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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

J U LY 4 , 2 0 1 8 - J U LY 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | w w w . l a g n i a p p e m o b i l e . c o m ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

The 250-foot supply ship New Venture was sunk 20 miles south of Orange Beach last week, becoming the latest addition to the state’s artificial reef program.

COMMENTARY

In the wake of a deadly shooting at The Capital Gazette newspaper in Maryland, a reminder that the media is not the enemy.

BUSINESS

Haley Development LLC recently broke ground on Phase I of the Portico development in Fairhope.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

Saucy ideas for your barbecue this Fourth of July — and beyond.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA MATTEI Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com

COVER

Montgomery’s new National Memorial for Peace and Justice memorializes lynching victims, including seven from Mobile.

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BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WOOLSEY Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com DAVID GRAYSON Advertising Sales Executive david@lagniappemobile.com

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ARTS

It took the dedicated efforts of many to piece together the seven individual stories of Mobile’s lynching victims.

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: J. Mark Bryant, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Randy Kennedy, Alice Marty, John Mullen, Jeff Poor, Ron Sivak, Tom Ward ON THE COVER: THE NATIONAL PEACE AND JUSTICE MEMORIAL BY GIDEON C. KENNEDY. LAGNIAPPE HD Periodicals Permit #17660 (Volume 3, Issue 40) Copyright 2015 is published weekly, 52 issues a year, by Something Extra Publishing, Inc., 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604 (P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652). Business and Editorial Offices: 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604 Accounting and Circulation Offices: 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604. Call 251-450-4466 to subscribe. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652 Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36602. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251-450-4466 Email: atrice@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE HD is printed at Walton Press. All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted. photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers.

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The Guest List is giving the local music scene fresh, homegrown pop sounds blending bright, danceable pop and soulful R&B with “a sprinkle of hip-hop.”

FILM

Christopher Plummer and Michelle Williams shine in the riveting and cinematically gorgeous “All the Money in the World.”

GARGENING

In the right conditions, spider mites can double their population every couple of weeks. Here’s how to minimize their impact in your garden.

SPORTS

The proposed construction of a new football stadium is not the only thing happening at the University of South Alabama.

STYLE

Boozie explains why Mobile has continued to be a darling of the national media.

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GOING POSTAL

Cast specious squabbling aside Rob: Thank you for your clear-headed commentary about distinguishing [the important issues that ought to influence our governance decisions] from [shiny objects that serve to distract us from these issues]. Yes. Let’s grow up a bit. We can and should plan and prepare for good and sustainable quality of life as we ride a decade-long wave of economic expansion. Good public education, decent health care and quality infrastructure are essential for our quality of life. And our needs are not static — they are rapidly growing as Lower Alabama grows. Let’s cast specious squabbling aside, and use our minds to identify and elect leaders who can and will help us secure these blessings for ourselves and our children. Bob Ryan, Mobile

Shortchanged again Editor: Do we in Southwest Alabama matter? With the latest slap in the face from Goat Hill regarding no new rail service, all the way to the flat-out, high-noon robbery of the BP funds, what in the hell is going on? Regarding Amtrak, Gov. Kay Ivey said there are more pressing funding issues for transportation projects, and I am sure there is north of Evergreen. I am only 39 years old but I swear there has been major highway road work going on in Montgomery and Birmingham for as long as I can remember. When was the last time the I-10/65 interchange was updated? Not since I was 4 and could remember things. How do I say this nicely … it pisses me the f*uck off. What are our legislators doing up there? Do any of them have her ear? Has a governor ever said “no” to anything that

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Montgomery, Birmingham or Huntsville asked for? I would rather be a part of Mississippi and be able to put a C note down on the Saints without Big Brother or Sister telling me how bad it is for me. But that is for a different time, and I guess we will just wait around until they deem us worthy of their time and money.

