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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

J U LY 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J U LY 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | w w w . l a g n i a p p e m o b i l e . c o m ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

A former McGill-Toolen football players files suit against the school, coaches, Archdiocese.

COMMENTARY

For the love of dog, please build the new bay bridge!

BUSINESS

Homes in Baldwin County are still selling at a sizzling clip, according to new data from the Baldwin County Association of Realtors.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

Asian Garden serves tasty, traditional Asian food, including Korean bulgogi, and features fresh, well-cooked vegetables.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA MATTEI Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WOOLSEY Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com DAVID GRAYSON Advertising Sales Executive david@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

Beachfront condos continue going up in Alabama’s resort towns, causing divisions between residents, government officials and the business community.

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ARTS

Mobile drummer Bradley Hamilton will join the headlining ensemble for the 20th annual Gulf Coast Ethnic and Heritage Jazz Festival.

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager legals@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: J. Mark Bryant, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Randy Kennedy, John Mullen, Jeff Poor, Ken Robinson, Ron Sivak ON THE COVER: ON THE RISE BY DAN ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36602. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@ lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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Ahead of his show at The Wharf on Thursday with Jason Aldean, Dee Jay Silver talks about his own special mix of country EDM.

FILM

The stop-motion film “Isle of Dogs” is both a quintessential and an unusual Wes Anderson film, with a disturbing apocalyptic edge.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Hear African percussionist and storyteller Makinde Gbolahan in Toulminville, enjoy food and wine at The Pillars and “Brews and Braille” at Fairhope.

SPORTS

The recent announcement of Spring Hill’s full acceptance into the Division II ranks marks the end of an extensive and sometimes frustrating journey.

STYLE

Boozie has your Nappie Awards scoop.

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GOING POSTAL

Cost of waiting on I-10 bridge construction Editor: Congestion, delay, gridlock, economic loss, health hazard, extreme inconvenience — pick your label to describe a personal experience and impact due to a lack of construction on a proposed Interstate 10 Bay Bridge. All are correct for I-10 users and becoming worse, as any traveler along the Southeastern U.S. will describe. Commuters might need several labels to relay their road experience. Travelers could require other colorful and memorable labels to communicate their journey to the beach. In addition to a void of any new business activity and tax revenue from an absence of construction funding, Mobile and the local area will suffer from selected increasing congestion costs due to the continual waiting for final approval decisions. This includes the annual hours of delay for Mobile estimated by a Texas university projected to be 10,396,000 or 30 per auto

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commuter, compared to 42 hours for the U.S. This same U.S. annual auto commuter contributed to congestion cost by wasting 19 gallons of fuel. Further, the annual Mobile congestion cost is estimated to be $236 million in lost income or $670 per auto commuter, compared to the national cost of $960. Using these estimates, the annual estimated potential Mobile jobs lost due to congestion can be calculated to be 2,299. These numbers are estimates for auto travel only. Omitted are estimates for the impact on truck traffic and its relationship to reduced regional economic productivity from congestion. Each number above describes the travel experiences of an interstate highway user and is supported by estimates and calculations. The figures describe “congestion� in Mobile that will become steadily worse with time. Congestion will lead to some level of gridlock, which will produce additional concerns for a higher health hazard from an increased level of pollutants in the atmosphere. Discussion of bridge construction should include alternate

routes to generate additional traffic flow to relieve congestion, such as the Cochrane-Africatown Bridge. Using it provides both a short-run and long-run choice for drivers. A request to electronic mapping services such as MapQuest to illustrate this route to travelers should result in fewer vehicles in the tunnels. Further, new signage on I-10 and I-65 would be helpful to direct traffic for drivers who rely on road signs. What is required to move this construction project forward? What is required to reach final agreement among all parties interested in the location? Don Epley, Ph.D. Mobile Dr. Epley is the CEO and president of Coastal Economics, a Mobile company. He is the former director of the USA Center for Real Estate and Economic Development, and Emeritus Professor of Finance. He specializes in the analysis of urban and regional growth, and is the author of previous economic impact estimates of the Bay Bridge project.


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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Concussion protocol

FORMER PLAYER SUES OVER HEAD INJURIES SUSTAINED AT MCGILL

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BY JASON JOHNSON

former McGill-Toolen football player is suing the school, its coaching staff and the Archdiocese of Mobile over “traumatic brain injury” he claims was caused by injuries sustained during his time as a defensive back. Eric Williams, who graduated last year, claims coaches, athletic trainers and school administrators were negligent in their handling of a head injury he sustained during spring training in 2015. In short, Williams’ attorneys say he was allowed to continue practicing even though he’d shown clear signs of a concussion. Williams says he was running practice drills under the direction of linebackers coach Carl Jackson on May 7, 2015, when he “suffered several blows to the head” and began exhibiting “signs of a concussion” that included a headache and stronger than usual emotional reactions. Also named in the lawsuit is Encore Rehabilitation, which facilitates McGill’s athletic training program and employees athletic trainer Drew Garner. Williams says he was evaluated by Garner after practice and met with Jackson at his home to discuss his health on the day his head injury occurred. However, he claims neither sent him to a doctor for an assessment of his symptoms. “[He] was permitted to continue to participate in football practice without any restrictions,” the complaint claims. “At no point did any one of the defendants receive a written clearance for [Williams] to return to play from a licensed physician.” According to the Alabama High School Athletic Association (AHSAA) concussion policy, “any health care professional or AHSAA certified coach may identify concussion signs, symptoms or behaviors of a student athlete during any type of athletic activity,” which includes team

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practices and training. If any of those symptoms are recognized, the policy dictates the affected student stop playing immediately. “Any student-athlete who exhibits signs, symptoms or behaviors consistent with a concussion shall be removed from the contest and shall not return that day,” it reads. “Following the day the concussion symptoms occur, the student-athlete may return to practice or play only after a medical release has been issued by a medical doctor.” However, a few days after his initial injury, Williams claims he was allowed to participate in another practice and ordered by Jackson to go through the tackling drills he’d been injured performing days before. The complaint states that during those drills, “[Williams] suffered several blows to the head, and lost consciousness.” William’s medical condition is said to have deteriorated between the first practice, which was on a Thursday, and a second practice that following Monday. He never saw a physician during that time, according to the lawsuit. At the hospital, Williams required surgery due to a subdural hematoma. As is common in these types of lawsuits, Williams’ attorney, Craig L. Lowell, is also targeting anyone and everyone tasked with supervising McGill’s coaching staff. So far, the defendants named in the lawsuit include Jackson, Garner and Encore Rehabilitation, but also head football coach Earnest Hill, his predecessor Caleb Ross, McGill Athletic Director Bill Griffin, Principal Michelle Haas and the Catholic Archdiocese of Mobile. From the top down, Lowell claims, negligent training, supervision and enforcement caused Williams to suffer a traumatic brain injury as well as “permanent physical, emotional, neurological and cognitive deficits.” Over the last few years, concerns have grown about

football players — especially those in youth and high school leagues —  developing Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) from repetitive brain trauma. The same concerns have also led to a few players making high-profile exits from the National Football League (NFL). Just this April, a former football player in California was awarded $7.1 million in a lawsuit brought against his high school school due to the coaching staff’s failure to correctly diagnose a concussion in a game he played in at age 14. Part of that case was based on those same coaches’ failure to complete mandated concussion training. In Alabama, the AHSAA requires all certified coaches to complete an online course to learn how to identify concussions and the procedures to follow when concussion symptoms are recognized. While that would seem to include McGill’s coaching staff, the school so far has declined to comment on this matter in print. Reached by Lagniappe, Gwendolyn Byrd, executive director for Catholic education for the Archdiocese, said: “It is our policy not to discuss the personal issues of students nor to comment on legal proceedings.” Similarly, messages sent to Lowell seeking comment on Williams’ lawsuit have not yet received a response. However, a 2014 video uploaded by McGill’s athletic department discusses, in detail, how the private school handles concussions. In an episode of “In the Arena with Bill Griffin,” Griffin and Garner both discuss how concussions occur, how they’re recognized and how McGill’s staff is supposed to respond to them. Garner said signs of a possible concussion include things like “dizziness, complaining of nausea, light sensitivity and obviously, a headache.” He also said student athletes exhibiting any of  those types of symptoms are not allowed to return to field of play until they’ve been cleared by a medical doctor. “The way we treat it, we would first sit the person out. That’s the first thing. We’re going to sit them out as long as they have any of these symptoms, and you can’t return to play in the state of Alabama without being cleared by a physician,” Garner said. “We’re not going to put you back in until you’re cleared by a physician.” Griffin said coaches at McGill and throughout the state are taught the same, adding that the responsibility for recognizing students showing concussion systems falls on coaches as much as athletic trainers and physicians. “Winning at McGill-Toolen is very important, but the safety of athletes is in the forefront. Concussions don’t just happen in football, they can happen in every single sport we have,” Griffin said. “That’s why every athlete and every coach has to be aware of the signs and symptoms of concussions.”


BAYBRIEF | COURTS

‘Heat of the moment’

WOMAN IN WAFFLE HOUSE ARREST VIDEO FOUND GUILTY

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BY JASON JOHNSON

judge found Chikesia Clemons guilty of disorderly conduct and resisting arrest Monday after a bench trial for charges stemming from a controversial arrest at a Saraland Waffle House earlier this year. Since a Snapchat video of her arrest made national news, Clemons’ supporters have held her out to be a victim of police brutality and a racially motivated overaction from employees at the Waffle House, who called the police on her and two friends around 2:30 a.m. on the morning of April 22. During the arrest, Clemons — a black woman — was taken to the ground by two white officers from the Saraland Police Department, and her breasts became exposed during a subsequent scuffle. The incident made national news and prompted cries of racism from such national civil rights activists as Rev. Al Sharpton. Those siding with police, which includes the Waffle House employees, have maintained Clemons didn’t follow orders from officers after the group she was with caused a scene and refused to leave when asked to do so by the staff. The division of opinions about this particular case was on full display in the courtroom Monday. On one side of the room, a mostly white crowd of law enforcement supporters included a sizeable group of bikers, while Black Lives Matter activists joined members of Clemons’ family on the opposite side.   Despite all the external chatter, the decision on Clemons’ criminal charges fell to Saraland Municipal Judge Mark Erwin, who, after a three-hour special court session, found there was enough evidence to prove the city’s claim Clemons behaved in a disorderly fashion in front of police officers and then resisted arrest. While he said his decision was based solely on the facts of the case and the law, Erwin noted a fact-finding mission would do little to address all of the other concerns surrounding Clemons’ arrest for months. “Finding that these violations occurred does not solve the emotions involved in this case,” Erwin said. “Finding a way

to process those emotions is not what the law is set up to do. That’s what individuals have to do as part of a community, and I can’t speak to it.” Central to Erwin’s decision was testimony from both witnesses for the defense and prosecution that Clemons verbally threatened a Waffle House employee with violence while officers were present. Other than Clemons, who did not take the stand, a key figure in the SPD’s investigation was Waffle House employee Goldie Mincey, who got into an argument with Clemons’ group and ultimately instructed a co-worker to call the police. Clemons’ criminal attorney, Marcus Foxx, particularly focused on when Mincey called the police and why. According to surveillance footage, that call was made about two minutes and 32 seconds after Clemons’ group arrived, which is before any visible signs of an argument. Foxx said Mincey didn’t seem fearful of Clemons’ group because she continued to stand near them and never told them she’d called the police. Defense witnesses Mandy Sullivan and Heather Snow, who were at Waffle House during most of the incident, said they didn’t feel unsafe or uncomfortable because of Clemons’ behavior. They also testified that, in their view, Mincey was an equal participant in any yelling, cursing or aggressive behavior that took place. They also claimed a group of white men came in after her arrest being loud as well. When one of them cursed audibly, Snow said the staff didn’t call the police, but told them not to use that language because “somebody just got arrested for that.” Foxx made the argument that the restaurant’s handling of those two arguably disruptive groups shows a racial disparity that raises questions about why police were called to the scene. He said Mincey was the instigator and police made no effort to get all sides of the story — noting that officers took no statements from other patrons. Another key argument Foxx made was that the surveil-

lance video showed little reaction from other customers and employees to Clemons’ behavior, which he said proves she didn’t cause “public inconvenience, annoyance or alarm” that would rise to the level of disorderly conduct under Alabama law. “There’s not a single patron who gets up, leaves, calls the police or even acts differently. To the contrary, several of the employees are working around her preparing orders,” he said. “More importantly, these officers had an obligation to conduct a fair investigation. There were eight other people in that Waffle House, and regardless of what they may have observed, an officer’s duty when he comes into a situation is to assess everything.” Regardless of why police were called, prosecutor Jeff Perloff said Clemons’ charges weren’t based on anything that happened before police arrived or after they left. He also said the owners of private property “have the right to call the police” if they feel as though someone needs to be escorted off their property. He said the issue boils down to an observation made by Officer Christopher Ramey, who testified to hearing Clemons tell Mincey: “F**k you. I’ll come over this counter and beat your ass.” Ramey said that phrase indicated to him that Clemons was the aggressor and prompted his attempt to arrest her for disorderly conduct. While there’s no recording of the exchange, multiple witnesses for the prosecution as well as the defense testified to Clemons’ making a similar statement that — at the very least — included the words, “beat your ass.” “That ends up being the sole fact of disorderly conduct,” Erwin said. “I am also struck by the fact that [Clemons] had an opportunity to separate from this whole situation and left — best decision of the night so far — but came back into the situation with some point to make, and therefore we have this comment made in the presence of a police officer and the defense witness. It’s really undisputed.” As to the charge of resisting arrest, Foxx questioned whether Clemons was ever properly informed of why she was being arrested. On the stand, Ramey said she was, but that was disputed by defense witnesses. Still, Erwin said Clemons’ behavior in the arest video submitted by the defense shows clear signs of resistance. “She chose to tell them, ‘You’re not taking me,’ and struggle with the officer trying to get handcuffs on her to the point her friends, I think, sensed that enough was enough and said so in the video,” he added. After his verdict, Erwin sentenced Clemons to one year of informal probation and fined her $200 for each count she was found guilty of and ordered her to pay court costs associated with the trial. However, Foxx immediately gave an oral notice of his intention to appeal the case to the Mobile County Circuit Court. After the trial, he told reporters the guilty verdict was disappointing, but said he and Clemons’ family are prepared to meet the challenge at every level moving forward. “Obviously, we respect the province of the court. We do disagree with the verdict, and as for question of whether the things we heard here today are undisputed or beyond a reasonable doubt, we disagree with that as well,” he said. “We expect to take this to the next level and try this before a jury of our peers.”

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BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Something special

SPANISH FORT EXPLORES TAX DISTRICT TO HELP SCHOOLS

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BY JOHN MULLEN

ayor Mike McMillan has seen the support Spanish Fort has for its schools for many years. “Spanish Fort’s always been known for our schools, and this community has proven in the past that we will support our schools,” he said. Even when the rest of the county ultimately shot down taxes for a school-building program and other school initiatives, Spanish Fort voted in favor. “The referendums that failed countywide in the past, they always passed up here,” McMillan said. “We’re the only precinct that it did pass in. Our community has always, with volunteerism and financially, … supported our schools and parents are very active in schools.” With that in mind, he and the Spanish Fort City Council announced an effort recently to form a special tax district within the Spanish Fort High School feeder pattern. The Baldwin County Board of Education first approved the special districts in 2016 allowing citizens in the seven high school districts to vote on an extra 3 mills of property tax for their schools. “This gives the community another option and a way to fund their schools over and above what the school system can do without breaking away,” Chief School Financial Officer John Wilson said at the time. “The community will have its say in how the money is spent. If one feeder pattern wants to bring in additional teachers or build a new school, they can do so with this money.” Spanish Fort has asked the school board to ask the County Commission to set up a referendum on

the 3-mill tax in the high school’s district. “Maybe early spring, but we really haven’t gotten to the point to pin down a date,” McMillan said. “We don’t rush into things. I would prefer to do it once and do it right.” McMillan said he wants the citizens of the Spanish Fort feeder pattern, one of the more diverse in the county, to have a chance to vote in a referendum on the new tax. Portions of three municipalities and several unincorporated neighborhoods are packed into the Spanish Fort High School feeder pattern. “We’d like to at least give the opportunity to all our citizens and all of those in the feeder pattern to accomplish some goals that maybe the rest of the county can’t,” McMillan said. “Putting it to a referendum seemed to be a fair way to make it happen. Let the people decide.” If passed, the 3 mills would raise $750,000 annually to be spent in the district. A local board would be formed to make recommendations on where the money would be spent, McMillan said. “The council is very emphatic that it would be strictly for academic and arts enhancement, nonathletic,” McMillan said. “Strictly going to all four schools within our feeder pattern. No district has even voted on a tax, but both Daphne and Fairhope have explored the idea. Gulf Shores came the closest to getting a vote, but that effort eventually stalled when the local group and county officials couldn’t agree on who would control how the money would be used. Gulf Shores eventually decided to start its own school system.

BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

They will build it

CHINESE COMPRESSOR COMPANY TO BUILD PLANT IN LOXLEY

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BY JOHN MULLEN

n the end, it came down to what it almost always does in real estate: Location, location, location. County and Loxley officials announced last week the Kaishan Group of China will build its newest manufacturing plant in the central Baldwin town. Lee Lawson, president and CEO of the Baldwin County Economic Development Alliance, said the company considered several locations in the county. The Kaishan Group is a worldwide manufacturer of compressed air, refrigeration, power generation and mining equipment. “We market the entire county,” Lawson said. “We sat down with officials there at Kaishan and we showed them pretty much every site in the county that really fit their specs. They just really gravitated toward the Loxley site and the area. “We showed them several locations from Daphne to Foley and everywhere in between. We gave them a handful of options that really fit their needs and fit their design and their layout. They made the decision from there.” The Industrial Park Drive location’s ready access to Alabama State Route 59 and Interstate 10 won out over other sites Baldwin County had to offer. “The logistical advantages of that site are really great with great proximity to I-10 and great access in and out of that site from a highway standpoint,” Lawson said. “All that helps.” Another advantage was some of the company officials had already experienced what Baldwin County could offer, Lawson said. “They wanted to be here in Baldwin County,” he said. “They had some executives with some previous experience here from being here and living here and doing business here. They already

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knew it to be a good location.” Lawson said the county is becoming wellknown among international companies looking to expand into the United States. Besides being the 11th-ranked metropolitan statistical area in growth, Baldwin has been ranked No. 1 in the state three straight years by SmartAsset for incoming business investment. “Baldwin County is a fast-growing area and a superb place in Alabama to launch a new business venture,” said Greg Canfield, secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce. “Kaishan Group has selected an ideal location for its North American manufacturing operation, and we look forward to working with the company as its business grows.” The site will be a total “greenfield build,” Lawson said, but already has available utility access. “There’s utility service there and they’ll have to extend a couple from [Route] 59,” Lawson said. “The road it’s going on is Industrial Park Drive, so it’s in a light industrial area of Loxley. Up and down County Road 49 and Industrial Park Drive you’ve got multiple businesses that are all in the distribution logistics or light manufacturing arena.” The new building will be a 65,000-square-foot facility, with completion expected in the second quarter of 2019. It will mean 62 new jobs and more than $11 million in capital investment in the county in its first three years. “We are excited to add Kaishan Group to the list of companies that have chosen Loxley as a great place to do business,” Billy Middleton, mayor of Loxley, said. “As our community continues to grow and thrive, Kaishan will play a key role in providing well-paying jobs for our residents, and I look forward to partnering with this company for many years to come.”


