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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

N O V E M B E R 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - N O V E M B E R 2 7 , 2 0 1 8 | w w w. l a g n i a p p e m o b i l e . c o m ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

Rejecting the City Council’s proposed 5 percent pay raise, Mayor Sandy Stimpson is instead offering public works employees an incentive plan.

COMMENTARY

Praying for peace among Mobile City Council members.

BUSINESS

Nurx, a health care company providing free online consultations with physicians and home delivery of medications, has expanded its footprint into Alabama.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

A nod to Thanksgiving traditions new and old, and a recipe for leftover turkey tamales.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA MATTEI Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WOOLSEY Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com DAVID GRAYSON Advertising Sales Executive david@lagniappemobile.com SUZANNE SAWYER Advertising Sales Executive suzanne@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

Wedged between Black Friday and Cyber Monday, the Small Business Saturday promotion of holiday money spent locally can have a broad community benefit all year long.

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ARTS

Area graphic artists reimagined famous movie posters with an Azalea City focus for a contest renewed by the local chapter of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.

MUSIC

STAN ANDERSON Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager legals@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Brenda Bolton, J. Mark Bryant, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Randy Kennedy, John Mullen, Jeff Poor, Ron Sivak, Tom Ward ON THE COVER: SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY BY LAGNIAPPE LAGNIAPPE HD Periodicals Permit #17660 (Volume 4, Issue 8) Copyright 2015 is published weekly, 52 issues a year, by Something Extra Publishing, Inc., 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604 (P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652). Business and Editorial Offices: 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604 Accounting and Circulation Offices: 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36602. Call 251-450-4466 to subscribe. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652 Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36602. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251-450-4466 Email: atrice@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE HD is printed at Walton Press. All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted. photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers.

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24 Cardinal Copia celebrates Ghost’s black mass.

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For the diversion they provide, or the emotional succor they deliver, or the engagement they give us, a brief list of movies to be thankful for this holiday season.

SPORTS

The Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Magnolia Grove has been selected to host the men and women’s golf championship of the Gulf South Conference next year.

GARDENING

Must-have holiday gifts for the gardeners on your list.

STYLE

The movie has wrapped and the stars are gone, but Boozie still has much to be thankful for.

November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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GOING POSTAL

Kudos to courthouse landscapers Editor: I consider myself an environmentalist. I garden, limit water use, recycle, walk or ride my bicycle instead of driving whenever possible, and try my best to be environmentally responsible. An avid walker, I believe that walking is a great form of exercise, stress relief and entertainment. Living in Midtown, I love seeing all of the interesting houses, trees, flowers, plants and people during my walks. I have a couple of routes I usually take through my neighborhood, but recently I chose a different route that took me downtown to see the new federal building. Walking around the perimeter of the building, I noticed that instead of using traditional shrubs and trees for landscaping, milkweed, lantana, echinacea, abelia and other pollinator plants had been used. I was amazed, so I had to call and find out who was responsible for the landscaping of the building. I was amazed again that the phone was actually answered by a live person who listened to my crazy call asking “Who chose the plants and did the landscaping for the building?” She didn’t brush me off as an insignificant or unimportant caller and connected me to someone’s voicemail who I was told would be able to answer my question. I left my message and wondered if I would actually receive a return call. Much to my surprise, I soon was talking to Amy Rice, who not only answered my questions, [but] told me many other interesting things about the building, artwork inside and outside the building and landscaping. I was amazed with how much thought went into planning this new building addition to downtown Mobile and how connected it is to our environment, our history and our people. Landscaping using native pollinator plants around a federal building in itself may not be so surprising but since milkweed, in particular, had at one time been included as one of the plants listed on the Federal Noxious Weed Act, it is commendable that the federal government is making efforts to bring it back. The reason is that milkweed is the only plant where Monarch butterflies can lay their eggs and their caterpillars can eat before transforming into a chrysalis and, finally, an adult Monarch butterfly. According to the National Wildlife Federation, Monarch numbers have been reduced by 80 percent over the last two decades for many reasons (habitat destruction, use of pesticides, climate change, etc.), but inclusion of milkweed on the Noxious Weed Act and efforts made to eradicate the plant had a significant impact on Monarch decline. When the milkweed/Monarch relationship was understood and the decline of Monarchs realized, milkweed was removed from the list and efforts made to bring it back. One such effort is the MIllion Pollinator Garden Challenge that encourages planting milkweed and other pollinator plants in gardens and using them in landscapes. Seeing the federal government accept this challenge by using pollinator plants in the landscape of our new federal building in Mobile is truly amazing. I had an amazing walk that day and am glad I took a different route that led me downtown to see our new federal building. It gave me hope that maybe other environmental efforts will be tangibly supported as well by our federal government. Wouldn’t that be amazing! Pat Hall, Mobile Urban Growers

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Living with bipolar disorder Editor: I am writing this hoping it will help someone with bipolar disorder. I cannot stress enough to take your medication, even when you feel good and believe it would be alright to quit taking it. Also, keeping your doctor’s appointments is very important. Taking a stranger’s credit card payment out of their mailbox, believing I could get their credit card number to buy my daughter and her husband a house. Taking a baby doll in a stroller to Bel-Air Mall and introducing it to strangers as my grandchild. (After about an hour, the security guard at the mall asked me to leave.) Wearing my wedding dress to my doctor’s appointment. But of all manic attacks, a fullblown manic attack believing my husband was Satan was the worst. These are just a few things I did when I had manic attacks. It took 19 years plus at least four psychiatrists before my doctor found the right combination of medication that finally stopped the mania attacks. It was during a hospitalization in 2005 that she came upon it. It was the prescribed medication and my faith in God that saved me from destruction. For the past 13 years, I have remained stable and it feels so good. If I had to make a choice between my medication and food, I would choose my medication. Have a great day! Mary Rosalind Foster, Mobile


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

A little something extra MAYOR ANNOUNCES INCENTIVE PROGRAM FOR PUBLIC WORKS EMPLOYEES BY DALE LIESCH

Photo | Lagniappe

After public works employees expressed their concerns about working conditions and pay, Mayor Sandy Stimpson unveiled an incentive program for them in lieu of a 5 percent pay raise.

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espite an amendment passed by the Mobile City Council adding raises for public works employees to the fiscal year 2019 budget, Mayor Sandy Stimpson released details about an incentive plan for those workers instead. The incentives would take the place of the 5 percent, across-the-board raises pushed by the council — but could be worth more, Stimpson’s office said in a statement. “This new program will improve services for our citizens and reward our hardworking team members,” Stimpson wrote. “Our goal is to create a healthy work environment where our public works team can grow both professionally and financially while meeting daily goals of production. It’s time to challenge the status quo.” The package includes a $25 shift incentive which would “reward personnel who report to work.” The shift incentive would not apply to administrative employees and would cut down on overtime pay, according to the statement. The program also includes a 2.5 percent pay increase for workers with commercial driver’s licenses (CDLs), which is designed to help motivate employees to attain CDLs and would give the department a deeper pool of available drivers when needed. Assistance in obtaining CDLs will also be offered. Further, the program provides an incentive for employees who work in open-cab equipment. Those employees will receive separate 2.5 percent pay increase. Finally, the program also includes a maximum $1,000-per-year safety incentive for heavy-equipment operators and truck riders, according to the statement. The safety incentive would be paid in $250 installments each quarter, provided there is no injury or damage due to negligence, the statement reads. Wesley Young, president of a local public works employee advocacy group, said he’s opposed to the program because it won’t benefit all employees. “The employees work in the merit system,” he

said. “The raise is supposed to be based on merit.” For employees that can’t receive all the incentives, it’s not a good plan, Young said. “It sounds good if you get all the incentives, but if you don’t get all of them then you’re against the wall,” Young said. Added funding for 5 percent, across-the-board raises for public works employees was among a number of changes councilors made to the budget Sept. 26. The money for the raises came from a $104,000 cut to the mayor’s Innovation Team. That $104,000 was added to $846,000 already set aside for the incentive program. It’s unclear what will happen with the $104,000 allocation in the mayor’s incentive plan. Over the past year, Young and various employees have come to council meetings to complain about working conditions and pay. Workers have also voiced concerns about alleged racial mistreatment and hostility. The council recently hired special counsel Patrick Sims to conduct an investigation into those concerns. Public works employees also advocated for raises similar to those given to public safety employees during last year’s budget cycle. Last year, police officers and firefighters received 2.5 percent longevity raises. That means pay for public safety personnel would be increased 2.5 percent for every five years of service up to 20 years. The council instead added 5 percent raises to the budget for public works employees, but the mayor has decided not to implement those, replacing them with the less costly incentive program. “Why are they treating public service workers differently than public safety?” Young asked. Council Vice President Levon Manzie said he had hoped Stimpson would follow through on the council’s amendment, but acknowledged he didn’t have to. “I felt the raises would have a long-lasting impact for employees, particularly as they plan for retirement,” Manzie said. “We fought vigorously for the raises, but we knew it was a decision the administration would ultimately have to make.”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Detour ahead FLORIDA STREET BUSINESSES CONCERNED ABOUT ROAD WORK BY DALE LIESCH

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the street to help alleviate flooding. Crews are not only planning to repave the street, but will replace all the curbs and gutters, as well as the infrastructure underneath. This includes all sewer and stormwater systems, she said. While the project should last about another eight months, the plan is to keep the street open throughout the remaining time, Byrne said. “We understand that this is the most painful part of the project, as the top layer has been removed … ,” she said. “The goal is to keep two-way traffic going during the project.” Councilman Fred Richardson, who represents the area, said he doesn’t expect the same issues as 10 years ago because Florida Street is “not going to be closed.” With an eye to what happened with the previous project, Richardson said he advocated “strongly” not to “close it all up.” “It’s not going to happen this time,” he said. Lauren Burnette, owner of The Pastry Shop near the intersection of Dauphin and Florida streets, said the work has had a dramatic impact on her sales, especially when the intersection was completely closed in October. She estimated the shop has taken a 50 percent hit since the project began. “It has been very difficult, even for our regular customers,” Burnette said. “Especially when the road was closed. People didn’t think they could transit down … ” Since the intersection has partially reopened, Burnette said business has picked up, but customers are still frustrated by the work. It has impacted Burnette’s commute home as well. Arthur Green, owner of the relatively new Bay Barbecue, said sales there have dipped 60 percent to 70 percent

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Photo | Lagniappe

usiness owners on North Florida Street hope issues from the past don’t return, as the city continues a nine-month rehabilitation project in the corridor. Current business owners along the midtown thoroughfare remember all too well what happened, beginning in 2007, at the intersection of South Florida and Emogene streets. There, a drainage project filled with cost overruns and delays kept portions of the street impassible for years. The previous project forced some businesses to close and others to move. Roy Seewer, owner of Butch Cassidy’s, said he hopes this portion of the project goes better than the attempt about a decade ago. “It’s supposed to,” Seewer said. “But it hasn’t been very smooth for me yet.” He said the sales at his casual restaurant suffered last month because of the work, when the intersection of Dauphin and Florida streets was closed in all directions. He said he hasn’t looked at the sales numbers so far in November, since the intersection partially reopened. Seewer said business was boosted recently by what he called a “viral” Facebook post by Callaghan’s Irish Social Club, asking folks to visit Butch Cassidy’s in spite of the construction. Seewer said he was thankful for the post. While the intersection at Dauphin Street is reopened to east-west traffic, North Florida Street itself has been stripped of the top layer of asphalt and is only accessible via Old Shell Road. City officials understand the frustration of business owners along the corridor. City spokeswoman Laura Byrne said the goal of the project is a comprehensive rebuild of

A drainage improvement project on North Florida Street is expected to continue for another eight months, concerning many business owners along the busy midtown corridor. since construction began. “I’m having huge, huge, huge issues with it,” Green said of the construction. “They’re doing a horrible job.” Green said the road surface is almost undriveable and when it rains “it’s a lake.” He said he understands the completed project will be an improvement, but “I might be dead” before it’s finished. Green and Burnette both said they weren’t notified before it began. The Pastry Shop owner said if she had been, she probably could have made some contingency plans. Seewer said he was notified by the city. Byrne said business owners along the corridor were notified of the impending construction by the contractor and were also invited to a meeting.


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIIN COUNTY

Exit strategy STATE BRIDGE PROJECT DRAWS MIXED REVIEWS AT PUBLIC HEARING BY JOHN MULLEN

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Photo | ALDOT

ac McAleer likens the current traffic situabranch off of the Foley Beach Express south of County tion on Pleasure Island to the closing line of Road 8, or what is now called Coastal Gateway Boulethe famous Eagles song “Hotel California.” vard, and head south to a new bridge over the Intracoastal “You can check out anytime you like, but Waterway just east of the Gulf Shores airport and only you can never leave,” McAleer said. about two miles west of the existing toll bridge. He was one of more than 40 speakers at an Alabama McAleer, developer of LuLu’s and Homeport Marina Department of Transportation and a former Krispy Kreme donut (ALDOT) public hearing on a magnate, said visitors’ battles with controversial and expedited road traffic could begin to take a toll on and bridge project planned for south the vital tourism industry. Baldwin County. A standing-room“What I know, as a group, we’re only crowd greeted state and local only as good as the worst experience I’M LOSING MY HOME officials at the Gulf Shores Activity our tourists have so we’ve got to Center on Nov. 15. make it the best we can,” McAleer AND I’VE LIVED IN IT FOR State Auditor Jim Zeigler wasn’t said. “For many the worst part of 40-SOMETHING YEARS AND one of those speakers, saying the that experience is when they load up allotted two minutes wasn’t enough that car on Saturday or Sunday and I’M STILL IN FAVOR OF IT. IT’S time for his questions. He said he then they’ve got to go fight that trafhas been seeking information from fic. It’s a horrible situation.” NOT GOING TO BRING MORE ALDOT since April on the project Former Gulf Shores firefighter TRAFFIC, IT’S JUST GOING TO and intended to ask for it again in Tony Diliberto supports the project writing at the meeting. even though it will quite literally SPREAD IT OUT A LITTLE BIT. “I have more questions than ancome right through his living room. swers about the proposed additional He heads to court in March in his bridge,” Zeigler said. “I hope to solve fight to get a fair price for his propthat with my specific requests for erty just north of County Road 4. public records. We need to make sure that this $30- to $87 “I’ve got a bullseye on my home,” Diliberto said. “I’m million-dollar project is the best use of our limited funds.” losing my home and I’ve lived in it for 40-something While some residents were downright giddy about the years and I’m still in favor of it. It’s not going to bring project, others expressed opposition and others spoke more traffic, it’s just going to spread it out a little bit.” emotionally about how their land was condemned to Joe Emerson, founder of the End the Bridge2Nowhere make way for the roadway. As proposed, a new road will Facebook page, said the better solution and use of tax-

Local legislators and ALDOT are taking public comments on a fasttracked, $87 million bridge project just west of the existing toll bridge across the Intracoastal Waterway. payer dollars would be a north-south road through Gulf State Park. “Our traffic problems in and around this area can be vastly improved by one build alone, a project that his been in the conception phase for over a decade,” Emerson said of a road through the park. “I recognize we desperately need a cross-island corridor.”

November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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BAYBRIEF | COASTAL ALABAMA

Fish and wildlife

FEDS APPROVE $49 MILLION FOR COASTAL RESTORATION PROJECTS BY JASON JOHNSON

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he National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) has approved a $49 million plan to fund eight coastal Alabama restoration projects using criminal penalties assessed to BP and Transocean for causing the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. As one of the various BP funding streams, NFWF’s Gulf Environmental Benefit Fund has already sent $200 million to coastal Alabama that, according to Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (ADCNR) Commissioner Chris Blankenship, has funded 32 coastal projects. “These projects will significantly enhance long-term restoration and protection of our natural resources and will ensure the sustainability and resiliency of our coastal ecosystem,” he said. The Gulf Environmental Benefit Fund is one of the only oil spill funding streams controlled entirely by the federal government, though state officials and Alabama residents have been able to submit project proposals for NFWF to consider. Several projects in the latest group of allocations continue efforts already underway in the state, including a $22 million allocation to the state’s prolific artificial reef program. Over the past 15 years, ADCNR has placed hundreds of structures in coastal waters, but officials say “subsidence, storm damage and other factors” have caused Alabama’s existing artificial reefs to deteriorate over time. Land acquisition efforts at the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge on the Fort Morgan peninsula, which has been identified by NFWF as one of its highest priorities

in Alabama, will continue in the latest round of funding. In 2017, NFWF approved $5.9 million for the acquisition of a 251-acre property near the refuge. This year, they added another $4.4 million to purchase and restore 236 acres of estuarine and forested shrub wetlands that, according to Gov. Kay Ivey’s office, are “under significant and consistent threat of commercial and residential development that would result in loss of habitat and negatively impact living coastal and marine resources.” Another $1.5 million will go toward completing engineering and design plans for the creation of new wetlands near Bon Secour to help treat urban runoff impacting downstream fisheries and improve habitat quality in areas historically serving as “Alabama’s most significant and productive shellfish habitats and nursery areas for juvenile finfish.” “Alabama’s Gulf Coast is of great ecological importance to our state, and it is imperative we protect and restore those natural resources harmed by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill,” Ivey said in a release. “We are improving our water quality in the Bon Secour River and Mobile Bay, bolstering our fish populations with the expansion of artificial reefs and ensuring resilience along our coastline.” The second most expensive project approved in 2018 is a $16.5 million marsh restoration effort at Lightning Point at the mouth of the Bayou La Batre River. Once completed, the project will have added approximately 28 acres of coastal marsh and 1.5 miles of breakwaters. It is also expected to help protect 127 acres of sensitive coastal habitat purchased by Alabama’s Forever Wild Land Trust and the city of Bayou La Batre using previous

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NFWF allocations. Other 2018 NFWF projects include: • Multifaceted Fisheries and Ecosystem Monitoring in the Gulf ($2.4 million) — This project will expand the temporal and spatial coverage for monitoring the long-term sustainability and recovery of marine resources into its fifth and final year. Alabama’s Marine Resources Division will work collaboratively with Florida and Mississippi state resource agencies, the University of South Alabama and the Dauphin Island Sea Lab to continue to implement standardized fishery independent and dependent surveys for broad scale data. • Restoration of the North Side of Dauphin Island ($329,000) — This project will restore beach and marsh habitat on the north side of Dauphin Island to enhance the barrier island’s resilience in future storms and improve habitat

THESE PROJECTS WILL SIGNIFICANTLY ENHANCE LONG-TERM RESTORATION AND PROTECTION OF OUR NATURAL RESOURCES AND WILL ENSURE THE SUSTAINABILITY AND RESILIENCY OF OUR COASTAL ECOSYSTEM.” for shorebirds. Specifically, the project aims to fill borrow pits that were excavated to supply sand for emergency barriers built along Gulf-facing beaches on Dauphin Island during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. • Dauphin Island Causeway Shoreline Restoration Engineering & Design ($250,000) — This project will fund the engineering and design of breakwaters to enhance, protect and improve the resiliency of marsh and oyster habitat adjacent to the Dauphin Island Causeway. • Deer River Coastal Marsh Stabilization and Restoration ($750,000) — This project will complete engineering and design plans to stabilize and restore the shoreline and intertidal salt marsh at the mouth of Deer River, adjacent to the Theodore Industrial Canal and Mobile Bay. In the past two decades, approximately nine acres of productive intertidal marshland and shoreline have been lost due to erosion from heavy storms, tides and ship wakes. Once designed and constructed, this project will stabilize and enhance up to 5,600 feet of shoreline along Mobile Bay that will protect more than 275 acres of existing priority coastal saltmarsh.