in Houston County that offered electronic bingo/slot machines. Country Crossing developer Ronnie Gilley, who spent four years in prison for 11 counts of conspiracy, bribery and money laundering, had close ties to King. Before Country Crossing opened in 2009, AG King not only okayed the electronic bingo/slot machines, he also said developers could take money from the operation, which violated the charity bingo provision of Houston County law. When Gov. Riley’s task force raided Country CrossDrew Barron, ing, King opposed the action. Mobile In 2010, AG King announced that he would take over Riley’s task force. Upon the news, Country Crossing and Lowndes Something about Troy County’s White Hall Entertainment Center, two of the state’s largest bingo/slot machine casinos, which had closed rather than be raided by the task force, publicized they would reopen. Jeff Editor: Emerson, communications director for Gov. Riley at the time, In the July 17, 2018, Republican runoff for the office of said, “It’s clear to see the casino bosses are pulling hard for Troy Attorney General of Alabama, I believe it is important for the citizens of Alabama to be reminded of the history of one of the King to win. … They’ve admitted it. Not even Troy King can deny that.” two candidates whose names will appear on that runoff ballot. Gov. Riley said King’s announcement almost immediately Troy King was appointed to the attorney general position in led to “expanded gambling” with a “promise of protection” for 2004 by Gov. Bob Riley and won election to the position in “casino bosses.” More than 12,000 electronic gambling machines 2006. While [he was] serving as the AG, I actually invited him were estimated to have operated in Alabama at some point in to speak at the church I was pastoring at the time because of 2010. Reportedly, VictoryLand in Shorter had the largest number his reputation for being a conservative who strongly and fairly with more than 6,000 active machines. enforced the laws of Alabama. The electronic bingo question eventually made its way to the Later in his tenure, however, King’s ties to gambling became Alabama State Supreme Court, which decisively ruled over and a frequent concern. Shortly after his appointment in 2004, King over again in several similar cases that bingo is a game that candeclared that state law permitted both paper and electronic not legally be played on electronic machines. Such machines are bingo in Macon County, home to VictoryLand Casino, and in slot machines and illegal under Alabama law. Greene County, the home of Greenetrack Casino, both dog While I do not publicly endorse candidates, I felt it was imracing and gambling operations. Casino owners took King’s portant to make my fellow Alabama citizens aware of former Atwords as permission to add hundreds of Vegas-style electronic torney General Troy King’s past connection to illegal gambling gambling machines (aka “slot machines”) to their facilities — operations in Alabama. The runoff election for attorney general machines the Alabama Supreme Court repeatedly declared as in the Republican primary and the general election in November illegal under Alabama law. will have far-reaching consequences. Unbridled illegal gambling expansion could again return to this state if citizens do not make Because AG King would not enforce the laws against these a wise choice at the ballot box. illegal gambling machines, Gov. Riley formed a “Task Force on Illegal Gambling” in March 2010 without King’s support. Joe Godfrey Troy King criticized the task force’s raid on VictoryLand and Birmingham Country Crossing, a casino/entertainment development project


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Abandon ship 250-FOOT SHIP SUNK FOR ARTIFICIAL REEF PROGRAM BY JOHN MULLEN

“By that time the boat had drug its anchor outside of the reef zone. Then we had to wait until a tug could make it out there and tow it back to the reef zone and to the reef site. Once we got that done we were able to sink it that day.” Even the eventual sinking didn’t go as planned, Newton said. Initially, the stern, or back of the boat, was supposed to flood first and hit bottom first, followed by the bow. “There were too many pipes connecting the forward and aft tanks, so we were unable to isolate where the water was going,” Newton said. “Everything essentially ended up draining toward the bow of the ship, resulting in the bow going down first.” But when all was said and done the new addition to the reef system was sitting pretty on the bottom. “It still landed upright and is sitting on its keel,” Newton said. “There’s no notable list of the ship sitting on the bottom and the pilothouse is about 57 feet

Photo | Courtesy of the Alabama Marine Resources Division

ANOTHER PROJECT THE AMRD IS CURRENTLY INVOLVED WITH IS THE DEPLOYMENT OF 600 PYRAMID REEFS FROM DAUPHIN ISLAND TO ORANGE BEACH IN SEVEN NEW REEF ZONES SIX TO NINE MILES OFFSHORE.”

The 250-foot New Venture was sunk 20 miles south of Orange Beach. Its coordinates are N29 54.052 W87 32.896.

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t wasn’t the easiest of sinkings for Alabama’s latest addition to the nation’s largest artificial reef zone. “No, but it’s down,” biologist Craig Newton of the Alabama Marine Resources Division said. The New Venture, a former 250-foot research vessel, now sits on the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico about 20 miles south of Orange Beach, or about two miles south from where the LuLu was sunk in May 2013. The LuLu

went down in one try. Not so much with the New Venture. The first attempt was on June 20 but several problems arose when the ship was finally in position. “The biggest problem was the pumps that were taken out there were not in good operating condition and didn’t keep them running,” Newton said. “Then we had to wait until we got another boat out there with some appropriate pumps, with pumps in good condition.