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Mayor may not

STIMPSON LAYS OUT STADIUM PLAN FRAMEWORK AT CONTENTIOUS COMMUNITY MEETING

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BY DALE LIESCH

ome of Doris Walton’s best memories are kept in a small purple box. Inside the nondescript box, the Maysville resident has saved the ticket stubs from every Senior Bowl she has attended since at least the 1970s. “I attended every one with my husband,” she said. “We just walked across the street.” Walton didn’t speak during a two-hour meeting on the future of the Senior Bowl’s current home, Ladd-Peebles Stadium, but quietly wished it would stay put. “Ladd means a lot to me,” she said. “I made a lot of memories at Ladd.” When she and her late husband didn’t attend games there, they would invite friends over to watch the scoreboard from their backyard. That was until its orientation was changed. “We had a wonderful time,” she said. “We enjoyed the games. I want them to keep Ladd. I want it to stay where it is.” The meeting, held Monday, July 23, in the shadow of the city-owned stadium at Williamson High School, grew contentious at times, as Mayor Sandy Stimpson made his case for the 70-year-old facility’s repurposing. At issue for many at the meeting is a plan for the city and county to contribute $500,000 per year for 20 years to a proposed on-campus stadium at the University of South Alabama. In return for its contribution the city would receive $2.5 million from the school for the repurposing of Ladd. While the city has previously floated the idea of a 5,000-seat high school football stadium being built around Ladd’s current field, Stimpson walked some of that back Monday. At the community meeting he told residents the city wanted to hear from residents first. He also said he would appoint a citizens committee to help develop plans. He did confirm that his vision includes football still being played at the stadium, but didn’t elaborate further. The total of $10 million over 20 years would come from the city’s economic development fund, Stimpson said. “USA is one of the largest economic development entities in the city,” he said. At issue with Ladd, Stimpson said, is roughly $7 million in deferred maintenance and another $2 million in maintenance per year beyond that. Estimates done by the city’s architectural engineering department have costs topping out at $33 million to keep the stadium in good condition, Stimpson told the crowd. Up until about two years ago, USA only paid expenses at the stadium, Ladd board Chairwoman Ann Davis told the crowd. She said now the school pays $20,000 per game to use the stadium. Since 2000, a period spanning three mayoral administrations, the city has spent roughly $300,000 per year on Ladd, Stimpson said. In contrast,  Stimpson said other projects in Maysville need about $4 million in deferred maintenance. “We have to give up something,” he said. “There are multiple projects we need to do in the community.” There is also a total of $83 million in deferred maintenance citywide, Stimpson said. The city is currently spending $1.2 million per year on deferred maintenance all over the city. “There’s a lot going unfunded,” Stimpson said. “There’s not enough money to maintain Ladd and do the other things we need to do.” When asked if the $10 million proposed for the USA stadium could cut down on Ladd’s maintenance costs, Stimpson admitted that it could, but added it wouldn’t be enough to sustain it long-term. Stimpson also said, when asked, that the city

would not take out a bond issue to make improvements to the stadium. He cited financial issues from before he took office as a reason. Stimpson also fielded questions related to how the city planned to protect African-American culture and specifically about what was planned for the annual “classic” game featuring two historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) football teams. “ … It doesn’t mean it can’t be played somewhere else,” Stimpson said of the game in question. “I didn’t say that’s what you wanted, I said ‘it could be.’” In addition to USA football, the Senior Bowl and the “classic” game, Ladd hosts four local high school football teams. To address questions related to the proposed stadium’s capacity, Stimpson said the on-campus stadium would initially seat 25,000 with possible expansions to 30,000 and 35,000 in the future. “We’re not filling Ladd up as it is,” he said. “Even if you were going to rebuild it, I don’t know if you should rebuild it as is ….” Walton wasn’t the only Maysville resident in attendance to have sentimental reasons for wanting Ladd to remain. “Ladd is special,” Thomas Davis said. “It should remain open because of its importance to the city and the inner city. It should not be torn down.” Others had a more pragmatic view of the situation, like former cIty Councilman William Carroll, who said it was the city’s responsibility to maintain Ladd and it should remain that way. “We did not do maintenance and we’re trying to find another way to resolve it,” he said. “We need to continue to do the maintenance to the stadium so it could remain viable.” Many of the stadium’s additions are relatively new, including the press box and field, Carroll said. Keeping the current structure well maintained would allow younger promoters to come in and schedule events. Zane Horn, who said he believes the stadium should be torn down, said he’s skeptical of giving money to USA. He called the idea of giving them $10 million while receiving $2.5 million in return a “shell game.” Stadium supporters have questioned the plan to contribute to the stadium when it appears USA has enough money, or donors, to build it itself. School officials have already publicly stated USA Foundation money cannot be used to build the stadium. In addition to the foundation, USA has a multimillion-dollar endowment, funded through contributions from donors. USA spokesman Bob Lowry could not be reached by deadline to answer questions about the endowment. Horn also said the city doesn’t do enough to maintain city-owned property near the stadium. He has worked for a year to clean up city property adjacent to his own property. He said if the city can afford to contribute to USA’s stadium, it can reimburse him. The meeting at times became contentious, with moderators on several occasions forced to pause the question session to quiet the crowd. Councilman Levon Manzie stepped in at one point to speak directly to upset citizens, citing the outbursts as a reason some of the community meetings are held in churches. “I called this meeting so we could hear from the mayor about his proposal,” he said. “You may disagree with [Stimpson] … but at least listen to his answers.” Manzie also told the crowd the future of Ladd is far from being a done deal, as some were claiming. “We would not be engaging the public if we didn’t want to hear what you had to say,” he said. J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 9


BAYBRIEF | POLITICS

Party mixup ISSUES WITH CROSSOVER VOTING BAN REPORTED LOCALLY BY JASON JOHNSON

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member of the Republican State Executive Committee says he was forced to cast a provisional ballot in last week’s runoff election after the Mobile County Board of Registrars erroneously marked him as having voted in the Democratic primary on June 5. “When I showed them my ID, [a poll worker] said: ‘You can’t vote. You’re are down here as voting in the Democratic primary.’ I said, ‘You gotta be kidding me,’” Austin L. Rainwaters told Lagniappe. “Most folks in the room started laughing because they knew better than that.” Rainwaters also knew there had to have been some mistake. Not only was his name on the June 5 Republican primary ballot, but he and pretty much all of his family are longtime GOP supporters. Including his campaign for a seat on the state committee, Rainwaters has run as a Republican in four local elections since 1994. Yet, there on the books last Tuesday — plain as day — Rainwaters and several of his family members were coded as having voted in the Democratic primary. They aren’t the only ones, either. Probate Judge Don Davis told Lagniappe election officials received reports of the same problem at “multiple precincts” throughout Mobile County. “It wasn’t every poll, but there were a number that reported citizens making those same kinds of comments,” Davis said. “The difficulty is, we have a lot of humans involved in this process. We do our best to train our poll workers as to what their duties and responsibilities are, but whenever humans are involved, mistakes can occur.” This particular mistake can have much more of an

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impact now that Alabama has banned crossover voting, which is when someone votes in one party’s primary election but then votes in the opposite party runoff election. According to Davis, the records of which party primary a voter cast a ballot in begins with the poll, when they inform workers which ballot they would like to receive during the primary. On election day, poll workers circle either “D” (Democrat) or “R” (Republican) by each voter’s name that corresponds to the ballot they chose. Those voting rolls then go to the Mobile County Board of Registrars, which scans a barcode by each voter’s name to determine who actually cast a ballot in the most recent election and who the county’s active voters are. However, the party preference of each voter has to be input manually in the system, and that’s where Davis and Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill believe things went wrong ahead of last Tuesday’s runoff. “They actually have to type in DEM or REP to code that voter based on that information. Apparently, they got started doing it wrong and did it wrong several times,” Davis said. According to the Secretary of State’s office, Mobile and Montgomery counties were the only two that reported these types of problems. In fact, Montgomery County had its own notable mix-up when State Rep. John Knight (DMontgomery) was told he couldn’t vote in the Democratic runoff even though he was on the ballot. While Knight’s story was picked up by local media, Merrill said there were only 22 reports of those types of problems in all of Montgomery County. He added that, like Montgomery, any mistakes in Mobile County’s elec-

tions process most likely originated with work performed by the local board of registrars. “It’s been our observation that when errors like this occur, the reason they occur in almost every instance has to do with the lack of attention given by the individuals responsible for inputting the information,” Merrill said. “In this instance it is the Mobile County Board of Registrars.” Lagniappe was able to confirm that, at least in Rainwaters’ case, the party affiliation on the books provided to the board of registrars from poll workers in June did not match what was on the updated rolls the board sent back for the July 17 primary runoff. Multiple voters clearly marked as Republicans were coded as Democrats. In Mobile County, poll workers are trained to inform voters if records indicate they voted in the opposite party’s primary, but to allow them to vote a provisional ballot if they insist. Rainwaters said that happened to multiple people at his precinct alone, including his brother, wife, son, daughter in-law and two children. They all had to vote provisional ballots because the records indicated they voted in the Democratic primary last month. “I think there was something like 15 provisional ballots cast, and my family was about half of them,” he said. “I still feel a bit uneasy about it because I don’t know why they’d make the mistake to start with, and it’s very relevant because that could make or break an election like the one for [Alabama House District 102].” That race was separated by just 25 votes before provisional ballots were counted and certified on July 24. So far, the board of registrars has declined to discuss what, if anything, went wrong on their end, even though Davis and Merrill have put the blame squarely at registrars’ feet. Currently, Virginia Delchamps, Pat Tyrrell and Shirley Short make up the Mobile County Board of Registrars, but none has responded to emails about this topic. One member, who did not identify herself, told Lagniappe over the phone “that is marked at the polls.” “We take the information sent to us from the polls, and that’s how we know whether or not they have voted Republican or Democrat,” the woman said. While it seems the board was shifting blame to the poll workers, Davis’ Chief of Staff Mark Erwin said the board requested a copy of the paper records from the June 5 primary the day after the runoff in order to go back and verify which primary voters participated in — giving the indication the mistake was made on their end. Reviewing the party affiliation information from last month’s election likely helped determine whether some provisional ballots were counted or not — a task that is also handled by board of registrars.


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Trashed WASTE MANAGEMENT SETTLEMENT WITHDRAWN BEFORE COUNCIL VOTE BY DALE LIESCH

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possible settlement with Waste Management (WM) designed to save the city money on the disposal of yard waste was removed from the agenda before the Mobile City Council could vote on it Tuesday, July 24. Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s administration asked for the item to be removed during a preconference meeting. The settlement has been in the hands of Wanda Cochran, the board’s attorney, for months. She has recommended an executive session to discuss the issue in the future due to possible litigation. City Attorney Ricardo Woods said there is no timeline to re-introduce the settlement at this time. The settlement, which would pay WM $389,000 per year, would put to bed issues raised during a breach of contract lawsuit the city’s Solid Waste Disposal Authority lost to the company back in 2016. What later became an issue following that lawsuit was the city’s diversion of yard debris, or trash, from the city-owned and WM-managed Chastang Landfill to a private facility called Dirt Inc. WM attorneys successfully argued any diversion from the landfill it manages would be in breach of the original contract the Solid

Waste Disposal Authority entered into in the early 1990s. The settlement would pay WM for the diversion of trash, as well as pay lump sums for lost profits and reimbursements mentioned in the previous court filing. Jaime Betbeze, an attorney for WM, said the company was ready to put the issue to rest. “We’re hopeful that we’re getting close to a resolution,” he said. “It’s in the citizens’ best interest to get a resolution.” About the withdrawal, Betbeze said it’s his understanding it would lead to a resolution. The item in question first appeared on a City Council agenda in early February. A vote on the settlement was delayed a month to allow Cohran to review it. It has been delayed at least once since, back in April. Betbeze said he understood the council attorney wanted to “get up to speed” on the issue. During a press event related to his recent trip to the Farnborough International Airshow, Mayor Sandy Stimpson implored the council to act on the settlement once it comes back on their agenda. “We need to bring a close to this situation,” he said. “We need the council’s support on that.” Stimpson said not resolving the issue would result in increased costs to city and its residents.

BAYBRIEF | POLITICS

Stringer and Hambright hold on to wins BY DALE LIESCH

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atsuma Police Chief Shane Stringer won a tight Republican primary for House District 102 over Citronelle Call News Publisher Willie Gray Tuesday after provisional ballots were counted. Stringer increased his 25-point election night margin by three votes after Tuesday afternoon’s counting of provisional ballots at the Mobile County Probate Court office and became the Republican nominee in a race that features no Democratic opposition. Stringer took the majority of the 29 ballots counted in the race, 16 votes to 13. The 29 ballots counted is exactly half of the provisional ballots received. Only provisional ballots coming from qualified and correctly registered voters were counted. Stringer said he was “excited” to take the seat previously occupied by State Senator-elect Jack Williams. “I just want to thank everyone who supported me,” he said. To those voters who didn’t support him, Stringer says he plans to represent them well in Montgomery. As for the election, Stringer is happy he can put it behind him. “I’m glad it’s over,” he said with his wife, Jaclyn, beside him. “It has been a tough 14 months.” Stringer said his top priority in Montgomery

would be school safety. He has supported measures to arm trained teachers in the past. It is currently unclear if Gray will ask for a recount. He has 48 hours to do so because the state does not provide for an automatic recount in a primary runoff election. Gray’s campaign spokesman, Jon Gray, said at the time he wasn’t sure whether the candidate would call for one. Probate Judge Don Davis met with the two candidates shortly after the results were announced. It’s unclear why the three met, but the meeting in Davis’ office took about 30 minutes. Davis was unavailable after the meeting. Calls to his chief of staff, Mark Erwin, seeking an explanation were not immediately returned. In all, 91 provisional ballots were counted Tuesday. Eighty-two of those ballots included a vote in the Republican circuit court judge runoff between attorneys Brandy Hambright and Harry Satterwhite. Hambright led Satterwhite by 125 votes following election night returns. Satterwhite gained 12 votes on his opponent Tuesday, but it wasn’t enough. Satterwhite picked up 47 votes to Hambright’s 35. Hambright now goes on to face Democratic nominee, Mobile Municipal Court Judge Karlos Finley, in the November general election. The election results will be certified at noon on Friday, July 27, Davis announced to those in attendance.

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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

For the love of dog, please build the bridge! ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AS MY KIDS ARE NOW FIRMLY IN THEIR TEENS, I TRY AS OFTEN AS POSSIBLE TO IMPART IMPORTANT LIFE LESSONS. SOME ARE PRETTY SIMPLE — “SHUT THE DOOR WHEN YOU’RE PEEING!” OTHERS ARE MEANT TO SINK IN OVER TIME AND COME IN HANDY LATER IN YOUNG ADULTHOOD — “DON’T LET YOUR LAST WORDS BE ‘HOLD MY BEER AND WATCH THIS!’”

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this problem. Any of you who have experience with Destin, Florida have already seen where all this goes. Even 15 years ago it was a 45-minute trip to a restaurant five miles away in Destin. Honestly, I never even consider going there anymore because of the congestion. Baldwin and Mobile are headed in that same direction if something isn’t done. Even people just trying to drive through now recognize the Mobile/Baldwin area as a total cluster. The bridge needs to be built and I-10 six-laned all the way to the Florida line. That’s my take as an esteemed traffic engineer. We already have dogs and men jumping off the Bayway. What are we waiting for? Cats and old ladies? Is that what it’s going to take to get something done? Perhaps the only way to ever get the ball rolling on this thing is to get the state and federal people with all the money to get in a nice, hot 1972 VW bus and try to drive from Mobile to Orange Beach at 3 p.m. on a Friday. They can even bring their dogs as long as they’re wearing canine life preservers. I bet the money would flow quickly. This snarl of cars is actually changing our way of life and part of what makes this such a cool place to live. Gone are the days of making that quick run down to the Gulf. I’m waiting for Baldwin County’s next tourism marketing campaign to be “Come for the beaches. Stay because there’s no way you can get out.” If the feds aren’t going to cough up the money for the bridge anytime soon, maybe they could at least spring for some minor improvements to the Bayway — diving boards.

THEGADFLY

Wallace Tunnel at 45 mph honking their horns and holding their breath. A local man’s best friend perfectly accented the frustration with the Bayway this past weekend. According to news reports, Al Trovinger was trying to get across the Bayway on Sunday when — of course — he ended up stuck in a traffic jam caused by a wreck. After sitting for half an hour, he decided to let his dog, River, out to stretch her legs and River did exactly what every one of us has thought about doing in that situation. She flung herself over the railing into the water below. Trovinger watched his 3-year-old dog swim around under the bridge, but without direction he was afraid she’d drown, so he jumped over too. A heroic act, no doubt, but one that would have been completely unnecessary if someone somewhere would get off their duff and finally build the I-10 bridge we’ve been yakking about for the past 15 years. I’m not going to give Trovinger a tough time because he had to relearn a lesson he already knew the hard way: Take the Causeway, Al. I’m sure River was sitting there beside you when you got on the Bayway thinking, “What the hell is he doing?! It’s Sunday! Sunday on the Bayway, are you crazy?! We’ll be stuck for at least an hour! That’s like seven hours for me!” It’s sad to think River was willing to brave drowning and alligator attacks to get off the boiling hot Bayway. Truthfully, though, it wasn’t much better down on the Causeway — or Battleship Parkway, to road snobs. A terrible boating accident had the overflow from the Bayway rubbernecking and making the trip back to Mobile nearly impossible. But at least there was the option to

have a cold beer. Making the trip back and forth to Orange Beach this past weekend was one where you needed to pop a few of grandpa’s blood pressure pills. Traffic was so bad going over on Saturday I even resorted to the dreaded “backroads” tactic in hopes of sneaking around the congestion. I’m sure my father telepathically sensed my use of his favorite move and smiled like Yoda. But it didn’t work. Sure, Highway 31 was fine, but when I headed south on 181 to get on I-10 there was a completely senseless traffic jam that made a one-mile trip take 20 minutes. And then it was an interstate crawl all the way to the Baldwin Express exit anyway. There’s really no reason to explain much more as I’m certain everyone reading this has been through the same exact situation. For the better part of 20 years we’ve been hearing about how the Wallace Tunnel is the worst pinch point on I-10’s entire route from Jacksonville to Los Angeles. And we’ve heard a million times it’s a “priority” for the federal government to rectify that problem. Still, one year after another flips by and nothing concrete ever happens. (Yes, that’s a bridge pun. My dad is smiling like Yoda again.) There are even more condominiums being built along the Gulf, which means more and more people joining in the traffic jam. Some like to dismiss the traffic issues as not being as bad as in big cities like Atlanta, but I’m not certain aspiring to be mentioned in the same breath as the worst snarl in the entire Southeastern U.S. should be our benchmark for getting serious about

Cartoon/Laura Mattei

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s my kids are now firmly in their teens, I try as often as possible to impart important life lessons. Some are pretty simple — “Shut the door when you’re peeing!” Others are meant to sink in over time and come in handy later in young adulthood — “Don’t let your last words be ‘Hold my beer and watch this!’” But perhaps the piece of fatherly advice that passes my lips most often these days as my son begins driving is, “Do not, under any circumstances, ever get on the Bayway!” OK, OK, I’ll admit there are times it’s not massively dumb to try to drive across the Jubilee Parkway, the technical name of the long, raised Interstate 10 roadway connecting Mobile and Baldwin counties. Between the hours of 11 p.m. and 3:45 a.m. it’s not completely likely you’ll end up in a traffic jam as long as it’s not raining. But certainly while the sun is shining it’s a risk, and thinking you’ll sail smoothly across during daytime hours on the weekend is a fool’s errand. None of this is news, of course. We all know these things like we know how to peel a crawfish. But locals still roll the dice every day and end up sitting on the seemingly endless stretch of concrete, waiting for people from Texas, Louisiana and Florida to drive through the

THE TRAFFIC ON THE BAYWAY IS SO BAD, DOGS ARE JUMPING OFF OF IT. IF THEY DON’T BUILD THE BRIDGE SOON, FRUSTRATED MOTORISTS ARE SOON TO FOLLOW.


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Writing is on the wall for Ladd, might as well control the ending

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ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

his week, the city had a community meeting at Williamson High School to discuss the future of Ladd Stadium. The meeting, which was highly contentious at times, seemed to be more about sentimentality than practicality, and what should have been a discussion about what to do with a 70-year-old stadium that will soon, without question, have a much younger and attractive rival on the USA campus, turned into an emotional argument with racial and socioeconomic undertones. Unfortunately, these two issues that have become intertwined should have never been in the first place. As most everyone knows by now, the city is considering giving the University of South Alabama $500,000 per year for 10 years for a total of $10 million to build a stadium on the USA campus. The county has also been asked to contribute but they have not publicly discussed numbers. The stadium is estimated to cost a total of $72 million to construct. In turn, USA would give the city $2.5 million to do whatever it wants with Ladd. The city has floated the idea of tearing it down and building a brand-new but smaller, 5,000-seat stadium that would require much less maintenance and be better suited for the high school teams that would still play there. Many at the meeting expressed how they had been to the Senior Bowl every year and how they loved walking over from their houses or even watching the scoreboard from their yards. I had friends who lived on West Street years ago and they would have an epic Senior Bowl party every year that I never missed. After they moved, my friends and I would always “tent hop” and then head to the “World’s Largest Senior Bowl Party” at Callaghan’s. I get the sentimentality of having it at Ladd and near downtown. I can also understand how the African-American community must feel. The stadium is located in a majority-black community and, as many said at the meeting, it has a been a big part of their culture for decades, hosting Senior Bowl, Dollar General Bowl and Gulf Coast Classic tailgates in their yards over the years. Now, it must seem like the powers-that-be are swooping in and using some of their taxpayer money to move their stadium to a whiter part of Mobile. I get how that is the perception and how that does not seem fair. But that is not the reality. The reality is USA is going to build its stadium no matter what, because that is the next logical step in their football program. That is going to determine Ladd’s fate, and it really doesn’t matter what the mayor, City Council, stadium board or citizens who live around it say or do. So let’s think about that fate. What is going to happen almost immediately once the new USA stadium is completed? There will be a brand-new, 25,000-capacity stadium with the latest, state-ofthe-art training facilities and indoor and outdoor practice fields. The city does not have the money to renovate and maintain Ladd to the level that would be competitive against this new facility. So if you don’t think the Dollar General Bowl and Senior Bowl won’t go to USA almost immediately, you are kidding yourselves. Ladd’s decrepit condition is the biggest thing you hear the NFL coaches, scouts and national sports media complain about every year at the Senior Bowl. When I was riding in the elevator to the press boxes one year with some ESPN folks, they were making jokes about how they thought they were going to get stuck in the elevator (I was scared of that, too!) and just how low-rent the whole place was. They didn’t know I was listening to them, but I was embarrassed for us. I wouldn’t even be surprised if the Gulf Coast Classic was eventually wooed over to USA, too. Nice facilities and a campus full of students who can walk from their dorms and make your game nearly or completely sold out is pretty enticing. USA knows this, too. And they know this move

will essentially kill Ladd, which is part of the reason they offered this money to use in repurposing it. “When we start playing games at home, on campus, it will have an impact on the community,” said Nick Lawkis, associate director of USA’s office of governmental relations, at a recent Mobile City Council meeting. “So we’re saying, here’s $2.5 million to help the community with whatever enhancements they would like to do with Ladd. If not, so be it, we don’t have to. We don’t have to do it. We’re just saying, as a part of this deal, if you would like $2.5 million to help renovate or spruce it up, whatever you’d like to do, we’re trying to contribute to leave the community in a better place than when we got there when we leave. … We’d like to contribute a little bit to what we’ve called our home stadium for the last nine years.” So if we don’t take their money and we just leave it as is, what happens then? We can have four high schools play their games at a 40,000-capacity stadium that they will never, ever fill, and the city will continue to perform the minimum amount of maintenance on a stadium that is way too large for what it is now hosting. And it will continue to deteriorate. Or you could let the city tear part of it down and build a nice, new stadium with a smaller footprint that could possibly include community meeting spaces, walking tracks, practice football or soccer fields, basketball courts, any number of things to make it a much greater asset to the community than it is now and certainly in the years to come. Now, do I think it’s still a valid debate on how much money the city and county contribute to the project, if anything? Absolutely. It’s 100 percent true that the city and county will benefit from the economic impact a new stadium like this will bring in. But obviously one could argue the city could just take $2.5 million from its own budget and do something with Ladd and save itself the $7.5 million going to USA. But, of course, the university is already a huge economic driver in this community and only continues to grow. And because of this, I do think the city and county should contribute something to this project. Should it be this exact deal? I’m not sure yet. I do think it would give taxpayers more comfort to know the university was doing all it could possibly do in private fundraising through bigwig alumni donors and especially with the USA Foundation, which has tons of money (a reported $369 million in net assets), but says they can’t give money to the stadium because it’s “out of the scope of their mission,” which puts some bad-tasting South in the collective taxpayer’s mouth. Because, hey, is it really part of the city and county’s “mission” to help build a stadium either? The university should really try and work something out with the foundation on this. It would look much, much better if they were contributing to this as well. The foundation says its mission “is to support the academic programs of the university like student scholarships or professorships. The endowment is designated and restricted for specific purposes, and the support of a stadium is really outside of that scope.” Like it or not, having a football team and stadium helps attract the kind of students and professors they want to “support,” so they should really reconsider. We can fight and fuss and let this matter divide our community all we want. But it’s all for naught. USA will build a stadium. That move will be detrimental to Ladd. The writing is on the wall, but we can at least control the story that is written. And getting a brand-new, smaller but nicer stadium with many other new amenities really seems to be a much happier ending than watching a stadium that we have all known and loved over the years die a slow and painful death. J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 13


COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

Alabama could be an unintended trade war casualty

BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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ast week a rare moment of bipartisanship highlighted the profound impact of President Donald Trump’s trade policy on newspapers around the country. At the United States International Trade Commission on July 17, Republican and Democratic members of Congress voiced their alarm over how the preliminary tariff on uncoated groundwood paper used for newsprint has caused the price of newsprint to rise nearly 30 percent. The commission was holding a hearing to consider whether the preliminary tariff imposed four months ago on paper coming from Canada should become permanent. As newspapers around the country, both small and large, are buckling financially from the weight of this tariff, unified voices in Congress made it clear: This tariff must end. Republican Sen. Johnny Isakson of Georgia remarked: “The threat of losing the newspaper in this country is a tremendous threat to the First Amendment. … Printed newspapers remain a vital part of our country’s free press, which is a key component of our democratic governance and civic life. … At the local, regional and national level, these papers help us understand and provide necessary context to the events unfolding here at home and across the globe.” According to the law of unintended consequences, the actions of people — and particularly of governments — always have effects that are unintended or unanticipated. This is a fundamental economic principle. However, according to one observer, “Economists and other social scientists have heeded its power for centuries; for just as long, politicians and popular opinion have largely ignored it.” We are seeing this observation play out in real time as tariffs are being put forward and enacted as a way to supposedly level the international trade playing field. Alabama and other states are paying a price for this, though, and if further tariffs are put in place the price can eventually become exceedingly high. Fueled by the increasing production of such things as cars, aircraft components, paper, minerals and chemicals, Alabama exports for 2017 set an annual record, hitting a mark of $21.7 billion. Trade in Alabama is a big deal. Alabama exports have grown 21 percent since 2011 and 50 percent over the decade. Mobile serves as the gateway for shipments that go out to 189 countries, with Canada, China, Germany, Mexico and Japan, in that order, the top five recipients. Likewise, Alabama imports totaled around

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$23.6 billion for 2017. Again, another significant dollar amount, with Mobile serving as the entryway for imports coming chiefly from South Korea, Germany, Mexico, Canada and China. The tens of billions of dollars in trade taking place in Alabama supports close to 600,000 jobs throughout the state. As a result, many Alabama families are beneficiaries of the high volume of exports and imports constantly on the move throughout the state. Yet one of the unintended consequences of putting “America First,” by engaging in the implementation of tariffs, is that this powerful economic growth engine and jobs creator that international trade is in Alabama could become seriously imperiled. As can be seen by the above data, the very countries that are being threatened with tariffs or already have tariffs levied against them are the very same ones that are Alabama’s top trading partners. In retaliation for tariffs levied against them, China has slapped a 25 percent tariff on U.S. soybeans exported to China. On the list of the top 25 Alabama exports, soybeans come in at number 15. The state produces around 400,000 acres of soybeans each year and the soybean industry employs more than 100,000 people throughout the state. The effects of this retaliatory tariff on the state could be profound. Alabama political and business leaders are anxiously waiting to see whether the administration will impose a 25 percent tariff on foreign cars, trucks and auto parts. Not including the new Toyota-Mazda plant that’s estimated to bring in 4,000 jobs, currently Alabama’s automotive manufacturing sector employs almost 40,000 people. Alabama vehicle exports in 2017 totaled nearly $8 billion. Automotive manufacturing has grown so much in Alabama the state has become the nation’s third-largest automobile exporter. We’re in the top three of a national ranking for something besides football. But if the 25 percent tariff is imposed and the nations we target respond in like fashion, the impact on Alabama’s automotive manufacturing sector could be profound — in a negative way. As the gateway for the flow of goods in and out of the state, Mobile stands to take an economic hit as well if there is a significant downturn in international trade in the state. Trade wars aren’t good, nor are they easy. If the country is thrust into one, an unintended consequence could be Alabama becoming one of its casualties.


COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

A 2020 U.S. Senate election bloodletting is what Alabama needs BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

T

he six weeks leading up to last week’s Republican primary runoff was a reminder of just how ugly politics can get. Even without the state’s highest office of governor on the ballot, hundreds of thousands of dollars were pumped into winning an election in which only 12.7 percent of Alabama’s 3.4 million registered voters participated. Consider this: The marquee race on the ballot pitted State Rep. Will Ainsworth (R-Guntersville) against Public Service Commissioner Twinkle Cavanaugh for the office of lieutenant governor. Beyond being thought of as the second-string governor waiting for a chance to steer the ship of state should the sitting governor step aside, could you ask anyone on the street to explain what exactly is the role of lieutenant governor in Alabama and get a satisfactory response? Probably not. Even as an office without a clear purpose, the contest for the GOP lieutenant gubernatorial nomination turned into a free-for-all. Allegations of arrests hit the airwaves. Fiberglass tigers roamed the state. And for what, a seemingly ceremonial position with an office at the State Capitol? The Ainsworth-Cavanaugh race could be a warmup for the GOP intraparty bloodletting the state of Alabama badly needs, which could be coming in 2020 when U.S. Sen. Doug Jones (DMountain Brook) is up for re-election. When Jeff Sessions vacated his seat in 2017 to become U.S. Attorney General, there should have been a robust contest convened to determine the nominee in an election for Sessions’ replacement. Instead, we had the bizarre appointment of Luther Strange by disgraced Gov. Robert Bentley. Then the departure of that disgraced governor led to an ill-timed special election called by his successor, Kay Ivey. Even with Ivey’s effort, we didn’t get it in 2017. The 2017 Republican primary race should have been the opportunity for the best of the best in Alabama Republican Party politics to go head-to-head and weed out the pretenders from the contenders. All of Alabama’s power brokers should have declared an allegiance and laid their cards on the table in backing their guy. We didn’t get that. We got outsiders enabled by Alabama’s respected elder statesman, Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Tuscaloosa), trying to concoct a scenario to have Luther Strange rubber-stamped as the GOP nominee and as U.S. Senator. If you were a visible figure in Alabama politics at the time and thought maybe this would be an opportunity, given it was an off-year election, for you to hold your current office — you might have been told not to bother. Luther was “the guy.” If you were a political consulting firm, you had threats of being blacklisted if you accepted business from a potential candidate. There were a few who ignored those signals, most regrettably Roy Moore. It backfired. Voters rejected Strange, and after some well-timed, well-placed opposition research, they rejected Roy Moore. Had other serious challengers not been deterred, there might have been an ugly civil war within the Alabama GOP. For Republicans, that might sound terrible. Enabling a circular firing squad sounds counterintuitive. In a one-party state such as Alabama, where Democrats struggle, it would have been healthy. Aside from last year’s U.S. Senate special election, going back a decade the GOP candidate

always wins statewide. Thus, the GOP primary process involves trade groups and lobbying interests deploying their resources to support the Republican candidate of their choosing. Those interested parties may or may not include the planters, the old Big Mules, the new Big Mules, the cattlemen’s association, the power company, the health insurance providers, the gambling interests, the pro-lottery advocates, the chamber of commerce types, etc. They have a favorite candidate. Sometimes they line up behind the same favorite. Sometimes they don’t. If the latter is the case, it could pit some of these well-funded heavyweight groups against one another. If the heads of these groups are unable to compromise on a candidate in a backroom somewhere, it’s war. Questionably named “super PACs” run dishonest radio spots, mail out glossy flyers, place endless robocalls and display billboards and yard signs. If you thought the race for lieutenant governor was bad, wait until there is something on the line more relevant than a seemingly ceremonial office. There are also casualties. Usually, no one is donating hard-earned money to political groups for fun. They want results. They want candidates that will cater to their interests. This scenario is in place for the 2020 U.S. Senate election. In Montgomery, there is a schism underway among the state’s most influential groups that is sorting itself out with the breakup of the Business Council of Alabama. Mostly it is a lot of egos vying to be Alabama’s ultimate kingmaker. Last week’s GOP primary was the end of this election cycle for the most part. A formal end comes in November. As studious members of the media, some of us will pretend to take a hard look at both of the candidates, or try to fool ourselves into thinking there is a real contest. Deep down, we all know the GOP nominee is probably going to win in November. That’s why last Wednesday marked the beginning of the political silly season for 2020. Most of America will be watching who the Democrats pick to run against Donald Trump. In Alabama, it will be about who Republicans choose to run against Doug Jones. The speculation as to who that person might be started during Jones’ victory speech in Birmingham last December. Some of the names include Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-Fairhope), Alabama Senate Pro Tem Del Marsh (R-Anniston), Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Huntsville), State Sen. Arthur Orr (RDecatur) and Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-Haleyville). One longshot possibility is the return of Jeff Sessions, but at age 73 in 2020, would he want to campaign to resume his role as a backbencher in the U.S. Senate? A knock-down-drag-out election cycle is what Alabama needs: major divisions within the state’s political power structure. Break up the monopolies. Have the best of the best political consultants go head-to-head against one another. In the end, the last man or woman standing will show who won the will of the voters and those that dwell in the circles of power will be forced to adapt or suffer a future of irrelevance. (Hi, Alabama Education Association.) Think of it as a bloodletting. All the unhealthy factions that exist for the sake of existing will go away. The rotting good ol’ boy networks will give way to new ones. The results won’t be perfect, but they will be more representative of the constituents in the state.

J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 15


BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

BCAR releases June residential report BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

C

oming as no surprise, and perhaps appropriately for summer, Baldwin County residential homes are still selling at a sizzling clip, according to the most recent data released by the Baldwin County Association of Realtors (BCAR). “The Baldwin County housing market — and national housing market for that matter — continues to speed up, and we better be ready for the ride,” the BCAR study said. Residential active inventory totaled 3,184 in June, with 793 properties sold last month, a decrease of 5.6 percent from 806 properties sold in June 2017. Properties are spending fewer days on the market than in 2017, decreasing 41 percent from 138 days last year to 82 days this June. Total sales increased 4 percent this June, to $232,095,540 from $223,388,146 last June. The average sales prices of residential properties in Baldwin County in June 2018 increased about 6 percent from 2017. Last year the average sales price was $277,156, compared to $292,680 this year. Here are residential MLS stats by area:

Central Baldwin

• Residential properties sold in June 2018: 177 • Average sales price: $198,876 • Average days on market: 70 • Average sales price change from June 2017: up 6.2 percent

Coastal Condos

• Residential properties sold in June 2018: 106 • Average sales price: $374,696 • Average days on market: 80 • Average sales price change from June 2017: up 6.4 percent

Coastal Homes

• Residential properties sold in June 2018: 94

16 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8

• Average sales price: $395,881 • Average days on market: 85 • Average sales price change from June 2017: up 8.9 percent

Eastern Shore

• Residential properties sold in June 2018: 289 • Average sales price: $312,544 • Average days on market: 87 • Average sales price change from June 2017: up 8.8 percent

North Baldwin

• Residential properties sold in June 2018: 16 • Average sales price: $153,643 • Average days on market: 77 • Average sales price change from June 2017: up 0.7 percent BCAR is a professional trade association supporting more than 2,000 Realtors in the Baldwin County region. The organization supports members through professional education, peer networking and MLS services. More information about the organization can be found on its website or Facebook page.

Commercial real estate moves

• Hank’s Fine Furniture recently purchased the TechLine warehouse and office property at 30852 State Highway 181 in Spanish Fort for $1,450,000. The 2.1acre commercial parcel consists of two buildings with more than 26,000 square feet of space. The seller will continue to operate from the property while they build a new facility in the I-10 Commerce Center Industrial Park in Spanish Fort.  Plans are in place for the buyer to start renovating the property during the first quarter of 2019. This will be the furniture retailer’s fifth store along the central Gulf

Coast, with existing stores in Mobile, Pensacola, Destin and Panama City. Steven McMahon with Inge & Associates represented TechLine and Sharon Wright with White-Spunner Realty worked for the Hank’s Fine Furniture retail chain. • According to Ballard Sweat with RE/MAX Paradise in Orange Beach, speculators paid over $1 million for the Whispering Pines subdivision located off of U.S. Route 8 in Baldwin County near Gulf Shores. Plans are in place to divide the former neighborhood into 150 lots for recreational vehicles this fall, to be sold for $59,000 per plot. Stacy Ryals with Hosteeva of Realty worked for the buyer. Ballard Sweat represented the seller. • PrimeLending recently held a grand opening for its new 2,000-square-foot retail space. The branch, located at 214 St. Francis St. in downtown Mobile, has been staffed with approximately 20 local employees, according to branch manager Stephanie Kyle. The Dallas-based residential mortgage originator is also planning to open at least five more branches in Mobile and Baldwin counties by the end of the year, reportedly adding upwards of 100 new jobs for the area, per a news release. A PlainsCapital company, PrimeLending has more than 270 locations in 37 states, collectively employing some 2,300 workers. • According to Jeremy Friedman of Katapult Properties, Kudzu Ventures recently acquired a 2,000-square-foot lot inside the Fairhope Professional Park. The site is situated on Professional Park Drive off of Nichols Avenue and near U.S. Route 98 (N. Greeno Road) in Fairhope. Kiel Rubio with Coldwell Banker Reehl Properties represented the sellers. Friedman worked for the buyers.

Stalcup appointed to Ascension AL board of directors

Wilkins Miller, LLC, a local accounting firm with offices in Mobile and Fairhope, recently announced L. Page Stalcup III, a partner with the firm, was selected by the Ascension Healthcare board of trustees to the Ascension Alabama board of directors. Board members carry out Ascension’s mission to manage service priorities across its continuum of health care units. Stalcup joined the firm when the office was originally the Mobile office of Pannell Kerr Forster and became a founding shareholder of Wilkins Miller, P.C., in 1991. He has experience in areas of taxation including corporate, partnership, individual and fiduciary tax and estate planning. He also offers specialized experience in economic, financial, operational, organization and management consulting accounting and auditing for real estate, colleges and universities, construction and manufacturing. Stalcup is a frequent teacher and lecturer in the accounting industry on topics related to the real estate industry. He also has served in an advisory capacity for another municipality, as well as numerous charitable and civic organizations, according to a news release.


J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 17


EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($)

5602 Old Shell Rd. • 219-7086 920 Industrial Pkwy • Saraland • 378-5314

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

FATHOMS LOUNGE

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

15 N Conception St. • 378-9377

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285 $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BIG WHITE WINGS ($)

405 S Wilson Ave. • Prichard• 301-7880

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 378-8378

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$) CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 622-0869

CLEAN EATZ ($)

7335 Airport Blvd. • 654-1575

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

12 N Royal St • 415-1700 107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 3694 Airport Blvd • 342-2352 5300-C Halls Mill Rd • 660-0995 3075 Government Blvd B105 • 461-6080 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730 6890 US-90 #6 • Daphne • 625-8723 9912 Dimitrios Blvd • Daphne • 626-7827 113 S Greeno Rd • Fairhope • 990-3970

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768 6860 US-90 • Daphne • 626-4278

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($)

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($) MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 Eastern Shore Center • Spanish Fort • 625-6544

NOURISH CAFE ($)

HEALTHY WHOLE FOODS & MORE 101 N Water St. (Moorer YMCA)• 458-8572

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($) 562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

PANINI PETE’S ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($) BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

R BISTRO ($-$$)

HOOTERS ($)

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 29660 AL-181 • Daphne • 626-3161 3151 Daupin St• 525-9917 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 S Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-4334

JUBILEE DINER ($-$$)

A VARIETY COMFORT F00D. BREAKFAST ALL DAY. 6882 US-90 • Daphne • (251) 621-3749

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government Blvd. • 665-4547

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477 334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

ROLY POLY ($)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2904 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000 1539 US-98 • Daphne • 517-3963

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$)

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 432-8000

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 4715 Airport Blvd/Regency Square • 304-1155

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St/RSA Building • 444-0200

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. • Daphne • 222-4120

320 Eastern Shore Shopping Center •Fairhope • 929-0055 3055 A Dauphin St. • 479-3200 33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

LAUNCH ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 7450 Airport Blvd. A • 634-3454 570 Schillinger Rd. • 634-3454 29740 Urgent Care Dr.• 626-1160

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) BREAKFAST, HOT LUNCH & GREAT DESSERTS 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 5701 Old Shell Rd Ste 100 • 442-4846 29160 US Hwy 98 • Daphne •621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

1956 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

1500 Government St. • 287-1526

NOJA ($$-$$$)

WILD WING STATION ($)

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. • Fairhope • 990.8883

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • Fairhope •990-6192

‘CUE

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824 INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$)

BAY BARBECUE ($)

SOUTHERN NATIONAL ($$-$$$)

BENJAS ($)

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 829-9227

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

THE TASTE OF MOBILE 59 N Florida St. • 408-9997

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

BBQ AND MORE 6882 US-90 G2/Jubilee Square •Daphne• 210-2151 1390 W D6 Tingle Circle East/McGowin Park• 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. E100/Westwood Plaza • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) TEXARBAMA ($)

112.5 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope

360 Dauphin St • 308-2387

THAI & SUSHI 5369 US-90 • 661-5100

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

A LITTLE VINO DOMKE MARKET

18 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051 GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 312 Schillinger Rd • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

CLASSIC STEAKHOUSE + FRESH FISH 17107 Tennis Club Dr. • Fairhope • 517-7700

CHARM THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR ($-$$)

CHINA DOLL SEAFOOD RESTAURANT($) 3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

CHEF 181 ($)

ASIAN FUSION RESTAURANT 10179 Eastern Shore D • Spanish Fort • 621-2104

FUJI SAN ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

HALAL CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

FOOD PAK INTERNATIONAL FOODS POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171 2370 Hillcrest Rd.• 380-6062

ICHIBAN ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

LIQUID SUSHI LOUNGE ($$)

RED OR WHITE

CHAR 32 ($$$)

THE GALLEY ($)

DROP DEAD GOURMET

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd./Ambassador Plaza• 633-9077

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500

TRADITIONAL JAPANESE WITH HIBACHI GRILLS 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

SOUTHERN NAPA

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

966 Government St.• 408-9001

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

AROY THAI ($$)

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE 3211 Moffett Rd • 473-4739

THE BLIND MULE ($)

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

4513 Old Shell Rd. D• 473-0007

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 2058 Airport Blvd • 476-0516

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

FAR EASTERN FARE

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

THE CHEESE COTTAGE ($$) SPECIALTY GROCER/DELI 650 St. Louis St. • 251-308-8488

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 9 Du Rhu Dr Suite 300 • 378-2678 1539 US HWY 98•Daphne • 273-3337

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR ($$)

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($)

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

AT FLY CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 460-9191

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

2159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

D NU SPOT ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 6890 US-90 • Daphne • 621-2271 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-1689

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($)

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

MAMA’S ($)

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) FIVE ($$)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

BARBEQUE & MUSIC 4672 Airport Blvd. • 410-6377 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 3385 Schillinger Rd N #1 • 410-7428 6423 Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-7427

LODA BIER GARTEN ($)

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

3915 Gov’t Blvd. • 219-7922 3226 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000 BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

7 SPICE ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD.

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Government Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367 2601 S McKenzie St •Foley • 943-4648


SHO GUN ($$)

OFF THE HOOK MARINA & GRILL ($)

SIAM THAI CUISINE & SUSHI BAR ($$)

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

JAPANESE ENTREES, SUSHI & HIBACHI TABLES 7038 Airport Blvd • 304-0021 915 Hillcrest Rd. Suite C • 380-9111

STIX ($$)

10240 Eastern Shore Blvd • 621-9088

SUSHI 9 THAI & JAPANESE ($$) 720 Schillinger Rd • 607-7073

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 • Irvington • 957-1414

TEAK HOUSE

1703 US-98 • Daphne • 625-8680

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Battleship Pkwy • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/ MUDBUGS DIP SEAFOOD ($)

PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168 • 479-0123

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Battleship Pkwy • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1530 Battleship Pkwy • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2200

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($) 30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($) CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

CAJUN INSPIRED/FRESH SEAFOOD & MORE 621 N Craft Hwy • Chickasaw • 422-3412 THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464 3947 AL-59 Suite 100 • Gulf Shores • 970-1337

MANCIS ($)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318

BAR & GRILL 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA MURPHY’S

TAKE ‘N’ BAKE PIZZA 3992 Government • 287-2345 7820 Moffett Rd. • Semmes • 586-8473 2370 Hillcrest Rd • 661-4003 3764 Airport Blvd • 338-9903 705 Highway 43 • Saraland •308-2929 27955 US 98 • Daphne • 621-8666

RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

MUG SHOTS ($$)

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$)

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

LUCKY IRISH PUB ($)

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$) 751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Alabama 181 • Fairhope• 281-2663 IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 1108 Shelton Beach Rd •Saraland • 473-0757 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & OTHER AMERICAN CHOW 104 N Section St • Fairhope • 929-2219

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 805 S Mobile St • Fairhope • 929-2322 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335

MAMA MIA!

