sci-fi enthusiasts. In celebration of this “holiday,” local burlesque troupe Camellia Bay Burlesque will be providing a sultry evening filled with sexy, sci-fi dance numbers inspired by “Star Wars.” This sensual sci-fi display will feature a lineup of talented dancers dropping costumes to the floor as thematically appropriate tunes echo through Alchemy. The crowd will witness Expecta Patrone take on the role of Sith warrior Darth Maul. Foxy Monroe will provide her choreographed interpretation of the galaxy’s deadliest bounty hunter, Boba Fett. Chewbacca and Han Solo might even pay a visit to Alchemy for this special event.

Happy anniversary Band: The Listening Room of Mobile’s Third Anniversary Shindig Date: Saturday, May 5, 8 p.m. Venue: The Listening Room of Mobile, 78 St. Francis St., www.thelisteningroomofmobile.com Tickets: $20; call 251-367-4599 for reservations Three years ago, Jim Pennington established a haven for musicians and music lovers alike who prefer the serene clarity of a listening room experience. Since opening its doors, The Listening Room of Mobile has fulfilled its mission of providing night after night of music, delivered without the noise pollution of a typical venue, and its Third Anniversary Shindig promises to deliver nothing less. The Listening Room of Mobile could not have such a celebration without featuring a set from singer-songwriter Abe Partridge, who has used the venue as a platform for promoting his visual and musical art. Those hearing Partridge for the first time can expect tunes filled with his unique perceptions of the modern South, delivered with a worn voice. Brassy jazz of trumpeter Chip Herrington has also graced the venue. Herrington’s local music legacy includes both Wet Willie and the Mobile Big Band Society. However, his intimate shows at The Listening Room of Mobile have been jazz seduction at its finest. Eastern Shore singer-songwriter Madison Grace represents a new generation embracing the listening room environment. Armed with a piano and a beautiful voice, Grace has gathered followers with a fresh local sound that falls somewhere between Norah Jones and Diana Krall. Anyone hearing her homegrown sounds will be overwhelmed by the amount of talent this young artist possesses.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | May 2 - May 8 PLEASE SEND UPCOMING MUSIC TO LISTINGS@ LAGNIAPPEMOBILE. COM BY MONDAY BEFORE WEDNESDAY’S PAPER.

WED. MAY 2 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz, 8p Bluegill— Matt Neese Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Brickyard— Delta Smoke Callaghan’s— The Black Lillies Cockeyed Charlie’s— Karaoke JJ, 9p Felix’s— Sergio Rangel Duo Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p // Brian Hill Duo, 5:30p /// Rhonda Hart Duo, 6p //// Jo Jo Pres, 10p ///// Johnny B Duo, 10:15p Golden Nugget— Chris Houchin, 9p Lulu’s— Adam Holt, 5p Soul Kitchen— Animal Years, Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet - 8p

THURS. MAY 3 Beau Rivage (Coast Nightclub)— DJ Hurricane, 10p Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz, 8p Belle Fontaine Sandbar— Hunter Landry, 8p Bluegill— Johnny Hayes Duo Blues Tavern— Disciples of the Crow Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Brickyard— Yellowhammer Callaghan’s— Phil Proctor Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ JJ, 10p Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Flora Bama— J Hawkins Duo, 2p // Bat, 5p /// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p //// Mark Sherrill, Chris Newbury, James Daniel & Jose Santiago, 6p ///// Jason Abel Project, 10p ////// Mario Mena Duo 10:15p Golden Nugget— DJ Nikki Stylz, 9p Lulu’s— The Rebecca Barry Band, 5p Manci’s— Ross Newell Patricia’s River Club— Art Hedgepeth, 7p Royal Street Tavern— John David Anthony Saenger— Gov’t Mule, 7:30p Soul Kitchen— Hoodrich Pablo Juan, 9p Veets— Ryan Baltrop, 8p

FRI. MAY 4 Beau Rivage (Coast Nightclub)— DJ Hurricane, 10p Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz, 9p Belle Fontaine Sandbar— Jimmy Lumpkin, 9p Big Beach Brewing— The Rex, 6:30p Bluegill— Lee Yankee, 12p // Black Mouth Cur, 6p Blues Tavern— Ric McNaughton Band Brickyard— John Hart Band Callaghan’s— The Vegabonds

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Cockeyed Charlie’s— 3HG, 10p Felix’s— Bust Flora Bama— Bat 1p // LeaAnne Creswel Duo, 2p /// Dave Chastang, 4p //// Jack Robertson a.k.a.The Big Earl Show, 5:30p ///// Brandon White Duo, 6p ////// Hung Jury, 6p /////// Jim Newton & Jonathan Newton, 6p //////// Magic Johnsons 10p ///////// Brian Hill Duo, 10:15p ////////// Federal Expression, 10:30p Golden Nugget— No Idea, 9p // DJ Troy, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Perkins Road, 9:30p IP Casino— Boz Scaggs, 8p Listening Room— John Baumann w/Zach Nytomt, 8p Live Bait— The Perry Wall, 9:30p Lulu’s— Grits n Pieces, 5p Manci’s— Robert Sully Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Twang Gang, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Clay Connor and Johnny Mullen, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Don Holmes, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (OBA) — Kim Carson, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Anna McElroy, 6:30p Patricia’s River Club— Mudbucket, 8p Royal Street Tavern— John David Anthony Wind Creek Casino— The After Party, 10p

SAT. MAY 5 Beau Rivage (Headliner)— Alanis Morissette, 8p Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz, 9p Belle Fontaine Sandbar— Fat Lincoln, 9p Big Beach Brewing— The Defrosters, 6:30p Bluegill— Stephen Sylvester, 12p // Jamie Adamson Duo, 6p Blues Tavern— Disciples of the Crow Callaghan’s— The Stolen Faces Dority’s Bar and Grill— Grayson Capps, 7p Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Flora Bama— Al & Cathy, 1p // J. Hawkins Trio, 1p /// Kevin Swanson Duo, 1p //// David McCormick, 2p ////// Jason Abel, 4p ////// Tony Ray Thompson, 5p /////// Jo Jo Pres, 5p //////// Bat, 6p ///////// Jimmy Lumpkin & The Revival, 6p ////////// Mason Henderson, 8p /////////// Spunk Monkees, 10p /////////// Brian Hill Trio, 10:15p //////////// Foxy Iguanas, 10:30p Golden Nugget— Red Room Arrangement, 9p // DJ Troy, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Perkins Road, 9:30p Listening Room— 3-Yr Shindig w/Abe Partridge, Madison Grace and Chip Herrington, 8p Lulu’s— Rock Bottom w/Rick Carter, 5p Manci’s— Sergio & The Satin Dogs Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) —

Lefty Collins, 4p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Charlie Wilson, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Jimmy Lee Hannaford and Jose Santiago, 6:30p Patricia’s River Club— L.A. South, 9p Riders Lodge— Pearls of Trinity, 10p Royal Street Tavern— John David Anthony Waves DI—John Hall Trio Wind Creek Casino— The After Party, 10p

SUN. MAY 6 Beau Rivage (Headliner)— Alanis Morissette, 8p Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Unfazed Show & Band Big Beach Brewing— El Dub, 4p Bluegill— Lee Yankee, 12p // Jimmy Lumpkin & the Revivals, 6p Brickyard— Jake Burford Callaghan’s— Seth Walker Felix’s— Jamie Adamson Flora Bama— Smokey Otis Trio, 12p // Kevin Swanson, 1p /// Songs of Rusty McCugh w/ Jason Justice, 1:30p //// Al & Cathy, 2p ///// Jonathan Puzan, 2p ////// Mason Henderson, 5p /////// Jason Abel Project, 5:30p //////// Perdido Brothers, 6p //////// Yeah, Probably, 10p ///////// Lee Yankie Duo, 10:15p Frog Pond— Amy Ray, Grayson Capps,Will Kimbrough, Corky Hughes – 4p Joe Cain Cafe— Molly Thomas Lulu’s— Cadillac Attack, 5p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p

MON. MAY 7 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Unfazed Show & Band Felix’s— Matt Neese Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 2p // Open Mic w/ Cathy Pace, 6p /// Zachary Diedrick, 8p //// Petty & Pace 10:15p Royal Street Tavern— John David Anthony

TUES. MAY 8 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Unfazed Show & Band Bluegill— Quintin Berry Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— Jerry Powell Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p // Perdido Brothers 6p /// Kevin Swanson & Jon Puzan, 8p //// Delta Smoke, 10:15p Lulu’s— Albert Simpson, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Robbie Sellers, 6p Royal Street Tavern— John David Anthony


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ISO Bigfoot in the Alabama backwoods