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Bond, Bayou bond

DEVELOPERS GET $190 MILLION IN BONDS TO REVIVE BAMA BAYOU BY JOHN MULLEN

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evelopers hoping to revive the longstalled Bama Bayou project say a tax rebate agreement with the city of Orange Beach enabled them to secure $190 million in bonds. “The bonds never would have been available if it weren’t for what the city did,” Presidium’s David Wallace said. “Quite honestly it would have stayed in litigation, it would have stayed a failed project if the city did not do what they did.” The developer will keep 50 percent of the city’s sales and lodging taxes generated by Bama Bayou for 25 years or until the amount reaches $32.5 million. It’s the same agreement the city made with The Wharf development, Wallace said, adding it was vital to the project. “The dollars the city is going to be rebating is going to pay off these bonds, so it’s obviously going to ultimately benefit the investors,” Wallace said. “But the investors would have never had an appetite for it if it weren’t for what the city did.” Clearing the way for the bonds to be issued is an agreement of all parties in the 10-year legal saga to finally dismiss the lawsuits surrounding the project. “What’s happening is all parties have now signed releases and all the guarantors have released the banks from any counterclaims we ever filed, and the bank is releasing all the guarantors from everything that the bank ever

sued for,” Sam McKerall, a lawyer representing several of the guarantors, said. “Those releases are going to be escrowed. The special master will hold them and release them to the closing agent at closing, if there is a closing, and that will end everything.” Wallace said his company wanted to close on buying the property by the end of the year but it’s unlikely to happen before early 2019. McKerral said the purchase price will be around $30 million. “We had hoped to get everything done by Dec. 31 but quite honestly, with the conversations we’ve had with Stifel Nicolaus, our bond underwriter, it’s probably going to be in February when we actually close,” Wallace said. The company has issued three levels of bonds for the project with $145 million in tax-exempt bonds, $20 million in partially tax-exempt bonds and $25 million in taxable bonds. “There’s about $50 million of series B and C bonds that we as the developer are buying,” Wallace said. “I think Stifel has already soft-circled where the [$145 million] bonds will be acquired.” Wallace said there are three hotels, several restaurants and Gulf World signed up for Bama Bayou but says it’s too early to release names. “We have signed term sheets but at this time each and every one has a confidentiality clause,” he said. “But I honestly believe within 60 days we’ll be in position where we start announcing who all the partners are.”

BAYBRIEF | ORANGE BEACH

Emergency move

ORANGE BEACH TO START ITS OWN AMBULANCE SERVICE

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BY JOHN MULLEN

range Beach is taking steps to become the only city in Baldwin County to provide its own ambulance service in a move Mayor Tony Kennon said is partly due to heavy traffic in the resort town. “It’s almost impossible for an outside agency to provide, just strictly from the logistics of moving south through the traffic and moving about with all that’s going on in the summer,” Kennon said. “This is no reflection on Medstar in any negative way. It’s just our ability to do something most folks aren’t able to do for our citizens.” Rebekah McCarron of Medstar thanked the city for its past service in a Nov. 6 City Council meeting, but questioned the city’s plan in an email to Lagniappe. “We have respectfully informed the Orange Beach City Council that we feel their plan for starting a city-run ambulance service is deeply flawed and risky,” McCarron wrote. “The plan projects revenue which is grossly overestimated. As a major trend nationwide over the past 20 years or more, a great many communities have discontinued operating their own ambulance service and reduced their costs and liability by contracting with private entities for the service.” The rest of Baldwin County is under a contract with the company. Medstar is part of Birmingham-based Lifeguard, an emergency services company that also operates several 911 systems across the Gulf Coast, including Baldwin County, the city of Flomaton, Alabama, and

Santa Rosa County in Florida. “As for Baldwin County, all municipalities have historically participated in the countywide EMS system, which provides for a collaborative high-quality, responsive and well-equipped and well-resourced service,” McCarron wrote. “Medstar EMS has a fleet of more than 24 ambulances dedicated to Baldwin County. Each day, Medstar EMS routinely deploys more than 16 ambulances, other advanced first-responder vehicles and a medical helicopter to address emergencies.” Kennon said the relationship will continue as Medstar will be on standby to help out when the city’s service is overwhelmed. “There are plenty of times in the summer when we’ve got more than two running so we’ll need Medstar there with us throughout the summer,” Kennon said. “We feel like we can get our own ambulances and staff them here on the island and be able to be at your doorstep in three to four minutes ready to transport.” According to the city’s plan, it hopes revenue from the service will pay for the personnel costs. The city plans to man two new ambulances with six veteran paramedics already on staff and hire new firefighters to fill those spots. Orange Beach voted Nov. 13 to spend more than $600,000 for two ambulances from a Texas company. The city voted the same night to spend $1.2 million for two new fire trucks. Officials expect the service to be up and running by spring 2019. November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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BAYBRIEF |MOBILE COUNTY

Internal investigation

CREOLA COP PLACED ON LEAVE AFTER REPORTED SHOOTING

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BY JASON JOHNSON

sergeant with the Creola Police Department has been placed on administrative leave during an investigation into whether he falsely reported being fired upon during a traffic stop. Sgt. Donald Clark Turberville was placed on paid leave last week while the department reviews claims he was attacked during a Nov. 12 traffic stop on Dead Lake Road. Turberville initially told investigators with the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO) an unknown suspect in an unidentified car opened fire on him and he fired in return. However, MCSO investigators immediately had concerns about Turberville’s versions of events. During a press conference two days after the alleged incident, Sheriff Sam Cochran said despite Turberville’s claims he exchanged gunfire with the suspect, the only spent shell casing found at the scene came from Turberville’s gun. He went on to say Turberville described the suspect as having a white beard and driving a dark-colored car, but he offered no further description of the alleged shooter. Body camera footage released by MCSO show the blue lights in Turberville’s cruiser were off when deputies responded to the scene. In the same footage, the window of his police cruiser’s driver’s-side door is broken and Turberville can be seen lying on the ground just behind the door. When asked, Turberville said he may have bumped the switch for his blue lights with his leg as he was falling to the ground during the altercation, but Cochran said the evidence suggests that story is unlikely. MCSO ended its investigation after only two days. Cochran concluded there was “overwhelm-

ing evidence to determine that what he advised us did not occur.” Cochran said the inconsistencies in Turberville’s story led investigators to offer a polygraph test, but he refused. On Friday, the Creola Police Department confirmed Turberville had been placed on leave while the department conducts its own internal review. It’s unclear whether the nature of the investigation into Turberville’s actions is criminal, but Cochran told reporters no criminal charges were filed against Turberville because of a lack of evidence. However, in an interview with an NBC 15 reporter, Turberville has since denied allegations he made up the story, the only time he’s addressed the media directly since the shooting. But no matter how Creola’s investigation shakes out, the reported shooting may play a role in an upcoming, unrelated criminal trial. Last year, Turberville was the only witness to an altercation in which Creola City Councilman Harold Martin allegedly pointed a gun at fellow Councilman Ralph Avis Walker. He also signed the warrant against Martin that led to his arrest in August. In the complaint, Turberville claimed he witnessed Martin pull a pistol from his pocket while sitting in a vehicle outside the old Creola City Hall building before laying it “across his lap with the barrel pointed at [Walker]” during the verbal argument. Martin denied the allegation and pleaded not guilty to menacing. A trial for the misdemeanor charge is scheduled in December, and Martin’s attorney, Buzz Jordan, told Lagniappe the shooting claims have raised questions about Turberville’s credibility as a witness. Dale Liesch contributed to this report.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Come fly away

AIRPORT AUTHORITY SEEKS SPRING OPENING FOR BROOKLEY COMMERCIAL

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BY DALE LIESCH

he first commercial flight out of Brookley Field is still expected to take off in 2019, the Mobile Airport Authority (MAA) president confirmed, with recent moves by the board bringing it closer to reality. MAA President Chris Curry said the organization’s board of directors recently authorized construction activity related to the renovation of an existing building at Brookley to become a lowcost carrier terminal. “When we started this, we hired KPS to move us through the process to select a construction manager,” he said. KPS Group is a Birminghambased architectural firm. Through a request for proposals or RFP process, the MAA selected Jesco Construction Co. as the construction manager and Michael Baker as the engineering firm for the terminal. The existing building is a 50,000-square-foot former logistics building Airbus currently uses as a foreign trade zone, Curry said. “We’re going to share it with Airbus for another six months,” he said. “Then we’ll take over the building.” After renovations the building will become Terminal 1 and be used primarily for low-cost carriers until a master plan can be completed. The terminal is expected to open by April 30, 2019, and should cost $3.2 million to complete. The expectation is that Via Airlines will be the terminal’s first commercial carrier, Curry said. “Via has expressed a desire to move to the ter-

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minal as soon as it’s open,” he said. “We continue to talk to other carriers that don’t have service out of Mobile today.” Via currently flies from Mobile Regional Airport to Orlando-Sanford four days per week on 50-seat Embraer jets. The master plan is currently out for bid, Curry said. “We expect to have a list of firms soon with a selection by the end of the year,” he said. “It’ll take a year to a year and a half to complete.” Once low-cost carriers get settled at Brookley, Curry said, the MAA may build a second terminal for larger, more traditional carriers. A June report found that a move of commercial flights to Brookley from Mobile Regional was feasible. Among other things, the Mobile Metropolitan Airport System Study found it would be more cost effective to move commercial service to the Mobile Aeroplex at Brookley than to increase access through infrastructure at Bates Field in West Mobile. The study also pointed to a number of other positive factors, including Brookley being “geographically better positioned to attract additional air service due to its proximity to downtown and ability to attract a larger share of the airport’s catchment area.” The current airport only attracts about half of its catchment area, with passengers heading to airports in Pensacola and Gulfport. A move downtown could also open the airport closer to 138,000 potential customers.


BAYBRIEF |BALDWIN COUNTY

Wild wild west

MAGNOLIA SPRINGS SHOOTOUT INJURES FOUR, ONE CRITICALLY

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BY JASON JOHNSON

nvestigators are still piecing together what led to a shootout between family members in Magnolia Springs that left four people injured, one critically. According to Baldwin County Sheriff Hoss Mack, the incident occurred the afternoon of Nov. 18 in the middle of a trailer park on Springfield Court in the Magnolia Springs area. He said trouble began when Jermain Dickerson, Tamarius Dickerson and Royald Jones — all in their 20s — arrived at a mobile home where Jahlen Baker, 19, lives with two roommates. Police say the men were driving a green Ford Explorer at the time. He noted that Jermain and Tamarius are brothers and Baker is their half-brother. He also said Jones is a cousin to the Dickerson brothers. Investigators have been told by various sources the individuals involved in the shooting are somehow related to Atlanta Falcons receiver and Foley native Julio Jones. However, Mack said it’s still unclear exactly what their relation is to the former Crimson Tide standout. The cause of the shooting remains under investigation, but according to Mack some type of confrontation occurred just inside the doorway of the home and continued outside. “We believe it started inside the door of the trailer, continued out onto the porch and may have ended in the yard,” Mack said. “The initial gunshot happened inside the doorway, but there were definitely shots fired outside as well.” Investigators believe Baker was shot first and struck in the abdomen, and it appears a male roommate returned fire at the individuals afterward, striking all three. The man who returned fire and another female roommate of Baker’s have not yet been identified as deputies continue to investigate any role they may have played in the altercation. All told, Mack said at least 30 rounds were fired from a “high caliber rifle” and a 9 mm

pistol. When deputies responded to the home, they found Baker, who was quickly flown to University Hospital in Mobile. He was still listed in critical condition as of Monday afternoon. Jermaine Dickerson and Jones were treated in Mobile as well. All three required surgery and were initially listed in critical condition. However, Mack said Dickerson and Jones were upgraded to “stable” condition as of Monday, Nov. 19. Tamarius Dickerson was taken to South Baldwin Regional Medical Center in Foley in a private vehicle, briefly causing the hospital to go into a lockdown. Mack said it’s standard procedure to go into lockdown when gunshot victims arrive and police aren’t present. Dickerson was treated at SBRMC for a gunshot wound to the back and released. Police say they found a small amount of marijuana in Baker’s trailer and in the green Ford Explorer, though there was no indication the shooting was drug related. Mack said investigators have not interviewed all the individuals involved because of their medical status. Whatever the cause of the shootout, Mack said the altercation was “absolutely dangerous” not only for those involved but also for those in the surrounding homes in the trailer park. “This is a mobile home park. There was everything from small children to elderly and retired people in nearby houses, and there were people walking in the neighborhood,” he said. “It was a Sunday in the middle of the day … a beautiful day. We’re continuing to look at the crimes that may have been committed, but it’s very concerning that these individuals took no consideration of what they could have done in that community.” Mack said officers have so far received no reports of nearby homes or vehicles being hit in the crossfire.

BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Sworn in

NEW BALDWIN COUNTY COMMISSION HOLDS ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING

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BY GABRIEL TYNES

hree new members of the Baldwin County Commission took the oath of office Nov. 14, joining Commissioner Skip Gruber, a four-term incumbent. In the commission’s first agenda item, Gruber was unanimously voted chairman. All four are Republican, winning handily in a county where only a single Democrat mounted a campaign for the commission, and where nearly 80 percent of Republican voters cast straightticket ballots Nov. 6. Representing District 1 in northern Baldwin County is James “Jeb” Ball, who narrowly defeated 30-year incumbent Frank Burt in the primary election in June. Ball is a lifelong resident of the county and works as program director for Baldwin Substance Abuse Services supervising court-ordered classes. In District 2, which covers the Eastern Shore including Spanish Fort, Daphne and Fairhope, Joe Davis replaced Chris Elliott, who was elected

to State Senate District 32. Previously a Daphne city councilman, Davis is a native of Thomasville who moved to Daphne in 2006 after retiring from First United Security Bank as director of the brokerage and investments division. In his statement of economic interest filed with the Alabama Ethics Commission, Davis listed self-employment at J&J Contractors on County Road 64 in Daphne. District 3 Commissioner Billie Jo Underwood forced two-term incumbent Tucker Dorsey into the primary runoff election July 17, winning with a convincing 64 percent of the vote. A partner in the public accounting firm Giles Underwood and Wilson, LLC, Underwood also lives on a pecan farm in Summerdale. The commissioners also approved appointments to various boards and committees and rescheduled meetings over the next two months to accommodate the holidays. The Baldwin County Commission’s next meeting will be Monday, Dec. 3, at 8:30 a.m. in Bay Minette.

November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Local political scraps are out of hand ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

to even elect a president. Or look at a few other instances when councilors say they were left out of the loop by the mayor’s office. Or even as far back as when the council tried to keep Stimpson from even being able to add things to the weekly agenda. In other words, this isn’t new. It’s just getting worse. Personally I’ve never really understood why the council needs Steinfels, but if they find value in what she does, they should be allowed to have her. But there have also been a lot of complaints her position was used as a proxy to fight with the mayor’s office, and if that’s the case, then it’s really on the council to rein that in. I would love to see the mayor and council work this matter out without wasting taxpayer money on paying lawyers to fight one another. I’d love to see council members stop being babies about the president’s position and just get it done. We have trash to pick up and crime to fight. Roads to pave (for example, there is a sinkhole in my neighborhood that has had sawhorses around it for months — so long I started researching how many Domino’s pizzas I’d have to order to get it filled). GulfQuest is a question with no obvious solution. There’s plenty to do. When people say, “The business of the city isn’t being affected by these disagreements,” I have to roll my eyes. How can it not be? So when you get the big end of the wishbone on Turkey Day, ask for a little sanity and harmony for the local mayors and councils. They need it.