IS THE GAME ON?

1715 Main St. (Next to Manci’s) Daphne. • 264-2520

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 2453 Old Shell Rd • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 3206 Joe Treadwell Dr • 378-2444 6880 US-90/Jubilee Square • Daphne • 625-4695

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 36 Hillcrest Rd • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$)

WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832 25755 Perdido Beach Blvd •Orange Beach • 981-3041

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$)

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 • Spanish Fort• 375-0076

BUSTER’S BRICK OVEN ($-$$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GUIDO’S RESTAURANT ($$) FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

SEMMES HOUSE OF PIZZA ($) 3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

MARCO’S PIZZA ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 625-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 2409 Schillinger Rd S • 525-8431 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911 2303 S McKenzie St •Foley • 970-1414

MIRKO ($$)

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

VIA EMILIA ($$)

OLÉ MI AMIGO! AZTECAS ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 US-90 • 661-5509

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

DON CARLOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT ($)

29669 Alabama 181 • Spanish Fort • (251) 625-3300

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

EL PAPI ($-$$)

615 Dauphin St • 308-2655

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8619

FUZZY’S TACO SHOP ($) 5713 Old Shell Rd.• 338-9697

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

THE BLIND TIGER ($-$$)

quality food and simple unique cocktails

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

TIEN ($-$$)

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

ISLAND VIEW:

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($) CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$)

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

C&G GRILLE ($)

3172 International Dr. • 476-9967

PALACE CASINO:

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$) POOR MEXICAN ($) ROOSTER’S ($)

TAQUERIA CANCUN ($)

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$) AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

THE BUFFET ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

MIGNON’S ($$$)

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$) INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TREASURE BAY:

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839

THE DEN ($-$$)

INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS

AMAZING ARRAY OF MOUTH-WATERING FOOD.

CQ ($$-$$$)

LOCAL SEAFOOD AND 40+ BEERS

BLU ($)

STALLA ($$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

WIND CREEK CASINO:

TERRACE CAFE ($)

FIRE ($$-$$$)

COAST SEAFOOD & BREW ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

ITALIAN COOKING

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

HARD ROCK CASINO:

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($) AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$) EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SCARLET PEARL:

9380 Central Avenue D’Iberville • 800-266-5772

CHEF WENDY’S BAKING ($-$$)

MADE-TO-ORDER FESTIVE TREATS AND SPECIALTY CAKES.

UNDER THE OAK CAFE ($-$$)

CLASSIC ALL-AMERICAN CASUAL CUISINE WITH OVER 100 OPTIONS.

WATERFRONT BUFFET ($$-$$$) SOUPS, SALADS, FRESH SEAFOOD, AND MORE

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

CHOPSTX NOODLE BAR ($-$$)

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

SCARLET’S STEAKS & SEAFOOD ($$$)

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$)

BUTLER’S BAR & LOUNGE ($$)

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

VIETNAMESE SANDWICHES, PHO, AND APPETIZERS.

SAVORY STEAKS AND SEAFOOD

EXTRAORDINARY DRINK MENU, COCKTAILS

J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 19


CUISINE THE REVIEW

Asian Garden has the Korean you’re craving

ASIAN GARDEN 2488 HILLCREST ROAD MOBILE 36695 251-661-8338

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

I

’ve had a lot of people ask me about Korean food lately, and I can’t seem to find any. I’m all ears if you know a spot within a hundred-mile radius. Mainly the inquiries are about Korean barbecue, something I’ve considered getting into at home since I do love beef bulgogi. That’s the Korean dish requested the most. It got me thinking of the last time I had anything labeled Korean. There was the Korean barbecue taco from Jack’s by the Tracks in Pascagoula, which may be my favorite taco ever, but the last time I remember having bulgogi was at Asian Garden. When my mind is set on something delicious, it’s hard to steer me from it. We loaded up the latest grocery-grabbing Subaru, new to our fleet, and headed west on Cottage Hill. I can’t say exactly how many other places tempted us, but I had tunnel vision. It was bulgogi or bust for me. A full parking lot engulfing a smallish building is a sign of two things: The food is probably good, and you’ll more than likely have to wait on seating. It’s been four years since my last visit, but I very quickly realized my rookie mistake of hitting this place up at noon on a Sunday. They were slammed. In the weeds. The 112-degree heat index was, despite a short walk through the parking lot, enough to make us appreciate the air conditioning no matter if we were sitting or standing. A 15-minute wait was surely bearable. When finally seated, I noticed the lunch menu showed no signs of the dish that prompted the short-term (disputable, I know) insanity that drove me to drive this far for a bit of beef and a bowl of rice. A bit of panic set in. I was prepared to walk in spite of the fact that the chair was soft and accommodating and the cool air was

WORD OF MOUTH

Tickets on sale for 2nd annual Wine on the River Cooper Riverside Park will again host the Land Rover Gulf Coast Wine on the River wine tasting Saturday, Oct. 20, 4-8 p.m. This second annual event will have an “Around the World” theme focusing on selected cultural regions, with wine and beer available for purchase. Live music and food from local restaurants and food trucks sweeten the pot. There’s plenty of time to get your tickets, but take advantage of early-bird pricing to attend on the cheap. Now through Aug. 6, tickets cost $39 plus tax. Thereafter (Aug. 7 through Oct. 19) tickets will cost $49, and $59 the day of the event. Wine on the River is proud to maintain a charitable component by contributing pro-

drying my feverishly hot forehead, until the third waitress to take our drink order told me I could certainly order off the dinner menu. Whew! About the time Waitress #3 was tending to us, the restaurant was calming down and resuming a sense of normalcy for diners and servers alike. We’d all handled it well with minimal panic or fussing and fighting. It was now time to get busy eating. You can’t take the boys anywhere Asian without getting pork dumplings ($4.50). Call them pot stickers or any other of the half-dozen names you see in this town, but I’m on board with this type of behavior. Asian Garden offers them steamed, deep-fried or pan-fried. We chose the latter for that hint of crispiness. We ran the table on the soup course, complimentary with every lunch special. Graham was more than pleased with his miso. Crispy noodles, cheese-stuffed wontons and a veggie spring roll on the side were “delicacies from the Orient” as far as he was concerned. He loved every bit. Lucas had the clear-broth egg drop soup, flavorful despite its plain appearance. He’s fond of the crispy noodles, but donated the rest of his fanfare to his little brother. Katie had the wonton soup, with a single, sizable wonton with good texture and plenty of vegetables. Cabbage, greens and the wonton not being “cooked to death” won her over. Since I wasn’t ordering from the lunch menu I had to order soup separately. Tom yum ($4.50) isn’t exactly what you crave in these temperatures, but I wasn’t going to feel left out. Served with chicken and shrimp, I will allow that it’s not my favorite. A bit of cabbage, mushrooms, imitation crab and that oddly cut chicken just didn’t turn me on. The broth was pretty good and I enjoyed the heat

ceeds and collaborating with Fuse Project, an organization dedicated to providing the spark for innovation, funding and implementation of projects benefiting health, fitness, education and social responsibility of our children. For more information and to purchase tickets online visit www.wineontherivermobile.com.

Walk-Ons Bistreaux and Bar opens on Airport Blvd. If you’ve ever visited 3673 Airport Blvd., you may have dined at Don Pablo’s Mexican Kitchen, Baumhower’s Wings or Bishop’s Grill and Bar. That interior space is now unrecognizable, transformed into Mobile’s latest sports bar, Walk-Ons Bistreaux and Bar. With a name like that you can bet your

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level 3 (of a possible 5), but I just wanted it to be a little simpler. Lucas had the beef and broccoli lunch ($7.50), basically pepper steak with mixed veggies of carrots, broccoli, mushrooms, zucchini and onions in a brown sauce. He ate all of his vegetables, save the onions and ‘shrooms, again passing them off to his brother. Moo Goo Gai Pan ($7.50) was Katie’s choice, and she was happy to report the thin-sliced chicken with tender, crisp vegetables in the light sauce had a bit of a garlic flavor. It was non-polarizing, as moo goo gai pan should be. Graham settled for a very good dish of Osaka Chicken Chop ($7.50). Perfectly cooked chicken breast was chopped crosswise with a light brown sesame sauce next to the same mixed veggies we pretty much all enjoyed, only he had more due to a generous brother. I loved his chicken. It was the second-best dish of the day. Of course I got what I came for. Seoul Bulgogi ($10.99) wasn’t on the lunch menu, but I happily paid the dinner price. I have a lot of favorite dishes in this city. I’ll easily keep this in the top 15, and that’s a big deal for me. This version is thin-sliced beef marinated and cooked with garlic cloves (sliced even thinner) that reach a sweet flavor, imparting earth tones to the meat. A side of kimchi adds the tartness and sting, but remember a little goes a long way. It’s a gorgeous dish. I want someone’s Korean grandmother to show me the secrets of bulgogi. I must learn the ways. So here’s what we’ve learned: Asian Garden is still shelling out great food. It’s probably better to wait until 1:30 p.m. if you go on Sunday. I don’t know why it took me four years to return, but I won’t wait that long again. You asked me, I checked it out, and it’s still good. Know any other Korean spots? Clue me in.

bottom dollar the place has roots in Louisiana. With co-owner/partner Drew Brees of the New Orleans Saints, there is some celeb power behind this, as well as a heavy Cajun influence to the menu. Yes, it’s a sports bar, but everything has a bit of a twist to it. Boudin balls are served with a Dijon horseradish sauce. Devils on Horseback are stuffed with cream cheese and pickled jalapeños, wrapped in bacon and deep fried. The gumbo is duck and andouille. Fried alligator is more tender than usual, and you can even get etouffee as a side. Definitely not your usual sports bar menu, but they still have burgers and wraps. Certain tables have their own taps so guests don’t have to wait for a server to refill their glasses. The taps record how much you drink and tally up your check. That sounds delightfully dangerous! The staff seems knowledgeable, as if

spring training went well. With plenty of TV screens, I’m certain this will be a football destination for those in the Airport/I-65 area. It opened Monday, so try it soon. For a complete menu and the backstory of this growing chain, visit www.walk-ons.com.

Bay Bites finalized food truck list seems promising

It’s last minute, but Bay Bites Food Truck Festival has assembled a smart-looking list for its July 25 event. BFF Food Truck, Frios Gourmet Pops, The Hotdoggery, Katie’s Kotton Kandy, Kraken Katering Co., Maya Luna, Mother Shuckers Corn Roasters, Southern Grill BBQ, Soul Heaven Café, TinTin’s Rock and Roll and WeMo’s Wings will be in attendance. That’s a mouthful! Recycle!


J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 21


COVER STORY

Condos still rising on beaches in resort towns BY JOHN MULLEN/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

E

very time a new resort condo complex is approved, a hue and cry goes up from the citizenry about how the beaches in Baldwin County are already overcrowded. New complexes, they say, will bring more and more traffic to an already overburdened infrastructure. And every time, Orange Beach Mayor Tony Kennon comes back with the same response. “There’s an argument out there to stop building condos or [impose] a moratorium on building,” Kennon said. “We say this over and over and almost every time we have a meeting that this is not a possibility. You can’t stop people from building on property what they have a right and are zoned to build on. You will get sued and lose gazillions of dollars. “It really frustrates me to hear the chatter out there, especially on social media, that we need to stop building, we need to stop growth. It doesn’t work that way. As long as people want to build and they follow the rules, they can do it.” Causing the latest uproar is the fourth new condominium complex from developer Brett-Robinson in four years. Fifth, if you count the buildings. Phoenix Gulf Towers is planned for west Orange Beach between Sugar Beach on the east and Palm Beach on the west. It will include two 26-story buildings, each with 96 units. That’s not the only area of growth along the coast. In Orange Beach alone since January 2017, more than 843 subdivision lots or condo units have been approved. In 2017, 139 building permits were issued for singlefamily housing and through June of this year, 62 more have been issued. Additionally, the Caribe Resort already has approval for more than 500 more units at its complex on the east side of Perdido Pass, owner Larry Wireman said. His plans to build a 160-unit Caribe on the Beach next to the Cotton Bayou Beach Access have been canceled. On the books and approved before January 2017 are three towers on lots east of the Hampton Inn and near the intersection of Alabama State Route 161 and Route 182, the only intersection on beach road in town. Those condos - Grace, Ascension and Transcendence - would add a total of 443 units if developed. Ground has not been broken on any of these projects. Gulf Shores is seeing even higher numbers. There are 21 subdivisions with a total of 1,614 single-family residential lots approved and ready for building. D.R. Horton is applying for 23 more lots in a subdivision on Wedgewood Drive that is phase III of an 85-lot subdivision already underway.

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of the year and the rest of the time nobody’s here. It’s a way of life anymore.” There are more than 17,000 vacation condos, hotel rooms and beach houses in south Baldwin County. Orange Beach alone has 8,466 of the 14,567 condos with Gulf Shores having 4,519 and Fort Morgan 1,582. There are a total of 2,473 hotel rooms in Gulf Shores and Orange Beach and none in Fort Morgan.

Traffic fixes

Kennon and Mayor Robert Craft of Gulf Shores are both trying to come up with traffic fixes of their own, but the problem roads are controlled by the Alabama Department of Transportation. Another 931 units are approved for condo, apartment Both towns recently voted to increase the lodging tax from 11 percent to or vacation cottages for a total of 2,545. Included in those 13 percent with the state getting 4 percent; each city collects 7 percent, and 2 numbers are the 350-room Gulf State Park Lodge and a percent goes to the island Convention and Visitors Bureau to woo tourists to 98-room Best Western on East Beach Boulevard across vacation in both cities and the Fort Morgan peninsula. the street from the beach. Both cities say the extra funds — about $5 million for Orange Beach and Those numbers don’t include a new public-private just under $3 million for Gulf Shores — will be used for roads and the clean venture to build a 229-room Embassy Suites hotel on a city-owned lot on West Beach Boulevard across the street beach initiative, Leave Only Footprints. On the Gulf Shores side, the state is moving ahead with property acquisifrom the Gulf. The city is giving DD Partners a $6.5 miltions for a new road from the Foley Beach Express south to a bridge over the lion tax rebate over eight years to help pay for meeting Intracoastal Waterway east of the Gulf Shores airport. It will land on a Canal space in the new hotel. All of this will attract more and more people on roads Road that is scheduled to be widened to five lanes using Restore Act money. Gulf Shores also recently announced plans to pursue $46 million in grant that are already clogged daily during the busy summer season. Vann Owens is a retired autoworker who drives a money for a variety of traffic fixes, among them a third lane south over the State taxi amid all the traffic chaos. He says the main problems Route 59 bridge and a pedestrian bridge attached to the east side of the bridge. A city delegation also visited officials in Washington, D.C., to pursue a he sees are at the Flora-Bama and eastbound travel on grant in the Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development program, or Canal Road. BUILD. It takes the place of the former Transportation Investment Generating “I was trying to get a passenger to Indigo in Perdido Key and the back-up eastbound from the Flora-Bama was Economic Recovery, or TIGER, grants. The project would cost a total of $46.1 million, with $25.1 million coming a mile and a half,” Owens said. “I turned around and went from BUILD funds, $21.6 from RESTORE Act funds and the city will kick in to 98 to Lillian and then went to Perdido Key that way. $3.4 million to pay for the design costs of the projects. I’ve had to do that four or five times this year because of In Orange Beach, the city is moving forward with the Wolf Bay Bridge, a what the Bama is not addressing.” span that has been talked about for 25 years or more. The City Council recently Owens also has a route to miss the Canal Road headvoted to spend a little over $3 million on survey work as well as design, enache, one many residents are using during the summer gineering and permitting to kick off the process leading to construction of the months. long-awaited span. “If I pick up somebody at Turquoise and take them to ALDOT is preparing to begin construction of a second eastbound lane from The Wharf and it’s backed up like that and it’s jammed William Silvers Parkway to Alabama 161 on Canal Road. Moving utilities to and jammed and jammed, I circle back through Gulf make room for the lane will start when school is back in session and take until Shores and the state park,” Owens said. “This year’s it’s the start of the 2019 summer season, maybe longer. been a nightmare out there.” It will include a complete rebuild of the Canal Road and Alabama 161 Owens says he understands there’s not much the city can do to stop someone who wants to build on property they’ve intersection with two sweeping turn lanes headed south, causing the removal of a Tom Thumb convenience store at the corner. invested in and are building within the zoning laws. The biggest fix needed, most people agree, is a road through the state park. “I think the City Council and the planning commis“I don’t think in my lifetime there will ever be a road through the park to sion both can only do so much,” Owens said. “They just can’t stop things in its tracks. I know we don’t like it and connect the beach with Canal Road,” Kennon said. “It is the most commonI know we don’t like fighting this traffic that’s gotten tre- sense fix for our traffic. But the governor’s office, in a lawsuit with environmental groups over the lodge for Gulf State Park, signed an agreement not to build mendous this year because I’m all over the place. I think the City Council, they just can’t shut the door. I don’t like any new roads for 20 years.” Orange Beach officials are saying improving an existing roadway which some of the things they do but this particular issue right was the original road on the island to the beach, Powerline Road, would not go here, I just don’t think they can do any different.” against the lawsuit. Wireman says he knows adding units, whether it be “We all agree it is a road, Powerline Road and its continuation,” Kennon at Caribe or the two towers Brett Robinson is planning said. “But the state doesn’t recognize it as a road.” in west Orange Beach, will increase the traffic on city streets. But he also says it’s seasonal. “I’m probably the wrong person to ask because I’m in PUD a bad word? the condo business and I think traffic is fine,” Wireman The cities sometimes get flack for approving planned unit developments said. “As far as the traffic goes, I’m not going to complain (PUDs) that include changes or variances to the zoning regulations. Brett Robabout the traffic. Somebody said it’s as bad as Atlanta and inson asked for some in each of the four buildings it is building or planning to I say you haven’t been to Atlanta lately. It’s 100 days out


COVER STORY build in Orange Beach. Phoenix Orange Beach is nearing completion on the west side of the Hampton Inn and Phoenix Orange Beach II is a few stories out of the ground about a mile or so east of the Alabama 161 intersection. There is a PUD to avoid a small zoning requirement, the incremental setback rule. Starting at a certain height, zoning calls for the building to be 10 feet narrower with each additional story. Kennon insists that in the past most PUDs were efforts to increase density and squeeze in more units than allowed by zoning regulations. “PUD is not a bad word in this context,” Kennon said. “This is the proper use of a PUD.” In all the new Phoenix developments there were concessions, but the end result was buildings smaller than what the company could build by rights. In the case of Phoenix Gulf Towers, more than 1.16 million square feet of living space and 243 individual units would be allowed on the parcel Instead, each building will have 96 units, or a total of 192 broken down into 24 twobedroom units, 24 three-bedroom units and 48 four-bedroom units in each building and a total of 926,000 square feet. “We’re reducing the overall number of units by 51,” Brett Robinson’s John Brett told the commission. “That’s 51 less three- and four-bedroom units and however many cars it takes to fill up those units. It’s 243,000 square feet smaller.” In applications for each of the new Phoenix buildings, similar concessions were made reducing the number of allowed units and height of the projects.

Embassy Suites

Herb Malone, president and CEO of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach Tourism, says the Embassy Suites hotel will be used to provide a new tourism draw. “Not only does Embassy Suites add more meeting space to the destination, but it also adds to our lodging inventory, which helps us to continue to attract more visitors who will shop at our stores, eat at our restaurants, book at our attractions and vacation here for years to come,” Malone said. When Gulf Shores and island tourism officials looked at the plan submitted by DD Partners for the project they saw something was missing. Or, at least something they hoped would be included. “It was us requiring they do some level of public meeting space to create meetings within the city that we do not have right now,” Craft said. “We have nothing that we can host a conference or convention within the city of that scale.”