S

FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Road South Mobile, AL (251)639-1748 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin St Mobile, AL (251) 438-2005 REGAL MOBILE STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Drive Mobile, AL (844) 462-7342 AMC JUBILEE Square 12 6898 Highway 90 Daphne, AL (251) 626-5766

ee local legends chase down actual legends in “Bo McGraw & The Legend of the Alabama Bigfoot,” a short feature making its debut at the Crescent Theater on Saturday, May 5, at 11 a.m. Local commercial videographer and documentary filmmaker Jon Miller tapped Uncle Henry, Killer Beaz and Johnny Gwin to work on this microbudget feature shot in Evergreen, not coincidentally the designated Bigfoot capital of Alabama. It is the tale of Bo McGraw, the kind of guy many of us might well recognize from our own experience, who runs amok in the Alabama backwoods, convinced he is on the trail of Bigfoot, that elusive and hirsute figure of lore. The star of all this madness is Steve Jenks, a longtime radio personality whose largely improvised character Bo McGraw was developed a few years ago. Says Jon Miller, “Steve Jenks and I used to host a cable access and internet country music video show together and we’d come up with skits and material to go between the videos … I’d been watching the ‘Finding Bigfoot’ show on Animal Planet and I was captivated by this show. I ordered a ‘Gone Squatchin’’ hat and

took Steve and a video camera out to the woods near my house. I told him to put on the hat and a wig I’d just bought from the Dollar Tree, and just pretend like everything you see in the woods is some sort of evidence of Bigfoot. He did, and it was hilarious.” For Jon Miller, whose previous projects include documentaries about spirituality and a documentary about cigar box guitars called “Strung Together,” this comedic mockumentary is both a departure and a natural transition. “When I was a kid,” says Miller, “I absolutely loved the Ernest movies and Mr. Bean. I was a big fan of Pee-wee Herman and Ace Ventura. I really enjoyed the eccentric individual-type films that had a lot of slapstick and situationaltype humor. So when I kind of zoned in on this idea, I drew a lot of inspiration from those movies and shows that I grew up loving, along with some of the other more rural stuff like ‘Hee Haw,’ ‘The Andy Griffith Show’ and ‘The Beverly Hillbillies.’ It just seems to me that we don’t get a lot of that good-hearted, ruraltype comedy anymore. That’s really what I was going for with this. It’s not necessarily a kids’ movie, but it’s clean enough for the family to watch.”

In search of an idea for a microbudget film, Miller remembered the material he and Jenks came up with on Bigfoot, and knew Jenks’ natural gifts for comedy and improvisation were a perfect fit for the project. About 70 percent of this movie was shot over a two-day period at Miller’s family property and his father’s childhood home in Washington County, where the cast and crew felt free to “act totally foolish and no one would care.” The result is a daffy, uproarious misadventure that finds bumbling outdoor enthusiast Bo McGraw investigating possible Bigfoot sightings and evidence. If you’ve ever sought out our own Crichton Leprechaun, you will appreciate the humor of the good-natured, poorly prepared Bo as he goes in search of the elusive Alabama Bigfoot. What he lacks in grammar Bo McGraw makes up for in enthusiasm, and locals will appreciate this wacky version of our backyards as only we can. After the May 5 screening, the filmmakers will making it available on Amazon Prime and also on Vimeo On Demand. Visit www.BoMcGraw.com to keep up with this elusive creature and visit www.crescenttheater.com to view the trailer and purchase your tickets for $7.

NEXUS CINEMA DINING 7070 Bruns Dr. Mobile, AL (251) 776-6570 AMC CLASSIC WHARF 23151 Wharf Lane Orange Beach, AL (251) 981-4444 COBB PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 923-0785 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 State Hwy 181 Spanish Fort, AL (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Photos | Miller Media / Electric Entertainment

From left: The locally produced microbudget feature film “Bo McGraw & The Legend of the Alabama Bigfoot” debuts at the Crescent Theater Saturday. In “Bad Samaritan,” David Tennant is a wealthy psychopath attempting to silence a pair of burglars who discovered a woman bound and gagged in his home. NEW THIS WEEK BAD SAMARITAN

A valet (Robert Sheehan) develops a clever scam to burglarize the houses of rich customers. Things go smoothly until he robs the wrong customer (David Tennant) and discovers a woman being held captive in his home. AMC Mobile 16

KINGS

A recluse (Daniel Craig) helps a woman (Halle Berry) and her children when riots erupt in Los Angeles following the 1992 acquittal of the policemen

charged with assaulting RodNOW PLAYING ney King. Regal Mobile Stadium AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 18, AMC Mobile 16 Nexus Cinema Dining, all listed multiplex theaters. FINDING YOUR FEET TRAFFIK When “Lady” Sandra Abbott Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16 (Academy Award nominee I FEEL PRETTY Imelda Staunton) discovers her All listed multiplex theaters. husband of 40 years is having an SUPER TROOPERS 2 All listed multiplex theaters. affair with her best friend, she seeks refuge in London with her ISLE OF DOGS Crescent Theater, Regal estranged older sister, Bif (Celia Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16 Imrie). The two could not be BLUMHOUSE’S TRUTH more different: Sandra is a fish OR DARE out of water next to her outspoAll listed multiplex theaters. ken, serial-dating, free-spirited RAMPAGE All listed multiplex theaters. sibling, but different is just what CHAPPAQUIDDICK she needs. Crescent Theater All listed multiplex theaters.

THE MIRACLE SEASON AMC Mobile 16, AMC Jubilee Square 12 A QUIET PLACE All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining. BLOCKERS All listed multiplex theaters. READY PLAYER ONE All listed multiplex theaters. SHERLOCK GNOMES All listed multiplex theaters. PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST AMC Mobile 16 I CAN ONLY IMAGINE All listed multiplex theaters. A WRINKLE IN TIME Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16 BLACK PANTHER All listed multiplex theaters. PETER RABBIT AMC Mobile 16


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS MAY 2, 2018 - MAY 8, 2018

PULL-A-PLANE DUMAS WESLEY’S 3RD ANNUAL PLANE PULL IS SATURDAY, MAY 5. TEAMS WILL COMPETE TO SEE WHO CAN PULL AN AIRBUS A320 MORE THAN 12 FEET IN THE SHORTEST AMOUNT OF TIME. REGISTRATION/ GATES OPEN AT 9 A.M. AND THE EVENT BEGINS AT 10 A.M. INCLUDES ENTERTAINMENT, FOOD TRUCKS AND A KID ZONE. MORE INFORMATION AT WWW.DUMASWESLEY.ORG. Photo | dumaswesley.org

GENERAL INTEREST LGBTQ Family Dinner Rainbow Mobile presents its first monthly LGBTQ Family Dinner for Mobile County on Thursday, May 3, 6:30 p.m. at Chili’s Grill & Bar, 790 Schillinger Road S. First Thursday of every month. Please RSVP no later than one day prior at www. rainbowmobile.org/mobile-family-dinner. Fairhope farmers market Outdoor market is hosted by city of Fairhope on Thursday, May 3, 3-6 p.m. and will continue each Thursday until July 19. Local farmers, bakers, fresh local produce, fresh-cut flowers, local honey, plants and more. Fairhope library will host children’s activities at 4 p.m. Call 251929-1466. 2018 Griot award recipient Friday, May 4, 6-9 p.m. at History Museum of Mobile, 2018 Griot Award recipient and Pulitzer Prize winner Cynthia Tucker will be honored. Purchase tickets at www.dffaaht.org. May the 4th be with you Come join us Friday, May 4, 3-5:30 p.m. at the Ben May downtown library for an afternoon screening of “Rogue One” at 3:30 p.m. DIY lightsaber instructions, Star Wars 3D printing projects and more. Dressing as your favorite Star Wars character is encouraged. Call 251-2087079. Tidy the city Spanish Fort residents will have an opportunity to “Tidy the City” starting Friday, May 4, at 8 a.m. through Sunday, May 6, at 8 p.m. at Spanish Fort Community Center. Two dumpsters will be placed behind the center in the cul-de-sac for the collection of unwanted items. Find us on Facebook @cityofspanishfort. Hot air balloon festival The Gulf Coast Hot Air Balloon Festival will feature hot air balloon rides, balloon glow Friday and Saturday nights, World Famous Disc Connected K-9 Frisbee Dog Show, carnival rides, arts and crafts vendors, food, live music and more. Friday, May 4, at 2 p.m. through Sunday, May 6, at the Foley Soccer Complex. General admission is free. Visit GulfCoastBalloonFestival.com.