THEGADFLY

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things for the citizens and making Mobile a better place. There are some who get sidetracked with petty or personal issues at times, but most appear to have their hearts in the right place. The irony of all the disagreement between Mayor Stimpson and the City Council is that in most areas, Mobile is doing better than it has in decades. That’s not to say there aren’t some significant challenges, but overall we are heading in a better direction than we were seven or eight years ago. So why all the fighting? Right now, for example, the council and mayor are gearing up for a courtroom battle over whether the City Council can rehire its communications specialist, Marion Steinfels, after Stimpson fired her in October. At the last meeting, City Attorney Ricardo Woods even raised the specter of impeachment, should the council attempt to contract with Steinfels again. But councilors voted 6-1 to do so anyway and now they may be heading to court. All of this is so counterproductive. We can look back at recent history and councilors are upset because they say Stimpson tried to force a $10 million deal for USA’s new football stadium down their throats without any discussion. The mayor’s office is upset the council changed a number of items in his budget, including cutting raises to his own communications staff. The next thing you know, Steinfels gets the axe. But we can keep looking further back and observe the fact that the council also can’t cooperate with one another enough

Cartoon/Laura Mattei

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s we all gather this week to thank God for our many blessings and demonstrate our gratitude by performing amazing feats of gluttony, let’s take a moment to include in those prayers the people who give their time to lead local communities. Being an elected official on the local level is a tough job, and one that generally comes with little pay and just a sliver of the pageantry we reserve for national leaders. The truth is, serving as a city councilor or mayor probably comes with as much aggravation as it does adulation — if not more. There is an intensity in local politics that goes beyond the usual Democrat vs. Republican battles dominating the national scene. On the local level decisions are made that affect us in a much more immediate fashion. Can your favorite chicken finger joint have a drive-thru? Should we re-time the traffic lights on Dauphin Street? What are we going to do with an empty baseball field? These are local decisions that can affect your life in a much more tangible way than those coming from D.C. And often that’s why there is so much friction between councilors and mayors, or councilors and councilors. Factions form and people take things personally. We’ve seen it many times, although I’m not sure aggravation levels between city officials have ever been as high as they are across our area right now. Finding a city government around here involved an internal political war isn’t a difficult assignment. That’s why we need to say a prayer that our local elected officials will take a step back and remember why they got into the “business” of serving the people in the first place. Several cities in this area need to get back to a little harmony. The most extreme example of the problems we’re having is in Creola, where a city councilman is accused of brandishing a pistol at one of his fellow councilors. Granted, this is just an accusation and the matter has not yet been adjudicated, but if true, that’s a just a bit too “Dirty Harry” for city government. Daphne has had its share of dustups in the past couple of years, as has Bayou La Batre. Prichard’s political dysfunctional has not only extended into its water and sewer services, but threatens to cripple the city’s ability to keep people’s homes from burning to the ground as the mayor and council grapple over getting new fire trucks. And of course there’s the firefight that has been raging in Fairhope for two years now. Mayor Karin Wilson and the City Council have squared off over just about everything imaginable; there have been accusations of spying, financial malfeasance, using positions for personal gain and allegations of personal threats, just to name a few. The situation has gotten so bad there was even an attempt to change the city’s form of government, which failed in the recent election. I could probably write a whole column on each of these, but right now it makes the most sense to focus on the city of Mobile, where the relationship between the council and mayor is spiraling out of control. Nobody’s flashing a piece yet, but it’s getting bad. People ask me constantly lately what’s going on in Mobile’s city government. They often want to know whose fault it is or who started the troubles, but I’m not really sure there was one single spark that started this inferno. I also don’t really think it matters much who started it. The more important thing is who’s going to stop it? In my opinion we’re lucky to have people running this city who are primarily interested in doing good

THINGS ARE GETTING A LITTLE CRAZY OVER AT GOVERNMENT PLAZA


November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

How to ruin Thanksgiving: 2018 edition

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ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM his week we will gather together with people we share some DNA with to eat a type of bird we only eat once a year, topped with gelatinous cranberry “sauce” out of a can. Aunts will make schedules for the oven, while uncles make schedules for the TV and the football that must be watched. Cousins who have perfected the art of humble bragging will annoy the cousins who Maw Maw considers to be the black sheep of the family. Grandpa will clean his plate and make the joke that the food was just “terrible” at least three times. Oh, Thanksgiving, you really are the best holiday of them all! But if you really want to jack it up and cause discord there are a number of ways in which you can accomplish this. You could just say out loud all of the insane conspiracy theories and inappropriate comments your crazy Aunt Lucille puts on Facebook, or you can use any of the suggestions below, which are also guaranteed to start a civil war and cause alternate plans to be made for Christmas. National politics The Number One way to ruin any family gathering is to bring up politics. It is very rare to find a family where every member shares the same political views. And much like posting snarky memes on Facebook, no “discussion” about it while eating green bean casserole is ever going to change anyone’s mind. Ever. But if you just can’t help yourself and you really want to stir the pot, then you can drop some of these bombs in the conversation. To make your Republican relatives angry, just say one or more of these lines: I just don’t get it, Uncle (insert name). How can you defend that petulant, blithering, Tweeting idiot who happens to be our president? I know you hate Hillary but you have to admit, she’d be better than that fool. So how many sexual predators have y’all put on the Supreme Court now? You don’t get due process in a “job interview.” MSNBC really is the most balanced network there is. Jim Acosta is a national hero. I think we really need abolish ICE. George Soros, Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, Tom Steyer, Clinton (Bill), Clinton (Hillary). They only reason y’all can win any election is gerrymandering. Rigged! Socialism. We have so many awesome candidates running for president, 2020 is ours! To make your Democratic relatives angry, just say this: He doesn’t get the credit now, but mark my words, Donald Trump will go down in history as one of the greatest presidents of all time. The fake news media has never treated a president like this. EVER. They can’t say anything nice about him at all. Half the time, I want to hand out brown paper bags to the commentators on MSNBC. (I mean the clips I see, because I, of course, never watch that channel.) Ruth Bader Ginsburg looks ill. How can you have an economy like this and say he is not doing a good job? Christine Blasey Ford is nothing but an attention-seeking liar. How much did she get in her little GoFundMe account? Like almost a million dollars. Uh huh. Y’all made a huge mistake by trying to ruin

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a good man like Justice Kavanaugh. How would you feel if that was your husband or son? The only reason y’all won the House back is the officials let dead people vote. Rigged! You want to take care of disease-carrying gang members but you don’t care anything at all about our veterans. Typical. FOX News is the only channel that even tries to treat the president fairly. Mitch McConnell, Mike Pence, Sheldon Adelson, Jared Kushner, Trump (Donald), Trump (Ivanka), Trump (Don Jr.), Trump (Eric). Lock her up! Sarah Huckabee Sanders does a great job. I hope she gets her own show one day. I am not worried about 2020 at all because y’all will definitely nominate someone completely unelectable like you always do. Local politics For the family full of Mobilians tired of talking about Beltway turkeys, go local … To enrage anti-Stimpson folks … Sandy Stimpson is the best mayor this city has ever had. It’s a shame that the City Council constantly tries to undermine him. To enrage pro-Stimpson folks … The cleanest, safest and most business- and family-friendly city by 2020? Puh-leez. Crime is out of control and he ran on being able to communicate better with the City Council members than Sam Jones did and now his relationship is just as bad. Food To irritate the meat eaters in your family … I hope that poor, innocent, defenseless turkey gives you Salmonella. To irritate non-meat eaters … I like a good breast, but dark meat is best. That’s some good eatin’! Iron Bowl To upset your Auburn relatives … Tell me again. How much did y’all give Gus to stay? Was it more than you gave Scam Newton? I really do wish y’all had a better team. I want the Iron Bowl to at least be somewhat competitive. WDE, you booger-eatin’ Barner! To upset your Alabama relatives … You got a second? I’m wearing this Auburn shirt because I went to school there. You are wearing that Bammer shirt because you went to Walmart. Rohl Tawd, you cousin-marrying Bammer! See, it’s not even fun to talk about any of these things anymore (well except for the Iron Bowl trash talkin’, because that’s all in good fun and it’s our duty as Alabamians). But the rest of this stuff just doesn’t matter in the grand scheme of things. It’s just too easy and we get too much of this crap on social media every day. So be thankful for the folks you have eaten turkey and dressing and sweet potato casserole and gelatinous, canned cranberry “sauce” with for most of your life, even if you disagree with them on just about everything. Your Aunt Lucille may be crazy but she’s yours and she loves you. So this Thanksgiving, step away from your Facebook and Twitter feeds, turn off the cable news and turn on the football. There is indeed so much to be thankful for and it has absolutely nothing to do with the turkeys we’ve elected! Happy Thanksgiving! Gobble! Gobble!


November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

No gas taxation without fair appropriation BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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ig and controversial things are coming this legislative session. As with any new quadrennium, the Legislature completes its potentially unpopular agenda items first so that by the time the next election cycle begins, legislators hope voters have long forgotten any past betrayals. Last week, Republicans in the Alabama House re-elected Rep. Mac McCutcheon (RMonrovia) to another term as speaker. He made it clear long before his re-election that a hike in the gas tax is on the table. McCutcheon’s Alabama Senate counterpart, Senate Pro Tem Del Marsh (R-Anniston), shares that sentiment. It will be one of the big proposals, other than a lottery referendum, the state will consider next year. The idea is if by some miracle President Donald Trump and the GOP-led U.S. Senate can come together with the Democratic-led U.S. House of Representatives to pass an infrastructure bill, Alabama could use the gas tax to meet any of the matching requirements in funding that could come out of federal legislation. Given that lawmakers will likely do something with a gas tax, what would that look like? There are all sorts of details to be ironed out: How will drivers of hybrid and electric vehicles pay a fair share? How will 18-wheeler trucks carrying heavy loads that do the most damage to the state roads pay their share? And so on. But perhaps the most crucial question is: How will Montgomery divvy up revenue within the state? Going back to the beginning of the last century, and perhaps to the end of the Civil War, Alabama has experienced regional tribalism. It’s not solely geographic, although geography plays a large part. It’s also economic and cultural. While the rest the country looks at Alabama as a monolith — flyover-country Republican voters united by bass fishing, barbecue, college football or whatever it is they do down there — it’s a little more complicated than that. Southwest Alabama is no stranger to this phenomenon. To some folks in Birmingham, Mobile might as well be Mexico. “Isn’t it that place near the beach? If I lived in Mobile, I would go to Gulf Shores every day!” To be fair, there’s probably a little bit of that going the other way regarding how Mobile and Baldwin counties view the rest of Alabama. That jaunt up Interstate 65 beyond the Dolly Parton Bridge seems like forever until you get to Montgomery. And who has time for that? If you think the spread between Mobile and the rest of Alabama is daunting now, before there was I-65 there was no clear straight shot between Mobile and Montgomery. Prior to the completion of I-65, you had to cross the Causeway and head north on a winding U.S. Highway 31 through Brewton, Evergreen and Greenville.

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Or, before that, you took the old Federal Road to and from points beyond the beginning of Mobile Bay. It might have involved a steamboat, a stagecoach and then rail. Whatever it was, if you think Mobile seems isolated from the rest of Alabama now, it once was a lot more isolated. That separation, along with its subtler cultural and economic differences, has made the Port City somewhat of a stepchild in the eyes of the rest of Alabama. That impression is historic and deeply ingrained in the state’s collective mindset, such that even with modern modes of transit and communication it has been difficult to overcome. The state’s politics reflect this. Which brings us back to the gas tax. Given that Alabama’s two coastal counties have been given short shrift, even as recently as being robbed of BP settlement money so the state could make ends meet, is there any reason to believe southwest Alabama will be treated fairly with the gas tax? The Alabama Department of Transportation’s (ALDOT) ability to not intermingle politics with its road and bridge priorities leaves much to be desired. All over Alabama, from the Shoals to Mobile, local elected officials are afraid to criticize ALDOT for fear their local project will be moved further down the priority list of projects out of retribution. If a deep state exists in Alabama government, it’s probably ALDOT — unelected bureaucrats using leverage of road and bridge construction to influence elected politicians. Why should the good people of Mobile support a gas tax given the history of being thought of as out of sight, and therefore out of mind? Behind the scenes, policymakers are having all kinds of discussions about how to put some constraints on gas tax revenue. One proposal suggests distribution by population. Jefferson County, for example, is densely populated and, under this proposal, would receive the bulk of the revenue. So does that mean places like Choctaw and Wilcox counties, with their shrinking populations, remain cut off from the rest of the state? One reasonable potential solution would be to include language requiring a portion of where revenue is collected to remain in that county. If a gas tax is a true usage tax — i.e., you’re trying to collect revenue from the people and entities that actually use the state’s highways — then money should go to improving the state’s most traveled roads. That doesn’t necessarily address the Choctaw and Wilcox county conundrum, but it might prevent Montgomery from taking revenue generated in Baldwin County and using it for a road project in Madison County, or vice versa. Think of it as an insurance policy against the century-old tribal politics of Alabama for our neck of the woods.


November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

New birth control, HIV prevention programs available BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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an Francisco-based Nurx, a consumer health care company providing free online consultations with physicians and home delivery of medications, has expanded its footprint into Alabama. Additionally, Mobile native and former U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Regina Benjamin has joined the telemedicine company’s board of directors, Nurx recently announced. Benjamin will advise the company on a variety of critical public health issues and brings a strong background to patient-first preventive care. “I have always been committed to ensuring everyone has access to quality, affordable health care, regardless of their income or where they live,” Benjamin said. “I look forward to working with the Nurx team as they break down barriers to care, increase access and ultimately help improve the health of the nation.” Nurx offers birth control and HIV prevention medication, focusing on consumers that traditionally lack access to affordable health care services and medications. After consulting with a state-licensed provider, users can choose from more than 50 birth control brands, many of which are available without insurance. It has been reported that in Alabama more than half of all pregnancies are unintended. Public spending for unplanned pregnancies in the state topped an estimated $323 million in 2010.  Nurx also offers PrEP, a daily pill that is up to 99 percent effective at preventing transmission of the HIV virus. Nurx offers an at-home test kit for PrEP treatment, allowing patients to complete all the testing required before using the medication. One study indicated southern states accounted for more than half of new HIV diagnoses in 2016, with 13.1 new cases for every 100,000 residents in Alabama. Southern states have the highest number of new HIV diagnoses in the U.S., but have disproportionately fewer people using anti-HIV treatment.  “State by state, our users get the care they need when they need it, regardless of their insurance status or where

they live. We’re especially thrilled to have Dr. Benjamin join our board as well. She has consistently demonstrated her commitment to community health and pushing for innovative health care solutions and we’re thrilled that she will bring these same insights to Nurx,” Hans Gangeskar, cofounder and CEO of Nurx, said. Nurx is currently available in 21 states and the District of Columbia, encompassing more than 70 percent of the U.S. population. Nearby states include Florida, Georgia, Tennessee and Texas. More information about programs can be found on the company’s website.

Hydro Technologies announces new ownership

Hydro Technologies in Mobile recently announced Ward Muller as the new president and owner of the local company, which represents more than 40 major manufacturers of HVAC, plumbing and fire protection products for the industrial, institutional and commercial building markets, according to a news release. Muller has more than 11 years of business and entrepreneurial experience with a background in accounts receivable financing, concentrating on contractors and subcontractors. From 2012 to 2018 he was a partner in a local real estate development company which executed over $500 million dollars in real estate projects. He is also an active member of several networking and professional organizations as well as the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce. “I am thrilled about the opportunity at Hydro Technologies,” Ward said. “Hydro has had strong leadership and experience throughout its 34 years in business and has built solid relationships with contractors across the Southeast. We are ready to continue doing great work for our clients and the manufacturers we represent.” Hydro Technologies’ facilities cover some 14,000 square feet of warehouse and assembly space at 1047 Sledge Drive in Mobile. It represents more than 40 major manufacturers of process, HVAC, plumbing and fire protection products for the industrial, institutional and

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commercial building markets. The company’s footprint stretches across Alabama, Northwest Florida and Mississippi. More information about Hydro Technologies can be found on its website.

Business moves and transactions

• Marl Cummings IV with Cummings & Associates reported the Dauphin Island Chevron, located at 1000 Bienville Blvd. on Dauphin Island, is taking over the entire corner that includes the space formerly occupied by Anchor Real Estate, expanding from 2,000 square feet to 2,600 square feet. There are plans to increase the size of the sales floor, upgrade the kitchen and offer additional seating, according to Cummings, who assisted in managing work involved with the expansion.   • Jeremy Friedman with Katapult Properties reported a 2,000-square-foot office building at 119 Professional Park Drive in Fairhope is now fully leased with two tenants. • Dr. Michelle Kerr Patrick with Healing Touch Chiropractic has leased some 1,000 square feet of office space, represented by Joe Steen of Joe Steen Real Estate.  Bay Bridge Realty leased 1,000 square feet of office space, represented by Joann Beck of Bay Bridge Realty. Katapult’s Friedman represented the developers in both transactions. • Pensacola-based CPC Office Technologies recently held a grand opening and ribbon cutting at its new 6,000-square-foot location at 863 Lakeside Drive in Mobile. The company offers office technology solutions for businesses.

Bellator Real Estate adds agents

Bellator Real Estate & Development has added 28 new realtors since the beginning of October in its Eastern Shore, Mobile and Fairhope Section Street offices, according to a news release. In October Bellator merged with the former Fairhope Realty Group, which brought over 23 agents, including: Terryl Reeves, Gina Littlepage, Susan Beeco, Randy Branch, Deanie Buck, Harry Dodich, Jim Gratz, Steven D. Hazelwood, Sarah Hofferber, Rod Hofferber, Tanya Johnston, Theresa King, Wiley Kinggard, Eric Kristfelt, Jeremy Lee, John Luce, Melissa Mahan, Elizabeth Mahan, Jamie Oquin, Bernice Price, Jessica Reid, Stephanie Sandefur and Richard Smith. The company also added five new hires: Cindy Breeland (Eastern Shore Office), Lisa Griffin (Eastern Shore Office), Daniela Nielson (Eastern Shore Office), Tonya Sanderson (Mobile Office) and Amanda Spears (Eastern Shore Office). “These agents represent years of experience in real estate and business, and we as a company are better for having them with us,” Troy Wilson, president of Bellator, said. According to the company, Bellator closed over $555 million in commercial and residential sales in 2017, ranking the firm as the No. 1 real estate firm along the Alabama Gulf Coast.


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CUISINE | THE DISH

This Thanksgiving, wish upon a tamale BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

Photo | depositphotos.com

Try something different and use that leftover turkey to make tamales, which freeze well and are just right for Christmas Eve Mexican dinner.

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he day is finally here. It’s the day any food writer worth his or her salt shaker looks forward to more than the other 364. Thanksgiving is the feast to end all feasts. Mardi Gras may be the day to lay your liver on the line, but Thanksgiving is the day to lay it all on your belt line. Eating your way through a holiday usually ends with more to regret than there is to be thankful for, but I have never woken up on Black Friday and thought it wasn’t worth it. It’s always worth it. I don’t mean to be gluttonous, but the food is so good that I appreciate the fact that we don’t do it all year long. The dressing is my weakness. My mom’s corn casserole, giblet gravy, deviled eggs, sweet potatoes, pies ... oh, the cranberry sauce! Don’t change a thing, ma. It’s been perfect for decades! But yes, it would kill me if we did it more than once a year. I couldn’t take frying turkeys at 8 a.m., beers in hand, with my 110-pound brother (I don’t know why we call him Big Al) any more than annually. We don’t see the point in going

through the fuss to fry only one. Usually we cook somewhere in the neighborhood of three to five. A man can spread the beer out better that way. You may time your bird at 3.5 minutes per pound, but we have long since figured out how many beers are required for a 14 pounder. If you guess 14, you’re wrong, but we have usually solved the world’s problems around turkey number three. I get super excited every time this issue of the paper comes around; I always want to avoid repeating myself, but I don’t want anything to change. This is my one holiday I will fight for. This is the one about which I’m most obstinate. My pigheadedness for Thanksgiving is certainly about the food (despite a lack of pig at the table, save a bit of sausage in the rice), but the real star of the show is family. As much as I love the food it’s the family I crave more. I mentioned the rituals my brother and I have adopted over the past few years, but what good would Thanksgiving be if my sister weren’t there? I couldn’t lovingly harass her for being the last to show up for lunch and the first to pounce on the

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deviled eggs, not to mention her hoarding the canned crescent rolls. She could easily snuff my taunts by flying straighter. I hope she never does. My mother, Khaki, the matriarch for the past nine years — who perhaps is the only one who understands how important this day is to me — unflinchingly will not entertain the idea of this meal leaving her table. We tried it once in the past 44 years. It wasn’t the same. Aesthetically her china, the place settings, the chairs and the good silver add to the aura of it all and I don’t feel the same without it. Those things typically don’t mean anything to a guy like me, content to have dinner on the ground with paper and plasticware, but on this day they do. It’s Khaki’s moment to shine. We tease her because she seems to never eat, only tending to babies, refilling drinks and making sure the big kids’ table has what it needs. I don’t know that we’ve ever seen her eat. It’s not like the mom in “A Christmas Story,” who is pulled in all directions against her will. It’s more by design. Does she have an odd eating habit? Is her dessert/protein/vegetable ratio embarrassingly out of whack? What could she be hiding from us? Maybe she grazes when she cooks, but this year I am going to sit and watch her clean her plate, the reverse role of a mother to a son, the progeny who now worries his parent will neither appreciate her meal nor be healthy until every bit is gone. In an attempt to not sound like a broken record, I’m avoiding a long list of what to do with leftovers. We’ve played that game. This year I’m focused on one leftover trick our house has never had: turkey tamales. The best part about them is if you’ve grown tired of turkey sandwiches, gumbo, tetrazzini and turkey a la king, but still have leftover bird, then these are perfect. Tamales freeze well and are just right for Christmas Eve Mexican dinner (hi, Betsy!). Bonus is the whole fam can be involved, assembly-line style. A large pack of dried husks lasts me a year. Soak 20 or so in hot water before you get started. • 3 cups masa cornmeal • 1 cup shortening • 2 cups chicken (or turkey) broth • Shredded turkey leftovers • Chopped onion • Chili powder and cumin to taste • Dried corn husks soaked for 2 hours Once the husks are pliable we will basically make a skillet stew of turkey and onions. Garlic is great if you wish. Saute the onion in a bit of oil. Once soft, add the turkey and season with chili powder and cumin. Hopefully your bird is salty enough. If not, you know what to do. Add enough water or stock to cover and simmer until all is moist. In a mixing bowl beat shortening and add a little masa at a time as well as the chicken broth, until the mixture has a spongy consistency. You may not use all of the broth. Pat dry the corn husks and spread the dough mixture to a ½ inch thickness. Place a tablespoon of meat filling in the center, roll them up and fold the ends toward the middle. Steam these for about an hour. Serve them with your leftover turkey chili. Have fun with this recipe and get creative. Tamales rule. Happy Thanksgiving to you all!