Craft believes the meeting spaces in the hotel will attract a new segment of the tourism market. “We’re excited for the opportunity to have this in our community and we think it will provide a broader season,” Craft said. “The convention and conference season is typically not in the middle of the summer. It’s in the shoulder season and we feel like this will give us a broader impact.” Gulf Shores will give Embassy Suites a tax rebate of 42 percent during the first three years of operation and 35 percent every year following, until the $6.5 million is reached, or the basic cost of adding more than 11,000 square feet of meeting space including a 7,800-squarefoot ballroom to the project. “We’ve taken the cost of that floor and incentivized them to do that with that $6.5 million rebate on a certain level of taxes to get that done,” Craft said. “We felt like that was an important addition to the city but we didn’t give them money just for nothing. We gave them that to include that in their plan.” City officials estimate they’ll reach the $6.5 million after eight years of operation. It does not include a rebate on any taxes earmarked for education, transportation projects or beach renourishment. Additionally, the company gets no breaks on permitting required by city codes including the building permit. Even with the rebates, the city expects to still collect as much as $15 million in revenue from the project over its first 10 years of operation. DD Partners will also give the city $1.2 million in cash to build 150 parking spaces in the Gulf Beach District and a $3.3 million letter of credit to secure the property for the project. Once the project begins, Economic Development Director Blake Phelps said, the letter will be returned. The company must start the project no later than July 2019 and complete construction by September 2021. The city first sought partners in 2015 to develop a 1.93-acre parcel it owns on West Beach Boulevard behind the Alvin’s Island store, where Alabama Route 59 ends at the beach. A study by Dr. Keivan Deravi from Auburn University-Montgomery said the new project will have a $65 million annual impact in the community. Officials said the entire project will cost about $85 million. There will be 229 rooms, a full-service spa, an indoor pool and a fitness center. The crown jewel of the project is the 23,000-square-foot rooftop with views of Gulf Place beachfront and the Gulf. It will include a bar, a lounge and a grassy area for games and viewing events on the beach road and will be open to the public. The rooftop pool will be available to hotel guests only.

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ART ARTIFICE

Mobilian headlines 20th annual jazz festival

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BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM rummer Bradley Hamilton is familiar with the spotlight but he’ll be facing more hometown folks than ever on Aug. 4. That’s when he takes the stage with saxophonist Donald Harrison Jr. in the headlining ensemble for the 20th annual Gulf Coast Ethnic and Heritage Jazz Festival. It’s not Hamilton’s biggest event considering the Mobile native played the prestigious Newport festival in the summers of 2013-15. He’s also been a director for the B.B. King All-Stars at Sea for 16 months. But it will be the largest group of locals who have watched Hamilton play beyond church and smaller venues. His childhood path to the show at the Arthur Outlaw Convention Center began when he spied some drums in church. “My grandmother, she passed recently but she’s responsible for my training. She put me in a drum class with Mr. Leon Rhoden of the Excelsior Band and I was with him from [age] 3 to 16,” Hamilton said. Rhoden fostered the youngster’s interests at every turn. He let him sit in on gigs, even took the 12-year-old to a clinic by James Brown alum Jabo Starks. Rhoden also let a teenaged Hamilton take over the older musician’s slot as a Community Activities Program teacher. As Hamilton neared graduation from John LeFlore High School, an aunt passed along word about the New Orleans mentor program at the nonprofit Tipitina’s Foundation. Hamilton made the cut, so every Monday for a semester during his last year at LeFlore the family drove him to the Crescent City for instruction.

Company 11 stages Pulitzer winner Jessie Cates is utterly disappointed by life. A physical disability wracks her, she can’t keep a job or marriage, her son is a criminal and without her widowed mother, she would be homeless. Jessie’s untreated chronic depression suddenly lifts one day. That’s when she gets things in order and asks her mother for her dead father’s service revolver. “‘night, Mother,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama about life’s cruelties, is the latest offering from Company 11, an upstart troupe targeting edgier adult fare. They utilize a 70-seat facility in the Center for Creative Living (60 N. Ann St.), on the southwest corner of Ann Street and Old Shell Road. The play runs July 26 through Aug. 2. Curtain for the Thursday through Saturday shows is 8 p.m.

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What the Mobilian learned there under Harrison built on the contemporary jazz he was exposed to through his father. Hamilton’s admiration seeps into his accounts of the enthusiasm and patience he witnessed. “They call him Uncle Donald. Once you’re under his wing, under his mentorship, then you really do become a part of his family,” Hamilton said. The drummer’s talent and a few connections landed him a slot in the hallowed halls of Berklee College of Music, where he delved further into musical theory, its language and challenges. He wasn’t as awestruck by Berklee as others expected. Hamilton credited his focus on longterm goals. “What blows my mind now is a lot of the people I went to school with then are touring with major artists now. They’re in Atlanta and L.A., getting endorsements and recognition, and I went to school with these people. It’s crazy,” Hamilton said. Hamilton’s shining hometown moment will be old hat for Harrison. The saxophonist and Mardi Gras Indian Chief-turned-TV star — Harrison was in HBO’s “Treme” series — has played GCEHJF twice before. That path reflects the maturation of the event. His first show was intended for outdoors but a powerful August thunderstorm chased festival personnel into a now-defunct Water Street blues club. The second was in the iconic Temple Downtown. Last year’s GCEHJF concert was the first held in the luxurious Water Street Convention Center and the enthusiastic response from all involved made a return a priority. The bill features percus-

Tickets are $15, $12 for seniors and students. Visit company11.org for tickets and information. Student winners announced Winners of the 12th annual MAWSS “Fun with Water” Watercolor Contest have been selected from more than 150 entries submitted by area students in grades K-12. • Overall winner: Jeremy Bankston (Theodore High School), “Hide ‘n Seek”; • Grades 9-12: Lindsey Imsand (Theodore High School), “Adventure Under the Sea”; • Grades 6-8: Catherine Chung (Dunbar Magnet School), “Dragon Boat Race”; • Grades 3-5: Dylan LeGros (Council Traditional School), “Fishing with Dad”; and • Grades K-2: Camille Chancey (home-schooled), “Colorful Kayaks.” Winners will be recognized at

sionist Tony Bowers, the E.B. Coleman Big Band featuring Karmilla Ali, Tower of Power tribute ensemble Everybody’s Here, before concluding with Harrison and the Young Greats Band. The centerpiece concert starts at 5:30 p.m. Entrance is $15, $10 for students. GCEHJF’s customary cultural impact lands in the preceding weeks. The Marcus Johnson Jazz Camp runs July 23 through Aug. 3. “A Night of Poetry” takes place at the History Museum of Mobile (111 S. Royal St.) on Thursday, Aug. 2, at 8:30 p.m. The jazz campers hold a recital on Friday, Aug. 3, 6 p.m. at the same museum. “I’ll pull as many people as I can bring in. Most of my friends will come out,” Hamilton said of the Saturday show. The young musician points to jazz and hip-hop as his “top genres.” His project, “Thoughts of a Scholar,” blends the academic with contemporary trends for a unique voice. “I’m telling my generation it’s OK to educate yourself on things you’re curious about, don’t shun it for what the majority says. Everybody’s different and we all have our own experiences,” Hamilton said. He aims to tour colleges in the fall. Hamilton worries about technology and efforts to replace human creativity with artificial intelligence. He points to another Harrison protégé who played GCEHJF with Esperanza Spalding a dozen years ago as a sign of something only humans can do. “We always find ways to reinvent. Christian Scott did a good job of mixing what jazz was and where it is and where it’s going. He did all of that,” Hamilton said.

an Aug. 3 awards ceremony at The Shoppes at Bel Air. MAWSS officials will present them with gift cards.    Judges were Amberly Harris of Cumulus Broadcasting, Shelby Mitchell of 95 KSJ, Kelly Finley of FM Talk 106.5, local artist Ardith Goodwin and Jennifer Caillavet, marketing coordinator for The Shoppes at Bel Air.  Congratulations to all the winners! MTG hands out Zoghby awards Mobile Theatre Guild presented its annual Zoghby Awards for the 2017-2018 season July 14 at the Lafayette Street playhouse. Named for Fr. Anthony Zoghby, who founded the Catholic Theatre Guild that became MTG, this completes their 68th season. Winners are: • Best Show: “Assassins,” directed by Gene Murrell; • Best Actress (nonmusical): Jo Ann

Olivera; • Best Actor (nonmusical): Timothy Guy; • Best Actress (musical): Kat Hewitt; • Best Actor (musical): Larry Andrews; • Best Female Newcomer: Melissa Summersell; • Best Male Newcomer: Nick Smith; • Dr. Leslie L. Leslie Award: Gay Gandy and Trish Kellar; • Nibbles Award: Susan Vinson (“Assassins”); • Jerry Carre Award: Phillip Tapia; • Danny Conway Award: Jo Ann Olivera; • Presidents Award: Alessia Vinson; • Tres Costa Award: Corrine March; • Director’s Awards: Angel Ashley (“Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf”); Susan Vinson (“Tuna Does Las Vegas”); Josh Harper, Savannah Teague, Gavin Reeves (“Assassins”); Gayle Alexander (“The Pot”); and Stan Chapman (“Closed Session”).


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miserable. When you get it in and let people know it’s still a party and drinking and fun, it triggers a memory, even if they didn’t know they had it — it makes it familiar. Now, you look at guys like Luke Bryan and Jason Aldean and Sam Hunt and Kane Brown, my bucket list at the time. and I can mix it and nobody even turns around Centanni: With all that considered, for some- and looks at you like you’re crazy. body so schooled in classic EDM, what was it Centanni: How would you describe your about country music that made you want to mix first experience mixing country in front of a and mash it up? country crowd? Silver: That was what I grew up on and comSilver: You know, that was probably harder fortable with and what I knew. Just like a guy than mixing country for people in a nightclub, that grows up on hip-hop, they know what songs because they’re usually a little more drunk. I to get in and out of and how to drop a verse or will never forget that first night I was with Jason. chorus and make people sing back to you. I knew We were in Little Rock, Arkansas. He met me in that with country. Vegas a few months before and said he had a tour My mom and dad and all my friends would coming. Kevin Neal, our agent, worked it out. sit on the front porch. My parents would sing First show was in Little Rock. These people off-key or play the wrong chords, but I thought it in Arkansas — and nothing against Arkansas was the greatest thing that I ever heard. That was people — are into very true, traditional country. something I knew and was comfortable with. I Now that I know that, I probably would’ve done didn’t know that there was no one else doing it. It things a little different, but it was my first time was nothing for me to play Alabama, Ludacris and to play in a crowd like that. They were kinda Rage Against the Machine back-to-back. Good looking at me. I’d get a song in, and it would music is good music. It kinda became my thing. take a minute. Then, they would catch on, and it People would be like, “You want an off-thewas good. wall, mashup DJ, then hire this guy.” Then it A lot of people that just go to pure country got to where it was, “I know you’re gonna play bars, they always have dancers that if you play country tonight, so just get in and out.” Now, their one song, they’ll dance the entire song, and we’re doing 10 straight days and a residency in no matter if Jesus Christ himself was singing the Las Vegas in December for the [National Finals national anthem after that song, they’re gonna Rodeo] at the Gold Buckle Zone at the MGM. leave the dance floor. That’s the mentality they Centanni: What kind of reaction did you get have. It took me years to break that. Now they from the EDM crowd when you started messing come to see me and it’s a nonstop party. They with country? know what they’re getting into. Silver: Country has a stigma of ugly people Centanni: What is it about being out on the and dogs running away and being lonely and road with Jason Aldean that keeps you coming

Band: Jason Aldean with special guests Luke Combs, Lauren Alaina and Dee Jay Silver Date: Thursday, July 26, 7:30 p.m. Venue: The Amphitheater at The Wharf, 23101 Canal Road (Orange Beach), www.thewharfal.com Tickets: $199-$300 (resale prices) available through Ticketmaster

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or more than two decades, music enthusiasts have seen a steady mingling of genres and styles, one of the most surprising being the union of EDM and country music — with Dee Jay Silver leading the movement. Silver’s talent for mixing and mashing dance club beats and backwoods anthems has led him to collaborate with a number of country artists ranging from Austin Webb to Luke Bryan. Silver even showcases country mix-ups and mashups on his weekly radio program, “The Country Club with Dee Jay Silver.” Lately, Silver has been keeping the party rolling on the road with longtime friend Jason Aldean. Silver gave Lagniappe some insight into the creation of his unique EDM style. Stephen Centanni: You’ve been in EDM since before the term was coined. Dee Jay Silver: Yeah, I remember when they tried to break that in, and we all kinda thought it was laughable. It’s all “electronic dance music” if a DJ is playing it, you know. Centanni: I was reading where one of your heroes was Bad Boy Bill, who has been a favorite of mine. Silver: He’s one of the best I’ve ever seen. He is one of the first DJs I had ever seen showcased live; it was at Excalibur in Chicago. I remember that it was like walking into “Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome.” The dude was just killing it. The first time I got to headline that room was part of

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MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Dee Jay Silver mixes, mashes country with EDM

back for more? Silver: I have been so blessed in this world and in this life. I’ve been with Jason for nine, almost 10 years now. Every night, his show is just high energy and fun and never gets old. I don’t wanna sound biased because he’s my dude, but he is a true entertainer and a rock star. Even though I saw it [the live show] Thursday night, I wanna watch it Friday night and watch it Saturday and watch it Sunday night. I could have very easily went back to the bus and watched TV or went to sleep, but it’s the excitement and energy. I’m also over-the-moon proud of this dude. I know what he’s gone through and fought to get where he’s at and fought to keep that position he has. I don’t believe that I’m partial when I tell you he’s the best, and I’m proud to be on the road with him. Centanni: When you’re on the road playing these big venues with Aldean, what goes through your mind when you start thinking back to your early days in the club? Silver: Honestly, it’s that nervous excitement that I can’t even wait for my 35 minutes to play and my time to get onstage. Another part of me says, “I can’t believe I get paid to do this.” Everybody says, “Find a job you like and get somebody to pay you for it for the rest of your life.” That’s been the last 20 years for me, and I thank you Jesus. We’re still going. It doesn’t matter. Next week, we’re in Orange Beach, and then The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, and then ending the week in Dallas. You get onstage and see 25,000 people every night going to see the guy in the cowboy hat, then it’s an opportunity to step out and do what you do for a minute and set people up for Jason. It’s an honor that I’ll never take for granted.


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Jimbo Mathus returns to The Listening Room of Mobile BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: An Intimate Evening with Jimbo Mathus Date: Sunday, July 29, 7 p.m. Venue: The Listening Room of Mobile, 78 St. Francis St., www.thelisteningroomofmobile.com Tickets: $25; call 251-367-4599 to reserve

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ince opening its doors, The Listening Room of Mobile has proven to be one of Mobile’s most unique musical experiences. From singer-songwriters to sideshows, this venue innovates the listening room concept with a diverse variety of events. Now The Listening Room of Mobile is bringing the prolific Grammy winner Jimbo Mathus back to its intimate confines. The “Katfish King” has something special planned for this Azalea City performance — an “audience request” show, where members of the audience can request songs from the span of Mathus’ career. Given the eclectic nature of his body of work, this format makes for a performance filled with a variety of sounds. Mathus’ musical roadmap began with the punk sounds of Johnny Vomit & the Dry Heaves. Then he spent time as the leader of the retro jazz outfit Squirrel Nut Zippers, which he has revived in recent months. Mathus will be prepared to perform raw, dirty blues from his Knockdown South era. The country rock sounds of his Tri-State Coalition project will also be available for request. With such a plethora of music from which to choose, those attending are encouraged to explore Mathus’ extensive catalog for potential requests.

Psychedelic 4-pack

Band: Black Magic Flower Power, Little Girl, Ravel, Supervillain Date: Thursday, July 26, 8 p.m. Venue: The Merry Widow, 51 S. Conception St., www.themerrywidow.net Tickets: $8 available through Ticketfly

The Merry Widow invites the area to start the weekend early with a versatile, four-band lineup. Black Magic Flower Power will mesmerize the audience with its new-school psychedelic rock. This group epitomizes the modern psychedelic rock revival both aesthetically and musically. A smooth, modern delivery of resonant vocals is carried by plucky, wah-wah accented riffs, classic organ and thrilling rock beats The band will be joined by a trio of groups including Supervillain. With Asheville’s reputation for customary jam rock, a band such as Supervillain is a pleasant surprise. Supervillain’s chosen jam style is an adrenalized delivery of raw, uncut rock sounds in the key of The Stooges. Birmingham ambient rocker Little Girl will add a set of music that falls somewhere between Siouxsie Sioux and St. Vincent, filled with warm, electric dreams interpreted by dreamier vocals. Ravel will also be on hand to mix things up.

Cordovas return to The Brickyard Band: Cordovas Date: Thursday, July 26, 10 p.m. Venue: The Brickyard, 266 Dauphin St., 251-219-6488 Tickets: Call for more info

Once again, Music City will invade the Azalea City with a visit from the Cordovas. The story of this band begins with frontman Joe Firstman. When he was just 20, this North Carolina native made the move to Los Angeles seeking notoriety in the music game and scored a contract with Atlantic Records. After parting ways with Atlantic, Firstman became music director for the late night talk show “Last Call with Carson Daly.” Now he is reveling in the music of his Cordovas project and its talented lineup. The Cordovas’ sound is an attractive mix of old-school jams pulling from the same muses that inspired such icons as J.J. Cale, the Grateful Dead and the Allman Brothers Band. The group has collected these sounds for its upcoming ATO Records debut, “That Santa Fe Channel.” The Brickyard audience can expect twangy country rock jams that can’t be contained.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | July 25 - July 31 Please send upcoming music to listings@lagniappemobile.com by MONDAY before Wednesday’s paper.

WED. JULY 25 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Troy Laz Band, 8p Bluegill— Matt Neese Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Brickyard— Chad Davidson Band Callaghan’s— Marlow Boys Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— Delta Donnie Mathis, 2p / Kyle Brady, 5p // Bruce Smelley, 5:30p /// Rhonda Hart Duo, 6p //// Hung Jury, 10p ///// Justin Jeansonne Duo, 10:15p Hangout— The Chillbillies, 6p Lulu’s— The Middletons, 5p

THUR. JULY 26 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Troy Laz Band, 8p Bluegill— Sergio Rangel Duo Blues Tavern— Rebecca Barry Duo Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Brickyard— The Cordovas Callaghan’s— Chris Powell Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Flora Bama— Mike Diamond, 2p / Tim Roberts, 5p // Dueling Pianos, 5:30p /// Bruce Smelley, 6p //// Ja’ Rhythm, 6p ///// Mark Sherrill, Chris Newberry, James Daniel, Jose Santiago, 6p ////// Red Clay Strays, 10p /////// Bruce Smelley Duo, 10:15p //////// Jerry Jacobs Band, 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — DJ San-D IP Casino (Chill Ultra)— Whiskey Kiss Lulu’s— Marlow Boys, 5p Manci’s— Josh Ewing McSharry’s— Rock Bottom, 7p The Merry Widow— BMFP / Little Girl / Ravel / Supervillain Off The Hook— Sugarbabies Karaoke, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jimmy Lee Hannaford, 6p Veets— Brooke Brown The Wharf— Jason Aldrean

FRI. JULY 27 Beau Rivage— The Isley Brothers, 8p Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Troy Laz Band, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Brent Burns, 6:30p Blind Mule— Ryan Oscillator + Hotel Colors + Deluna + Goodwin Rainer Bluegill— LeeYankie, 12p / J.E.R.I. 6p Blues Tavern— Ric McNaughton Band Brickyard— Tyler Mac Band Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill, 10p Cortland’s Pizza Pub— Marcus Elizondo, 8p Dauphin Street Blues Co— Tyler Livingston & The Absolutes Fairhope Brewing— Brittany Grimes, 3p / Poarch Ninjas, 6p Felix’s— Bust Flora Bama— Spencer Maige, 1p / Rock Bottom w/ Rick Carter, 2 //

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Mike Diamond, 4p /// The Big Earl Show w/ Jack Robertson, 5:30 //// Bruce Smelley Band, 6p ///// Greg Lyon, 6p ////// Smokey Otis Duo, 6p /////// Dave Chastang Duo, 8p //////// Oliver’s Twist, 10p ///////// Brian Hill Duo, 10:15p //////////Jerry Jacobs Band, 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Perkins Road IP Casino (Chill Ultra)— Whiskey Kiss IP Casino (Thirty-Two)— Steve Warren Listening Room— Johnny No, 7p Lulu’s—Yeah, Probably, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Maxwell, 8p Manci’s— Delta Smoke McSharry’s— DJ Embezzle, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Lightnin’ Malcolm, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Anna McElroy Moe’s BBQ (OBA) — Christina Christian Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — This Side of 49 Off The Hook— Keith ‘Mailman’ Burns, 7p Original Oyster House — Brandon White, 6p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Jimmy Lee Hannaford, 11a / Three Bean Soup, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Kyle Brady, 6p Waves DI— Pearls Of Trinity, 9p

SAT. JULY 28 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Troy Laz Band, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Lisa Christian, 6:30p Blind Mule— A Sunday Fire + The Handsome Scoundrels + West Means Home + Early Humans Bluegill— Stephen Sylvester, 12p / Black Mouth Cur, 6p Blues Tavern— Doobious Brickyard— Ryan Dyer Band Callaghan’s— Paw Paws Medicine Cabinet Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ MBezzle, 10p Dauphin Street Blues Co— Chad Davidson Band Felix’s— Swamp Hippies Flora Bama— J Hawkins Trio, 1p / Spencer Maige Duo, 1p // Jo Jo Pres, 2p /// Lea Anne Creswell Duo, 2p //// Wade Reeves, 4p ///// Kyle Brady, 5p ////// The Big Earl Show w/ Jack Robertson, 5:30p /////// Brandon White Duo, 6p ////////Yeah, Probably, 6p ///////// Brian Hill Duo, 8p /////////// Foxy Iguanas, 10p /////////////Spencer Maige Trio, 10:15p ///////////// Whiskey River Band, 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Perkins Road plus DJ San-D IP Casino (Chill Ultra)— Whiskey Kiss IP Casino (Studio A)— Michael Grimm IP Casino (Thirty-Two)— Steve Warren Listening Room— All The Kimonos w/Ansley Stewart, 7p Lulu’s— Rock Bottom with Rollin’ in the Hay, 5p McSharry’s— DJ Carter, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Travis Posey

Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Anna McElroy Off The Hook— Elaine Petty, 7p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lefty Collins, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Platinum Duo, 11a / Soul Food Junkies, 6p Waves DI— Lucky Dogs, 9p Wind Creek Casino— Clay Walker, 8p Wind Creek Casino (Sound Lounge)— Michael Stacey Band