Domehead Science: May the 4th be with you Gulf Coast Exploreum will host “Jedi Physics” with Dr. Albert Gapud of the USA Physics Department. A free viewing of “Return of the Jedi” will follow in the IMAX theater. General admission is $10 for adults and children. Capacity is limited; purchase tickets at www.exploreum.com. Help Me Grow Alabama Amelia Leonard will discuss the importance of development screenings and how they help with early detection of developmental delays that may indicate a child is on the autism spectrum. Saturday, May 5, 10 a.m. to noon at the Ben May Main Library. Call 251-208-7079. Market in the Park Come shop at the second Market in the Park of the spring/summer in Cathedral Square on Saturday, May 5, from 7:3011 a.m. The market features one-of-akind arts and crafts produced by local artisans, as well as locally grown produce, seafood, cheese and eggs, honeys, flowers and plants, baked goods, pasta and more. Follow us on Facebook @ SpecialEventsMobile. MBG marketplace Come to Mobile Botanical Gardens MarketPlace (located at the end of our parking lot) and get some great plants for your garden on Saturday, May 5, at 9 a.m. Plant experts will be on hand to answer any questions and give advice. Visit www. mbgrebloomshop.com. Cuban festival The Mobile Museum of Art’s first ever Cuban Festival will celebrate the shared cultures of Mobile and its sister city, Havana, Cuba. Events begin at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 5, with tours and book signing. Free admission for all Mobile County residents all day. Experience special exhibits, vintage Cuban cars, food and dance. Visit www. mobilemuseumofart.com. Jewish American Heritage Series A special screening of the PBS series “The Story of the Jews with Simon Schama” at Bernheim Hall at the Ben May Main Library on Sunday, May 6, at 1:30 p.m. Call 251-208-7079 or visit www. mobilepubliclibrary.org.

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The Market at The Pillars Enjoy a fun afternoon of local makers, bakers, crafters and artists at The Pillars on Sunday, May 6, beginning at noon. Live music and local food. Free and open to the public. Family fun and pet friendly!

kayaking, fun run/walk, swimming and reading. Proceeds benefit the Reach Out and Read-Alabama program that provides books and a foundation for success for Alabama’s children. Find us on Facebook @AlabamaChapter.AAP.

JLM breakfast Junior League of Mobile will host a Community Collaborations breakfast on Monday, May 7, 7:30 a.m., with guest speaker Vicki Clark at the JLM headquarters, 57 N. Sage Ave. Free; seating is limited so pre-registration is required. Call 251-463-9342.

Mother/Daughter Tea Join us at The Battle House Hotel on Sunday, May 6, at 2 p.m. for a tea benefiting the Salvation Army’s Family Haven, the only family shelter that accepts men, women and children as a unit. Arts and crafts, tea time refreshments and special princess guests. Tickets cost $50 per pair and $15 for each additional child 12 and under, $35 per adult. Call 251-4596144 to reserve tickets.

District court judge debate Please join the Mobile County Young Republicans for a debate between the three district court judge candidates on Tuesday, May 8, at 6 p.m. at Dublin Pub & Eatery. Candidate meet and greet starts 6 p.m. Find us on Facebook @MobileYR. Thursday evenings at the gardens Each Thursday Mobile Botanical Gardens will remain open until 7 p.m. Come out and enjoy a late afternoon stroll or just sit and watch the sunset. Last admission is at 6 p.m. Visit www. mobilebotanicalgardens.org.

FUNDRAISERS Cocktails with Critters 13th annual fundraiser for the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Foundation on Thursday, May 3, 6-9 p.m. at Bluegill on the Causeway. Silent auction, hors d’oeuvres and drinks with music by Johnny Hayes Duo. Tickets $50 in advance/$55 at the door. Call 251-605-6624. Pull-A-Plane Dumas Wesley’s 3rd annual Plane Pull is Saturday, May 5. Teams will compete to see who can pull an Airbus A320 more than 12 feet in the shortest amount of time. Registration/gates open at 9 a.m. and the event begins at 10 a.m. Includes entertainment, food trucks and a kid zone. More information at www. dumaswesley.org. Grand Pediatric Pentathlon Fun, family event at the Grand Hotel Marriott in Point Clear on Saturday, May 4, hosted by the Alabama Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Participants will have five events — biking,

Hobby Horse Derby Don’t miss the inaugural Mobile Hobby Horse Derby hosted by Delta Dogs in Cathedral Square on Sunday, May 6, at 1 p.m. Hop on your hobby horse, dress in your best race day costume and compete to be “top dog” in Mobile. Register online at eventbrite.com. Late registration is online only through Friday, May 4, at 5 p.m. There will be no registration at the event.

ARTS Gov’t Mule at the Saenger Rock ’n’ roll music has always been a reflection of the times, and the new Gov’t Mule album, “Revolution Come… Revolution Go,” is no exception. Gov’t Mule with special guests Black Stone Cherry on Thursday, May 3, at the Saenger Theatre. Tickets at the Saenger Box Office, Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or at ticketmaster.com. “Newsies” Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre will bring Disney’s “Newsies” to Henry George Park in Fairhope May 3-5. All shows begin at 7:30 p.m., and gates will open at 6:30. Tickets are available online or can be purchased at the gate on the night of the show if space is still available. In the event that a performance must be canceled due to inclement weather, a rain date performance will be held on Sunday, May 6. All tickets are non-refundable. For more information, visit www.easternshorerep.org.


“Butterflies Are Free” Last chance to see Theatre 98’s “Butterflies are Free” by Leonard Gershe. Showtimes are Friday, May 4 and Saturday, May 5, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, May 6, at 2:30 p.m. Visit theatre98.org for pricing information.

“Permian Monsters: Life Before Dinosaurs” Take an adventure back in time 290 millions years when bizarre-looking animals dominated life on land and sea. The Exploreum will display this traveling exhibition thru June 3. Visit exploreum. com. “Galapagos: Nature’s Wonderland” In the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, there is a paradise unlike any other: the Galapagos Archipelago. Immerse yourself in this spectacular film at the Exploreum until May 26. Visit exploreum.com.

WORKSHOPS

Photo | mobilesaenger.com

Seinfeld at the Saenger America’s premier comedian, Jerry Seinfeld, will return to the Port City to perform his signature stand-up routine at the Saenger Theatre this Friday, May 4, at 7 p.m. Purchase tickets online at www. ticketmaster.com or call 800-745-3000. Mozart’s Requiem The Christ Church Cathedral Choir will present the iconic Requiem in D minor by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart as the finale to their 2017-2018 Music Season on Sunday, May 6, at 4 p.m. This is considered Mozart’s most mysterious work, commissioned by a secret patron and left unfinished at the time of the composer’s death. Free and open to all. Corner of Church and St. Emanuel streets. Music in the Park Enjoy free concerts in the Pavilion at Town Center Park in Spanish Fort every Friday. Mitcher Rencher, steel drum artist, will perform at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, May 4. Visit spanishforttowncenter.com for the summer lineup.

Digital Marketing Boot Camp Join us for half-day boot camps composed of workshops providing handson instruction in the tools used by today’s digital marketer on Friday, May 4, 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Mobile Area Association of Realtors (2827 Airport Blvd.). Visit twww.southalabama.edu/colleges/mcob/ digitalmarketing/bootcamp.html. Getting bogged down Join us at the Mobile Botanical Gardens MarketPlace to learn more about native and local insect-eating plants, where they grow and how you can take them home with you. The workshop will be held Saturday, May 5, at 10 a.m. and include a presentation about carnivorous plants and their ecological companion plants, what makes a bog a bog and how to construct a bog garden. All materials are included in registration fee; MBG members $65, nonmembers $75. CPR training The Daphne Public Library will provide a CPR class on Saturday, May 5, at 9:30 a.m. This course is open to students in grades 6-12 and adults free of charge. The class will cover adult, toddler and infant CPR. To register, call 251-621-2818, ext. 211.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES

MUSEUMS Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all Mobile County residents. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com.

rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www.baldwincountyal.gov

Pedestrian tunnel The Alabama Department of Transportation will open the Bankhead Tunnel for for bicycle and pedestrian traffic on Saturday, May 5, from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m.

Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre. com.

Soccer at the Lip AFC Mobile soccer team takes on the New Orleans Jesters, the biggest team along the Gulf Coast, on Saturday, May 5, at Lipscomb Stadium, 7 p.m. The Jesters went undefeated in the Southeastern Conference of the National Premier Soccer League. Now they head to Mobile to participate in the biggest and highest-level soccer match to ever take place in the Port City. Visit @AFCMobile on Facebook for details and the 2018 schedule. Fuji BJJ Classic Join us Saturday, May 5, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Alabama Youth Sports Combine for a fun, family-friendly event for one and all. See some great competitions and learn a little about jiu jitsu, too. Register now at www.fujibjj.com. Register during the early registration period to receive a $10 discount and a promotional item. Free Yoga at Alabama Contemporary Recharge and refresh with Yoga at Alabama Contemporary Art Center. This free one-hour class on Saturday, May 5, at 11:30am is led by certified yoga instructors and open to participants of all levels of experience. LGBTQ Kayaking trip Join us for Rainbow Mobile’s first kayaking trip at noon on Sunday, May 6, at Off the Hook Marina. We will have both single kayaks and dual canoes for rent for $20 each. Launch fee is $3 per person if you want to bring your own. Check us out on Facebook. Group rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@rideSAMBA.com.

“Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is the latest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. Fairhope’s Founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday), 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471.

8-team bracket for double-elimination competition. Tournament runs May 4-6 at Gulf Shores Main Public Beach (101 E. Beach Blvd.). General admission day passes cost $20; $30 for courtside seating day passes; $45 for general admission all-session; $75 for courtside seating all-session. Visit GulfShores.com/ NCAAWomensBeachVball.aspx for details.

Photo | milb.com

BayBears vs. Lookouts Gates open at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 2, for the BayBears’ first game of five against the Chattanooga Lookouts at Hank Aaron Stadium. Games begin nightly at 7:05 p.m. through Saturday, May 5. Last game is Sunday, May 5, at 2:05 p.m. Log on to mobilebaybears.com for tickets or call 479BEAR (2327). National Collegiate Beach Volleyball Championship The best teams from the fastest-growing NCAA sport will hit the sand with an

Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Fitness and athletics classes Try something new this year. Classes are being offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Tai Chi, bellydance, candlelit yoga, Piyo Tone and piano. Call 251-463-7980 or visitmobilecap.org

PUBLIC MEETINGS

Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov.

Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450. Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd.,www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope. com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope. com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www.cityoffoley. org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St.,www.gulfshoresal.gov. Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., www.cityofmobile.org. Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St.,www.urban.cityofmobile.org. Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd.,www.cityoforangebeach.com. Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. thecityofprichard.org.

Satsuma City Council: First and third Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 5464 Old Highway 43 Satsuma, AL Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. 36572, 251-675-1440. M a y 2 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 8 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 37


MEDIA MEDIA FRENZY

Nine years later and still talking

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BY ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE PLUSES AND MINUSES BY ROSS TRUDEAU / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Bedbug, e.g. 5 “Police Line — Do Not Cross” material 9 Gay ____ 14 Blemish for a straight-A student 19 R.p.m. indicator 20 Having gone tit for tat 21 Florida city whose name ends with two state postal abbreviations 22 Humiliate 23 Makes eye contact before undressing? 26 Hoosier hoopster 27 Expatriate 28 Wide-eyed type 29 “What ____ thou?” 31 One of five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council 32 One reading up on infant care, maybe 34 Equilibrium 36 Minor setback 38 Butts 39 Parent wearing your Superman costume? 42 Year abroad 43 The sun, for one 44 “Party Up (Up in Here)” rapper, 2000 45 Bugs’s cartoon pursuer 46 Org. with evening meetings 47 Book after Jonah 49 “Get ____” 51 Root beer brand since 1937 54 Script suggestion about starting the fight scene? 60 A.F.L. partner 61 The “A” of I.P.A. 62 Ocean buildup 63 Willa who wrote “My Ántonia” 65 Mean-spirited sort 68 Richard Gere title role 69 Eat a little here, a little there 70 Greek god of sleep 72 Take for granted 76 Early Chinese dynasty 77 Black ____ 78 Ballet choreography? 84 Sport 86 RR ____ 87 Widening of the mouth? 88 Broody genre 89 Racy film 91 FEMA offering 94 Cartoonist Thomas 95 Beaut 96 Was harder for the bronco buster to hold on to?

101 High flier 102 Firstborn 103 University of Illinois city 104 Lumbering, say 106 In days of yore 107 “Same with me” 109 Subjects of an apartment restriction 111 Actresses Field and Hawkins 113 Rarity in a Polish name? 115 Like the digit “0” in 2018? 118 Iowa senator elected in 2014 119 “… but I could be wrong” 120 Reynolds of “Deadpool” 121 James who was nominated for a 1967 Grammy for “Tell Mama” 122 Hives, e.g. 123 Forte’s opposite 124 Old flames 125 Balance DOWN 1 All-too-common V.A. diagnosis 2 Corroded 3 Fall guy 4 Loses intentionally 5 What the classics stand 6 “Selma” director DuVernay 7 Southernmost Ivy 8 Hyphen’s longer cousin 9 Agricultural locale that’s

weed-friendly? 10 Down’s counterpart: Abbr. 11 Trail mix bit 12 Title city in a 1960 #1 song 13 “Don’t panic” 14 Event for Jesus described in Matthew 3:13-17 15 Kegler’s org. 16 Popular Mexican folk song 17 Depletes 18 It’s a wrap 24 “Uhh …” 25 Positioned 30 Lambaste 33 Auto-repair chain 35 Boxcars half 37 Looped in, in a way 38 Skipper, informally 40 Places for conductors 41 Kind of tide 43 Breakfast order at a diner 48 Giggle syllable 49 The New Yorker cartoonist Chast 50 Tip of the tongue? 52 Number between nueve and once 53 Put out 55 Make 56 Politician inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame 57 Trunk 58 Tally, in Britain 59 Vituperated 64 Orbitz booking 65 Grub 66 Build up

67 Fickleness of life 71 Demeaners of the #MeToo movement, say 72 Part of a stockyard 73 Dungeons & Dragons, e.g., for short 74 T-shirt size: Abbr. 75 First name on the Supreme Court 76 Monsoons 79 Draws 80 Treeless plain 81 Put on an act? 82 February birthstones 83 1899 gold rush destination 85 Be absolutely awesome 90 Makes potable, in a way 91 Wall St. worker 92 Probably will 93 Supergiant in Cygnus 96 A state of rapture 97 Notable whose name is an anagram of GALORE 98 Some arm bones 99 Journalist Fallaci 100 Emotionally developed 101 ____ whale 105 Bacon runoff 108 Cockeyed 110 Boundary between the earth and the underworld, in myth 112 R.B.I. or H.R.s 114 The “e” of i.e. 116 III or IV, maybe 117 When doubled, a 2010s dance craze

ANSWERS ON PAGE 45

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ine years ago, talk radio in Mobile took a huge leap forward when FMTALK 106.5 hit the airwaves. The brainchild of longtime WZEW disc jockey Sean Sullivan, along with his stepfather, Don Bigler, and local radio stalwart Wayne Gardner, FMTALK has blossomed over the past nine years to become a daily addiction for an ever-growing band of listeners. Looking back nearly a decade later, Sullivan says the station certainly lines up with what he’d expected it could do, despite facing a daunting recession at its inception and the industrywide decline in terrestrial radio numbers. “What I’ve done since [we started] is every chance I’ve gotten to put on more local programming, I do,” Sullivan said. “It’s the hardest thing to do. What happens across the rest of the fruited plain is people just run syndicated programs.” While FMTALK certainly has its share of syndicated features, Sullivan has grown the bullpen of local talkers conspicuously over the years, which has taken the station in directions he didn’t necessarily foresee at startup. “Maybe I didn’t expect all the ways people would use the station,” he said. That means shows not only about politics, but also gardening, food, sports and more, all curated by local hosts. The result is the station now does live shows on the weekends and reaches people interested in a wide variety of topics. “In a given week we’re doing at least 40 hours of locally produced programming and over 20 different podcasts,” Sullivan said.

This goes to the core of his “content is king” attitude about programming, and that is also something that allows Sullivan to brush off the doom and gloom talk about the end days of terrestrial radio. He believes good content will always draw listeners, but also says FMTALK embraces podcasts, social media and other digital ways of getting to listeners. The station also just launched a retooled website. As for the station’s signature show, “Mobile Mornings,” it has morphed considerably since the early days featuring Sullivan and Gardner. Listeners now are getting Sullivan and co-hosts Dalton Orwig and Kelly Finley, both of whom Sullivan says were tremendous “gets” for the station. “He has the chops and can learn just about anything,” Sullivan said of Orwig. “Having people who can learn to do things is so valuable.” Likewise he says Finley, with her background as a television news anchor and reporter, has brought a meatier dimension to the station’s news presentation. “It’s really elevated our news game and our social media game,” he said of the ever-tweeting Finley. The only big complaint Sullivan has about the morning show, he jokes, is that it still airs 6-9 a.m., meaning very early mornings for the father of two. He also hosts the midday talk show each weekday, and says running a radio station keeps him very, very busy. But looking back at the growth over the past nine years, Sullivan realizes the station has come a long way and has solidified a place in Mobile media. “I’m very happy and very grateful,” he said.