November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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CUISINE | THE BEER PROFESSOR

Back in black BY TOM WARD/THE BEER PROFESSOR

Photo | Facebook

Huntsville’s Yellowhammer Brewing describes its Midnight Special as “a dark lager crafted in the spirit of a German-style schwarzbier, blending German Munich malts and dark roasted malts for a smooth finish.”

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s the days get shorter and the nights chillier, darker beers tend to come back into fashion. Pilsners and sours may rule the summer, but stouts and dunkels tend to reign in the colder months.

WORD OF MOUTH

Cooking Light calls it quits BY ANDY MACDONALD Last week many of us went to our mailboxes to find this month’s Cooking Light magazine with a cover that read, “The Farewell Issue.” The magazine — born as a spinoff of Southern Living in 1987 — is losing its hard-copy status but will still have recipes on Cookinglight.com. The Cooking Light Diet will still serve folks in need of healthy meal planning tools and advice, according to Executive Editor Ann Taylor Pittman. Printing giant Meredith Corp., which took over Time Inc.’s collection of 22 food and lifestyle magazines this past year, an-

However, many people are intimidated by dark beers, worried they may be too strong or heavy for their tastes. But a number of black beers showing up this season seek to strike a balance between the malty notes of a dark brew and the lighter

nounced it will be merging Cooking Light with its other healthy title, Eating Well, under that brand. Subscribers will begin receiving that magazine in 2019 with the January/February issue. Cooking Light will still publish a half a dozen issues or so per year available only on newsstands, and Meredith’s food headquarters will continue to operate in Birmingham. This includes Southern Living as well as Food & Wine. Please don’t take those subscriptions away. To learn more about your subscription you can email cklcustserv@cdsfulfillment. com or call 800-336-0125. If you’d like to learn more about Eating Well, visit eatingwell.com.

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Cheese Cottage hosting Black Friday Brunch

taste of a lager. Black lagers seem to be this year’s seasonal style du jour this fall, with a wide variety of macro- and microbreweries putting out their own versions, including New Belgium (1554 Black Lager), Dixie (Blackened Voodoo Lager) and Shiner (97 Bohemian Black Lager), all of which can be found in grocery stores throughout our area. I had my first black lager a couple of weeks ago at Serda Brewing during the annual “Woofstock” festival. While the temps were still summerlike, I had a hankering for something different, and the black lager intrigued me. I was not disappointed. It had some excellent roasted malt flavors with chocolate and coffee notes, like one would expect from a good porter, but was acidic, not creamy. It hit the spot. I don’t know how long it will be available down on Government Street, but it’s worth a try if you stop into the taproom. A number of other state and local brewers are putting out their take on the black beer phenomenon. I found the Midnight Special black lager from Huntsville’s Yellowhammer Brewing in cans at my local Piggly Wiggly. It was similar to Serda’s, but a bit lighter and not quite as flavorful. Fairhope Brewing Co. does not put out a black lager, but it does have a Black IPA in its taproom — the Painted Black IPA. A black IPA might seem a bit of a contradiction, as IPAs are known for their bitter, hoppy flavors, while darker beers are associated with maltiness and softer hints of chocolate, coffee and caramel. However, I found the Painted Black, while stronger than the black lagers I tried (at 7 percent alcohol by volume or ABV), to have a nice balance, as the hoppiness of the IPA was offset by coffee and malt hints. If you’re looking to try the Painted Black and other dark beers, Fairhope Brewing is hosting its annual Black Friday celebration from 1-10 p.m. on Nov. 23. A dozen dark beers will be available on tap, including the debut of holiday brews such as the Gingerbread Stout and the There’s Something About Merry imperial stout. Special peanut butter versions of favorites Judge Roy Bean and Long Handshake will also be available. There will be live music and a food truck, so take a break from your black Friday shopping (or, better yet, abandon it altogether) and try out some dark beers this Thanksgiving weekend.

Your go-to place for all things cheesy should be The Cheese Cottage at 650 St. Louis St. I don’t do big-box stores the day after my favorite holiday; I happily avoid the sales, but if you want to meet me for brunch I can pull myself out of my food coma and muster up the courage for a glass of wine and some cheese! These guys will be serving a Lazy (not Black) Friday Brunch, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., at which time they’ll be closing early. Drink specials and the cheesiest menu in town should coax you into leaving the mall. Visit their social media pages for more details. Get out that cellphone and say, “Cheese!”

Don’t “poke” the bear

Serda Brewing Co. is really on the educational track these days. Prepare yourself for their latest continuing education event as they have their Mobile Beginner Sushi Class Monday, Dec. 3, and Mobile Poke Class Tuesday, Dec. 4, 6:30-8 p.m. Learn how to make perfect sushi rice, where to shop and how to buy sushi-grade tuna. You’ll also learn the secrets behind the sauces, how to cut veggies, roll your own sushi and assemble the traditional Hawaiian poke bowls we all love. It’s a good break from the holiday hustle and bustle. Visit Serda’s Facebook page for more details and ticketing information on these two events.


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COVER STORY

Small Business Saturday promotes benefits of spending locally

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JASON JOHNSON/REPORTER it’s “the first time that’s happened in years.” However, the ultimate goal isn’t to prop up businesses nificant impact on yearly sales for big-box stores with one really good day of sales. As the director of small and national retailers, but for small businesses in business development for the chamber, Danette Richards South Alabama and across the U.S. the day after said SBS is a perfect way to emphasize a yearlong message and those that follow can be equally important to to “shop small” and “shop local.” their bottom line. Richards said getting exposure is a challenge all new Small Business Saturday (SBS) was created by American Express in 2010 as businesses around the country were businesses face, but because smaller companies typically have a limited budget for advertising and a less-established struggling in the midst of the Great Recession. The idea was to redirect some of the post-Thanksgiving spending to brand, one crucial step to success is getting the word out about the business and drawing in customers. local retailers, restaurants and shops. By most measures, While actual transactions during annual SBS events it’s been a success. are vital for area businesses, she said, the exposure can According to an American Express survey, customers be just as important. As the popularity of the annual event have spent an estimated $85 billion increases, Richards is hopeful it can at independent businesses in the grow into a year-round “shop small” eight years since. In 2017, more than movement. 108 million shoppers spent around “It’s got momentum” she said. $12.9 billion on Nov. 29 alone, a “The other thing is, if you can get slight decrease from the $15 billion TODAY, PEOPLE ARE people out and into local businesses reportedly spent at small businesses on that day, there’s a good chance during the 2016 SBS. NOT ALWAYS LOOKING you can get them to come back as While the collective numbers can well.” give an indication of national trends, FOR THE CHEAPEST It is worth noting that American they divide into smaller figures that Express limits its SBS packages to OPTION. SOMETIMES can sometimes make or break an companies that accept it as a form of entire year for small businesses. Acpayment, but the chamber also hosts YOU’RE LOOKING FOR cording to the Mobile Area Chamber independent events to help small of Commerce, several local busiTHE BETTER ALLbusinesses. Over the past few years nesses have participated for years. organized “cashMOBs” at local For entrepreneurs like Cindy AROUND EXPERIENCE. it’s businesses. Newman, who owns Oak Ridge A cashMOB is a two-hour shopGifts in Mobile, SBS helps provide ping event to support local small a strong start to the Christmas businesses in the Mobile area which season. Newman said the store “participates heavily” every year to take advantage of the includes complimentary hors d’oeuvres and cocktails. While free to attend, guests are asked to commit to spendpromotional opportunity. ing at least $20 at that location. The next cashMob is “I can’t stress this enough, but the holiday season is scheduled to take place 4:30-6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. absolutely important for us. It’s typically a huge influx of 29, at the Urban Emporium on Dauphin Street. sales,” Newman said. “I think [organizers] realize what

T’S WIDELY KNOWN BLACK FRIDAY HAS A SIG-

key players small businesses are within communities, and they know we can’t compete with the money that large box stores have for advertising and things like that.” The Downtown Mobile Alliance (DMA) has also been involved with SBS since 2013, and spokesperson Carol Hunter said she’s seen the event get “bigger every year.” The DMA will be offering maps, information and refreshments outside its office on Dauphin Street at this year’s event, too. Hunter said the growth of SBS has also mirrored an increase in the number of new, independent businesses downtown. She said six new retailers have opened in downtown over past several months, and told Lagniappe

Local shopping trend

The death of mom and pop stores was a frequent topic of think pieces, news articles and dinner table conversations in the ‘80s and ‘90s, but over the past five years it’s been the national chains that have had to downsize, restructure and, in some cases, shut down altogether. While business for brick-and-mortar retailers has stabilized, there’s no doubt the rise of online shopping and the shifting expectations of younger customers have forced local companies to adapt. In that changing landscape, it’s been easier for smaller businesses to carve out a niche for themselves.

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One of the bigger names to face financial troubles recently is Toys “R” Us. The once dominant retail toy store filed for bankruptcy in late 2017, but has since backtracked on those plans in favor of a nationwide restructuring of its assets. During the transition, though, the company’s prominent store in Mobile saw its doors shut permanently. While she doesn’t celebrate the closure of a store she described as a “staple of [her] childhood,” Melanie Clark — owner and proprietor of Big City Toys on Old Shell Road — said the gap it created in the local market may put her business in a good position heading into what is undeniably the most important time of the year for retail toy sellers. “Until now, [Toys “R” Us closing] has actually kind of negatively impacted us because there was a lot of liquidation, and I think people were shopping the sales. It remains to be seen what fourth quarter might do,” Clark said. “We don’t like to see a negative thing like that happen, but I’m trying to turn this into a positive. We’ve really tried to get our name out there so people keep the money in Mobile locally rather than shopping online or with bigger retailers outside the city.” Don Mosley, director of the Melton Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the University of South Alabama, said gaining local support may be easier today than it was just a decade ago. He said the climate for small business has been shifting in a positive direction over the past few years. According to Mosley, a new enthusiasm for shopping locally has been driven by a younger generation of shoppers who are often willing to pay more for a product in exchange for more personalized service. Mosley also said younger generations tend to think more about the broader impact of their spending than older shoppers do. “[Millennials] tend to look at the impact they can have within the community, and that often translates into their spending as well,” Mosley said. “Coming out of the recession, I also think our society is also starting to recognize the vast majority of businesses are small.” While Mosley said larger businesses and industries are vital for a healthy economy, he said small businesses may be more important because of the jobs and economic impact they create. He compared smaller, local employers to “the sand between the big marbles in a jar.” However, it can be nearly impossible for small retailers to compete with big chains on price because they aren’t able to purchase items on such a large scale. Mosley said thriving small businesses have learned to differentiate what they offer customers by incorporating products from local vendors or more unique products. It can also be seen in terms of customer service and the shopping experience. “Today, people are not always looking for the cheapest option,” he added. “Sometimes you’re looking for the better all-around experience.” That “experiential” shopping idea has been a big part the business plan at Big City Toys. In fact, Clark said a lot of her motivation for opening the store in 2015 was a “dissatisfaction” with big-box and online shopping for toys. She wanted her two children to have toys that contributed to their development and weren’t “cheap” and “plastic.” Clark said she had a hard time finding quality toys locally, and filling that need has driven a lot of what customers will find at Big City Toys today — a knowledgeable staff, hands-on toy displays and an inviting atmosphere that feels more like a place to play than a place to shop. “You can’t get somebody at Target who is going to show you how a toy works or direct you to sensory toys and have the knowledge of those individual products,” Clark told Lagniappe. “We have a toy lab with all sorts of demonstrations and games sitting out to play with. We do a weekly story time. Some of it’s unique, but I think that’s what makes it work.” At Oak Ridge Gifts, Newman said one of the ways she tries to set her store apart is by using local vendors, which she described as a “win-win” for both the business and the community. That type of support for local vendors is one of the ways shopping local benefits the local economy. A 2010 study conducted by Michigan State University’s Center for Community and Economic Development concluded for every $100 spent at local


COVER STORY

Photo | Lagniappe

Melanie Clark, owner of Big City Toys, hopes to see Small Business Saturday place the holiday shopping focus on locally owned businesses. businesses, $73 stays in the local economy. When the same amount is spent at nonlocal businesses, that figure is reduced to $43. While some customers will always shop for the lowest price, Mosley said he thinks Americans — and more specifically Mobilians — are starting to realize the benefits of paying a little more to support retailers in their backyard. “I think most people understand that when dollars are spent with individuals who have a single unit in a community or multiple units in the community, that money stays here,” he said. “Whether it’s through hiring additional employees, purchasing supplies from local vendors or giving back socially in the local area, that money stays here.” Small businesses have also been assisted by the advance of technology, which has made many things more affordable that were once only accessible to larger businesses. For instance, point-of-sale applications like Square Inc. can now be installed on a standard tablet computer and can track customer spending habits and provide instant insights about what’s selling and who’s buying. It’s also become much easier for smallbusiness owners to set up online stores, whether they’re building their own standalone website or using one of a number of template services available. At Big City Toys, Clark said having an online store has helped bypass spatial limitations and appeal to those who are accustomed to shopping online. “I know I shop at 11 o’clock at night sometimes, but if I can do that shopping with a local store, to me that’s a no-brainer. So we try to accommodate both,” Clark said. “I would say the majority of what Toys “R” Us could get, we can get, too.” However, technology wasn’t always a benefit for small business. Alabama’s physical businesses struggled for years to compete with online retailers because the state had yet to develop a system of collecting taxes on internet purchases. However, that changed when the Simplified Sellers Use Tax Remittance Act (SSUT), or the “Amazon Bill,” took effect in 2016. Nancy King Dennis, director of public relations for the Alabama Retail Association (ARA), credited the passage of the SSUT as one of the reasons retail sales have been trending upward, adding that ARA has so far recorded steady increases throughout each month of 2018. The positive trend has led to an optimistic “holiday sales prediction” for the months of November and December. Overall, ARA ex-

pects a 4.5 percent increase in sales throughout the season. “Because of the Simplified Sellers Use Tax Alabama already had in place and the enforcement of the state’s economic nexus rule, which began Oct. 1, Alabama retailers should now be able to compete with all retailers on price and shopping experience,” Dennis wrote via email. “We expect Alabama retailers to see higher sales in part because of the progress made toward ending the unfair tax advantage out-of-state, online-only businesses had over local businesses.”

Community engagement

Other than the economic impact, Mosley said small businesses are able to give back to the local community in more acute ways because they are part of the community. He said smart business owners realize the benefits of getting involved and contributing to their communities. “Think about the amount of community support you see from someone like Palmer’s Toyota, Goodwill Easterseals or what Will Fusaiotti has done with Foosackly’s,” he said. “When you spend money in your local, small business, they put money back into the community because they understand that in order to be successful as a business, the community has to be healthy.” Since she opened Oak Ridge Gifts, Newman said she can’t think of many requests she’d deny, whether it’s donating items for charity raffles, helping send kids to church camp or raising money for local residents battling cancer. She says customers have indicated that type of support keeps them coming back to Oak Ridge, but while that’s good for Newman’s business, she said that’s not really the point. “Either way, we’ve done the right thing,” she said. Clark said the same is true at Big City Toys, which regularly donates to local toy drives and actually started a “tree drive” last year after a few Christmas trees were stolen outside of the storefront. Clark told Lagniappe “someone must have really needed those trees.” That type of community involvement is something the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce encourages businesses in Mobile to incorporate as they are able. Aside from having a positive impact in the community, Richards said it’s ultimately good for business as well. “People tend to buy from people they like and trust,” she added. “That’s how you get them to come back.” November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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ART ARTIFICE

Graphic artists put Mobile in the movies BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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rea graphic artists reimagined famous movie posters with an Azalea City focus for a contest renewed by the local chapter of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA). The results adorn the walls of Optera Creative (5 N. Jackson St.) through the end of November. Last year’s version focused on musical album cover art. While AIGA board members opted in on the fun, Events Coordinator Katie Vogtner said their submissions were ineligible for awards. She relayed the winners as follows: First prize was for “Bridge” by Amy Busbee, a takeoff on the poster for the film “Airplane.” It not only transmuted the original’s airplane fuselage with Mobile’s proposed Interstate 10 bridge, tied into a knot, but included the tagline “What’s slower to be built than a speeding bullet, and able to connect the Bayway in a single bound?” Of the runners-up, one was Amanda Pritchard’s “Won’t You Be My Neighbor,” taken from the Fred Rogers documentary by the same name. It kept all the elements as the original but supplanted Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s head atop Mister Rogers’ body as he dons a red cardigan. The other was Brendan A. Gibbs’ “Mardi Gras Encounter of the Third Kind,” from the obvious Steven Spielberg classic filmed in the Mobile Bay area in 1976. Gibbs gave us a twist, though. He discarded the original vision — a road leading from the viewer into a mysteriously glowing nighttime horizon — and employed elements of 1996’s “Independence Day.” A giant alien craft is parked over the Mobile skyline, its glowing shaft of energy showering the RSA Tower. The tagline? “A new guest is coming to Mobile this Mardi Gras.”