below the surface.” At that depth divers with the lowest certification can explore the New Venture. But even the experienced divers onsite to explore the wreck and retrieve cameras that recorded the sinking had trouble with the churning Gulf. “The current was horrible,” Newton said. “We had a hard time just keeping our marker buoy on the ship for our divers to go down. It wasn’t for the novice diver. That’s part of diving in the Gulf. “We’ve got some footage from inside the ship from GoPros that captured the flooding and they turned out real well.” The coordinates of the New Venture are N29 54.052 W87 32.896. Another project the AMRD is currently involved with is the deployment of 600 pyramid reefs from Dauphin Island to Orange Beach in seven new reef zones six to nine miles offshore. “These are 10-feet tall concrete pyramids. So far we’ve got 100 of those pyramids out now and we should have another 100 of them put out probably Friday or Saturday of this week,” Newton said. “The construction schedule is getting out another 100 of these every other week.”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

All-out blitz ROW OVER USA STADIUM CONTRIBUTION CONTINUES BY JASON JOHNSON AND DALE LIESCH

Photo | Lagniappe

The 69-year-old Ladd-Peebles Stadium will cost $33 million to maintain over the next 20 years, according to Mayor Sandy Stimpson.

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obile Mayor Sandy Stimpson is continuing to push a plan to demolish and downsize LaddPeebles Stadium and give $10 million to the University of South Alabama’s efforts to build its own football facility, but many of the people who must approve the deal still have unanswered questions. USA has plans to construct a 25,000-seat, $72 million stadium for its football program on its West Mobile campus by the fall of 2020 — a long-awaited development for Jaguar fans and one that might only be possible with a big chunk of taxpayer dollars. “At present, the university does not have the funds to build the stadium without the city and county support,” USA spokesman Bob Lowry told Lagniappe. Originally, USA had suggested the $20 million public contribution was more about legitimizing the project than funding it. As a result, both the Mobile City Council and the Mobile County Commission have been approached by the university about contributing $10 million to the project over the next 20 years. The county has showed interest in a smaller contribution. Stimpson, however, has opted to tie the city’s contribution to a larger plan to resolve looming financial obligations at 69-year-old Ladd-Peebles, which has more than $6 million of deferred maintenance needs, according to the administration. If maintained properly, Stimpson said Ladd could cost the city more than $33 million over the next 20 years or as

much as $90 million to rebuild from the ground up. He’s called Ladd-Peebles “a $100 million problem” that could potentially be “a real money pit.” If an agreement with USA is inked, Stimpson says the city would only be obligated to spend $500,000 per year through 2027, which Finance Director Paul Wesch says could be generated mostly from money that would otherwise have gone toward maintenance and capital needs at Ladd-Peebles anyway. In return, USA would also give Mobile $2.5 million to help cover the cost of demolishing Ladd-Peebles and rebuilding a smaller facility in that location for hosting high school and middle school football games as well as other sports such as soccer and lacrosse. While the administration is calling the proposal a “win” for everyone, it’s not avoided controversy. For starters, despite its current condition, there’s vocal opposition to its demolition and reconstruction. Then there’s the Public Park and Recreation Board of the city of Mobile, which has managed the stadium since 1983. Board Chairman Ann Davis has been opposed to such a radical move and said it’s an unexpected shift in the city’s approach to the stadium. Plus, much of Stimpson’s concern about the stadium’s current condition is based on an engineer report conducted in 2016 — one the board and City Council members say Stimpson’s administration has not mentioned for nearly two years.