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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

NCAA Beach Volleyball Championship returns to Gulf Shores BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

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match throughout the tournament. Duals 1-8 will be played Friday and duals 9-12 will take place Saturday. Championship Sunday will showcase duals 13 and 14. Additionally, ESPN3 will provide full coverage of every individual match from all five courts. Tickets are on sale now for the beach volleyball championship. Weekend tickets prices are $45 for general admission, $75 for Courtside and $200 for NCAA Experience. Visit GulfShores.com for more details on the event and NCAA.com for tickets. The event is hosted by the city of Gulf Shores, the Gulf Shores & Orange Beach Sports Commission and The University of Alabama at Birmingham. (Although Spring Hill College has a beach volleyball team, the school is in its final year of transition before becoming a full NCAA member.) “NCAA awarding the broadcast contract to ESPN means even more exposure for Alabama’s beaches to a national audience,” said Beth Gendler, vice president of sales for the Gulf Shores & Orange Beach Sports Commission. “We are continuing to improve this championship from a local sports tourism perspective, and we look forward to welcoming the student-athletes, families, fans, staffs and ESPN to Gulf Shores in May 2018.” For more information on the NCAA Women’s Beach Volleyball Championship, visit ncaa.com/beachvolleyball.

Photo | Courtesy Gulf Shores & Orange Beach Sports Commission

ome of the best female athletes in America will once again descend on the Gulf Shores Public Beach for the National Collegiate Beach Volleyball Championship. The competition is set for Friday, May 4, through Sunday, May 6. “We are proud of our 32 miles of sugar-white sandy beaches and of our Southern hospitality,” Gulf Shores Mayor Robert Craft said. “But we are equally proud of our relationship with the NCAA and excited to host the National Collegiate Beach Volleyball Championship on our newly revitalized public beach.” The American Volleyball Coaches Association started hosting its national tournament in Baldwin County in 2012, and two years later the NCAA sanctioned beach volleyball as its 90th championship. The University of Southern California returned to the West Coast with golden trophies in those initial tournaments. The Trojans beat Florida State in 2016 and Pepperdine in 2017 in the title matches. Beach volleyball is one of the fastest growing NCAA sports and is currently sponsored by 69 institutions. The championship has an eight-team bracket that will be played in a double-elimination format. Teams consist of five pairs of female student-athletes. Competition will observe standard beach volleyball rules with the five pairs playing five-set matches. The winning team needs to win three of the five pair matches to win the dual and advance to the next round. The NCAA announced the bracket and seeding on Sunday. From the East Region are No. 4 Florida State, No. 6 South Carolina and No. 8 Florida International. The West Region includes No. 1 UCLA, No. 2 Pepperdine and No. 3 Hawaii. No. 7 LSU and No. 5 Southern California received the at-large bids. The NCAA and ESPN have reached a multiyear agreement to telecast the beach volleyball championship. Full coverage from all five courts will be aired live throughout ESPN’s family of networks. The championship match will air on the main ESPN network Sunday afternoon. ESPN has also announced it will televise the event in Gulf Shores through 2022. “We are extremely thrilled to have ESPN telecast the championship for the next five years,” said Kelcey Roegiers, chair of the NCAA Women’s Beach Volleyball Committee and associate athletics director at Georgia State. “The coverage ESPN will provide for the championship allows great exposure for the sport, the hardworking student-athletes and the growth and excitement surrounding the NCAA Women’s Beach Volleyball Championship.” ESPN will provide live whip-around coverage of every

College honors

• The University of South Alabama football team had a pair of representatives on the 2018 Hampshire Honor Society list released by the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame. Offensive linemen Dominic Esposito and Harrison Louden were recognized, marking the first time in program history that multiple Jaguars have been honored by the organization in the same season. The duo completed their undergraduate degrees from South with better than a 3.30 GPA. • The Spring Hill College baseball team handed head coach Frank Sims the 900th victory of his 34-year career with a 13-0 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference win over Lane College recently at historic Stan Galle Field. Sims, the most successful coach in SHC history, began his career on The Hill with just 10 games remaining in the 1985 season and has since built a 864-856-3 record with the Badgers and a 900-866-3 mark overall. • University of Mobile junior Mariah Plauth has earned the Southern States Athletic Conference’s Tennis Player of the Year honors for the second straight season. Plauth is ranked ninth in the ITA doubles rankings and 25th in the ITA singles rankings, going 13-1 at No. 1 singles and 12-4

The National Collegiate Beach Volleyball Championship returns to Gulf Shores May 4-6 and will be televised by ESPN networks. at No. 1 doubles. Teammate Emily Chang was named Newcomer of the Year and was on the all-SSAC roster with Sina Marchione. • Uwe Titti of the University of Mobile was named SSAC Coach of the Year after the Rams won the regular season tennis championship. Senior Tim Buehler was on the all-league roster for the second year, Boris Klingebiel was Freshman of the Year, Illya Filanchuk was Newcomer of the Year, and joining them on the all-conference team was Mark Simons. • USA junior Alexandria Stiteler and freshman Yu Fujioka were voted FirstTeam all-Sun Belt Conference in tennis, and Fujioka was additionally named the league’s freshman of the year in the SBC’s annual postseason awards. Stiteler earned first-team honors for the third time in her career, and Fujioka became the second Jaguar to be named freshman of the year, after Stiteler in 2016. • USA sophomores Loic Cloes and Clement Marzol were voted First-Team all-Sun Belt Conference in singles and doubles, and Cloes was named the conference’s tennis player to watch. Cloes and Marzol each earned first-team allSBC honors for the first time in their careers, as Marzol was named freshman of the year last season and Cloes earned second-team recognition.


SPORTS FROM BEHIND THE MIC

The NFL dream should remain alive BY RANDY KENNEDY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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hat do you want to be when you grow up? That question is almost never answered with “I want to be a CPA” or “I want to be a personal injury attorney” or “I want to be a dock worker.” Yet most of us work as CPAs or attorneys or dock workers or something similarly as crucial to society, but not nearly as glamorous as the more common answers. I want to be a music producer. I want to be an NFL quarterback. I want to be a movie star. To make it in any of those professions is an extreme long shot. But dreams can come true. That’s what last weekend’s NFL Draft was all about. Yes, it’s about football and which teams are going to improve their chances of winning the Super Bowl. But at its core the draft is about beating the odds and becoming one of those rare kids who never had to come to grips with the idea that being a CPA can provide a good life, even if nobody will ever fill an arena to watch you balance a ledger account. The 32 players who were selected in the first round last Thursday night will each earn a signing bonus of at least $5 million. For No. 1 pick Baker Mayfield of the Cleveland Browns, that signing bonus number is $21.85 million. The total value of his first deal is an estimated $32,683,750. For the four players chosen from The University of Alabama in the first round, their first NFL contracts are set to pay $16.5 million for No. 11 pick Minkah Fitzpatrick of the Miami Dolphins, $14.5 million for No. 13

pick Da’Ron Payne of the Washington Redskins, $11.6 million for No. 22 pick Rashaan Evans of the Tennessee Titans and $10.9 million for No. 26 pick Calvin Ridley of the Atlanta Falcons. Fitzgerald, Payne, Evans and Ridley make 26 players in the last 10 years selected in the first round from Alabama. Among those 26 are Mark Barron from St. Paul’s, C.J. Mosley from Theodore, Julio Jones from Foley and D.J. Fluker, who played at both McGill-Toolen and Foley. Of course, you don’t have to be an expert in statistics to know these astronomical paydays for first-round picks are only slightly more likely to be achieved than winning a Mega Million lottery jackpot. But there’s a huge difference between working to realize an NFL dream and trying to strike it rich at the local convenience store. For every person who reaches his NFL goal, there are thousands who learned the value of hard work, persistence, teamwork and goal setting while falling short of their ultimate dream. I was one of those kids who was good enough to play quarterback just like Baker Mayfield — except for the part where he completed most of his passes to his receivers while most of mine went to the opposing team, and the part where he won a bunch of games and became nationally famous while I … didn’t. But the point is that, like thousands of kids playing in park leagues and junior highs and high schools around Mobile, my dream, even if it died 14 levels shy of the NFL level, propelled me to learn how to work toward a goal.

In my case, it led to a career in sports that didn’t depend on my extremely minimal athletic ability. But even if I had become a CPA or lawyer or dock worker, I know the lessons I learned playing sports — and yes, pursuing a multimillion-dollar NFL contract — would still benefit me every day. To this day I use the skills I learned being part of sports teams just as much as I use what I learned in high school classrooms. And one of those lessons was that you don’t always get what you want or believe you deserve even if you work really hard for it. It’s why when I hear a kid say he or she wants to be a music producer or NFL quarterback or movie star, I don’t feel tempted for a second to say “Yes,

IT’S WHY WHEN I HEAR A KID SAY HE OR SHE WANTS TO BE A MUSIC PRODUCER OR NFL QUARTERBACK OR MOVIE STAR, I DON’T FEEL TEMPTED FOR A SECOND TO SAY ‘YES, BUT WHAT’S YOUR BACKUP PLAN?’ THAT’S BECAUSE, ANY BACKUP PLAN IS GOING TO BE ENHANCED SIMPLY BY PURSUING THE LESS LIKELY GOAL.” but what’s your backup plan? That’s because any backup plan is going to be enhanced simply by pursuing the less likely goal. And, who knows, somebody’s got to be the next Baker Mayfield. There are plenty of examples to prove that kid could be from right here. Randy Kennedy writes a weekly column for Lagniappe and is co-host of “Sports Drive” every weekday from 3-6 p.m. on WNSP 105.5 FM, the country’s first all-sports FM station.