SUN. JULY 29 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Triggerproof 8p Big Beach Brewing— Wyatt Edmondson, 3:30p Bluegill— Matt Bush, 12p /Velcro Pygmies, 6p Brickyard— Jake Burford Fairhope Brewing— Sugarcane Jane, 2p Felix’s— Jamie Adamson Flora Bama— Smokey Otis Trio, 12p / Al and Cathy, 1p // Songs of Rusty w/ J Hawkins, 1:30p /// Brittany Grimes, 2p //// Kevin Swanson Duo, 2p ///// Spencer Maige, 5p /////// Brian Hill Band, 5:30p //////// JoJo Pres, 6p ///////// Perdido Brothers, 6p ////////// Whiskey River Band, 10p /////////// Spencer Maige Duo, 10:15p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — The Mixed Nuts plus DJ D-Funk, 8p IP Casino (Chill Ultra)— Ty Taylor & Friends Listening Room— Jimbo Mathus, 7p Lulu’s— J.E.R.I., 5p Off The Hook— Open Mic w/Nori Hendrix, 6p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 4p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Happy Jim,11a / Mason Henderson,6p Veets— Greg Afek Waves DI— Noah Ferrell The Wharf— Dave Matthews

MON. JULY 30 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Triggerproof 8p Brickyard— Brennan & Christian Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 2p / Mike Diamond, 5:30p // Open Mic w/ Cathy Pace, 6p /// Whyte Capps, 10p //// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brandon White, 5p

TUES. JULY 31 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Triggerproof 8p Bluegill— Jimmy Lumpkin Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Cockeyed Charlie’s— Karaoke Jordan, 9p Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p / Mason Henderson, 5p // J Hawkins Duo, 5:30p /// Perdido Brothers, 6p //// Jo Jo Pres, 10p ///// Brandon Coleman Duo 10:15p Lulu’s— Phil & Foster, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Emily Stuckey, 6p Original Oyster House — Bobby Butchka, 6p


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FILMTHE REEL WORLD

‘Isle of Dogs’ has disturbing apocalyptic edge

W

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM es Anderson escapes the gilded cage of his own distinct visual style by abandoning live-action for stop-motion in “Isle of Dogs.” Of course, his colorcoded and symmetrical world is even more so in this film, since the world and its characters are quite literally constructed, but the puppet cast makes this both a quintessential and an unusual Wes Anderson film. The film is set in an invented Japanese city 20 years in the future, when a brutally anti-dog political regime banishes all canines to an island made of trash, under the pretense of eradicating an untreatable dog flu combined with overpopulation. Only one bereaved dog owner, a 12-year-old boy named Atari — who happens to be the ward of Mayor Kobayashi, the man spearheading the anti-dog movement — flies a tiny plane to the Isle of Dogs and attempts to find his lost pet and bodyguard, Spots. Atari’s rescue brings the dog situation to a head on the eve of a mayoral election that pits

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Kobayashi against a scientist who is developing a cure for dog flu, and the machinations of the ruling party are revealed to be sinister and farreaching. This somewhat grand plot gives a nice, contrasting background to the intimate dialogue between the dog compatriots, voiced by the usual Anderson suspects including Edward Norton, Jeff Goldblum, Bob Balaban, Bill Murray and Tilda Swinton. An intentional language barrier creates a very effective experience of immersion into the canine world, for in this film, the voices of the dogs are spoken in English, while the humans, being Japanese, speak only Japanese with no subtitles. We infer the idea of what they are saying from context and body language. We are shown the world of dogs and their feelings toward humans and each other, and this language trick accomplishes so much of that effect. I like films that show the rules and morals of a separate world, often a criminal world, and this film does that for canines. As such, it is very moving and adorable, but it has a disturbing

THE SPY WHO DUMPED ME The story of Audrey (Mila Kunis) and Morgan (Kate McKinnon), two best friends who unwittingly become entangled in an international conspiracy when one of the women discovers the boyfriend who dumped her was actually a spy. All listed multiplex theaters. MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: FALLOUT Ethan Hunt and the IMF team join forces with CIA assassin August Walker to prevent a disaster of epic proportions. All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining.

TEEN TITANS GO TO THE MOVIES A villain’s maniacal plan for world domination sidetracks five teenage superheroes who dream of Hollywood stardom as the popular cartoon makes its way to the big screen. All listed multiplex theaters.

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apocalyptic edge to it. It’s odd and brilliant and gorgeous, complex and profound, particularly on a visual level. Inspired by Japanese films by Akira Kurosawa and Miyasaki, and with a score by Alexandre Desplat that includes memorable taiko drumming, this film has been accused of cultural appropriation, but the lens is so intentionally fictitious and inaccurate that it can only be seen as a deliberate collage, naïve by design. “Isle of Dogs” is intensely aware of every reference, image and visual cue; it is as richly constructed as a Joseph Cornell assemblage. It takes delight in depicting scrambling dogfights that are shrouded in dust clouds of cotton balls, evoking nostalgia for the jerky, handmade stopmotion animation films of the past. Voice performances, particularly a canine flirtation between stray dog Bryan Cranston and a sultry show dog played by Scarlett Johansson, make the film not just a sculpture that moves, but a delightful tale of love, devotion, adventure, sushi, politics, amateur aviation and high school journalism. “Isle of Dogs” is currently available to rent.

All listed multiplex theaters. MAMMA MIA! HERE WE GO AGAIN All listed multiplex theaters, Crescent Theater. SKYSCRAPER All listed multiplex theaters. WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR? AMC 16, AMC Classic Jubilee Square, AMC Wharf WHITNEY Regal Mobile Stadium 18 ANT-MAN AND THE WASP All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining. THE FIRST PURGE All listed multiplex theaters. SICARIO: DAY OF THE SOLDADO

All listed multiplex theaters. UNCLE DREW All listed multiplex theaters. JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM All listed multiplex theaters. INCREDIBLES 2 All listed multiplex theaters. SUPERFLY All listed multiplex theaters. HEREDITARY All listed multiplex theaters. OCEANS 8 All listed multiplex theaters. SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY All listed multiplex theaters. DEADPOOL 2 All listed multiplex theaters.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS JULY 25, 2018 - JULY 31, 2018

GENERAL INTEREST Park system improvement plan Give input on Mobile’s parks and recreation programs at the following locations: Wednesday, July 25, South Brookley United Methodist, 3755 Dauphin Island Parkway; Wednesday, July 26, Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive; and Monday, July 30, Toulminville Library, 601 Stanton Road. Meetings begin at 6 p.m. Visit mapformobile.org/ Parks or search “Mobile Parks” on Facebook. Kids+Teen Experience Experienced Gulf Coast models ages 6-18 stomp it out on multiple runways showing some of the most cutting-edge designs and boutiques. Hosted Coastal Fashion Week on Thursday, July 26, 7-9:30 p.m. at Azalea Manor. For tickets and additional information visit www. coastalfashionweek.com. Summer social and sunset The Alabama Contemporary Art Center will host an event in support of Jason Fisher, Democratic candidate for Alabama Senate, Thursday, July 26, at 5:30 p.m. Meet the candidate and enjoy the art space, plus drinks and light refreshments. Suggested donation of $25; $100 or more will be listed as sponsors. RSVP to hanh@ fisherforsenate.com.

African percussionist and storyteller Makinde Gbolahan plays a variety of instruments native to the African continent. His program combines music with stories to enlighten, encourage and entertain his audience. Thursday, July 26, 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. at the Mobile Public Library Toulminville Branch. For more information or to register, call 251-438-7075. Dauphin Island family movie series Dauphin Island’s West End Beach is the site of free family movie nights. Thursday, July 26, see “Finding Nemo” and Friday, July 27, see “Sing.” Visit dauphinislandtourism.com/ calendar for complete summer lineup. Food and wine at The Pillars Join us Thursday, July 26, 6:309:30 p.m. at The Pillars. Chef Von Larson, owner of Von’s Bistro, will be preparing and serving a fourcourse meal, each paired with wine. Cost is $75 person. Call 251-307-5382 to reserve, seating is limited.

and locations, follow Mobile FireRescue on Facebook. Comedy murder mystery dinner Mobile Mystery Dinners’ “Murder on the Battleship: The Last Show of the USO” will be Saturday, July 28, at Central Presbyterian Church. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $59 per person and include unlimited wine and catered dinner by Naman’s. Reservations at mobilemysterydinners.com. Tire recycling day SouthernTires will sponsor a tire recycling day on Saturday, July 28, 8-11 a.m., for residents of the city of Mobile (ID required) at the following locations: Public Safety Memorial Park, WAC Recycle Center, Medal of Honor Park, Kidd Park, Trinity Gardens Park, Henry Aaron Park and Spring Hill Recreation Center. No business drop-offs, 36-inch tires or under, four tires per person, no rims. Market in the Park Stock up on your summer shopping at the last Market in the Park of the season. Find original art, fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, decor and more in Cathedral Square on Saturday, July 28, 7:30 a.m. to noon.

Music in the park Enjoy a free musical performance by Alexa Yanez in the Pavilion at Under the Big Top Town Center Park in Spanish Fort on Friday, July 27, 6:30-8 p.m. Visit Southwest Mobile County spanishforttowncenter.com for the Chamber of Commerce will host the 5th annual Kids Day “Under complete summer lineup. the Big Top” on Saturday, July 28, Friday at the firehouse 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Tillmans Come visit Station 22 at Airport Market in Lavretta Park Corner Community Center (5055 and University on Friday, July 27, Locally produced, locally made Carol Plantation Road). Laser tag, 5:30-7 p.m. Tour the fire station, items are available at the summer’s video game theater, inflatables, trucks and equipment and meet last market on Thursday, July 26, free food and more. Event is free firefighters. Free and open to the 3-6 p.m. at Lavretta Park. Contact public on Fridays throughout the but please bring a canned food William Amos, 251-208-1550. donation. Call 251-666-2488. summer. For more information

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FOMAS adoption event Friends of Mobile Animal Shelter will be at B&B Pet Stop Saturday, July 28, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. with many adoptable pets. All pets are spayed/neutered, have age-appropriate shots, are microchipped and on heartworm preventative. Adoption fees vary. Visit adoptapetmobile.org for more information. Back-to-School Bash Join us for games, crafts and snacks on Saturday, July 28, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Ben May Main Library. Back-to-school supplies will be given as door prizes to some lucky winners. Call Ben May Main Library Children’s Department, 251-208-7086 or email crhodes@mplonline.org. Ole Slac’s Saturday Soiree The Joe Cain Marching Society will host an afternoon of fun on Saturday, July 28, at The Merry Widow in support of the Joe Cain Day procession. Tickets are $20 and include a chance to win $1,000. Some food will be provided and a cash bar. Find us on Facebook @ JoeCainFootmarchers. In the Stacks at SFPL Spanish Fort Public Library welcomes local author and newspaper columnist Leslie Anne Tarabella, who will read from her book “The Majorettes are Back in Town: And Other Things to Love about the South,” Saturday, July 28, at 11 a.m. Tarabella will read and take questions about her stories and her writing experience; books will be available for purchase after the event. Call 251410-READ (7323).

Harry Potter Birthday Party Calling all children, age 6 and up! Join us Saturday, July 28, 10:30 a.m. at the Moorer/Spring Hill Library for a Harry Potter Birthday Party. Call 251-470-7770 or email ftigner@mplonline.org. Singspiration Bring your favorite dish and song Sunday, July 29, starting 10:30 a.m. to West Side United Methodist Church at Midtown. There will be old gospel songs picked and sung by the congregation and a potluck lunch following the service. Contact Kay Lauber at 251-478-3721. “Yard talk” at the Container Yard Constance Adele Ray will be guest speaker for “Yard Talk — The Unseen Connections Between Disability, Business & Community” Tuesday, July 31, 9 a.m. at The Container Yard. Ray developed cerebral palsy soon after birth due to complications from being born 10 weeks early and now works to raise awareness of issues facing the disabled community by starting Access for All, LLC. For free tickets visit www. containeryardworks.com.

FUNDRAISERS Mobile Baykeeper’s Bay Bites Food Truck Festival The Mobile Baykeeper’s Young Advisory Council will host a food truck festival Wednesday, July 25, 5-9 p.m. at Cooper Riverside Park to benefit Baykeeper’s work for clean water, clean air and healthy communities. Visit mobilebaykeeper.org or call 251433-4229 for tickets.


American Legion Post 250 raffle The Post 250 Honor Guard performs at veterans’ funerals in Mobile and Baldwin counties. A limited number of raffle tickets to win a new Colt Gold Cup Trophy 45 pistol will be sold Friday, July 27, at American Legion Post 250, 10950 Dauphin Island Parkway in Theodore. Call Jim Hall at 251-3918400. Southern Grace Dinner Series Enjoy an evening with awardwinning chef Hugh Acheson at Fisher’s at Orange Beach Marina on Thursday, July 26, at 7 p.m., benefiting Fuse Project. Visit fishersobm.com/southerngrace. Brews and braille Enjoy brews and live music at Fairhope Brewing Co., Sunday, July 29, 2-7 p.m. Hosted by Fairhope Brewing and Sugarcane Jane, all donations benefit the Foundation for Blindness, www.blindness.org. Cheers to Children An event to benefit the Child Advocacy Center will be held Monday, July 30, 6-8:30 p.m. at El Papi, 615 Dauphin St. Enjoy wine tastings, live and silent auctions, live music and hors d’oeuvres. Hosted by Williams Financial Group. $35 Donation. Call 251-4321101.

ARTS

“Café Murder” dinner theater St. Dominic Eagle Theatre (grades 5-8) present “Café Murder” by Nathan Hartwick Saturday, July 28, 5-8 p.m. at St. Dominic Catholic School. Tickets cost $20; reserve at www.eagletheatre.weebly.com. “Cinderella — The Musical” Playhouse in the Park will present

its original musical, “Cinderella — The Musical,” through Sunday, Aug. 12. Reservations recommended. Visit www.playhouseinthepark. org for showtimes and ticket information. “The Skin of Our Teeth” Theatre 98 will present “The Skin of Our Teeth” beginning Friday, July 27, at 7:30 p.m. Contact Joan Scott at 251-928-4366. Classics at the Saenger The Summer Classic Movie Series continues through Sunday, Aug. 19. Showtimes are 3 p.m. Sundays, doors open at 2:30 p.m. General admission $6 for adults, $3 for children under 12. Seats are first come, first served. The July 29 feature is “Steel Magnolias.” Visit mobilesaenger.com for complete schedule. Garden sketch club Visit Mobile Botanical Gardens every Friday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. for a relaxing time sketching in the gardens. All levels of experience are welcome. General admission is $5 for non-members.

MUSEUMS

real. At the Exploreum on Thursday, July 26, at 6 p.m., WKRG Chief Meteorologist Alan Sealls takes you on a weather journey to break down phenomena and bust some weather myths. A free screening of “Sharknado” will follow. General admission is $10 adults/children, $8 member adults/children. Visit exploreum.com.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES

“Dinosaurs Alive” Narrated by Michael Douglas, ”Dinosaurs Alive” is a global adventure of science and discovery featuring the earliest dinosaurs of the Triassic Period to the monsters of the Cretaceous, “reincarnated” life-sized for the giant IMAX® screen. Visit www.exploreum.com for showtimes and tickets.

Dauphin Island Sea Lab excursion A salt marsh excursion will be held Thursday, July 26, from 9:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Learn about the important role salt marshes play in the Gulf of Mexico and how they support the seafood we enjoy. Cost $12 per person. Limited space, visit disl.org or call 251-861-2141, ext. 7545, for reservations.

“Ice Age Imperials” History Museum of Mobile through Aug. 26. Imagine traveling 20,000 years into the past when fierce cats, enormous mastodons and woolly mammoths, 6-foot-tall beavers and other giant creatures roamed the land and every day was a struggle for survival. Visit historymuseumofmobile.com or call 251-301-0266.

“National Parks Adventure” A trio of adventurers’ quest to “Water’s Extreme Journey” experience America’s wildest, most An exciting quest that transforms historic and most naturally beautiful you into a drop of water entering a places becomes the ultimate watershed and traveling to oceans, off-trail adventure in MacGillivray while learning how clean choices Freeman Films’ “National Parks keep our drops healthy and moving Adventure,” narrated by Robert toward a clean ocean. Daily through Redford. Visit www.exploreum.com Sept. 3 at Gulf Coast Exploreum. for showtimes and tickets. Visit exploreum.com for details. Thursdays at MMoA “Weather: Wild, Weird, or Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to What?!” 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art Every week you might find offers free admission to all Mobile weather on social media that you County residents. No reservations have never noticed or heard of are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 before; sometimes it is not even Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

Mobile BayBears Beginning Wednesday, July 25, the BayBears will host the Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp in a five-game series at Hank Aaron Stadium. Call 251-479-BEAR (2327), log onto mobilebaybears. com or visit BayBears offices.

Pop-Up Yoga Complimentary yoga classes instructed by Nonie Taul of Naturally Strong Nonie will be held weekly on Saturdays through Aug. 25, at 9:15 a.m. at The Shoppes of Bel Air in the fountain area. Classes are family-friendly and open to all ages and fitness levels, and are first come, first served. Attendees will be offered water and light snacks. Visit /www.facebook.com/ TheShoppesAtBelAir. Irish dancing Beginner classes for ages 3 through teens are held Saturday mornings at 9:30 a.m. at the Azalea City Center for the Arts, 63 Midtown Park East. Featuring traditional jigs, reels, hornpipes and ceili dances! Learn the beautiful art form that is Irish dancing, which develops confidence, poise and stamina. Fun performances during the year. Competition also available. Contact Julie Black by calling or texting 228-239-2422

or email maccrossanirishdance@ yahoo.com.   Bingo at VIA! Every Tuesday and Thursday 1:303:30 p.m. at VIA! Health, Fitness, Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St., 251-478-3311. Open to the public. Piyo Tone Mondays and Thursdays through Aug. 2 at Stott’s Park, 2150 N. Demetropolis Road, 6-6:45 p.m. Class fee $21. Call 251-463-7980.

WORKSHOPS

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America

AFA and Dementia Friendly Alabama are offering a full day of dementia training in Mobile on Thursday, July 26, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the GM&O building at 110 Beauregard St. Apply ASAP online for limited scholarships at https://alzfdn.org/ events/2018-07/. Contact Beth Reinert at pittman1212@comcast.net.

Improv workshop

Strengthen your confidence and public speaking skills during this improvisational acting workshop with theater professional Eric Browne. Workshop will take place at the Mobile Arts Council on July 26, 10 a.m. to noon. All ages and experience levels welcome. Free for MAC members, $10 for all others. Visit mobilearts.org.