MTG auditions modern gospel retelling

go to mobiletheatreguild.org or visit their Facebook page.

MOJO salutes Chick Corea

Keyboardist and composer Chick Corea is one of jazz’s true heavyweights left in the game. Alongside Miles Davis in the late 1960s, he was elemental in the birth of jazz fusion, then furthered its reach with his own group, Return to Forever, in the 1970s. His works “Spain,” “500 Miles High,” “La Fiesta” and “Windows” have become standards. The Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed (MOJO) will salute Corea Nov 26, 6:30 p.m. at Gulf City Lodge (601 State St.). Musical interpretations of Corea’s music will be provided by

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From left: “Crichton Leprechaun” by Katie Vogtner, from “Leprechaun”; “Moonpie” by Paige Garland, from “Moonlight”; “Mobile” by Megan Cary, from “Metropolis”; “Mardi Gras Encounter of the Third Kind” by Brendan A. Gibbs, from “Close Encounters of the Third Kind”; “MAWSS” by Gin Mathers, from “Jaws.”

keyboardist Jack Zoesch, saxophonist Chuck Schwartz, trumpeter Larry Carter, bassist Sean Peterson and drummer Fred Domulot. The organization will also accept donations of nonperishable food and new, unwrapped toys for the Salvation Army. Entrance is $15, $12 for students/military and $10 for MOJO members. Fee includes a light jambalaya dinner. Cash bar is available. For more information, call 251-459-2298 or go to mojojazz.org.

Cirque Dreams at Civic Center

Broadway director Neil Goldberg founded Cirque Dreams by assembling a unique cast of cirque-style artists, singers, dancers and theatrical talent. Their “Holidaze” show features

more than 300 costumes, some of the world’s finest voices, original music and a magical selection of seasonal characters blending musical with acrobatic illusion. The Boston Globe defined it as “Las Vegas meets family entertainment meets musical theatre.” The traveling company will stage a pair of shows at the Mobile Civic Center (401 Civic Center Drive) on Friday, Nov. 23, at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $23 to $97 and may be purchased at the Mobile Civic Center box office or the Saenger Theatre box office (6 S. Joachim St.). They are also available online through Ticketmaster or at 800-745-3000. For more information, visit cirqueproductions.com.

ARTSGALLERY

Nearly 40 years ago, Tom Key and Russell Treyz envisioned a stage retelling of the New Testament’s core, based on the book “The Cotton Patch Version of Matthew and John” by Clarence Jordan. It sets the story in North Georgia, where Herod is the mayor of Atlanta and local thugs are aiming for Jesus. The mostly country score is buoyed with some of the last compositional work by late singer/songwriter Harry Chapin. Mobile Theatre Guild will stage “Cotton Patch Gospels” at the end of January and will hold auditions Nov. 27 and 28, 7 p.m., at their midtown theater (14 N. Lafayette St.). For more information, call 251-433-7513,

Artifice favorites begin with Vogtner’s own “Crichton Leprechaun,” modeled after the film “Leprechaun.” She went the extra route, supplanting cast and production crew names for such Mobilians as Tallulah Bankhead, Eugene Walter, Danny Lipford, Billy Bangs, Sidney Phillips, Richard Tyson, Winston Groom and Joseph Paul Franklin. Just as humorous was Gin Mathers’ “MAWSS,” pulled from Spieiberg’s “Jaws.” Its titular shark ascends toward a swimmer, a warning tag for sewage in its teeth. Between prey and predator is a manhole surging with rainwater overflow, a familiar sight during local deluges. Paige Garland’s “Moonpie” was another nice offering, inspired by the film “Moonlight.” The artist kept the original design scheme, changed the dominant palette to green, purple and gold and employed a captivating photo portrait. Like Vogtner, Garland altered production credits, using Carnival entities Joe Cain’s Merry Widows, marching bands and revelers. The most striking was perhaps AIGA member Megan Cary’s “Mobile,” inspired by Fritz Lang’s 1927 masterpiece “Metropolis.” It channels German Expressionist sensibilities into a local frame, where the Mobile skyline looms in gold-and-black contrast behind the Maschinenmensch. Cary also injected Mobile names into the credits, with Jimmy Buffett, Hank Aaron, Lonnie Johnson, Bob Grip, Mel Showers and Laverne Cox joining others. The only fault found was that the show wasn’t far, far larger. I’m already looking forward to next November’s rendition. For hours and viewing opportunities, call Optera at 251-287-0958.


November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Cardinal Copia celebrates Ghost’s black mass BAND: GHOST DATE: THURSDAY, NOV. 29, WITH DOORS AT 6 P.M. VENUE: SAENGER THEATRE, 6 S. JOACHIM ST., MOBILESAENGER.COM TICKETS: $27.50-$75, AVAILABLE THROUGH TICKETMASTER

F

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Photo | Mikael Eriksson

or decades, Sweden’s music scene as the “Andrew Lloyd Webber of rock,” Forge has has made its presence known created a visual and narrative concept for Ghost that globally through pop groups such obscures the band’s identity. Past live shows, music as ABBA, Ace of Base and Redvideos and short films have taken on the air of a nex. Other bands such Bathory, dramatic, tongue-in-cheek black mass with a band Amon Amarth and Entombed of masked musicians known as “Nameless Ghouls” gave the world a cold blast of backing the lead singer. dark metal from this Scandinavian country. Of all Historically, this unholy service has been fronted the music echoing from the Swedish shores, Ghost by one of the members of the infernal Emeritus could be considered one of the country’s most, papal line. The popelike Papa Emeritus III served ahem, enigmatic and unique musical groups. as Ghost’s lead singer from 2015-2017. Upon his This musical project from Tobias Forge will be departure, his “right-hand man” Cardinal Copia was making its debut in the Azalea City for a relatively chosen as his replacement on lead vocals. As far as intimate performance at the Saenger Theatre, expos- the retirement of the corpse-painted Papa Emeritus ing the audience to one of the most musically and III is concerned, Forge says he is always moving visually innovative bands on into the future of Ghost, but he the road today. According to also maintains a nostalgia for Forge, the overall Ghost expeprevious concepts. rience is what keeps this band “Especially a little at the in business and on the road. beginning of a tour cycle, “Ghost is proving that we there’s a little getting used to are willing to be a nonecoan aspect that I’m not super FOR DECADES, SWEnomic entertainment entity,” fond of,” Forge admitted. “I DEN’S MUSIC SCENE Forge said. “We’re not saving am a creature of habit more up the money for something than anything else. I like the HAS MADE ITS PRESelse. We’re putting it all into same old, same old. It’s a the show. That makes a lot of paradox. I want to keep going ENCE KNOWN GLOBALLY promoters interested in seeing further. When it comes time THROUGH POP GROUPS what we’re made of in terms for change, I’m also afraid of elevated spots.” of the change. I want to take SUCH AS ABBA, ACE OF Musically, Ghost has away the thing that I’m bored created a fascinating tradeof, but I’m a little bit reluctant BASE AND REDNEX. mark sound. With classical to do the new thing. It’s just arrangements and monstrous part of it.” metal running wild through Ghost will be performing each measure, first impressions might lead one to cuts from its newest album, “Prequelle.” For this classify Ghost’s sound as a form of Scandinavian release, Forge brought in British producer Tom black metal. However, Forge places Ghost’s sound Dalgety (Pixies, Royal Blood) to work with him in in its own dimension with a contrasting infusion of the studio. Forge first met Dalgety several years ago bright indie pop and sometimes disco. As strange as at a Ghost show in Bristol, England. At the time, it might sound, this infectious concoction has found Forge wanted to create an EP “in a specific time and a wide array of listeners of all musical tastes. But at home.” the group has also had its critics. “It was a two-week endeavor, and it was a good “I think that the reason why we’re roasted by time to try out how we work together,” Forge the underground is because our music is uplifting said. “It’s not a full-length album or a five-month and catchy,” Forge explained. “That will always endeavor. He came over, and we recorded just down be a good recipe. The songs have to be moving. I the street from where I lived. It worked really well. also think that the word has gotten around about the A week into it, we were like, ‘Wow, it would be reentertainment value of it.” ally great to make a whole record at some point.’” The value goes far beyond the music. Coined Forge and Dalgety worked together to create

Sweden’s Ghost brings Scandinavian metal to the Saenger. the arrangements for “Prequelle.” Forge says the musicians featured on Ghost’s albums have never been the same as those who have joined him on the road. Forge and Dalgety controlled the album’s instrumental tracks. When they chose not to lay down an instrumental track themselves, session musicians were brought into the studio to serve as the album’s “Nameless Ghouls.” As soon as their work was done, the session artist would be dismissed from the studio. He says he has found comfort, convenience and business logic by using this technique. “Making a record takes a lot of time and a lot of involvement from me,” Forge said. “Sometimes, it’s a little bit impractical to have someone in the room just sitting around with a computer just doing something else for a few months. That’s an additional mouth to feed. It’s very impractical. A lot of bands that are a little bit more of a core group have suffered through many a recording because of this. Since I don’t have to, I find it way more rewarding and way more creative to just work with a producer and bring in people who I have chosen myself to work with.” When Ghost unleashes “Prequelle” on the Azalea City, Forge’s unsuspecting audience will be treated to songs he pulled from such muses as Jim Morrison, H.P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, Morrissey and James Hetfield. In addition to such offbeat pop metal anthems as “Dance Macabre,” Ghost will pay homage to classic British metal with epic tracks including “Rats.” The crowd can also expect to be amazed with a dramatic live show that will turn the Saenger Theatre into a dark cult cathedral and leave the crowd wondering whether they should headbang ... or dance.


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Binge, then purge BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Red Sun Rising, Spirit Animal, Dubé, Love the Hate Date: Friday, Nov. 22, with doors at 7:30 p.m. Venue: Soul Kitchen, 219 Dauphin St., www.soulkitchenmobile.com Tickets: $16 in advance, $19 day of show; available through venue website, Mellow Mushroom (Mobile locations) or 1-866-777-8932

Photo | Facebook | Red Sun Rising

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hanksgiving marks the beginning of the Azalea City’s nearly four-month holiday season, and Soul Kitchen is marking the occasion with a lineup of explosive mainstream metal as Red Sun Rising returns to Mobile. This Ohio rock quintet will snare the crowd with sounds from the band’s latest release, “Thread.” “Thread” maintains the edgy rock sounds of the band’s debut, “Polyester Zeal.” However, the arrangements tend to exude an epic grandeur, which complements Mike Protich’s clean vocal work. Spirit Animal should be a well-received opener. This group is touring in release of its new album “Born Yesterday.” Spirit Animal’s audience can expect a catchy, unique mix of indie pop and mainstream rock. Dubé is bringing a rock style powered by grungy riffs and intricate vocal work. This group’s sound could almost be considered an edgy rock hybrid of Nirvana and Spoon. Dubé will bring its latest singles, “Stoned Love” and “Who Do You Work For,” to the Soul Kitchen stage. Love the Hate will represent Mobile in this rock mix. This group of local rockers has been promoting its album “Burn.” While the band skirts the edge of the mainstream, it injects its repertoire with equal doses of adrenaline and rage.

Take a load off Band: Albert Simpson Date: Thursday, Nov. 22, 9 p.m. Venue: The Brickyard, 266 Dauphin St., 251-219-6488 Tickets: Call for more info Azalea City denizens will be welcoming friends and family to their Thanksgiving tables, but by the end of the day many may be awaiting their guests’ departure. After the leftovers are put away and the tryptophan starts to circulate, The Brickyard invites one and all to relax with Albert Simpson. This Gadsden-based singer-songwriter and Highly Kind alumnus is a regular visitor to the Gulf Coast. He’s used his mix of originals and crowd favorites to gather a following across the Southeast and beyond. Simpson will be serving up smooth, tasty jams from his catalog, including his latest, “Roll Your Mind.” Simpson’s jams lie on a bed of warm acoustic fretwork, using instrumental arrangements to embrace postive lyrics.

Slack Friday

Band: Ronnie Presley Date: Friday, Nov. 23, 5 p.m. Venue: Lucy Buffett’s LuLu’s, 200 E. 25th Ave. (Gulf Shores), lulubuffett.com Tickets: Free

Just as Thanksgiving 2018 is fading to memory, the retail hell known as Black Friday will descend. Those braving the crowds at the Baldwin County outlet stores can escape the madness in the early evening as Lucy Buffett invites one and all to LuLu’s to enjoy tropical libations and the stressfree sounds of singer-songwriter Ronnie Presley. Presley infuses his songs with a career and life experience that has taken him across the nation and planted him on the Gulf Coast, where he’s been performing cuts from his album “Heaven on Earth.” This album is filled will country sounds that can shift from bold to heartfelt. Presley weaves tenor vocals through classic country harmonies throughout.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | November 21 - November 27 Please send upcoming music to listings@ lagniappemobile.com by MONDAY before Wednesday’s paper.

Lincoln, 10p Dauphin Street Blues Co— Disciples of the Crow Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Flora-Bama— J Hawkins Duo, 1p / Elaine Petty, 2p / The “Big Earl” show featuring Jack WED. NOV 21 Robertson, 5:30p / Scott Koehn and Electric Dawg, 6p / Yeah, Blind Mule— Matt Neese Probably, 10p / Justin Jeansonne Boudreaux’s Cajun Duo, 10:15p Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Hard Rock (Center Bar) Brickyard— Mobile’s Dead — Perkins Road, 9p Callaghan’s— Phil & Foster IP Casino (Studio A) — Cockeyed Charlie’s— Love Vince Neil of Motley Crue The Hate & Lunatype, 9p IP Casino (Chill Ultra) — Felix’s— Matt Bush Duo Fortag Flora-Bama— Neil Dover, LuLu’s— Ronnie Presley, 5p 2p / Rhonda Hart Duo, 6p / Manci’s— Red Clay Strays Mario Mena, 8p / Bruce Smelley Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) Duo, 10:15p — Ricky Crook and the IP Casino (Chill Ultra) — Horseshoe Halo Band, 8p The Redfield Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — LuLu’s— Adam Holt, 5p Jimmy Lee Hannaford and Jose Santiago, 6:30p THURS. NOV 22 Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Ashley Feller, 6:30p Blues Tavern— Marcus & Original Oyster House — Ebony Brittany Grimes Brickyard— Albert Simpson Soul Kitchen— Red Rising Dauphins— Mark Pipas, 5p Sun, 7:30p Flora-Bama— Rebecca Wind Creek Casino — Berry Duo, 1p / Brittany Michael Stacey Band, 5:30p Grimes, 2p / Dueling Pianos, Wind Creek Casino 5:30p / Not The Real Band, But (Center Bar) — The Tommy The Real Deal (Mark Sherrill), Morse Band, 8p 6p / Tyler Mac Band, 10p / Justin Jeansonne Duo, 10:15p SAT. NOV 24 IP Casino (Chill Ultra) — Philo Blue Water BBQ— Three Manci’s— Delta Smoke Bean Soup, 7p Bluegill— Jamie Adamson, FRI. NOV 23 12p / Matt Neese Duo, 6p Blues Tavern— Doobious Beau Rivage— Martina Brickyard— Ryan Dyer Band McBride, 8p Dauphins— Mark Pipas, 5p Big Beach Brewing— Light Felix’s— Swamp Hippies Travelers, 6:30p Flora-Bama— Lauren Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12p / Murphy and the Psychedelics, Suckerpunch, 6p 1p / J Hawkins Duo, 2p / The Blues Tavern— Big Al & “Big Earl” show featuring Jack The Heavy Weights Robertson, 5:30p / Al and Bonefish— Lee Yankie Cathy, 6p / Red Clay Strays, 10p Boudreaux’s Cajun / Bruce Smelley Duo, 10:15p Grill— Delta Smoke, 6p Hard Rock (Center Bar) Brickyard— Jimmy Lumpkin — Perkins Road, 9p and The Revival IP Casino (Chill Ultra) — Cockeyed Charlie’s— Fat Fortag

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IP Casino (Studio A)— Jamey Johnson, 8p LuLu’s— Request Line, 5p Top of the Bay— Sunny Vaiden, 10p Wind Creek Casino (Center Bar) — The Tommy Morse Band, 8p

SUN. NOV 25 Big Beach Brewing— The Bitter End Band, 3p Bluegill— Matt Bush, 12p / Dale Drinkard & Friends, 6p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Blind Dog Mike, 6p Brickyard— Delta Smoke Callaghan’s— The Rotten Cores Dauphins— Roland Cobbs, 11a Felix’s— Leonard Houstin Flora-Bama— Songs of Rusty, 1:30p / Perdido Brothers, 6p / Mel Knapp, 8p / Albert Simpson, 10:15p IP Casino (Chill Ultra) — Ty Taylor

MON. NOV 26 Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora-Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 2p / Open Mic w/ Cathy Pace, 6p / Bruce Smelley, 8p / Petty and Pace, 10:150p LuLu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUES. NOV 27 Bluegill— Ty Taylor & Gram Rae Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— Phil & Foster Felix’s— Lee Yankie Flora-Bama— Neil Dover, 2p / Rhonda Hart Duo, 6p / Tim Roberts, 8p / Albert Simpson & John Kulinich, 10:15p Original Oyster House — Stephen Sylvester


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FILMTHE REEL WORLD Giving thanks for what films provide in trying times

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BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Road South Mobile, AL (251)639-1748 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin St Mobile, AL (251) 438-2005 REGAL MOBILE STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Drive Mobile, AL (844) 462-7342 AMC JUBILEE Square 12 6898 Highway 90 Daphne, AL (251) 626-5766

ince there are few Thanksgiving-themed movies to discuss, I’ve been thinking about what entertainments or entertainers I am thankful for. Sometimes movies can seem too trite a topic to consider in trying times, but on the other hand, the diversion they provide, or the emotional succor they deliver, or the engagement they give us are worth giving thanks for. Here are some of the movies and people for which I’m thankful. They may not be family (although that would be cool), but they have a place in our lives. Director and actor Taika Waititi — this dude is a delight. He gave us “Thor: Ragnarok,” and for that I am grateful, but please dig into his earlier films, specifically “Hunt for the Wilderpeople” (2016), an adorable and extremely heartwarming coming-of-age adventure. Waititi himself is a funny actor and just seems generally adorable. At my house we watch the “Thor” outtakes because we like his face and we like his shirts. We’re also thankful for the time and effort that go into Laika films, and I think we’ve put in almost as many hours watching them as the puppeteers put into making them. “Coraline” has inspired countless drawings in my house and “Kubo and the Two Strings” makes us want to do origami and also cry, sometimes at the same time. (Origami can be frustrating!) They’re such beautifully made, deeply felt works of art,

and we do some hardcore appreciating at my house. My children’s love of Jeff Goldblum was launched with the aforementioned “Thor: Ragnarok,” in which he sports a killer smoky eye and a variety of lame ensembles as The Grandmaster, but their appreciation is more far-reaching every day, which is as it should be, and now he pops up in all sorts of commercials. And of course they realize the guy from “Jurassic Park” is also The Grandmaster and he’s also a jazz musician now. Goldblum is a gift to humanity, and I assume we’re all grateful for him, his weird attractiveness and his inexplicably paced line readings. When I said there weren’t any Thanksgiving movies, I forgot the Charlie Brown Thanksgiving specials. They bear a moment’s discussion, because you don’t watch a Peanuts special expecting characters to die or vomit, but in this one, they do. Oh sure, there’s the normal Thanksgiving special where Peppermint Patty invites herself over to Chuck’s house for lunch and he ends up serving popcorn and jellybeans. But our DVD includes the educational “Charlie Brown: The Mayflower Voyagers,” which covers the Pilgrims’ arduous journey over here, with the Peanuts gang and longsuffering Pilgrim kids. They don’t gloss over the loss of life, and feature ailing cartoon people lying in bed dying, throwing up from seasickness and eventually having Thanksgiving dinner. Although his personal life is problem-

atic, the early films of Woody Allen soothe me, and while you hear more about “Annie Hall,” he actually gave us one of our few Thanksgiving flicks with “Hannah and Her Sisters” (1987), which is bookended by Thanksgiving dinners attended by the titular family members. Hannah (Mia Farrow) is a successful actress, devoted mother and enviably well-adjusted, productive woman; those sisters of hers, much less so. Dianne Wiest rightfully won a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award as Holly, a flighty failing actress who can’t find her place in the world. Carrie Fisher shows up as her frenemy and cofounder of their doomed “Stanislavski Catering Company” and Barbara Hershey gets wooed by both Max von Sydow and Michael Caine at the same time, a claim few can probably make. Allen tempers his usual peevishness with more depth and sweetness than his films usually have, and I have read in an interview that he, of course, regrets giving this film the happy ending that actually makes it one of his best films. I don’t think it’s a stretch to feel grateful for an experience that gives us pleasure, mental relief or an emotional journey. If you feel grateful for “Star Wars” or “Marvel,” “Downton Abbey” or “Disney,” “Game of Thrones” or “Rick and Morty” or “Sesame Street,” well, I’m right there with you. I’m thankful for the creativity and community of fantasy and fandoms and films.