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STYLE HOROSCOPES CELEBRATE CINCO DE MAYO TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — After having neglected to shave for more than a few days, you’ll be treated as the guest of honor at the premier of “Bo McGraw & The Legend of the Alabama Bigfoot.” Your lucky Cinco de Mayo party favor is a President Trump piñata. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — You’ll be flying higher than a hot air balloon in Foley this weekend when you finally achieve a goal after months of focus and practice. Your lucky Cinco de Mayo dish is a beef burrito. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll be swept off your feet in a romantic overture rivaled only by fairy tales during the celebration of an anniversary this weekend. Your lucky Cinco de Mayo attire is a huipil. LEO (7/23-8/23) — Eyes will roll as you playfully fondle the eggplant and peaches at Market in the Park this weekend. Your lucky Cinco de Mayo party favor is a pair of maracas. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — You’ll venture into a Waffle House this weekend bleary eyed and hungry, but wary of becoming an unwilling party to some tiresome national conversation. Your lucky Cinco de Mayo accessory is a mini sombrero. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — Impressed by the caliber of talent on the beaches of Gulf Shores this weekend, you suddenly become the world’s biggest beach volleyball superfan. Your lucky Cinco de Mayo decoration is red chili pepper string lights. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — After getting a little careless during a household painting project, you’ll be mistaken for an exhibit in the “Neu Dawn” fashion and art installation this weekend. Your lucky Cinco de Mayo viewing material is the 1960 film “Macario.” SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — Being slowly driven out of Mobile by a lack of affordable housing, you’ll settle in the mudhole that is Bayou La Batre, where you construct an adobe house of your own design. Your lucky Cinco de Mayo drink is a top-shelf Margarita. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — Displaying your athletic prowess both on and off the field, coach will award you the game ball of life. Your lucky Cinco de Mayo dish is queso dip. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — Joining the fight to keep Baldwin County’s dwindling public beach accesses open, you’ll change your permanent address to “Curbside, Zundel Road, Point Clear, Alabama 36532.” Your lucky Cinco de Mayo song is anything mariachi. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — You’ll eat so many blueberries during Harvest Nights at Weeks Bay Plantation that you’ll inflate and turn two shades darker than Violet Beauregarde. Your lucky Cinco de Mayo Intro to Spanish phrase is “Dónde está el baño?” ARIES (3/21-4/19) — You’ll celebrate May the Fourth by talking like a Wookie and forcing yourself to suffer through the “Star Wars Holiday Special.” Ease the pain with your lucky Cinco de Mayo beverage, sangria. 42 | L AG N I A P P E | M a y 2 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 8 , 2 0 1 8


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STYLE FEATURE

Horse sense

BY GABI GARRETT/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Photo | Sarah Chain

Horses in the Equine Therapy Group program have been rescued or adopted after no longer being fit to ride.

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ari Whatley owns the Equine Therapy Group in Bay Minette, a unique therapy application utilizing Whatley’s background as a licensed professional counselor and the foundational tactics of the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association. Whatley is on a mission to serve the community to the best of her ability, combining her love of counseling with her love of horses. “Some people are power hungry, some people are impact hungry,” she stated. “I am impact hungry.”

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Most importantly, Whatley is “impact hungry” around opportunities to assist military veterans and their families, in particular those struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). “The foundations in our area have been so helpful and supportive of Equine Therapy Group, thankfully — The Cox Family Foundation and the Community Foundation of South Alabama, in particular. Both of these foundations have enabled us to provide scholarship opportunities to veterans and their families,” Whatley said.

So, how does therapy with horses work? You may be envisioning horseback riding side by side with a therapist, explaining your life story and attempting to not feel frightened by the galloping of your horse. (Why do horses stomp their feet incessantly, anyway?) On the contrary, you won’t actually ride any of the horses at Equine Therapy Group. Much like the people ETG serves, there is something slightly malfunctioning in each horse. Every horse has been rescued or adopted after no longer being fit to ride. Many horses come in with slight blindness, for example. Each horse is taken through rigorous training to ensure they aren’t easily spooked by patients that feel nervous or make sudden movements. Therapy sessions start by simply standing near the horse in a small, enclosed area. “Horses are great detectors of energy,” Whatley said. “If you come in here with anger, or a bad mood, the horse will stand on the other side of the area. But if you are positive and loving, they can sense that and will willingly stay with you.” After you chat with Whatley about your current situation, you’ll begin to do a few alternative therapy techniques. This is especially helpful if you’re someone for whom traditional therapy hasn’t worked well. One exercise Whatley uses frequently is to write the name of a boundary, or fear, the person in session is struggling with on a prop for the horse to hop over, then allow the patient to walk the horse over the hurdle, simulating what needs to happen in real life. Whatley said she has seen dramatic improvements from equine therapy. In fact, the horses complement her counseling abilities, often sensing things before she does. “We’ve had experiences in family counseling where the horse would stand in between two family members,” she said, “We’d find later that there were particular issues between the two the horse was dividing.” Whatley said she wants to utilize the foundations’ gifts to the Equine Therapy Group to assist as many veterans as she can. So if you or a loved one could benefit from a little time spent in nature, at a beautiful location with kind horses, consider visiting Whatley and allow her “impact hunger” to be satiated. Interested in visiting Equine Therapy Group? Contact Kari, 251-237-3384. Visits by appointment only.

Equine Therapy Group 37252 Cheval Aire Road Bay Minette 36507


F U T U R E

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 38

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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com CIRCUIT DIVORCE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY ALABAMA DOMESTIC RELATIONS DIVISION NOTICE OF DIVORCE ACTION Case No. 02-DR-2018-500028.00S GAYLE ELIZABETH DAWSON, PLAINTIFF vs. CHRISTOPHER THOMAS FRYE, DEFENDANT CHRISTOPHER T. FRYE (Defendant), whose whereabouts is unknown, must answer the plaintiff’s Petition for Divorce and other relief by JUNE 11, 2018 or, thereafter, a Judgment by Default may be rendered against him/her in the above styled case. The defendant’s written answer must be filed with the Court and a copy mailed to the plaintiff’s attorney of record at the address provided below. Done this 4th day of April, 2018 JoJo Schwarzauer, Circuit Clerk ATTY: Harry Still, III Post Office Box 547 Bay Minette, AL 36507 Telephone: (251) 202-3234 Attorney for the Plaintiff

Lagniappe HD April 18, 25, May 2, 9, 2018

FORECLOSURES FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendor’s Lien retained in Deed from Steven Woods a/k/a Steven C. Woods to Teresa Chaffin dated November 6, 2009 and Recorded in Book 6597, Page 1354 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, notice is hereby given that the undersigned as holder of said Vendor’s Lien will under power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on June 4, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 45, RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 1-30 OF THE RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 28-55, GULF MANOR FIRST ADDITION AND LOTS 56-87, GULF MANOR, FIRST ADDITION, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 10, PAGE 90, OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA; TOGETHER WITH ALL LAND, IF ANY, LYING BETWEEN SAID LOT 45 AND THE DREDGED BOAT SLIP BOUNDED BY A SOUTHWARD PROJECTION OF THE EAST AND WEST LINES OF LOT 45. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS”  BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF THE PROBATE WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Steven Woods A/k/a Steven C. Woods Mortgagee Beth McFadden Rouse McFadden, Lyon & Rouse, L.L.C. 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Clement A. Conaway a single man, originally in favor of Citifinancial Corporation, LLC, on the 21st day of April, 2011, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Baldwin County, Alabama, in Instrument Number 1283836; the undersigned Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, A Delaware Limited Liability Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Bay Minette, Baldwin County, Alabama, on May 30, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Baldwin County, Alabama, to-wit: From the Northeast corner of Section 20, Township 5 South, Range 2 East run South along the Eastern boundary of such Section 990 feet to a point; run thence West 268 feet to a point as the Place of Beginning of the description of the lands hereby conveyed. From such Point of Beginning run West 500 feet to a point; run thence South 450 feet to a point; run thence East 210 feet to a point; run thence North 31 degrees 00 minutes