Lunch and learn at Dauphin’s

The Women’s Business Alliance will host an educational webcast featuring Barbara Corcoran from “Shark Tank” on “How to Pitch Your Business” Thursday, July 26, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Dauphin’s. $25 preregistration, $35 at the door. Seating is very limited. Register online at www.womensbusinessalliance.org/ events.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE COMPLIMENTARY BY SAM EZERSKY AND BYRON WALDEN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Iams competitor 5 Pretend 12 Song sung by Garth Brooks on Jay Leno’s last “Tonight Show” 20 Podcast host Maron 21 Fred Flintstone’s boss 22 Weathers, as a hurricane 23 “That’s me you’re looking for” 24 Compliment to a lawmaker? 26 Lesley who played Mrs. Patmore on “Downton Abbey” 28 ____ the sly (be secretive about) 29 Drug used to combat A.D.H.D. 30 Short writing assignment, informally 32 Really like 35 Really like 36 Compliment to a composer? 39 ____ voce 43 Deep, deep hole 44 Crème de ____ 46 Lucky strike? 47 Toe, to a tot 50 John, Paul or George, but not Ringo 52 Alternative to first class 55 Lake vessel 56 Water cooler? 58 Cornbread variety named for where it’s baked 59 Film role for the dog Skippy 60 Meditative discipline 62 Compliment to a lecturer? 64 Compliment to a taxonomist? 67 Compliment to a champion speller? 68 Smallville 69 2002 Literature Nobelist Kertész 70 Snack with a rock climber on its wrapper 71 Head of communications? 72 Gettysburg general 73 Like many holiday candles 74 Gal of “Wonder Woman” 77 Banned game projectiles 78 [not my mistake] 79 “Why, you little …” 81 Word with prayer or paddle 84 Claim in e-cigarette ads 87 Compliment to a charity organizer? 93 Dorm V.I.P.s 95 Major exporter of uranium 96 Hand-to-hand combat weapon 97 Long lines? 100 Athlete honored on Richmond’s Monument Avenue 102 Drained of color 103 Compliment to a

19 Uranians and Neptunians 25 Lack the courage to, for short 27 Musical set in St.-Tropez, familiarly 31 Actress Hoffmann of “Transparent” 33 Half: Prefix 34 What dark clouds might represent 37 Small bone, as in the ear 38 Quai D’Orsay setting DOWN 40 Prepared to shoot 1 Key of Mozart’s “Odense” 41 Beings on TV’s “Doctor Symphony Who” 2 Thin layer 42 West Coast beer brand, 3 ____ to sell informally 4 Color-changing creatures 45 Modern payment option 5 “Yo te ____” (Spanish 101 47 Musical medley phrase) 48 Wits 6 How boors behave 49 Not hold back, to a poker 7 Some inclement weather, in player broadcast shorthand 51 Ottoman title 8 “Oh, by the way …” 53 Twice tetra9 GPS system, e.g. 54 More sharply dressed 10 Suffix with señor 55 Container for amontillado 11 Bog 56 Easternmost of the Lesser 12 Weapon resembling the Antilles letter psi 57 Kitchen device 13 Posterior 58 Meriting only half a star, 14 Beat after a buzzer beater say 15 Rubbish 60 French city where 16 Alternative to Parmesan D’Artagnan lived in “The Three 17 Chuck ____, four-time Musketeers” Super Bowl-winning coach 61 MSN, for one 18 Pick out 62 B on an LP

vegetable gardener? 107 What the “s” stands for in “scuba” 108 Enhanced medium for talk radio 109 Draw upon 110 “____ Enchanted” (2004 film) 111 Result of a computer crash 112 Got back at 113 Difficult situation

63 Site for an A.C.L. tear 65 Took off 66 Words said before bed? 72 Peace Nobelist Yousafzai 73 ID card fig. 74 Lose rigidity 75 Not worth ____ 76 Florida’s Miami-____ County 77 Lightsaber wielder 80 Worlds external to the mind 82 Activity in libraries and movie theaters 83 Diplomatic agreement 85 Record label for Whitney Houston 86 One of the friends on “Friends” 88 Milkshake, in New England 89 Author Gerritsen and actress Harper 90 What one might seek after a computer crash, informally 91 Opera with the aria “Ave Maria” 92 Skim 94 Vice President Agnew 97 Stone that’s a star 98 It may be checkered 99 Till section 101 Scrape 103 Crestfallen 104 Tony winner Hagen 105 Dallas hoopster, briefly 106 Roll on a golf course

ANSWERS ON PAGE 37

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STYLE HOROSCOPES CAPRICORN: DON’T SCREAM AT YOUR TEAM

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 36

CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll find out the hard way that National Tequila Day isn’t a widely known event after being pulled over on suspicion of DUI by an undercover officer who isn’t remotely in the holiday spirit. LEO (7/23-8/23) — A new personnel strategy at your Baldwin County business will go bust when your idea to tap into a constant flow of escaped work-release inmates leads to some unforeseen, stab-woundrelated consequences. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — Your weightlifting challenge will take an awkward turn thanks to a faulty pair of gym shorts. You’ll be commended for your dedication to sport, but eliminated for steroid use without ever being tested. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — In a fit of rage while in a massive traffic jam on the Bayway, you’ll hurl a fellow driver over the side of the bridge. Realizing you might be headed to jail, you’ll jump in and save him by pulling him to land. You’ll buy beers for your soggy friend and by 10 p.m. Greg Peterson will declare you “Hero of the Week” on WPMI and give you a free calzone at his restaurant! SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You’ll make good on a promise to your passive-aggressive roommate and go see her one-woman show over the weekend, only to realize the title is “Wash Your Damn Dishes: A Monologue.” You will never get that hour and half back. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — While taking out your trash early this Thursday in midtown, you’ll be attacked by either a coyote or a rabid fox. The uncertainty of the situation will lead you to forgo painful rabies shots and decide to just “drink it off.” While brushing your teeth at 2 a.m. following a massive hurling session, you’ll wonder if that’s toothpaste foam or rabies. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — After losing your election for a State House seat by just 28 votes, you’ll scream at your Wee Ball team for not supporting you, even though they’re all 7-year-olds. Things get worse when you order the newspaper you own to run a headline saying, “Butthead wins election!” Find your peace playing with toy trains. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — Feeling rather itchy after watching countless commercials for various psoriasis treatments, you buy yourself some soothing salve. But after partying too hard on Taco Tuesday at Fuego you mistake the salve for your toothpaste. Yikes! Good news: Your teeth don’t itch. Bad news: You realize you hate the word “salve” as much as the word “moist.” PISCES (2/19-3/20) — Starting your campaign to win “Quintessential Mobilian” in the 2019 Nappie Awards early, you start doing “extra-Mobiley” things. You cut down all of your plants and replace them with azaleas, refuse to eat anything but Dew Drop dogs and MoonPies, and only answer to the name Joseph Stillwell Cain. You will receive enough votes for the win, but die of high cholesterol before being able to accept your honor. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — A pleasant evening out with your spouse goes sour when you misspeak and utter the phrase, “I see no reason I would want to have sex with you after I finish this chimichanga.” You’ll try to walk back that double-negative confusion over the next 48 hours, only to be called a fascist and a moron. You get “wouldn’t” tattooed on your forehead in shame. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — After finding out there is not only an albino squirrel inhabiting the Port City but also an albino sparrow, you decide to go on your own little Mobile area safari to see what other exotic, pigment-less creatures we may have. Your trip will end suddenly, though, when you’re “Irwin-ed” by an albino stingray during a jubilee in Fairhope. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — Afraid of the rise of veganism, you’ll start raising your own livestock to ensure a supply of tasty meats. After a few months, though, you’ll grow close to a pig named Kevin Bacon and attempt a plant-based diet. Days later, though, you’ll eat a rack of ribs while softly singing “Footloose” and sobbing. J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 37


SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Spring Hill’s long quest to join NCAA is successful

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BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

n an interview with this reporter on May 15, 2014, Spring Hill College Director of Athletics Jim Hall first discussed the school’s decision to apply for membership in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The recent announcement of Spring Hill’s full acceptance into the Division II ranks marks the end of an extensive and sometimes frustrating journey. “The first words out of my mouth were ‘Fantastic! This is wonderful news’,” Hall told Lagniappe of the phone call he received from the NCAA. “Even though we expected the news, there was still an immediate sense of gratitude to have completed the process.” That day four years ago in the Arthur Outlaw Recreation Center, Hall discussed the timeline that would normally occur to achieve full status in Division II. However, that voyage was forced to clear many more hurdles than was first expected. In what was scheduled to be a three-year process, the NCAA asked the Badgers to repeat Candidacy Year Two to give new campus personnel with direct compliance responsibilities adequate time get up to speed with NCAA requirements. In 2016, the Membership Committee ruled SHC had successfully completed the second phase and recommended advancement to Provisional Membership. However, the jump from the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) would remain elusive. Last year, the Division II Membership Committee notified SHC it would not recommend that the Badgers be allowed to advance to full membership. The sole reason cited was Spring Hill’s accreditation status with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). According to a report by the college, SHC at that time was in a 12-month probation by SACS’ Commission on Colleges because of financial instability.

Successful plea

Because it had already repeated one year, NCAA officials were going to remove SHC from the process and force it to wait one year to reapply. Thankfully, an appeal by Spring Hill after the SACS issue was resolved was accepted and the

NCAA granted an additional year within the provisional period during the 2017-18 academic year. “It boiled down to a lack of synchronization between the NCAA accreditation and the staff accreditation,” Hall said. “We had another good year with the review process, and the NCAA said nothing but good things for our athletics and processes. They said they are very happy to welcome us into Division II.” Throughout the journey, Hall said the school’s administration never wavered in its support. “Everyone in athletics is grateful to all faculty on campus,” Hall said. “They had to learn a new set of eligibility requirements. Staff members rewrote policies and procedures for compliance. There was a lot of work behind the scenes, and they need to be recognized. “The leadership by [former SHC president] Dr. [Christopher] Puto was fantastic. He was incredibly supportive and really made sure we had the things we needed to successfully complete the process. We couldn’t have done it without him.”

Finding a home

When the Badgers made their decision to leave the NAIA, they had to join a new league. After looking at several options, Spring Hill selected the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC). Founded in 1913, the SIAC comprised 13 historically black colleges in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, South Carolina and Tennessee. The Badgers’ new in-state rivals became Miles College, Stillman College and Tuskegee University. Because Spring Hill was not a full NCAA member, this kept the Badgers’ 16 varsity teams from competing for league championships and postseason action. Hall expects that all to change now. “On an annual basis, some of our sports haven’t had a real chance in conference play,” Hall said. “As we look forward to competing in the postseason and in the SIAC, we fully expect we’ll have eight to 10 teams that have legitimate chances to win conference championships. “There is a real sense of excitement to have an opportunity to compete in the postseason. My goal as a department is to win the SIAC all-sports

trophy. If we can do that, it means our athletes are excelling.” The league also welcomes the news. “The SIAC congratulates Spring Hill College on advancing to full membership in NCAA Division II and the SIAC,” Commissioner Greg Moore said. “We are especially pleased to welcome them given their institution’s historic leadership in promoting inclusion and social justice in the Deep South.” In 1954, Spring Hill enrolled nine AfricanAmerican students to the college. For 10 years, SHC states, it was the first and only integrated college in the Deep South.

Already finding success

Even with no hope for conference trophies, Spring Hill shined last season in numerous sports: Women’s Basketball — The Badgers dominated conference honors. Forward Tiffany Valentine was named as the SIAC Women’s Basketball Player of the Year while guard Jewel Hill (St. Luke’s graduate) earned Defensive Player of the Year honors. Spring Hill had a 15-3 conference record that tied for first place atop the West Division. While going a perfect 12-0 in division play, the Badgers closed the year with a 22-6 overall record that marked their best season since going 23-11 in 1999-2000. Volleyball — The Badgers finished the season with a 27-5 overall mark and a perfect 18-0 record in the SIAC. Softball — Spring Hill ended the year with a 23-14 overall record and an 18-1 mark in the SIAC West Division. Baseball — In their final season of transition, the Badgers secured a 27-17 overall record and an 18-1 mark in the SIAC West Division. Men’s Tennis — The Badgers were 15-6 overall and 12-0 in SIAC play. Earning all-conference honors were freshmen Cedric Nitz, Chris Mines and Ricardo Pena plus senior Lars Bajohr. Men’s Golf — Senior Sheldon Statkewicz (McGill-Toolen graduate) earned all-conference honors after recording a 72.70 average over 20 rounds while finishing in the Top 10 of six tournaments with one individual championship. Others

on the SIAC list were seniors Kalle Nilsson and Thomas Ruli Jr. plus sophomore John Karcher. Nilsson was also an academic All-American. Beach Volleyball — The Sandy Badgers finished the season with a 14-8 record, marking the second consecutive winning season in the program’s four-year history. The Badgers hold affiliate membership in the Gulf South Conference in men’s soccer, women’s soccer and women’s golf. Men’s Soccer — The Badgers earned 12 wins for the first time in SHC’s 25-year history. Alex Lipinksi set a school record with 10 assists and 38 total points. Spring Hill’s student-athletes also excel in the classroom. The SIAC placed 123 Badgers on the 2017-18 Commissioner’s All-Academic Team for maintaining at least a 3.0 or better cumulative GPA.

One giant leap

“Once you get to the NCAA postseason, it is an new level of experience,” Hall said. “That is the kind of learning experience we want for our people. This is a lifelong experience that few very college-athletes get to experience.” Of the 28 Jesuit colleges in the United States, prior to the ruling only Spring Hill and Loyola of New Orleans were not in the NCAA. Hall said becoming a part of the athletic organization would have a major impact on the Badgers. “It is certainly easier to recruit high-caliber student-athletes when you can provide these opportunities,” Hall said of joining the NCAA. “It eliminates one of the potential objections for a student on whether they want to come here. A potential objection has now turned into a real positive draw.” The first official on-campus event as a NCAA member is set for Thursday, Aug. 30, when the women’s soccer team hosts Wingate University at 4 p.m. “For the soccer match, we are going to do something a little bit special,” Hall said. “But we won’t stop there. We will do things throughout the year to recognize our full membership. It took us a lot time to get here and we want to spend an equally long time to celebrate.”

SPORTS FROM BEHIND THE MIC

This entry-level SEC position pays $4 million per year

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BY RANDY KENNEDY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

or the first time as head coach of the Ole Miss Rebels, Matt Luke stepped to the podium at SEC Media Days in Atlanta last week. Despite being a rookie in his new role, Luke was not the newest member of the SEC head coaching fraternity. In fact, he’s been in his current position longer than Tennessee’s Jeremy Pruitt, Mississippi State’s Joe Moorhead, Texas A&M’s Jimbo Fisher, Arkansas’ Chad Morris and Florida’s Dan Mullen. Those six coaches arrive at their current positions with a variety of experience and success. Fisher is the first national championship coach to go directly from one college program to another since Johnny Majors left Pittsburgh for Tennessee in 1976. Mullen had a solid run at Mississippi State before leaving for Florida. Morris was 14-22 in his three-year attempt to rebuild the program at SMU. Luke, Pruitt and Moorhead enter the SEC with no head coaching experience at this level. Pruitt may be the most interesting case study. He is the son of a veteran high school coach in Alabama and actually has as much experience coaching high school football as he does at the

college level. “Fifteen years ago I was teaching elementary school PE,” Pruitt said at SEC Media Days. “I didn’t get here trying to be somebody else. I can probably name you 100 high school coaches who were more qualified than I am. But I was in the right place at the right time.” Pruitt was probably being modest in that assessment, but his statement does bring attention to the fact that there is not a single track that leads to becoming a head coach in the SEC. In Pruitt’s case that means having never been a head coach at any level before signing a six-year contract worth $4 million per year. Pruitt’s resume is as impressive as that of former Nick Saban assistants Kirby Smart and Will Muschamp. Smart reached the national championship game after two seasons, while Muschamp succeeded at South Carolina after a rough start at Florida. But his resume is also similar to those of former Saban assistants Jim McElwain and Derek Dooley, and those experiments didn’t work out as well. When Mal Moore began his search to replace Mike Shula he famously said he was only interested in a candidate who had been a successful

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head coach at the highest level. That turned out to be Saban, and the rest is history. But that means Moore wouldn’t have hired a coach like Pruitt. It also means he would have automatically eliminated Dabo Swinney when he became head coach at Clemson, Bob Stoops when he became coach at Oklahoma, Tom Osborne when he became coach at Nebraska or Woody Hayes when he became coach at Ohio State. All of those coaches won national championships at the one and only school where they were head coaches. In other words, those coaches didn’t need previous head coaching experience before becoming legends at their major programs. Former Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray made headlines at SEC Media Days by questioning Pruitt’s ability to have success at Tennessee. Murray took some personal shots at Pruitt from when Pruitt was the defensive coordinator at Georgia. But the questions are fair about Pruitt’s skills translating to a completely new role. “I don’t know if his personality is fit to be a head coach,” Murray said. “As a head coach, there are so many things that go into it. It’s not just going out there and coaching. You have to deal with the front office. You’ve got to talk to the president

of the university. You have to deal with boosters. You have to deal with the offense, the defense. It’s not just going in there and dealing with the kids and scheming up. There’s a lot that goes into it. “I don’t think he’s the right guy to kind of be the CEO of a corporation. He’s really good managing just a defense and being a defensive coordinator. He needs to prove to me that he can handle the whole ship. For right now, I don’t think he can. We’ll see what happens this year. I don’t think it helps that he doesn’t have a lot of talent at Tennessee.” Tony Barnhart, known as “Mr. College Football” for his work covering SEC football, has a different opinion. He believes Pruitt will answer the critics by being successful in the long term in Knoxville. “Do you have the administrative skills? Do you have the people skills? Do you have the hiring skills? Those are all legitimate questions,” Barnhart said. “I happen to think the answer to that is ‘yes.’ But we will have to see.” Randy Kennedy writes a weekly column for Lagniappe and is co-host of “Sports Drive” every weekday from 3-6 p.m. on WNSP 105.5 FM, the country’s first all-sports FM station.


J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 39


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE WHEREAS, 13th day of July, 2009, a certain Mortgage was executed by Ralph C. Krout and Margaret A. Krout, husband and wife, as mortgagor in favor of Urban Financial Group and was recorded on August 27, 2009, in Book 6572, Page 1879, and in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama; and WHEREAS, the Mortgage was insured by the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the National Housing Act for the purpose of providing single family housing; and WHEREAS, the Mortgage is now owned by the Secretary, pursuant to an assignment dated October 2, 2013 and said mortgage transferred and assigned to Reverse Mortgage Solutions, Inc. in Book 6581, Page 841;   said mortgage transferred and assigned via assignment recorded December 11, 2013 to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in Bk: LR7102, PG: 1466 and Bk: LR7102, PG: 1467 to Secretary of Housing and Urban Development; in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile  County, Alabama; WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Mortgage in that the in that the payment due on December 5, 2016, was not made and remains wholly unpaid as of the date of this notice, and no payment has been made sufficient to restore the loan to currency; and WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent as of January 5, 2017 is $165,882.68; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the mortgage to be immediately due and payable; NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and by the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, recorded in the Probate Records of Jefferson County, Alabama, notice is hereby giving that on the 16th day of August, 2018   between the hours of 11:00 am and 4:00 pm, local time, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the following described premises (“Property”) will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder: Lot 2, Whittington Estates, 4th Addition as recorded in Map Book 88, Page 27, in the Office of the Probate Court Records, Mobile County, Alabama. Property being sold “AS IS”.  Property is subject to any title deficiencies.  No representation is made as to the title to the subject property. Commonly known as:   8640 Whittington Drive E, Mobile, Alabama 36695 The sale will be held on the 16th day of August, 2018 in front of the main entrance of the Mobile County, Alabama, Courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid $90,000.00 plus interest, fees and costs. There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorate share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bids, all bidders except the Secretary must submit a deposit totaling $9,000.00 [10% of the Secretary’s bid] in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. A deposit need not accompany each oral bid.  If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of $9,000.00 must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within 30 days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence.  This amount, like bid deposits, must be delivered in form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveying fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery date of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title.  At conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment.  All extension will be for 15-day increments for a fee of $500.00, paid in advance. The extension fee shall be in the form of a certified or cashier’s check may payable to the Secretary of HUD.  If the high bidder closes the sale prior the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee

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shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder may be required to forfeit the cash deposit or, at the election of the foreclosure commissioner after consultation with the HUD representative, will be liable to HUD for any costs incurred as a result of such failure. The Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD representative, offer the property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right or redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act.  Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price accordance with terms of the sale as provided herein. HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. The scheduled foreclosure sale shall be cancelled or adjourned if is established, by documented written application of the mortgagor to the Foreclosure Commissioner not less than 3 days before the date of sale, or otherwise, that the default or defaults upon which the foreclosure sale is based did not exist at the time of service of this notice of default and foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage agreement are tendered to the Foreclosure Commissioner, in the form of a certified or cashier’s check payable to the Secretary of HUD, before public auction of the property is completed. The amount that must be paid in if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to the scheduled sale is $165,882.68 as of August 16, 2018, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the mortgage had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out-ofpocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner for recording documents, a commission for the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement. Tender of payment by certified or cashier’s check or application for cancellation of the foreclosure sale shall be submitted to the address of the Foreclosure Commissioner provided below. Date: 7/12/18 Mark A. Pickens Foreclosure Commissioner P.O. Box 26101 Birmingham, AL 35260 (205) 933-1169 (205) 933-6929 facsimile Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, August 1, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on November 30, 2001 by David L. Bryant Jr., as Grantee to Oak Development Company, Inc. an Alabama Corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book 4941, Page 0250, and said vendor’s lien having been last assigned to Austin Mulherin, which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book LR7313, Page 1307, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on August 15, 2018. Lot 54 as per plat of RIDGE CREST, UNIT IV as recorded in Map Book 72, Page 33, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. W. Austin Mulherin Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD July 11, 18, 25, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on February 24, 2017 by Kristen T. Vaughan, as Grantee to Iras Development Company, Inc. an Alabama Corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7485, Page 670, and said vendor’s lien having been last assigned to EMON, LLC, which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book LR7580,

Page 676, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on August 15, 2018. Lot 3 as per plat of TIMBERLAND, UNIT I as recorded in Map Book 88, Page 19, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama, including A 1995 Destiny Mobile Home VIN: G43489. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. EMON, LLC Holder of said Vendor’s Lien. WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD July 11, 18, 25, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on October 24, 2013, by Daniel E. Thompson and Jennifer Thompson, as Grantees to Iras Development Company, Inc., a Alabama corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7090, Page 739, and said vendor’s lien having been last assigned to W. Austin Mulherin, which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book LR7097, Page 164, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on August 15, 2018. Lot 64, as per plat of TIMBERLAND, Unit III as recorded in Map Book 92, Page 16, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama; Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. W. Austin Mulherin Holder of said Vendor’s Lien. WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama  36691 (251) 460-2400

payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, Mortgagee/Transferee  The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postponed until 06/28/2018 during the legal hours of sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postponed until 08/31/2018 during the legal hours of sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 429247 Lagniappe HD July 25, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE POSTPONEMENT

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Ruth K. McIntosh and Herbert Hoover McIntosh, originally in favor of Genworth Financial Home Equity Access, Inc., fka Liberty Reverse Mortgage, Inc., on the 29th day of April, 2009, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6529, Page 203; the undersigned Liberty Home Equity Solutions, Inc., as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 12, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 16, Block 1, Summerville Place, as recorded in Map Book 3, Page 632, in the OfLagniappe HD July 11, 18, 25, 2018 fice of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. The hereinabove described property being one and the same as described in mortgage recorded in Book 6529 MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE and Page 203 and deed recorded in Book 5329 and POSTPONEMENT Page 1011. Property street address for informational Default having been made in the payment of the in- purposes:  2308 Holland St, Mobile, AL  36617 debtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE by Leona A. Driggers, an unmarried person and John- IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMny M. Driggers Jr., an unmarried person, originally BRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTin favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, GAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE Inc., as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation, on OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY the 30th day of August, 2007, said mortgage recorded WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR Alabama, in Book 6251 Page 1262; the undersigned RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, as Mort- AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO gagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public THERETO. outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the Alabama law gives some persons who have an intermain entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile est in property the right to redeem the property under County, Alabama, on April 26, 2018, during the le- certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that gal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An and to the following described real estate, situated in attorney should be consulted to help you understand Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 25, Yancey Glen these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure Subdivision (Revised), according to the Plat thereof process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying recorded in Map Book 104, Page 102 of the records the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder Alabama. Property street address for informational must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thoupurposes:  12218 Yancey Glen Dr, Mobile, AL  36695 sand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUM- of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be BRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORT- paid in certified funds by noon the next business day GAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the adOFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY dress indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE amount due. AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase THERETO. price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedAlabama law gives some persons who have an inter- ness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject est in property the right to redeem the property under to postponement or cancellation.Liberty Home Equity certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that Solutions, Inc., Mortgagee/Transferee. help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An  The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postattorney should be consulted to help you understand poned until 05/17/2018 during the legal hours of these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postas the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder poned until 06/21/2018 during the legal hours of must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thou- sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in sand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama.