NEXUS CINEMA DINING 7070 Bruns Dr. Mobile, AL (251) 776-6570 AMC CLASSIC WHARF 23151 Wharf Lane Orange Beach, AL (251) 981-4444 COBB PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 923-0785 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 State Hwy 181 Spanish Fort, AL (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

Photos | Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. / Universal Pictures

From left: Woody Allen’s Thanksgiving-centric “Hannah and Her Sisters” offers more depth and sweetness than his films usually have, making it one of his best. In “Green Book,” a working-class ItalianAmerican bouncer (Viggo Mortensen) becomes the driver for an African-American classical pianist (Mahershala Ali) on a tour of venues through the 1960s American South. NEW THIS WEEK GREEN BOOK

Dr. Don Shirley is a world-class African-American pianist who’s about to embark on a concert tour in the Deep South in 1962. In need of a driver and protection, Shirley recruits Tony Lip, a tough-talking bouncer from an Italian-American neighborhood in the Bronx. Despite their differences, the two men soon develop an unexpected bond while confronting racism and danger in an era of segregation. Crescent Theater, Regal Mobile Stadium 18

ROBIN HOOD

This is first I’ve heard of this movie; it apparently stars Jamie Foxx. All listed multiplex theaters.

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CREED II

Michael B. Jordan and Sylvester Stallone star in this boxing drama that pits the offspring of the stars of the original against each other. All listed multiplex theaters.

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET

The much anticipated follow-up to the original animated romp through video games. All listed multiplex theaters.

A PRIVATE WAR

Rosamund Pike stars as war correspondent Marie Colvin, a woman who is as comfortable downing martinis with high society’s elite as she is brazenly staring down warlords and fleeing from gunfire. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING

INSTANT FAMILY All listed multiplex theaters. FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF GRINDELWALD All listed multiplex theaters. WIDOWS Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Classic Wharf DR. SEUSS’ THE GRINCH All listed multiplex theaters. OVERLORD All listed multiplex theaters. THE GIRL IN THE SPIDER’S WEB All listed multiplex theaters. THE NUTCRACKER AND THE FOUR REALMS

All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining. NOBODY’S FOOL Regal Mobile Stadium 18 BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY Crescent Theater, Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16, AMC Classic Jubilee Square 12 HUNTER KILLER All listed multiplex theaters. THE HATE U GIVE All listed multiplex theaters. FIRST MAN All listed multiplex theaters. A STAR IS BORN All listed multiplex theaters. VENOM All listed multiplex theaters. NIGHT SCHOOL All listed multiplex theaters.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS NOVEMBER 21, 2018 - NOVEMBER 27, 2018

GENERAL INTEREST Thanksgiving Pow Wow Poarch Creek Indian Reservation in Atmore will hold its 48th annual Pow Wow Nov. 22-23. Gates open at 10 a.m. both days; $5 for ages 11 and up, free for ages 10 and under. Bring chairs and blankets. Cash only. Visit pci-nsn.gov. Thanksgiving at Wings of Life Wings of Life Recovery offers Thanksgiving Day lunch Thursday, Nov, 22, beginning at 9:30 a.m. with a movie, followed by a special program at 11 a.m. Free blankets and other gifts will be distributed at noon. Contact Richard Jones, 251-432-5245. Rock, Gem & Jewelry Show Mobile Rock & Gem Society’s 24th annual show. Friday, Nov. 23, 1-6 p.m. at the Abba Shrine (7701 Hitt Road). Visit mobilerockandgem.com. Magic Christmas in Lights Bellingrath Gardens and Home presents the 23rd season of Magic Christmas in Lights. Opening night is Friday, Nov. 23, continuing nightly 5-9 p.m. through Dec. 31. Visit bellingrath.org. Wales West Arctic Express Starting Friday, Nov. 23, through Dec. 24, take a steam train ride to the North Pole and visit Santa Claus. Petting zoo, pony rides, miniature train rides, a hayless hayride, bounce house and fun

artificial snow. Visit waleswestlightrailway. heartlandticket.com.

Free, but registration is required. Visit bryanstevensonmobile.eventbrite.com.

Breakfast with Santa The Grand Hotel will host Breakfast with Santa Nov. 24 and Dec. 1, 8 and 15. Breakfast buffet 7-10:30 a.m., pictures with Santa 8-11 a.m. Reservations required, call 251-928-9201.

FUNDRAISERS

Steampunk Sunday Join the crew of Airship Aberrant for themed board games, discussions and talk about steampunk. Sunday, Nov. 25, noon at Serda Brewing Co. Free, visitors welcome. Military Mondays Active-duty military and their families will receive a 15 percent discount each Monday of the Magic Christmas in Lights season at Bellingrath on Mondays, Nov. 26 and Dec. 3, 10, 17 and 24. Visit bellingrath. org. Winter at The Wharf Ice skating at The Wharf Nov. 16 to Jan. 13, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily; $10 for skating, $13 for skating and Ferris wheel. Horse and carriage rides Nov. 25 and 30, Dec. 2, 8, 9, 14-16, 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. Admission $20 per carriage ride. Visit ALWharf.com for details. A night with Bryan Stevenson Hear insights from Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative and author of “Just Mercy” Wed. Nov. 28, 5-9 p.m. at the USA Mitchell Center.

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The 2018 BIG Event Big Brothers Big Sisters of South Alabama’s 2018 BIG Event will feature John O’Leary on Tuesday, Nov. 27, at The Battle House Hotel. Cash bar at 6 p.m. Dinner and the program begin at 6:30 p.m. Buy tickets at give.classy.org/ BIGEvent2018. Habitat Giving Tuesday Mellow Mushroom on Airport Boulevard in Mobile is partnering with Habitat for Humanity on “Giving Tuesday” Nov. 27, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. for a day of giving back. Mellow Mushroom will donate 10 percent of its proceeds to Habitat for Humanity SW Alabama. Be sure to tell them when ordering that you are there for Habitat. “Trees for Hope” Second annual event at Dauphin Way Baptist Tuesday, Nov. 27, at 6 p.m. Bid on wonderfully decorated Christmas trees and wreaths and support families in the care of Alabama Baptist Children’s Homes & Family Ministries. Find us on Facebook @ treesforhope. Hargrove Foundation Gala The Hargrove Foundation will host its fourth gala Thursday, Nov. 29, at the Renaissance Battle House Hotel in downtown Mobile. Keynote address will be given by Frank Abagnale, a leading

authorities on anti-fraud and security practices. The event will raise funds to support the Hargrove Adaptive Toy (HAT) Project, an initiative focusing on retrofitting toy vehicles according to the specific needs of mobility-challenged children. Visit hargovefoundation.org for more information.

ARTS Cirque Dreams “Holidaze” Mobile Civic Center Theater, Friday, Nov. 23. Shows at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets available at Mobile Civic Center Box Office, 800-745-3000 or Ticketmaster. Bread and Puppet Theater “Grasshopper Rebellion Circus” will be performed Sunday, Nov. 25, 6-7 p.m. at the Alabama Contemporary Art Center (301 Conti St.). Join us for a raucous and colorful, funny and poignant show featuring papier-maché puppets driven by a hot brass band. Please note this performance deals with controversial material. Visit breadandpuppet.org for more information. “85 South” Improvs and freestyles by some of the fastest-rising comedic talent in the South. Sunday, Nov. 25, 7 p.m. at Saenger Theatre. For tickets visit mobilesaenger.com.

MUSEUMS “Our Beloved Women” The Marx Library at the University of South Alabama will host “Our Beloved


Women: Matriarchs of the Poarch Creek” through December. “Animation Academy” at the Exploreum Learn about the history of animated drawings, from prefilm animation devices to today’s computer-generated animation, and try your hand at drawing characters. Through Jan. 6. Call 251-208-6893 or visit exploreum.com. “Mystery of the Mayan Medallion” Secrets of an ancient world await at the History Museum of Mobile, through Dec. 30. Visit historymuseumofmobile.com. “Everest” at Exploreum Celebrate the Exploreum’s 20th anniversary with “Everest.” An international team of climbers ascends Mount Everest in spring 1996. The film depicts the lengthy preparations for the climb, the trek to the summit and the successful return to base camp. Visit exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all Mobile County residents. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Turkey Trot for Hope Hosted by Camp Rap-A-Hope Thursday, Nov. 22, 8-10 a.m. in Spanish Plaza, 401 Government St. Tickets available at raceroster.com.

“Free” yoga all day Sterling Hot Yoga will offer free yoga classes all day Black Friday, Nov. 23. Find us on Facebook @SterlingHotYogaWellness for a schedule of classes. 2018 Run the Beach Last run of the series on Saturday, Nov. 24, at the Orange Beach Sportsplex (4385 William Silvers Parkway). Packet pickup is Friday, Nov. 23, at the Orange Beach Event Center at The Wharf. To register visit TeamMagic.com/Events/122. Adult skate night Sunday, Nov. 25, 8-10:30 p.m. at Dreamland Skate Center (5672 Three Notch Road) with DJ Beaux, $5. Every 2nd and 4th Sunday each month.

Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale, baldwincountyal.gov. Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, baldwincountyal.gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., cityofbayoulabatre.com. Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450.

at 4:30 p.m., cofairhope.com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Visit cofairhope.com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m.; cityoffoley. org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., gulfshoresal.gov.

Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973.

Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting at 9 a.m.; council meeting at 10:30 a.m., cityofmobile.org.

Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142.

Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St., urban.cityofmobile.org.

Medicare open enrollment seminars The Mobile Parks and Recreation Department has partnered with the Area Agency on Aging/SHIP to offer a free seminar Friday, Nov. 30, 10 a.m. to noon, at Stott Park Community Center (2150 Demetropolis Road) to better understand Medicare choices.

Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., daphneal.com.

Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd., cityoforangebeach.com.

PUBLIC MEETINGS

Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday, townofelberta.com.

WORKSHOPS

Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite

Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., townofdauphinisland.org.

Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions held before each council meeting

Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., thecityofprichard.org. Satsuma City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 6 p.m. City Hall, 5464 Old Highway 43, 251-675-1440. Semmes City Council: First and third Tuesday. Work sessions at 3 p.m., regular council meeting at 4 p.m. Semmes City Council Chambers, 7875 Moffett Road Unit #C, 251-649-8811.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ESCAPE ROOM BY ERIC BERLIN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

THIS CROSSWORD REPRESENTS AN ESCAPE ROOM, WITH FOUR ARTICLES YOU’LL NEED HIDDEN INSIDE. AFTER YOU COMPLETE THE GRID, FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS AT 41-, 70- AND 99-ACROSS TO FIND WHAT TO DO NEXT. WORKING CORRECTLY WILL LEAD YOU TO A FOUR-WORD PHRASE WITH A TOTAL OF 12 LETTERS. ACROSS 1 Shakespearean father of three 5 “I agree!” 9 Enjoys the sun 14 Pants material 19 Approximately 20 Sycophant 21 Earth tone 22 Movie with a shootout at high noon, maybe 23 ____ Major 24 Band bookings 25 Outside the city 26 Any member of Abba 27 Automotive debut of 1957 29 Some univ. hirees 31 Turkish inn 33 Horror writer Peter 35 Stole, in slang 37 Cold treat 41 What’s needed in order to escape this crossword 44 Sandwich loaf 45 Pitcher Hershiser 46 Declares to be true 47 Indie rocker with the 2009 N0. 3 album “Middle Cyclone” 50 Not doing well 52 A snap 53 ____ jure (law phrase) 55 Tobacconist ____ Sherman 56 Virtuous ones 58 N.Y.C. subway org. 59 Words of denial 63 Round fig. 66 A little, musically 67 Charcuterie stock 69 Lycées, e.g. 70 What to do with the items referenced in 41-Across 74 Natural-light display 75 Move smoothly to the next thing 76 Great ____ 77 Billy ____ Williams 78 Like Russia prior to 1917 80 One of a couple 81 Neon and others 83 Apollo, to Zeus 84 Offshore 86 Possesses, to the Bard 87 Kind of battery 91 Final desperate effort 94 Tickle the ____ 97 Prefix on some first-aid products 98 “____ had it!” 99 After following the instructions at 70-Across, how to escape this puzzle 102 Not as much 105 Ratings pioneer 106 Edmonton athletes

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107 “Fine with me” 109 German name component, often 110 Uncool one 111 Unconventional 114 James of the West 116 “Just foolin’ ” 118 Algerian port 121 Get together 122 “Give it ____!” 123 Verdi soprano 124 Grp. founded by 12 countries 125 Luau, basically 126 Brothers’ name in R.&B. 127 Symbol of fire prevention 128 Vehicle that requires no fuel

16 Citizen of: Suffix 17 Actor Beatty 18 It’s mined, all mined! 28 Common middle name for girls 30 Constantly fidgeting, say 32 Game with 42 territory cards 33 Slovenly type 34 Prefix with byte 35 “Famous ____” (slogan on Idaho license plates) 36 Pause 38 Went on and on 39 Yiddish cries 40 Second of April? 42 Wretched smell 43 “Hey! That hurts!” 48 Kind of Hollywood romance 49 Literary scholars debate DOWN what’s in it 1 Name one can “skip to” 51 Getting to the point? 2 Goof 54 Solution to a maze 3 Confidently said 57 Specks 4 Pre-GPS staple 58 They might drop down 5 Subject with variables 6 Daily ____ (British paper) 60 Almost forever 7 Part of some physicals: Abbr. 61 Nothing more than 8 Attribute of many political ads 62 Latin 101 word 63 Petty disagreement 9 Soup with a red color 64 Also 10 Prefix with pressure 11 React with fear or delight 65 Beleaguers 12 Ralph and Alice, on old TV 67 Horrible headache 68 Anesthesiologist’s concern 13 Actress Ward 71 “The Bridge at Narni” painter 14 Trig function 72 Internet sensation 15 Native Iowan

73 Nut whose name sounds like a sneeze 79 Shock, in a way 81 Flowering evergreen shrubs 82 Bucks 85 Administrants of corporal punishment 86 “Can you explain that further?” 88 Requiring intellect 89 It might end in a ZIP code: Abbr. 90 Ph.D. requirement: Abbr. 91 Tiny “tiny” 92 Forum greeting 93 Former Yankee nickname 95 Soft and smooth 96 Happy wintertime news for schoolkids 100 Semi fuel 101 Golfer Michelle 103 Kinds 104 “Awesome!” 108 California city north of Ventura 110 Mythical queen of Carthage 111 Your and my 112 It has a big deck 113 Aunt: Sp. 115 Toledo-to-Columbus dir. 117 A Kardashian 119 Dined 120 Silent approval

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November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Magnolia Grove to host Gulf South Conference event BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

Hoping to compete for the golf title will be the Spring Hill College women’s team. The men’s team will battle for honors in the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, which does not sponsor women’s golf.

Baldwin County course honored

Kiva Dunes Golf Course opened on the Fort Morgan peninsula in 1995. U.S. Open champion and University of Alabama golfer Jerry Pate designed the original course, which was upgraded in 2015 to add Bermuda TifEagle grass for the greens. The course has hosted many of the state’s premier events along with two PGA Tour qualifiers. In 2017, the 7,100-yard-long course was cited as one of the Top 100 Golf Resorts by Golf Week magazine. The honors have continued in 2018, as Golf Advisor has rated it the state’s top public course. The recognition from Golf Advisor takes into consideration everything from architecture to course layout to staff friendliness. The rankings came from more than 150,000 reviews by private and professional golfers. One reviewer on Golf Advisor said, “Kiva is a hidden gem … you could play there every day and it never gets old!”

Sports briefs

Photo | Submitted

The Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Magnolia Grove will host the men and women’s golf championship of the Gulf South Conference in 2019.