East 550 feet, more or less, to the Place of Beginning, all being in the East one-half of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 20, Township 5 South, Range 2 East, Baldwin County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  1507 Conaway St, Daphne, AL  36526. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, A Delaware Limited Liability Company, Mortgagee/Transferee Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  352555727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 434384 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Marie P. Kent, a married woman, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for SouthPoint Bank, on the 15th day of April, 2009, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6521 Page 1579; the undersigned Bayview Loan Servicing LLC, as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 31, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 9, Block 7, Suburban Gardens, as per plat of survey thereof made by Durant Engineering Company, May 10, 1950, and recorded in Map Book 6, pages 295-300, of the Probate Records of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  5591 Andrews Road, Mobile, AL  36619. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Bayview Loan Servicing LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/ foreclosures 432628 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Ruth K. McIntosh and Herbert Hoover McIntosh, originally in favor of Genworth Financial Home Equity Access, Inc., fka Liberty Reverse Mortgage, Inc., on the 29th day of April, 2009, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6529, Page 203; the undersigned Liberty Home Equity Solutions, Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 12, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title,

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and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 16, Block 1, Summerville Place, as recorded in Map Book 3, Page 632, in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. The hereinabove described property being one and the same as described in mortgage recorded in Book 6529 and Page 203 and deed recorded in Book 5329 and Page 1011. Property street address for informational purposes:  2308 Holland St, Mobile, AL  36617. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Liberty Home Equity Solutions, Inc., Mortgagee/Transferee. Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/ Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 422922 The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postponed until 05/17/2018 during the legal hours of sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. Lagniappe HD May 2, 2018 

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by David E. Brooks and Alesia G. Brooks, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Amerigroup Mortgage Corporation, a Division of Mortgage Investors Corporation, on the 11th day of June, 2004, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5611 Page 1637; the undersigned U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America National Association, as Trustee, successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Residential Asset Mortgage Products, Inc., Mortgage Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-SP1, as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on June 14, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Commencing at the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 25, Township 6 South, Range 4 West, Mobile County, Alabama; thence run South 2089.60 feet to a point; thence run North 89 degrees 35 minutes 00 seconds East, 539.90 feet to a point; thence run North 00 degrees 43 minutes 00 seconds West, 65.00 feet to a point; thence run South 89 degrees 39 minutes 00 seconds East, 31.00 feet to the point of beginning of the property herein described; thence continue South 89 degrees 39 minutes 00 seconds East, 135.30 feet to a point; thence run North 00 degrees 11 minutes 00 seconds West, 165.39 feet to a point; thence run South 83 degrees 01 minutes 30 seconds West, 136.36 feet to a point; thence run South 00 degrees 11 minutes 00 seconds East, 148.00 feet to the point of beginning. Property street address for informational purposes:  12250 Franklin Creek Court, Grand Bay, AL  36541. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid

to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America National Association, as Trustee, successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Residential Asset Mortgage Products, Inc., Mortgage Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-SP1, Mortgagee/ Transferee. Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 426255 Lagniappe HD April 18, 25, May 2, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Casey A. O›Donoghue, a single person, originally in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. , on the 24th day of May, 2012, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6899 Page 1305; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. , as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on June 14, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 10, Block E, Resubdivision of Westlawn, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 4, Pages 516-520 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  2721 Ralston Rd, Mobile, AL  36606. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. , Mortgagee/Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www. sirote.com/foreclosures 433685  

Lagniappe HD April 18, 25, May 2, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Bayou La Batre Fire District Board will hold meetings the first Monday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at the BLB firehouse.  Lagniappe HD May 2, 2018

NOTICE OF COMPLETION STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE NOTICE OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, notice is hereby given that Marathon Electrical Contractors, Inc. has completed the contract for Alteration of University of South Alabama Primary Feeder Relocation New Simulation Lab Building at the University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL for the State of Alabama and the County/City of Mobile, Owner(s), and have made request for final settlement of said Contract. All persons having any claim for labor, materials, or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify Hayes Cheatwood Consulting, Inc. (Architect). Marathon Electrical Contractor, Inc. (Contractor) 2830 Commerce Blvd. Irondale, AL 35210 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2018

STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE NOTICE OF COMPLETION In Accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, NOTICE IS HEREBY given that Net Connections, LLC, has completed the contract for Hank Aaron Stadium – Replacement Netting & Padding – PR-018-18 at 755 Bolling Brothers Boulevard, Mobile, Alabama 36606. All persons having any claims for labor, material or otherwise in con-

nection with this project should immediately notify the Architectural Engineering Department, City of Mobile, P.O. Box 1827, Mobile, AL 36633-1827. Lagniappe HD May 2, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following work: Underground Domestic for Golf Team Building University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB #17-39A USA BID # 8041301 Work consists of installation of new water and sanitary sewer main and connections to existing water and sanitary systems. Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00PM local time on Thursday, May 10, 2018, at Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@ southalabama.edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 10:00AM local time on Thursday, May 3, 2018, in Room AD023 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 rcorrigan@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD April 18, 25, May 2, 2018

Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: INTRAMURAL FIELDHOUSE MASONRY University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 15-60B1 USA BID NO. 8041801 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, May 24, 2018, in Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal.Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office.  Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@ southalabama.edu). Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above.  A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 1:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, May 10, 2018, in Room AD23 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 rcorrigan@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: HVAC FOR GROUNDS MAINTENANCE BUILDING University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 18-01 USA BID NO. 8042401 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Tuesday, May 22, 2018, in Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office.  Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@ southalabama.edu). Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above.  A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 9:00 a.m. local time on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, in Room AD23 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below.  307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 bkelley@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com STORAGE AUCTION NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Alabama Statutes, that the goods stored in units rented by occupants listed below will be sold to the highest bidder at a public auction online at www.storagetreasures.com on May 25, 2018 at 10:00 am to satisfy liens claimed by STORAGEMAX MIDTOWN, together with all costs of sale. SHELDON INGE Any of the above goods may be withdrawn from sale by STORAGEMAX MIDTOWN at any time without prior notice. Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE TECHNICAL COORDINATING COMMITTEE (TCC)/CITIZEN ADVISORY COMMITTEE (CAC) of the MOBILE METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION (MPO) MEETING. The Mobile MPO Technical Coordinating Committee/Citizen Advisory Committee (TCC/CAC) will meet on Wednesday, May 9, 2018 at 10:00 am at the GM&O Building on the Second Floor at 110 Beauregard Street. The purpose of the meeting is to review and recommend the Transit Asset Management Performance Measures and discuss the draft 2019 Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP). The committee will also review and recommend modifications to the Destination 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan to accurately portray the I-10 Mobile River Bridge in terms of a considered toll, environmental justice considerations, and the bicycle/ pedestrian component. Also, the TCC/CAC will review and recommend the Performance Measures agreement with the Alabama Department of Transportation. The following modifications to the FY 2016-2019 Transportation Improvement Program will be reviewed and recommended: Bridge Replacement New Cost Estimate 100049566 ( CN ) REPLACE BRIDGE, BIN 008714, SR-16 (US-90) WESTBOUND OVER TENSAW-SPANISH RIVER. Old Estimate : $19,062,500.00; New Estimate : $24,595,731.22 With National Highway Funds 100068084 (UT) SR-158 EXTENSION LOTT ROAD OVERPASS AND JUG HANDLE. GRADE, DRAIN, BASE, PAVE AND BRIDGE (EB SEABURY CREEK TRIBUTARY AND PARTIAL LOTT ROAD; June 1, 2018; $30,000. The Mobile MPO Policy Board will vote on the recommendations by the TCC/CAC at a meeting on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 at 10:00 am at the GM&O Building in the Board Room. Physically challenged persons who need special accommodations should contact SARPC in advance so arrangements can be made to meet their needs. Transportation Planning Coordinator South Alabama Regional Planning Commission P. O. Box 1665 Mobile, AL   36633-1665 PHONE: (251)433-6541 FAX: (251)4336009 EMAIL: transportation@sarpc.org Lagniappe HD April 25, May 2, 2018