Despite “serious issues” cited in that report, the stadium has hosted dozens of events since 2016, including two visits from Donald Trump. In a letter from attorney Mark A. Newell, the stadium board questioned Stimpson’s tactics in releasing the study as part of his push to support USA. Newell noted the board was provided similar structural reports in both 1997 and 2009 without any such delay. “We were shocked and surprised to learn this week that the city has had in its possession since October 2016 an engineering report from Barter and Associates Structural Engineers indicating the stadium’s infrastructure was graded D+, and that the stands have ‘serious issues with corrosion’ and ‘need immediate attention,’” Newell wrote. The city says some of the issues cited in that 2016 report have already been corrected. City spokeswoman Laura Byrne said “the stadium is safe for next football season” and “some recent guardrail repairs” were made ahead of the 2018 college football season. “The immediate issues we were able to resolve on our own,” Byrne added. “The additional issues the report revealed to us don’t cause immediate danger. The report didn’t reveal that is in danger of collapse.” As for not making the report public, Byrne said the approval of funding was on a City Council agenda — something at least a few city councilors were questioning last week. Byrne said the city was also waiting for the results of a study on other city facilities being conducted by CBRE. The decision to include Ladd-Peebles’ demolition and reconstruction as part of the public contribution to USA has also proved to be a concern for the County Commission, which voted to delay its consideration of the university’s request last week due to the implications it could have for the public stadium. Under the proposed agreements with USA, collegiate bowl games hosted in Mobile, including the Reese’s Senior Bowl, Dollar General Bowl and the Gulf Coast Challenge, would be allowed to play in USA’s stadium in perpetuity without paying any rental fees to the use the facility. However, there’s also been concern over whether the bowl games would want to play in a smaller stadium. In the not-too-distant past, the Senior Bowl has drawn more than 40,000 spectators, but USA’s proposed facility would seat a little more than half that. However, newly appointed Executive Director Jim Nagy told city officials last week the Senior Bowl has no plans to leave and would be fine playing at USA’s new facility when it is built out. “We want to play our game in the best stadium possible. We want to put on the best event possible, and that would be at South in our opinion,” he said. “We can put on a game at Ladd, but we really can’t put on an event at Ladd.” For NFL staff in Mobile throughout Senior Bowl week and for most of the players, practices are far more important than the game itself, and USA’s campus would come with the added benefit of multiple practice fields, including one protected from the elements. The only downside to the campus is that it is a 20- to 30-minute commute from downtown. Yet Nagy said the condition of Ladd stadium isn’t an issue as much as the lack of parking options and space that can be made available for sponsor tents, tailgating and food vendors. “In my new role, I have to think about game day, and I’ve never realized how landlocked that parking lot was and how limited we are spacewise in and around the stadium,” Nagy said. “That’s the biggest issue for us going forward because we want to make this game more of an event so the NFL will never come in here and try to do anything to our game.” At this point, the county is still waiting for the issues with Ladd-Peebles to be sorted out before making any kind of contribution to USA’s stadium effort. As of this publication’s press deadline, the City Council had yet to make a decision on Stimpson’s proposal as well.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Canned GARBAGE SUPERVISOR ‘NO LONGER EMPLOYED’ BY CITY BY DALE LIESCH

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fter weeks of complaints from garbage collection employees, the supervisor of the department is out, a city official confirmed. City spokeswoman Laura Byrne wrote that Greg Beckham, who supervised a number of areas within the Public Works Department, no longer works for the city. Wesley Young, the president of the local public works union, said he was reluctant to comment on the situation because it’s “an ongoing investigation,” but he did say Beckham did not resign. Young has been very vocal over the last few weeks about the city’s treatment of public works employees, especially the use of what employees have referred to as

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“the box,” a sort of “rubber room” allegedly used to punish certain employees. “He created the box,” Young said of Beckham. Michael Beech, union vice president, said “the box” was used as punishment for those who didn’t do exactly what “the master” wanted. He described it as a room made purposely dark by drawing the curtains, but it included a television. While employees weren’t locked in the room, Beech said, “the box” was monitored and they weren’t allowed to leave. Another city employee said one supervisor subjected to “the box” was forced to pick up litter in front of employees he supervised. Byrne has said what employees have referred

to as “the box” is actually mandatory manual training and not punishment. Young said Beckham’s supervision was not the only issue for employees, who had a meeting scheduled to discuss the issues with interim Director of Public Works John Peavy. In a news conference Monday, July 2, Joe Keffer of the Poor People’s Campaign said he filed a grievance referencing a hostile work environment. He added that Mayor Sandy Stimpson has refused to meet with Young over the issues. Employees have been asking for raises similar to those police and firefighters received during last year’s budget cycle. They each want a $5,000 raise and a step increase in wages based on the number of years employed with the city. City councilors have stated they would support any raise brought forth by Stimpson’s administration. Another issue facing the department is a shortage of employees. The issue has caused recent delays in garbage and trash pickup throughout the city. Peavy has previously stated that the department is working to hire some 20 additional employees. Three councilors hosted a job fair Monday, July 2. “The councilors hope to help fill the 20 open positions in the department through the fair,” a statement from the council reads. Former Executive Director of Public Works Bill Harkins left the city in May to pursue the study of canon law and teach at McGill-Toolen Catholic High School.