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postponed until 08/24/2018 during the legal hours of sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 422922  

Lagniappe HD July 25, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: HYDRANT REALIGNMENT University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 18-26 USA BID NO. 8070301 Bids will be received and clocked in 2:00 p.m. local time on Tuesday, July 31, 2018, in Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office.   Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama.edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below.   307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 mmayberry@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD July 11, 18, 25, 2018

PROBATE NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: COLBY MCCOY JOHNSTON Case No. 2018-1168 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 13th day of July, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. FRANK H. KRUSE, as Administrator of the estate of COLBY MCCOY JOHNSTON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DUSTIN GARRIS. Lagniappe HD July 25, August 1, 8, 2018.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: VIVIAN BARNES GAZZIER Case No. 2018-1260 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 18th day of July, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. SUSAN IRIS GAZZIER PAYTON, as Administratrix of the estate of VIVIAN BARNES GAZZIER, Deceased. Attorney of Record: EDWARD G. HAWKINS. Esq. Lagniappe HD July 25, August 1, 8, 2018.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: THOMAS GORDON CHRISTIAN, SR., Deceased Case No. 2018-1451 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 18th day of July, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. BEVERLY SOWELL CHRISTIAN as Executrix under the last will and testament of THOMAS GORDON CHRISTIAN SR., Deceased. Attorney of Record:

AGEE S. BROUGHTON, III 25369 U.S. HIGHWAY 98, STE. B DAPHNE, AL 36526

Lagniappe HD July 25, August 1, 8, 2018

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING July 20, 2018 Case No. 2018-1058 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of MARY VERN NELSON, Deceased On to-wit the 27th day of August, 2018 at 9:30 AM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the Petition for Probate the Last Will and Testament and Codicil of Mary Vern Nelson as filed as filed by CHRISTINE TAYLOR GROVE. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest, specifically MARR RIME, WINNIFRED ELEANOR, ALBERT BRANCA, SUSAN THYE, PATRICIA PELTZ, JOHN BRANCA, PETERE BRANCA, MARY BASGEN, THOMAS BASGEN, ELIZABETH BASGEN, CATHERINE KAMENOFF AND BARBARA BASGEN, AND ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS AT LAW AND NEXT OF KIN, IF LIVING, who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: MELISSA WETZEL P.O. Box 3123 Mobile, AL 36652 Lagniappe HD July 25, August 1, 8, 15, 2018

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING CASE NO. 2018-1336 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Notice of the filing of petition for Summary Distribution in the estate of Peter A. Agee, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that a Petition for Summary Distribution has been filed by Mattie Carroll on June 28, 2018, and that 30 days after the notice of publication hereof and pursuant to law the Court shall be requested to enter an order directing summary distribution of the estate of said decedent. Don Davis, Judge of Probate. Attorney: Hendrik S. Snow, Esq. 50 Saint Emanuel Street Mobile, AL 36602 Lagniappe HD July 25, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: CAROLYN EVANS WILSON, Deceased Case No. 2018-1395 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 10th day of July, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. TAMIKA LASHAWN SANDERS WILSON as Executrix under the last will and testament of CAROLYN EVANS WILSON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: EDWARD G. HAWKINS Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, August 1, 2018

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING July 09, 2018 Case No. 2018-1372 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of MARIE THERESA PORTER AKA MARIE D. PORTER, Deceased On to-wit the 27th day of August, 2018 at 9:30 AM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the Petition to Probate the Last Will and Testament of Marie Theresa Porter as filed by REGIONS BANK AND GRACE REID. Notice is hereby given to all parties in interest, specifically ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS AT LAW OR NEXT OF KIN, who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate Attorney Name and Address: LESLIE G. WEEKS P.O. BOX 2767 Mobile, AL 36652 Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, August 1, 8, 2018

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING July 09, 2018 Case No. 2017-1924-4 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of THOMAS DURAND RIVERS SR, Deceased On to-wit the 20th day of August, 2018 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by BRITNI T. RIVERS. Notice is hereby given to all parties in interest

who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate Attorney Name and Address: ROBERT H. ROUSE P.O. BOX 2767 Mobile, AL 36652 Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, August 1, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ELOISE M. CRISWELL AKA ELOISE MIDDLETON CRISWELL, Deceased Case No. 2018-1205 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named parties on the 5th day of July 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. GINGER L. LOWERY as Executrix under the last will and testament of ELOISE M. CRISWELL AKA ELOISE MIDDLETON CRISWELL, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD July 11, 18, 25, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: WILLIAM MICHAEL VICKERS, Deceased Case No. 2018-1325 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named parties on the 5th day of July, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. BRANDON MITCHELL VICKERS as Executor under the last will and testament of WILLIAM MICHAEL VICKERS, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DAVID A. BOYETT, III Lagniappe HD July 11, 18, 25, 2018

CONDEMNATION NOTICE Notice is hereby given to any unknown heirs and next of kin of Alsie Harris, Deceased; or any other person or persons in interest of the following proceedings in the Probate Court of Mobile County, AL, viz: IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA CASE NO. 2017-2292 STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE, Plaintiff -VSHeirs at Law and Next of Kin of Alsie Harris, deceased, JERRY AND GLADYS WILKERSON, INEZ HUGHES, CATHERINE POLLACK, CARRIE BRACIE, BRENDA MOORE, MILDRED HENDRIX, DYRONE WILKERSON, QUINCY LATRELLE HARRIS, JANICE CROCKETT PARKER, KIM HASTIE, as REVENUE COMMISSIONER FOR MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA, Defendants COMPLAINT FOR CONDEMNATION Heretofore came the County of Mobile, by and through its attorney, K. Paul Carbo, Jr., Esq., its attorney, and filed a Second Amended Complaint to Condemn Lands in writing seeking to condemn for the uses and purposes set forth in said complaint that certain real property located in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, and described as follows: EXHIBIT “A” TRACT NO. 45 DE 1 PROJECT NO. MCR 2014-306 (Old Military Road) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF SAMUEL DUNCAN JR SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 86, PAGE 117 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, POINT ALSO BEING ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN NORTH, A DISTANCE OF 42.56 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 70°20’22’’ WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 276.34 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 68°01’56’’WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 327.06 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 111.10 FEET TO THE WESTERNMOST POINT OF RIGHT-OF-WAY TAKING FOR OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 16.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 8.79 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89°18’11’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 61.14 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00°38’49’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89°18’11’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 69.26 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN

SOUTH 00°38’49’’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 16.62 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.0315 ACRES (1,371 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. TRACT NO. 45 DE 2 PROJECT NO. MCR 2014-306 (Old Military Road) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF SAMUEL DUNCAN JR SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 86 PAGE 117 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, POINT ALSO BEING ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN NORTH, A DISTANCE OF 42.56 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 70°20’22’’ WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 276.34 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 68°01’56’’WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 327.06 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 111.10 FEET TO THE WESTERNMOST POINT OF RIGHT-OF-WAY TAKING FOR OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 25.40 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89°18’11’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 130.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89°18’11’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 23.32 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00°41’49’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89°18’11’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 23.30 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00°38’49’’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.0107 ACRES (466 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. TRACT NO. 22 ROW 1 PROJECT NO. MCR2014-306 (OLD MILITARY ROAD) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SAMUEL DUNCAN JR SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 86, PAGE 117 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, POINT ALSO BEING ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN SOUTH 69°30’41’’ WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD, A DISTANCE OF 21.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 15.89 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 69°23’52’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 131.95 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 16.17 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 69°30’41’’ EAST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD A DISTANCE OF 131.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.0455 ACRES (1980 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. TRACT NO. 17 ROW 1 PROJECT NO. MCR2014-306 (JOE CARL ROAD WEST) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF WANZER PLACE SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 89, PAGE 16 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00°19’50’’ EAST, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF JOE CARL ROAD WEST (A 50 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY), A DISTANCE OF 296.64 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 89°40’10’’ WEST ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID JOE CARL ROAD WEST A DISTANCE OF 127.35 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00°19’50’’ EAST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID JOE CARL ROAD WEST, A DISTANCE OF 104.29 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 208.71 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN WEST A DISTANCE OF 128.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE CONTINUE WEST A DISTANCE OF 50.44 FEET TO A POINT ON A NON-TANGENT CURVE TO THE RIGHT (HAVING A RADIUS OF 295 FEET); THENCE RUN NORTHEASTWARDLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE RIGHT (CHORD BEARING NORTH 11°52’20’’ EAST, CHORD LENGTH 51.09 FEET) AN ARC DISTANCE OF 51.16 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN EAST A DISTANCE OF 22.69 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 71.25 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 17°41’31’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 30.17 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN EAST A DISTANCE OF 7.35 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 17°41’30’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 84.26 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 70°01’35’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 41.62 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 79.80 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN NORTH 69°30’41’’ EAST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD A DISTANCE OF 66.54 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 17.41 FEET TO A POINT ON A NON-TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT (HAVING A RADIUS

OF 85.00’); THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTWARDLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT (CHORD BEARING SOUTH 39°24’48’’ WEST, CHORD LENGTH 62.92 FEET) AN ARC DISTANCE OF 64.45 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17°41’30’’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 254.61 FEET TO A POINT ON A TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT (HAVING A RADIUS OF 245.00 FEET); THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTWARDLY ALONG SAID TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT (CHORD BEARING SOUTH 13°00’26’’ WEST, CHORD LENGTH 40.02 FEET) AN ARC DISTANCE OF 40.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.3168 ACRES (13,800 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. TRACT NO. 17 ROW 2 PROJECT NO. MCR2014-306 (JOE CARL ROAD WEST) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SAMUEL DUNCAN JR SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 86, PAGE 117 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, POINT ALSO BEING ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN SOUTH 69°30’41’’ WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD, A DISTANCE OF 185.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 16.24 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 69°23’52’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 33.82 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 16.31 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 69°30’41’’ EAST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD A DISTANCE OF 33.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.0118 ACRES (515 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. You are further notified that the hearing of said complaint has been set by this Court for August 6, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. in Courtroom #1, at which time you may appear and answer said complaint or file objections thereto if you so desire. THE PARTIES TO WHICH NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN SHALL BE AFFORDED AT LEAST THIRTY (30) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF THE LAST PUBLICATION TO FILE AN ANSWER OR OTHER RESPONSE WITH THE COURT AND THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF. If the application to condemn is granted by the Court, a Commissioner’s hearing will be scheduled within 30 days thereafter to determine damages which may be due the defendants. For information on the date and time of such hearing, please contact the Probate Court during regular business hours at 574-6001. Witness my hand this the 26th day of June, 2018 K. Paul Carbo, Jr., Esq., Attorney 3030 Knollwood Drive Mobile, AL 36693 Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 18, 25,2018

PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Dauphin Island Property Owners Association is seeking proposals from parties interested in leasing a restaurant building located at 100-A Orleans Drive, Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528. The property is currently operating as a Bar & Grill and is available for lease as a restaurant and bar beginning October 1, 2018. The restaurant building is located on the Isle Dauphine Complex which is located on the Gulf of Mexico. The property to be leased is a one-story building with a commercial kitchen and indoor and outdoor seating for dining. Proposals should be submitted by September 1, 2018 to the Dauphin Island Property Owners Association via mail at: Post Office Box 39, Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528 or via e- mail to board@dipoa.org. Please contact Office Manager Louise Carrubba at 251-861-3144 for a site visit. Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, August 1, 8, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on August 6, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 3050 & 3060 Dauphin Street (North side of Dauphin Street, 655’± West of North Sage Avenue) for a Sign Variance to allow a second freestanding sign for a single tenant site in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance allows one freestanding sign on a single tenant site in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 16th day of July, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 41


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA

Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on August 6, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 5753 Old Shell Road (Southeast corner of Old Shell Road and Long Street) for an Off-Premise Sign Variance to allow an off-premise tenant panel for a hotel in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District; the Zoning Ordinance requires all signage to be on-premise for a hotel in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 16th day of July, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA

Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

ABANDONED VEHICLES NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 24, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2000 BMW 323I WBAAM3347YKC71565 1997 Toyota Avalon 4T1BF12B5VU177683 2001 Infiniti I30 JNKCA31A11T028973 1998 Ford Expedition 1FMRU17L8WLB03462 2005 Mercury Marquis 2MEFM74W05X617542 Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 24, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2008 Chevrolet HHR 3GNDA23D58S635316 Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 24, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1037 St Stephens Rd., Prichard, AL 36610. 1980 Oldsmobile Cutlass Calais 3R47AAD493523 2004 Chevrolet Trailblazer 1GNDS13SX42228782 2005 Chevrolet Malibu 1G1ZS54825F239254 Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on August 6, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 257 St. Joseph Street (Southwest corner of St. Joseph Street and Congress Street) for an Administrative Appeal of a staff decision to partially accept and approve Non-Conforming Documentation for surface parking in a T-5.1 Sub-District within the Downtown Development District; the applicant contends that the entire site should have non-conforming status. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 16th day of July, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 24, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 558 Forest Ave., Mobile, AL 36617. 2013 Nissan Altima 1N4AL3AP2DN510261

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA

Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on August 6, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 255 St. Joseph Street (West side of St Joseph Street, 140’± South of Congress Street) for an Administrative Appeal of a staff decision to partially accept and approve Non-Conforming Documentation for surface parking in a T-5.1 Sub-District within the Downtown Development District; the applicant contends that the site should not have non-conforming status. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 16th day of July, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on August 6, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 650 St. Louis Street (Northwest corner of St. Louis Street and North Dearborn Street) for a Front Yard

Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 24, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5887 Vinegar Bend Rd., Fruitdale, AL 36539. 2011 Ford F150 1FTFW1E68BFA68705 Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 24, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 27121 US Hwy 98, Daphne, AL 36526. 2009 Chevrolet Traverse 1GNER13D49S180687 These abandon vehicles will be sold on 08/24/2018 at 5781 Three Notch Road Mobile Al. 36619 at 9 am if not redeemed CHEV     1GNDS13S332287316 CHEV      5NPEB4AC9BH133877 KIA          KNDJT2A25B7345865 CHEV     1GNDT13W2Y2252158 MERC    1MEHM42W68G619543 SUZI       KL5JD66Z07K630722 PONT     2G2WP552161106388 KIA          KNALD125X75127090 FORD     1FAHPEN3AW250583 TOYT     4T1BE32K44U291588 JAGU     SAJEA51C84WE08732 KIA         KNDJD733555405305 HYUN     5NPEB4AC1BH112456 HYUN     KMHFU45E65A404153 DODG    2B3KA33G68H107787 MERC    1MEFM50U52A652235 BUIC      1G4AG55M4S6458337 TOYT      4T3ZF13C43U513138 PONT     1G2ZJ57B094251197 LEXS      JT8BD69S630179314 TOYT     4T1BF18B8WU273879 NISS      JN8AS5MV1DW643479 CHEV     1G1AT58H797264347 TOYT     JTEZT14R030005759 CHEV    2G1WL54T1P9236703 Lagniappe HD July 18, 25, 2018

42 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 31, 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  23445A Hwy 59, Robertsdale, AL 36532. 2007 Kia Sportage KNDJF723177431029 Lagniappe HD July 25, August 1, 2018

STYLE BOOZIE

Nah, nah, nah, Nappie Time! BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 31, 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  558 S Wilson Ave., Mobile, AL 36610. 2012 Ford Fusion 3FAHP0HA1CR238736 2008 Chevrolet Trailblazer 1GNDS13S982109000 Lagniappe HD July 25, August 1, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 31, 2018 - Time -  12pm, if not claimed - at  10550 Fox Ridge Rd., Semmes, AL 36575. 2001 Porsche Boxster WP0CB29881U664441 Lagniappe HD July 25, August 1, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 31, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  24469 Emerald Ct. N., Loxley, AL 36551. 2004 Ford LGT Convt 1FTRX12W64NA43244 Lagniappe HD July 25, August 1, 2018

These abandon vehicles will be sold on 08/30/2018 at 5781 Three Notch Rd Mobile Al. 36619 at 9am in not redeemed FORD      3FAHP0JA5AR429485 TOYO      2T1BURHE1FC413139 TOYO      4T1BE32K64U281080 HOND       1HGEG8649RL041847 HOND      JHMCG56652C031438 Lagniappe HD July 25, August 1, 2018

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 5 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday. Lagniappe HD offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36602 For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

Mobile’s Quintessential Mobilian, Suzanne Cleveland, center, donned a stunning headpiece at the Nappie Awards that was #somobile.

W

e came, we saw, we partied. At the 2018 Nappie Awards, of course. It was a great night, with a great crowd numbering over 1,500 winners, finalists, friends, advertisers and countrymen. With an after-party and an after-after-party, things got crazy and let’s just say, many a Mobile Lyft and Uber driver had to be happy counting their money on Sunday morning. With all this goodness, let’s just get right to it!

It’s Nappie time!

The doors opened at 5:30 p.m. last Friday night and folks flooded into the Saenger Theatre, some dressed to the nines, others in costume, some in drag, some in nothing at all (well, sort of — see Matt McCoy blurb below). Local TV celebrities included FOX 10’s Bob Grip and Sarah Wall, WKRG’s Mel Showers, Alan Sealls, Peter Albrecht and Randy Patrick, as well as WPMI’s Zora Asberry. Radio was well represented by FM Talk’s Sean Sullivan, Kelly Finley and Dalton Orwig, WABD’s Twiggins, WNTM’s Uncle Henry, WZEW’s Tim and LeeAnn Camp, Gene Murrell and Matt McCoy, who once again donned a naked bodysuit to accept the Nappie for “DJ whose voice leads you to believe you may want to see him naked.” Matt, if you don’t retire that disturbing bodysuit, we may have to retire that category! Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson, Fairhope Mayor Karin Wilson, State Sen. Rusty Glover and Mobile City Councilperson Bess Rich represented our local politicos as they were all there to pick up their various awards. Chief Slac, Miss Venus and the Order of Polka Dots, as well as the cast of “Newsies” looked smashing in their costumes as well. The winner for Quintessential Mobilian, Suzanne Cleveland, proved just why she took home that category’s Nappie. She wore a stunning floral headpiece and came with a cheering section, and they all had specially printed fans with her name and award on it. You can’t get more “quintessential Mobile” than that. Two dogs made an appearance at the Nappies this year — that was a first. An Afghan hound came with the winner for Best Pet Groomer, Addicted to Dogs. The other, a wiener-

looking dog, just showed up with his owner. The Nappies really are a zoo! Only one report of someone falling off the stage this year. Thankfully, the well-dressed lady seemed to be just fine. Most of the speeches were short and sweet. No one got out of control this year, thankfully. Jake Peavy, who won “Best Mobilian Right Now,” couldn’t attend but sent over an acceptance video thanking all of the winners for their contributions to our great community, which was very nice. The opening movie was, of course, a treat and featured celebrity cameos by attorney David J. Maloney — who was on a desk, on top of a scooter, wearing jorts, Heroes owner David Rasp, WKRG’s Bill Riales and John Nodar, DA Ashley Rich, Mayor Stimpson, Uncle Henry and Ms. Venus, among others. “Roy Moore” also made a brief appearance. You just have to see it. The link is on the Lagniappe Facebook page, but I warn you: It’s rated R. The best part of the evening, though, is that we raised almost $5,000 for the Justin Billa Community Foundation. Officer Justin Billa won “Best Mobile Policeman” in the 2018 Nappies with a record number of votes. Officer Billa was tragically slain in the line of duty in February 2018. Major John Barber presented the award to his widow, Erin, who received a standing ovation. Each winner and attendee was asked to make a donation, and most did. After the awards were handed out (in record time, I might add), we headed to Moe’s Original BBQ to party some more. The band The Nynties provided the tunes, and they were great. After Moe’s shut down, folks headed over to Peavy’s Cedar Street Social Club to keep on going. No word on how many hookups, breakups or bad decisions were made over the course of the Nappie evening, but we trust there were many of each. That’s just the Nappies! We already can’t wait for next year! (OK, maybe give us until next week to feel that way!) Well kids, that’s all I got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or some plain ol’, Nappie lovin, I will be there. Ciao!

Photo |Snaparazzi

PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on August 6, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 6300 Grelot Road (North side of Grelot Road, 350’± East of Hillcrest Road, extending to the East side of Hillcrest Road, 535’± North of Grelot Road) for a Sign Variance to allow two (2) wall signs for a tenant at a multi-tenant site, a wall sign to exceed 30% of the usable wall area and a banner to exceed 32 square feet in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District; the Zoning Ordinance only allows one (1) wall sign per tenant at a multi-tenant site and does not allow wall signs to exceed 30% of usable wall area and a maximum of 32 square feet for banners in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 16th day of July, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT

Setback and Frontage Type Variances to allow a building within the 10’ front minimum building setback line and a non-specified frontage type in the SD-WH Sub-District within the Downtown Development District; the Zoning Ordinance prohibits any structure within the 10’ minimum setback and requires all structures to have specified frontage type in the SD-WH Sub-District within the Downtown Development District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 16th day of July, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT


J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


Lagniappe: July 25 - July 31, 2018  
Lagniappe: July 25 - July 31, 2018