PROBATE ESTATE ADMINISTRATION NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: CHARLES H. CALDWELL, Deceased Case No. 2018-0852 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of April, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. CHARLOTTE M. WINTZ AKA CHARLOTTE CALDWELL WINTZ as Executor under the last will and testament of CHARLES H. CALDWELL, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PATRICK B. COLLINS Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: CALLIEROY ORESTIS ADREADES, Deceased Case No. 2018-0775 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 16th day of April 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. DEENA R. TYLER as Executrix under the last will and testament of CALLIEROY ORESTIS ANDREADES, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DEENA R. TYLER Lagniappe HD April 25, May 2, 9, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: CLAUDIA MARIE BECTON LEATHERWOOD Case No. 2018-0273 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 2nd day of April, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. XAVIER A. HARTMANN as Administrator of the estate of CLAUDIA MARIE BECTON LEATHERWOOD, deceased. Attorney of Record: DAVID ALLEN MCDONALD, Esq. Lagniappe HD April 18, 25, May 2, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: JOHN DAVID COLLINS, Deceased Case No. 2018-0672 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 4th day of April 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. LEIGH ANN COLLINS as Executrix under the last will and testament of JOHN DAVID COLLINS, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DENNIS P. MCKENNA. Lagniappe HD April 18, 25, May 2, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: TOSHIKO ISOZAKI MCCOY, Deceased Case No. 2018-0096 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 10th day of April 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. BEBE POPE as Executrix under the last will and testament of TOSHIKO ISOZAKI MCCOY, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JAMES DORGAN Lagniappe HD April 18, 25, May 2, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: JOHN JOSEPH WYNNE Case No. 2018-0609 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 12th day of April, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. CHAD WYNNE as Administrator of the estate of JOHN JOSEPH WYNNE, deceased. Attorney of Record: MATT GREEN, Esq. Lagniappe HD April 18, 25, May 2, 2018

ADOPTION HEARING NOTICE OF ADOPTION HEARING PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY CASE NO. 2018-0610 To: CHANEL NAMEER WALTON Mother of ANTHONY CHASE CAMPBELL, a minor. Please take note that a petition for the adoption of the above named minor child who was born to CHANEL NAMEER WALTON and ANTHONY BRENT CAMPELL on or about the 23 day of April, 2007, has been filed in said Court. Please be advised that if you intend to contest this adoption you must file a written response with the attorney for the petitioner(s) named below and with the Clerk of the Probate Court, P. O. Box 7, Mobile, AL 36601 as soon as possible but no later than thirty (30) days from the last day this notice is published. Attorney for Petitioner(s): ALISON BAXTER HERLIHY 1751 DAUPHIN STREET MOBILE, AL 36604 Lagniappe HD April 18, 25, May 2, 9, 2018

ABANDONED VEHICLES NOTICE OF SALE

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 01, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  8430 Hwy 188, Coden, AL 36523. 1990 Ford F150 1FTEF14N8LNA86956 1996 Pontiac Sunfire 1G2JB1244T7504314 Lagniappe HD April 25, May 2, 2018 The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 01, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  405 W 3rd Ave., Foley, AL 36535. 1988 Dodge Charger 3B4GD02W6JM833947 Lagniappe HD April 25, May 2, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 01, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at   305 Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. N., Prichard, AL 36610. 2008 Suzuki GSX 1300 JS1GX72A782104455 1999 Buick Park Ave 1G4CW52K3X4609766 Lagniappe HD April 25, May 2, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 01, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1997 Ford F150 1FTDX1761VNA49618 2007 GMC Sierra 1GTEC19X47Z177465 2003 Saturn Ion 1G8AJ52F23Z147611 Lagniappe HD April 25, May 2, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 01, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7798 McKinley Ave., Mobile, AL 36608. 2007 Mitsubishi Outlander JA4MS31X47Z009454 2008 Chevrolet HHR 3GNDA13D78S570978 2007 GMC Envoy Denali 1GKES63M572159326 2007 Chrysler Pacifica 2A8GM78X67R325144 2011 Mitsubishi Outlander JA4AS2AW9BU017186 Lagniappe HD April 25, May 2, 2018

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 05/31/2018 at 5781 Three Notch Rd.  Mobile, AL 36619 at 9am if not redeemed. HOND   JHMCG56451C000509 MERC    2MEFM75WXYX687763 Lagniappe HD April 25, May 2, 2018

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 06/06/2018 at 5781 Three Notch Rd Mobile Al. 36619 at 9 am if not redeemed before then. TOYO   4T1BE46K97U718834 FORD   1FA6P8AM0H5305525 FORD   1FAHP3K24CL444487 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 08, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 8687 Carlyle Dr., Theodore, AL 36582. 2003 Ford Ranger 1FTYR10E33PA86295 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 08, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2103 Wagner Court, Mobile, AL 36605. 2009 Honda Accord 1HGCP26859A042142 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 08, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2053 Barretts Lane, Mobile, AL 36617. 2009 Ford F150 1FTRX12W79KB55740 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 08, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2007 Chrysler 300 2C3KA53G07H748026 1995 Cadillac Deville 1G6KD52B6SU243075 2005 Chevrolet Cobalt 1G1AK12F057608890 2016 Kia Rio KNADM4A30G6681884 2001 Hyundai Elantra KMHDN45D11U130509 2005 Ford Taurus 1FAFP56U85A249277 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 08, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 265 Siena Vista St., Mobile, AL 36607. 2005 Chrysler 300 2C3LA56G96H130397 2003 Honda Element 5J6YH28533L022191 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 08, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 257 Dogwood Dr., Mobile, AL 36609. 2002 Ford Econoline 1FTRE14222HB47547 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 08, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 11764 Walker Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2003 GMC Sierra 2GTEK19T331263935 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 08, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1151 Rhett Dr., Mobile, AL 36608. 2002 Lexus IS300 JTHBD192520054144 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 2018

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 5 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday. Lagniappe HD offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604 For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

STYLE BOOZIE

How do you toss your mullet? BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

I

t’s almost summer, y’all! We have been blessed with a gloriously mild spring, but we live on the Gulf Coast, so it is about to get hotter than nine hells, as my fictional great Aunt Edna would say. But we have a few more weeks that we can pretend we have four seasons. In the meantime, I have some really fishy and feathery scoop we can put in your bellies. So go ahead and dig on in. Make sure to watch out for bones!

Mullet tossed!

My spies who attended the 34th annual Mullet Toss at the FloraBama said it was as expected and they meant that as a compliment. One of my spies said she and her friends determined the themes of the weekend were “Booty, booty, booty!” and “Thongs where they don’t belong!” They also said there were tons of mullets (the haircut, not the fish). Some were ironic (including wigs and Trump-like ball caps reading ‘Make Mullets Great Again”) and some were just people who have been sporting mullets since the ‘80s. Hey, you can’t go wrong with “business in the front and party in the back!” Well, yes you can, but we aren’t focusing on that today. They also said American patriotism as expressed in swimwear seemed to be a big theme — lots of patriotic bikinis and weenie bikinis. There was even a fair-complected man sporting some sort of stars and stripes unitard but very obviously not wearing sunscreen. That should make for some interesting tan lines! The spies said the usual shenanigans were observed. The bikini and “hard body” contests featured plenty of tattoos, body piercings and even a fanny pack or two. There were lots of folks sipping on the Bama’s signature Bushwackers, doing shots they probably shouldn’t have been doing and having a good ol’ time. My spies were particularly impressed by a group who had “anchored” their giant unicorn float in the water right in front of the FloraBama. They seemed to have one of the best vantage points, according to the spies. Oh, and I guess some folks actually tossed some fish, too. But who really goes there for that? (Well, I guess some do.) Another great year of craziness at one of our area’s (and the world’s) best dives.

When you gotta go

So, my spies also made a stop at Pirate’s Cove over the weekend. (I did not ask how may Bushwackers they consumed in 48 hours between Flora-Bama and Pirate’s Cove, but I am sure (I hope), the numbers were staggering!) Anyway, they said the place was packed and folks were enjoying lounging on the little beach area out front, particularly because someone’s little dog who “kind of looked like Spuds Mackenzie” and was sporting a GoPro was really putting on a show for everyone. Apparently he was running around everywhere, full of energy. But suddenly, the urge hit him and he hiked a leg and just peed all over someone’s unattended beach bag, causing giggles and gasps among the assembled patrons. I am sure that caused said bag’s owner much confusion later. “Why is this wet? What is this smell? Did I do this?”

Perees the Peacock update

Last week, we reported on Perees, the Spring Hill Peacock, a bird who allegedly flew the coop from his West Mobile home when his owner introduced another male bird into the brood. After hearing about a peacock sighting near their homes, a group of Spring Hill residents went on a mission to find him. They found him on a nearby residential roof, which spurred the creation a Facebook page and Perees Fan Club T-shirts. Although there were a few reported sightings and some alleged sightings since, it seems Perees has not been spotted in a week or two. Maybe he flew off to become someone’s emotional support animal? Peacocks are known for that, after all! Though he hasn’t been seen, members of the group have been posting all sorts of peacock merchandise — everything from lawn art and rafts to evening jackets and murals. Who knew there was so much peacock swag? Anyway, we still hope he finds his way home. Godspeed, Perees! Well kids, that’s all I got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or some plain ol’ “booty, booty, booty” lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!

M a y 2 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 8 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 47


Lagniappe: May 2 - May 8, 2018  
Lagniappe: May 2 - May 8, 2018