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he Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Magnolia Grove has been selected to host the men and women’s golf championship of the Gulf South Conference (GSC) next year. The 54-hole event, which is being presented by the Mobile Sports Authority, will be played April 14-16. Magnolia Grove will be hosting the GSC championships for the first time in conference history. The league also plans to utilize player-inputted hole-by-hole scoring to improve the spectator experience. “We are so pleased to partner with Magnolia Grove and the Mobile Sports Authority to provide our studentathletes with a first-class site for the GSC Championship,” league Commissioner Matt Wilson said. The facility, located in West Mobile off Moffett Road, is part of a massive system operated by Retirement Systems of Alabama. Started in the 1980s, the trail now includes 468 holes at 26 courses located in 11 sites. Readers of Golf World Magazine have named Magnolia Grove one of the “Top 50 Public Courses.” The Crossings and Falls courses are also listed in Golf Digest’s “Places to Play” as two of the nation’s great value courses and as “America’s Top 50 Affordable Courses.” “Alabama’s Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail and Magnolia Grove are excited to host the 2019 Men and Women’s Golf Championships,” said Paul Martino, director of golf at Magnolia Grove. “The Crossings and Falls courses

will be a great test of golf for these great young players and a great setting for their championship.” Local golf fans are familiar with the Crossings course, which has hosted LPGA Tour events and is known for it open parkland setting. During recent makeovers, several water features and crushed oyster shell waste areas have been added. The renovated Falls course reopened in 2010. It is the only par-71 course on the trail. The course is characterized by large, contoured Mini Verde greens — which have a deep root system that stands up well in dry conditions and grows quickly — and massive cloverleaf bunkers. The Mobile Sports Authority is a nonprofit formed in 2008 by Mobile’s County Commission. The authority’s main objective is to create a positive economic and public relations impact for Mobile County, the city of Mobile and the region through recruiting, hosting, managing and supporting sporting events that attract visitors. “The Mobile Sports Authority is very excited to be hosting for the first time in Mobile the 2019 Gulf South Conference Men and Women’s Golf Championships at Magnolia Grove Golf Club,” said Danny Corte, executive director of the Mobile Sports Authority. “We want to thank the GSC for giving us the opportunity to host one of their prestigious events and we look forward to seeing all the student-athletes, families and fans in Mobile this spring.” The GSC is a charter NCAA Division II member.

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• Jon Campbell, the women’s volleyball coach at the University of Mobile, hit a milestone this season by claiming his 500th career victory. Campbell took over the Rams in 2005 following stops at Cumberland College and North Greenville College. A six-time conference coach of the year, he has directed the Rams to six NAIA National Tournaments. This year’s squad finished 2313, giving him an all-time record of 503-223. A tribute written by Amber Campbell, his wife and assistant coach, can be found at umobilerams.com/sport/volleyball. • University of South Alabama (USA) sophomore cross country runners Andonet Cheruiyot and Warno Potgieter earned all-league honors at the Sun Belt Conference Championships held at the Brookley Field Golf Course. Cheruiyot finished less than four seconds behind Texas State’s Leslie Romero with a time of 17:26.36 to place second and pick up first-team all-SBC in the

MAGNOLIA GROVE WILL BE HOSTING THE GSC CHAMPIONSHIPS FOR THE FIRST TIME IN CONFERENCE HISTORY. THE LEAGUE ALSO PLANS TO UTILIZE PLAYER-INPUTTED HOLE-BY-HOLE SCORING TO IMPROVE THE SPECTATOR EXPERIENCE.” women’s 5K race. Potgieter placed sixth and earned second-team honors in the men’s 8K course with a time of 25:06.13. • USA’s Brenna McPartlan was voted SBC Women’s Soccer Freshman of the Year. McPartlan and senior Hannah Godfrey were named to the first-team all-SBC unit, while sophomore Anita Ágústsdóttir earned second-team recognition. McPartlan paced the Jaguars in goals, assists and points as well as shots and shots on goal. Godfrey led a defense that compiled six shutouts and posted a goals-against average in league games of 0.57, second best in the conference. Ágústsdóttir played the third-most minutes among USA outfield players. • Following the SBC women’s soccer playoffs, USA junior Briana Morris was voted to the all-tournament team. She recorded a goal and three assists in two games as the Jaguars reached the semifinals before falling in a shootout to top-seeded Texas State. Morris finished the season with three goals (tied for third on the team) and nine points (second).


SPORTS FROM BEHIND THE MIC

Where does Auburn’s roster stack up with No. 1 Alabama? BY RANDY KENNEDY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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ack in September a friend of mine, who happens to be an Auburn graduate and fan, asked if I thought there were any players in the SEC not playing for Alabama who could start for the Tide. In other words, would Alabama be improved by a onefor-one trade for any other player at the same position? At the time I thought the question was absurd, particularly coming from an Auburn fan whose team was ranked in the Top 10 in the country and coming off a convincing win in the 2017 Iron Bowl. I still adamantly believe there are players around the league who could make Alabama better. I would start with LSU defensive backs Greedy Williams and Grant Delpit. I’d also include just about any punter or placekicker in the league, including the specialists at Auburn. But just a few days away from the 2018 Iron Bowl I began thinking about that preseason discussion. How many players on Auburn’s offense or defense would start on Alabama’s undefeated and top-ranked team? The answer is zero. Despite the difference in how the season has gone for Alabama (perfect) and Auburn (largely disappointing), that answer is still shocking to consider. Alabama has recruited at an incredible level but Auburn has also consistently brought in highly rated classes. None of those recruits has developed to the point of being a starter-level player for their rivals. Let’s take a look at some of the best Auburn players and where they would fit in on the country’s best roster.

Nick Coe, Marlon Davidson, Derrick Brown and Dontavius Russell are all quality defensive linemen who have a chance to play for years in the NFL. But none is remotely on the level of Quinnen Williams, who is on his way to being named SEC Defensive Player of the Year and will receive consideration on my Heisman Trophy ballot. Raekwon Davis and Isaiah Buggs have also performed at a slightly higher level than those Auburn stars. Linebacker Deshaun Davis is the most popular player on the Auburn roster because of his hustling play, his intelligence and reliable tackling. But athletically he’s a step behind Alabama’s Dylan Moses and Mack Wilson. Auburn’s best cornerback, Javaris Davis, is just a notch behind Alabama’s second-best cornerback, Saivion Smith. And that’s where the discussion ends. No Auburn offensive player would crack the playing rotation at Alabama, and that includes record-setting wide receiver Ryan Davis. It’s hard to imagine how the discrepancy got to this point. It’s not enough to simply say Nick Saban has built a dynasty in Tuscaloosa. Less than a year ago Auburn beat Alabama 26-14. That marked the first time since 1969 that Auburn had beaten Alabama by more than 10 points — and the game wasn’t even that close. So how do we explain what has happened since? Alabama certainly lost more great players to graduation and to the NFL than Auburn since last year. Yet, since last year’s Iron Bowl, Alabama is 13-0, in-

cluding a national semifinal win and a national championship victory. Auburn is 7-6 over the same span. It’s not lost on Auburn fans that the 7-6 record corresponds to when coach Gus Malzahn was handed a $49 million contract, 75 percent of which is guaranteed even if he is fired. That brings us to Saturday’s game at Bryant-Denny Stadium. No matter what happens in the game, Alabama is still headed to the SEC Championship Game, where a win would lock up a spot in the College Football Playoff. One of the unintended and unfortunate consequences of the fourteam playoff is that it can render a huge game like the Iron Bowl irrelevant in the national championship race.

BACK IN SEPTEMBER A FRIEND OF MINE, WHO HAPPENS TO BE AN AUBURN GRADUATE AND FAN, ASKED IF I THOUGHT THERE WERE ANY PLAYERS IN THE SEC NOT PLAYING FOR ALABAMA WHO COULD START FOR THE TIDE. IN OTHER WORDS, WOULD ALABAMA BE IMPROVED BY A ONE-FOR-ONE TRADE FOR ANY OTHER PLAYER AT THE SAME POSITION?” Also, no matter what happens, Auburn is headed to a second-tier bowl and a season that fans will forever consider a disappointment and a missed opportunity. Auburn’s hopes of pulling the upset rely on the following: win the turnover battle; trust quarterback Jarrett Stidham to be the future NFL draft choice NFL scouts insist he is; count on the health of the Alabama quarterbacks to be a factor in the game; and win with special teams in the fourth quarter. All those things seem unlikely against an Alabama team that is on a collision course with a perfect season. But as we saw just one year ago, Auburn has proven to be one of the few teams that can at least temporarily derail the Alabama dynasty. Randy Kennedy writes a weekly column for Lagniappe and is co-host of “Sports Drive” every weekday from 3-6 p.m. on WNSP 105.5 FM, the country’s first all-sports FM station.

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STYLE HOROSCOPES

Gobble gobble Scorpio (10/23-11/21) — Taking the state road far less traveled, you’re advised to ignore the Iron Bowl this weekend and read a biography on Huey Long. Your lucky Thanksgiving side dish is sausage rice. Sagittarius (11/22-12/21) ­­— Stand in solidarity with Florida Street businesses and hold a protest at the corner of Old Shell Road and McGregor Avenue. Your lucky Thanksgiving side dish is creamed corn. Capricorn (12/22-1/19) — In case you were spiritually conflicted, it’s OK to attend the Ghost concert at the Saenger Theatre as long as you hide it from your mom and confess it to your priest. Your lucky Thanksgiving dessert is cheesecake. Aquarius (1/20-2/18) — Taking a cue from the mayor, you incentivize public works employees to pick up your trash on time by leaving an envelope full of scratch-off tickets on your garbage can. Your lucky Thanksgiving side dish is green bean casserole. Pisces (2/19-3/20) — In an attempt to curb political speech at your family Thanksgiving dinner, you require all your guests to wear shock collars. Your lucky Thanksgiving dessert is chocolate pudding. Aries (3/21- 4/19) — You’ll swear off big-box stores this year in support of Small Business Saturday. It won’t be yours, but at least that new $1,200 46-inch TV sent someone’s kid to college. Your lucky Thanksgiving side dish is cornbread. Taurus (4/20-5/20) — Inspired by the local chapter of the American Institute of Graphic Arts, you’ll create a movie poster for Mobile called “Suck,” based on the 2001 movie “Blow.” Your lucky Thanksgiving side dish is stuffing. Gemini (5/21-6/21) — Disappointed that Jeff Sessions never got to build the wall, you will happily erect a 12-foot chain-link fence with razor wire around his West Mobile house free of charge. Your lucky Thanksgiving side dish is cranberry sauce. Cancer (6/22-7/22) — You’ll combine all your Thanksgiving leftovers into a single breakfast bowl. The only thing missing is ranch dressing. Your lucky Thanksgiving side dish is sweet potatoes. Leo (7/23-8/22) — Mourning the loss of Gov. Kay Ivey’s pet dog, Bear, you’ll send her a new pet you believe is a perfect match: the Alabama Red Bellied Turtle. Your lucky Thanksgiving dessert is pecan pie. Virgo (8/23-9/22) — Distended from a holiday eating binge, the only way you’ll lose that heavy feeling is by Prancercising through downtown Fairhope. Your lucky Thanksgiving side dish is deviled eggs.

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 38

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Libra (9/23-10/22) — Simultaneously respecting Native American culture and exercising your appreciation of less restrictive underwear, you’ll attend the Poarch Creek Pow Wow in a flannel shirt and loincloth. Your lucky Thanksgiving side dish is sausage gravy.


STYLE GARDENING

Buying for the gardener on your list: Master Gardener favorites BY BRENDA BOLTON, MOBILE COUNTY MASTER GARDENER | COASTALALABAMAGARDENING@GMAIL.COM

Photos | Photos by Brenda Bolton

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Snips, totes, weed pullers and more make great stocking stuffers for those looking to improve their landscapes.

f you have a gardener on your holiday list this year, try one of these Master Gardener must-haves. Gardening can be pretty tough on the human body in the sunny South, so gardeners, when they’re not gardening, are searching for the perfect products to make the experience comfortable and less damaging. Enter SPF (sun protective factor) and cool-tech clothing. Gone is the day when the only gardening garb was a floppy hat and gloves. Today’s gardener loves a whole range of protective apparel for coastal zone gardening. Keeping a cool head is just as important in the garden as in the boardroom, so today’s SPF fabric hats, cool-tech neck wraps and sweatbands are all perfect gardening accessories to go with your favorite gardener’s SPF-fabric shirt to shield the sun’s harmful rays. Gloves, gloves, gloves: Of the multitude of shapes and styles for different gardening chores, most Master Gardeners prefer a lightweight, flexible and snug fit that allows gardening dexterity with coolness and fingertip latex protection. The signature glove sold by Master Gardeners, in a variety of cheery colors, is a great standard gardening glove. We’ll have them at our Annual Greenery Sale at the Mobile Botanical Gardens on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. The gloves’ latex palm and fingers protect while the stretch fabric gives a snug fit for dexterity. For tougher jobs and gardening around sticker bushes like roses, a pair of sturdy leather, long rose gloves will serve your gardener well. Mosquito woes: Cutter’s Deep Woods Dry spray is a great stocking stuffer. For stationary and long-term control, ThermaCell products create mosquito-free zones of about 15 feet. One at each end of a garden bed can protect you all morning as you work — or on the patio as you play. Favorite pruners: Never try to separate Master Gardeners from their red-handled Felcos! I have a couple of sizes of this

quality tool for different tasks, and if I get careless and damage the cutters, the blades can be replaced — voila! New pruners for the cost of new blades. One of the few tools for which there seems to be no good substitute. Leave it to the Swiss. Different sizes allow a good fit to a range of hands and tasks. I have a No. 2 hand pruner, a No. 23 long-handle nipper and the ergonomic No. 7. Another indispensable pruner is a pocketsize or palm-size bypass pruner for quick snips in the garden. I keep one in the kitchen utensil drawer, too, for herbs and other kitchen snipping. Favorite shovel for little old ladies: This was a tip from one of my Master Gardener friends, and it changed my life. Instead of using a standard shovel for the types of small digging chores a retiree faces, use instead a specialty “trenching shovel.” They are lightweight, easy for an older person to handle and have a sharp, pointed blade that reduces the amount of leg strength needed to get the job done. Not for big jobs, they are perfect for a small planting hole, for loosening compacted soil, digging weed clumps, slicing out squares of turf, edging and their intended role, trenching. Whatchamacallit (sapling puller): This one is in the running for overall favorite. After years of wrapping small saplings around my arm to pull them out of the ground, often resulting in a ruby-red blood blister, or worse, I discovered ... hey, there’s a tool for that! The Weed Wench puller has strong ridged jaws that grab the sapling’s lowest base point, at the soil line; then the long handle, when pulled away from the sapling toward the ground, easily draws the roots of even a large sapling from the earth’s grasp. Favorite gardening tote: Good to have at your side for pulling weeds, hauling a small amount of mulch, soil or water to a planting hole or potted plant, or carrying your tools around the yard, the brightly colored TubTrug can’t be beat. This original lightweight rubber garden carryall has only one drawback — its

lack of compartmentalization, so a great companion to a TubTrug is a heavy-duty tote with six to eight pockets. Canvas is traditional, but a strong “denier” soft suitcase material is tougher. Invest in durable, heavy material, strong stitching and sturdy, preferably rigid, side and bottom construction. Collapsible large-volume can: When I bought my 40-gallon “collapsible can,” my husband laughed that it was a gimmick we would never use. Ten years later, when we empty it of leaves and trash and recollapse it for easy storage hanging on the storeroom wall, he has stopped laughing. Made of a strong but lightweight vinyl that collapses on a coiled wire, then pops back open when the clasp is released, this handy thing can multitask when not hanging quietly out of your way on the tool shed wall. Every gardener needs ... a gardening apron with pockets, and in those pockets, a great pair of rust-proof scissors for small gardening chores like clipping stems, and lots of hand- and nailcleaning products and tools, sun blockers and moisturizers (for men as well as women). A fine gift is a thick foam kneeling pad, more convenient than large devices, and when thrown into the TubTrug tote, always there with tools when needed. Waterproof gardening shoes and boots make good additions to the gardener’s wardrobe. A strong wire-mesh wagon with durable tires for small hauling makes a gardener swoon, and for peaceful sounds in the garden on crisp fall mornings or soft spring afternoons, a great set of wind chimes. Happy shopping, ya’ll! AN ANNUAL EVENT NOT TO MISS: What: Mobile Master Gardener Greenery Sale and Mobile Botanical Gardens Holiday Market and Art Bazaar When: Nov. 30/Dec. 1 (Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.) Where: Mobile Botanical Gardens, 5151 Museum Drive, Mobile

November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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STYLE BOOZIE

Much to be thankful for BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

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t’s Thanksgiving! There is so much to be thankful for! Turkey, sweet “potater” casserole, stretchy pants and of course, gossip! And this week I have a cornucopia of it for you! So let’s set the table and spoon all this deliciousness onto our plates! Enjoy!

Our stars are gone

Sad to say, it seems our movie stars have left us. Liam Hemsworth, Vince Vaughn, Clark Duke and John Malkovich have been spotted around Mobile and the Eastern Shore in recent weeks as they were filming the movie “Arkansas.” Though there were a few more sightings of Vaughn at the Mobile Airport and Hemsworth at Gambino’s in Fairhope, it seems they have moved on to Arkansas to film a movie about Arkansas, which makes sense. Hopefully, they enjoyed their time here so much, they will be back for a visit! And it will be fun to watch the movie to see if anything looks familiar. “Arkansas” is scheduled for release in 2020.

When neon fails

Photos | Photos by Brenda Bolton

So, one of my spies sent me a photo of a business on Airport Boulevard this weekend. This is just a reminder it is crucial that you keep all of the lights in your sign in good working order or else you may be advertising something you aren’t selling. I’m pretty sure the Japanese Express is not selling “SEEX.” Staches and Stilettoes The men of O’Daly’s took the stage at B-Bob’s last Friday night for a womanless beauty pageant, raising money for men’s health issues during “Movember.” I am told the performances were inspiring and the men looked just gorgeous. My spies said the best ones were a Spice Girl performance, one of Shania Twain’s “I Feel like a Woman” and Gloria Estefan’s “Conga.” It was a great time for a great cause and we hear they raised over $1,000 for men’s health charities. Well kids, that’s all I got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine dramatic or scandalous or some plain ol’ “SEEX” lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!

F U T U R E S H O C K

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November 21, 2018 - November 27, 2018

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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendor’s Lien reserved in unrecorded deed from Lonnie G. Simpson Sr. to Mario Lucent Burden dated March 1, 2009, notice is hereby given that the undersigned as the holder of said Vendor’s Lien will under power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on December 12, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama,205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to Vendor’s Lien: COMMENCING AT A GRANITE MONUMENT ON THE WEST LINE OF THE BASIL CHESTANG GRANT WHERE THE SAME IS INTERSECTED BY THE EAST-WEST CENTER LINE OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 00 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE BASIL CHESTANGE GRANT A DISTANCE OF 4170.9 FEET TO A POINT THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 201.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF SHELTON BEACH ROAD EXTENSION (FORMERLY MOULTON STREET) TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST, ALONG THE SAID EAST LINE OF SHELTON BEACH ROAD EXTENSION A DISTANCE OF 110.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 314.00 FEET TO THE CENTER LINE OF EIGHT MILE CREEK, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG THE CENTER LINE OF EIGHT MILE CREEK TO A POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE WHERE A LINE RUNNING SOUTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES EAST, FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; WOULD INTERSECT IT THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 46 MINUTES WEST, A DISTANCE OF 318.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF SHELTON BEACH ROAD EXTENSION AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING SITUATED IN THE CITY OF PRICHARD, COUNTY OF MOBILE, STATE OF ALABAMA.   ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF THE PROBATE WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the Vendor’s Lien. Lonnie G. Simpson Sr., Vendor’s Lien Holder William S. McFadden McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on October 26, 2015 by Robert D. McKay and Kelly D. Griffin, as Grantees to g.l.s. Inc., an Alabama corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7317, Page 954, and said vendor’s lien having been last assigned to EMON, LLC, which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book LR7481, Page 1014, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on December 27, 2018. Lot 3 as per plat of FORT LAKE FARMS, FIRST ADDITION as recorded in Map Book 69, Page 18, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama, Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. EMON, LLC Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2018

POSTPONEMENT FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendor’s Lien retained in Deed from David F. Pruitt and Linda M. Pruitt, husband and wife to Michael Sharpe and Meridith Sharpe dated July 30, 2015, and Recorded in Book LR7289, Page 1459 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, notice is hereby given that the undersigned as holder of said Vendor’s Lien  will under power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on the October 3, 2018 at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 2, UNIT ONE OF DEER RUN ESTATES SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 44, PAGE 30, OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT NON EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER, ACROSS AND UPON A 30 FOOT WIDE STRIP OF LAND LYING IMMEDIATELY EAST OF THE ALABAMA-MISSISSIPPI STATE LINE AND RUNNING FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, SOUTWARDLY ALONG THE ALABAMA-MISSISSIPPI STATE LINE TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE PARCEL OF LAND CONVEYED HEREBY. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS”  BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF THE PROBATE WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. David F. Pruitt and Linda M. Pruitt Mortgagee John T. Bender, Attorney McFadden, Lyon & Rouse, L.L.C. 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 The sale provided for hereinabove which was originally scheduled for the October 3, 2018, was further postponed by public announcement being made at the public entrance of the Mobile County Court House, 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, during the legal hours of sale. Said foreclosure sale shall be held on November 30, 2018 at the public entrance of the Mobile County Court House, 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, during the legal hours of sale. Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 2018

POSTPONEMENT MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Leona A. Driggers, an unmarried person and Johnny M. Driggers Jr., an unmarried person, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation, on the 30th day of August, 2007, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6251 Page 1262; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 26, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 25, Yancey Glen Subdivision (Revised), according to the Plat thereof recorded in Map Book 104, Page 102 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes: 12218 Yancey Glen Dr, Mobile, AL  36695 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in

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property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances. Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, Mortgagee/Transferee  The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postponed until 06/28/2018 during the legal hours of sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postponed until 08/31/2018 during the legal hours of sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postponed until 11/09/2018 during the legal hours of sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postponed until 01/11/2019 during the legal hours of sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 429247 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 2018

CIRCUIT COMPLAINT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA CASE NO: CV-2018-902377 DONALD HOLMES, Plaintiff vs. CATHERINE HOLMES WILLIAMS, Defendant LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE to Defendant of a Complaint issued out of the Circuit Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Donald Holmes, by and through his Attorney John T. Bender, Civil Case Number: CV-2018-902377. NOTICE is given that on September 18, 2018, the above-named Plaintiff, filed this cause of action against said Defendant Catherine Holmes Williams to obtain an Order Granting Partition by Sale from the Court the following described real property: Lot 21, of F.D. Richardson Heights Subdivision, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 86, page 92, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. This notice is published pursuant to Section 35-6-20 et seq., of the Code of Alabama, 1975. Any persons claiming any future, contingent, reversionary, remainder or other interest therein must respond to the Complaint within 30 days after the date of the last publication of this notice, by serving a copy of your answer, either admitting or denying the allegations in said Complaint; to John T. Bender, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 718 Downtowner Blvd., Mobile, Alabama  36609, and failing to answer within said time, a default may be entered against you as determined by the court for the relief demanded by the Plaintiff. You must also file your Answer with the Clerk of the Court by such date. This publication shall be made in the Lagniappe Newspaper, published in Mobile County, Alabama, for four (4) consecutive weeks. WITNESS my hand this the 26th day of October, 2018. /s/ JoJo Schwarzauer                                                             Attest: JoJoSchwarzauer Clerk of Circuit Court of Mobile County, Alabama John T. Bender, Attorney for Plaintiff McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Boulevard Mobile, AL  36609 (251) 342-9172 johnt@mrbattorneys.com Lagniappe HD Oct. 31, Nov.7, 14, 21, 2018

CIVIL ACTION Case No. 18-901645 CIRCUIT COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY Paula Goblowsky v. Christolyn White, Mia McGee, and GEICO Casualty Company (in its capacity as uninsured/underinsured motorist carrier) NOTICE OF CIVIL ACTION CHRISTOLYN WHITE, an Alabama resident, whose where-

abouts are unknown, must answer the Complaint filed by PAULA GOBLOWSKY for civil damages filed in the case of Paula Goblowsky v. Christolyn White, Mia McGee, and GEICO Casualty Company (in its capacity as uninsured/underinsured motorist carrier), pending in the Circuit Court of Mobile County, Alabama, bearing Civil Action No. 18901645 on or before January 11, 2019. In the event that CHRISTOLYN WHITE fails to file a responsive pleading on or before said date, a judgment by default may be rendered against her in the above-styled case. This the 9th day of November, 2018. /s JOJO SCHWARZAUER CLERK MOBILE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT LEWIS & CAPLAN, PLC Barrett R. Stephens, Esq. 3631 Canal St. New Orleans, LA 70119 T: 504-486-7766 F: 504-486-7769 E: brs@lewis-caplan.com OF COUNSEL: JACKSON & JACKSON Jody Forester Jackson 11 North Water St., Suite 10290 Mobile, AL 36602 T: 251-460-3230 F: 888-988-6499 E: jjackson@jackson-law.net Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, Dec. 5, 12, 2018

PROBATE NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING October 16, 2018 Case No. 2018-0407 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of LAWRENCE PIERCE, Deceased On to-wit the 3rd day of December, 2018 at 9:30 AM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the Petition to Probate the Last Will and Testament of Lawrence Pierce as filed by DIANNA MARSHAY PIERCE. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest, specifically KIMBERLY PIERCE, MICHAEL PIERCE, BOBBY PIERCE, who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: JOHN DAVID BRADY JR., 3800 Airport Blvd Ste. 203 Mobile, AL 36608 Lagniappe HD Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING October 25, 2018 Case No. 2015-2292-1 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of CHARLOTTE S. LOGAN, Deceased On to-wit the 10th day of December, 2018 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by ANTHONY ERIC DAVIDSON. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: SANDRA RANDER 107 N. JACKSON ST. MOBILE, AL 36602 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 28, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: JOANN ADRIANNE SMITH Case No. 2017-2283 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 29th day of October, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. JOEL STEVEN SMITH as Administrator of the estate of JOANN ADRIANNE SMITH, deceased. Attorney of Record: DEENA R. TYLER, Esq. Lagniappe HD Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: LOUISE ELLIS OSWALT, Deceased Case No. 2018-2105 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 1st day of November, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. G. COLEMAN OSWALT JR. as Executor under the last will and testament of LOUISE ELLIS

OSWALT, Deceased. Attorney of Record: ROBERT H. ROUSE

Lagniappe HD Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ELIZABETH P. DODD, Deceased Case No. 2018-1817 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 5th day of November, 2018 by the Honorable Samuel Wesley Pipes, IV, Special Probate Judge of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. ELIZABETH ANNE DODD and MARTHA ALICE BAKER as CoExecutrices under the last will and testament of ELIZABETH P. DODD, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JOSEPH O. KULAKOWSKI Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 28, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF COMPLETION STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE In accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, notice is hereby given that James B. Donaghey, Inc. has completed the contract for: University of South Alabama HVAC – Food Court – Student Center, 307 N. University Blvd. Mobile, Alabama 36688. All persons having any claim for labor, material or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify Dell Consulting, LLC. Mobile, AL. James B. Donaghey, Inc. 1770 Old Shell Rd. Mobile AL 36604 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, Dec. 5, 12, 2018

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2019 Regular Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS: Relating to Mobile County; to abolish the office of constable at the end of the current term of office, or upon a vacancy occurring in the office for any reason. Lagniappe HD Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2019 Regular Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS: Relating to Mobile County; to amend Section XI and Section XV of Act No. 470, H. 952 of the 1939 Regular Session (Acts 1939, p. 298), as amended, which creates and establishes the countywide Civil Service System in Mobile County; to provide for midrange pay for certain initial employees and a minimum number of eligible persons for initial applicants for certain positions. Lagniappe HD Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2019 Regular Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS:  Relating to Class 2 municipalities; to amend Section 32-13-6, Code of Alabama 1975; to provide that any Class 2 municipality which maintains an impound facility and sells its motor vehicles at public auction shall retain the proceeds from the sale in the general fund of the municipality. Lagniappe HD Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as escribed in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2019 Regular Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS:  Relating to Mobile County; providing for additional fees in district civil, circuit civil, and domestic relations cases, and additional court costs in district criminal and circuit criminal cases; to provide for the establishment of a judicial administration fund in Mobile County; and to provide for the distribution of monies in this fund. Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 28, Dec. 5, 2018


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in 2019 in any Special Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS: Relating to Class 2 municipalities; to create an alternate Self-Help Business Improvement District as authorized in Section 11-54B-40, Code of Alabama 1975; to provide procedures for any Class 2 municipality to establish one or more Self-Help Business Improvement Districts for the purpose of promoting tourism, including the creation of non-profit corporations to manage the districts; to provide certain required provisions in the articles of incorporation of district management corporations; to provide for the levy of a special assessment on a particular class of businesses located within the geographical area of the district for the purpose of promoting tourism for the benefit of businesses in the district; to provide for the expansion or reduction of real property in any self-help business improvement district; to provide for dissolution of a district and withdrawal of a non-profit corporation’s designation as a district management corporation. Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, Dec. 5, 12, 2018

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in 2019 in any Special Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS: This bill relates to Class 2 municipalities and would provide that any federal Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE Program) in a Class 2 municipality would be allotted by the Alabama Medicaid Agency a minimum of 200 participants each fiscal year beginning October 1, 2019, and thereafter. Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, Dec. 5, 12, 2018

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in 2019 in any Special Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS:  Relating to Class 2 municipalities; to amend Section 32-13-6, Code of Alabama 1975; to provide that any Class 2 municipality which maintains an impound facility and sells its motor vehicles at public auction shall retain the proceeds from the sale in the general fund of the municipality. Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, Dec. 5, 12, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 1260 & 1262 Dauphin Street (Northeast corner of Dauphin Street and North Ann Street) for a Use Variance to amend a previously approved Use Variance to allow an art gallery with sales in a B-1, Buffer Business District; the Zoning Ordinance does not allow an art gallery with sales in a B-1, Buffer Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 4419 Rangeline Road (North side of Rangeline Service Road, 320’± West of Halls Mill Road) for a Sign Variance to allow three (3) wall signs for a tenant at a multi-tenant site in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance allows one wall sign per tenant for a multi-tenant site in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 7261 & 7311 Airport Boulevard (Southeast corner of Airport Boulevard and Portside Drive, extending to the Southwest corner of Airport Boulevard and Lakeview Drive) for a Sign Variance to allow four (4) freestanding signs and seven (7) wall signs for a single tenant site in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance only allows a total of three (3) signs with only one (1) being a freestanding sign for a single tenant in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 4404 Stein Street (North side of Stein Avenue, 200’± East of North McGregor Avenue) for a Side Yard Setback Variance to allow the construction of a dwelling within 5.2’± of a side property line and allow an existing carport within 0.3’ of a side property line in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District; the Zoning Ordinance requires a minimum 8’ side yard setback for all structures over 3’ tall in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 2955 & 2989 Dauphin Street (Southeast corner of Dauphin Street and South Sage Avenue) for a Administrative Appeal of a staff issued letter stating that the property was zoned B-2, Neighborhood Business District to allow a drug store or bank. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 2955 & 2989 Dauphin Street (Southeast corner of Dauphin Street and South Sage Avenue) for a Use Variance to allow a car wash in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District; the site was rezoned to B-2, Neighborhood Business District, via Ordinance 64-049 which has been construed to limit use to a drug store or a bank. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 5701 Old Shell Road (Southwest corner of Old Shell Road and South University Boulevard) for a Parking Ratio Variance to allow 55 parking spaces for a 6,488 square foot multi-tenant building to include

three (3) restaurant tenants and one (1) retail tenant in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District; the zoning ordinance requires 57 parking spaces for a 6,488 square foot multitenant building with three (3) restaurant tenants and one (1) retail tenant in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018.   BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 259 Cherokee Street (East side of Cherokee Street, 160’± North of La Salle Street) for a Use Variance to allow a four unit apartment complex in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District; the Zoning Ordinance does not allow an apartment complexes in an R-1, SingleFamily Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 308 Glenwood Street (West side of Glenwood Street, 201’± South of Airport Boulevard) for a Use, Off-Site Parking, and Surfacing Variances to allow an automobile dealership office in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District with gravel surfaced, off-site parking; the Zoning Ordinance requires a minimum of a B-3, Community Business District for an automobile dealership office with all required parking to be located on-site and surfaced with concrete, asphaltic concrete, or asphalt. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 1201 Montlimar Drive (West side of Montlimar Drive, 560’± North of Michael Boulevard) for a Sign Variance to allow (6) six freestanding signs for a multi-tenant site in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance only allows two (2) freestanding signs for a multi-tenant site with less than 1,200’ of linear street frontage in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 3961 Spring Hill Avenue (South side of Spring Hill Avenue, 285’± West of North McGregor Avenue) for a Tree Plantings and Landscaping, Residential Buffering and Access and Maneuvering Variances to allow reduced front yard landscape area with no tree plantings for an office building, with no residential buffering and a 14’-wide two-way access drive in a B-1, Buffer-Business District; the Zoning Ordinance requires compliance with all tree and landscaping requirements, provision of a compliant residential buffer and all access drives to be 24’-wide for two way access in a B-1, Buffer-Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018.   BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on December 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 2200 Dauphin Street (North side of Dauphin Street at the North terminus of Crenshaw Street) for a Use, Residential Buffer, Tree Planting, Access and Maneuvering and Surfacing Variances to allow a children’s activity center and a daycare in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District, reduced height residential buffer, reduced tree plantings, substandard access and maneuvering areas and gravel surfacing; the Zoning Ordinance requires a minimum of a B-2, Neighborhood Business District for a children’s activity center and daycare, requires 6’ height minimum residential buffer, full compliance with tree plantings, access and maneuvering areas to be 24’-wide minimum for two-way traffic and all surfaces to be paved with asphalt, concrete or asphaltic concrete. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 9th day of November, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Project: Innovation PortAL 358 St. Louis Street Mobile, AL 36602 Owner: Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation, Inc. 451 Government Street Mobile, AL 36602 – 2319 Separate sealed BIDS from General Contractors for the construction of Innovation Portal per plans and specifications will be received by the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation, Inc, at the 451 Government Street address until 3:00 pm CST on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 and then at said office publicly opened and read aloud. The Scope of work includes: Demolition, Sitework, Renovation and New Construction. The project is an approximately 29,000 square foot new business incubator facility to occupy a full block in downtown Mobile, Alabama. About half the building area is renovation and half is new construction. The BID DOCUMENTS may be examined at the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce, 451 Government Street address. A digital version of the BID DOCUMENTS, at no charge, and printed documents for purchase, can be obtained from Southern Reprographics, 924 Butler Drive, Mobile AL 36693, (251)665-7170. A PRE-BID conference will be held on Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at 1:00 CST at the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce, 451 Government Street address. Bid requirements include: BIDDERS LIST. General Contractors must submit a bid deposit of $250 to the offices of the Architect, Giattina Aycock Architecture Studio, 2625 5th Avenue North, Building C, Bessemer, AL 35020 to be included on the BIDDERS LIST. Companies on the Bidders list will receive addenda and be kept apprised of changes. Deposits will be refunded at the conclusion of the bidding. The project will be partially funded with federal funds from the US Department of Commerce, Economic Development Administration (EDA) and be therefore subject to federal laws and regulations associated with the program. Federal Procurement Standards will prevail if any conflict arises with provisions described. EDA Investment @04-79-07143 Lagniappe HD Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2018

ABANDONED VEHICLES NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2565 Government St., Suite E., Mobile, AL 36606. 2013 Ford Focus 1FADP3E26DL118573 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4807 N Pineridge Dr., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 1998 Dodge Ram 1500 1B7HC16X2WS632080 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5930 Plantation Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 2006 VW New Beetle 3VWRF31Y86M314462

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 10375 Vernant Park Rd., Foley, AL 36535. 2013 Yamaha 01 JYARN23E2DA015929 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7224 Theodore Dawes Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 2008 Smart Fortwo WMEEK31X28K098415 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 256 Chicago Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 2007 Honda Ridgeline 2HJYK16547H539342 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 551 Hope St., Chickasaw, AL 36611. 2007 HD FLHT 1HD1FF4177Y610352 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6986 Warrington Dr., Mobile, AL 36619. 2003 Ford Explorer 1FMZU62K43UC26869 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1993 Toyota Corolla JT2AE09E1P0018577 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 478 Scott Dr., Saraland, AL 36571. 2001 Honda Accord 1HGCG16591A079988 2009 Hyundai Sonata 5NPET46C99H431703 Lagniappe HD Nov. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on January 02, 2019 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 255 Schillinger Rd N., Mobile, AL 36608. 2003 GMC Yukon 1GKEC13VX3R139504 2008 Ford LGT Convt 1FTPW14V18FA44431 2008 Ford Mustang 1ZVHT82H185146690 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on January 02, 2019 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2004 Toyota Camry 4T1CA38P74U023881 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on January 02, 2019 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1111 Oakdale Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 2011 Kia Sorento 5XYKU3A16BG033846 2003 Honda Accord 1HGCM66513A049327 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on January 02, 2019 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 3151 Salco Rd W., Chunchula, AL 36521. 2004 Suzuki GSX-R600K JS1GN7CA942106805 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on January 02, 2019 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2821 Government Blvd., Mobile, AL 36606. 2005 GMC Yukon 3GKEC16Z85G208482 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on January 02, 2019 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4056 Highpoint Dr S., Mobile, AL 36693. 1994 Chevrolet K1500 2GCEK19KXR1321524 Lagniappe HD Nov. 21, 28, 2018

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The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on January 02, 2019 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1065 Woodside Dr W., Mobile, AL 36608. 1997 Acura 2.2CL 19UYA1255VL006673

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on December 21, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 472 Barlow St., Mobile, AL 36617. 2002 Honda Accord 1HGCG32032A010253

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on January 02, 2019 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5423 Carol Plantation Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 1997 Ford LGT Convt 1FTDX1761VNA33614

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Lagniappe: November 21 - 27, 2018  
Lagniappe: November 21 - 27, 2018