BAYBRIEF | ELECTION 2018

Crime and punishment DISTRICT COURT CANDIDATES PUSHING THROUGH RUNOFF BY JASON JOHNSON

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ith no Democrat appearing on the Nov. 6 general election ballot, Mobile County’s newest district judge will be decided by the July 17 GOP runoff between attorneys George Zoghby and Spiro Cheriogotis. In the June primary election, Zoghby claimed 47 percent of the total ballots cast — just four points away from avoiding a runoff with Cheriogotis, who managed to collect 40 percent of vote. City prosecutor Derrick Williams didn’t make the runoff but has since endorsed Zoghby. Zoghby is a Mobile native with 25 years’ experience in civil law practice in state and federal courts across Alabama. He’s also the son of late Mobile County Circuit Judge Michael E. Zoghby. Cheriogotis has focused primarily on criminal law during the six years he’s been a licensed attorney, both in private practice and as a former state prosecutor under Mobile County District Attorney Ashley Rich, who officially endorsed his campaign last week. Like most judicial hopefuls, Zoghby and Cheriogotis both say they’ll be tough on crime and uphold the law. But no matter who wins, Mobile County’s next district judge will join a circuit that’s already working under significant funding challenges and facing further layoffs this fall.

Spiro Cheriogotis

“If the citizens of Mobile County aren’t scared cuts like this are coming to the court system, they should be,” Cheriogotis said. “That’s why I think, in this race in particular, it’s so important that we get somebody with actual district court experience. Whoever is elected, if they aren’t prepared to do the job on day one, mistakes will be made and justice will suffer.” Those impending cuts were initiated at the state level and hit Mobile at the end of September despite the efforts of Presiding Judge John Lockett to secure the funding that would help retain a number of support staff positions to help manage one of Alabama’s busiest judicial circuits. Local courts have already reduced operating hours and the number of weeks set aside for jury trials, and with further staff reductions just around the corner, Cheriogotis said an incoming district judge should expect to have no clerks in their courtroom and only one judicial assistant. Having handled more than 15,000 criminal cases as a prosecutor and private attorney, Cheriogotis says his experience makes him “the most qualified candidate” for the position and notes Zoghby’s limited experience with criminal law. “If you’re not making very intentional decisions from a position of experience, you’re going to make mistakes and those mistakes permanently affect lives,” he said. “You can make a decision in one minute that may cost someone their job, or to lose their kids because they can’t get out of jail, and you’ve got to balance those interests with protecting the public.” If elected, Cheriogotis said he plans to crack down on the “small number of bad actors” he says are responsible for the vast majority of criminal activity in Mobile. He also said “the right to a bond may be in our constitution, but it’s a right that can be waived” in the name of public safety.

Cheriogotis said he wants to use the most restrictive bonding procedures the law allows when dealing with violent offenders and career criminals, and specifically said he’d like to see Mobile’s municipal and district courts “readdress” some of their current automatic bond schedules. Those preset schedules, he said, can allow defendants charged with violent crimes such as assault to walk out of jail for a just few thousand dollars. Depending on the bonding company, he said that bond may only cost an accused criminal as little as $100. “That’s why I think it’s important to use more restrictive bonding procedures, not only when it comes to the amount but also requiring a cash component or house arrest,” he said. “There are other things we can order to put greater restrictions on those who are out on bond.”

George Zoghby

While Zoghby may not have much criminal law experience, he noted he has 20 years’ more total experience than his opponent because of their ages. He also said a civil law background isn’t at all uncommon among the district and circuit judges on the bench today. “Something like 11 out of the 16 current judges have a similar background to mine, and they all do an outstanding job,” he said. “I’ve been litigating and trying cases for 25 years, and you don’t have to be a prosecutor to know right from wrong or just from unjust.” Zoghby has practiced law in local courts and all the way up to the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in federal court, and has even been admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court. Throughout his career, Zoghby said he was fortunate enough to represent law enforcement officers in a number of cases, adding “I don’t represent criminals.” A good chunk of Zoghby’s campaign has also focused on “repeat offenders,” who routinely bounce from jail to the streets. “The crime rate here in Mobile is much higher than other cities comparable to its size,” he said. “I’ve been told 80 percent of the crime is committed by the 10 percent of the population. What’s that tell you? They’re getting out. We don’t need these repeat offenders.” Like Cheriogotis, Zoghby said the funding for local courts is in a “sad” state currently. A handful of crucial assistant positions have been funded over the past year by an allocation from the Mobile County Commission. Even though he said “cities and counties” should help with funding shortfalls in May, Zoghby said last week that state courts are a state responsibility. “It’s our Legislature’s job,” he added. Zoghby has made violent crime a focus of his campaign, but in addition to locking up “those who are a danger to society” if elected, he said he wants to use his position to “save those that need saving,” too — something he says he watched his father do from the bench growing up. “I saw the impact he made in people’s lives. I saw him save lives, and I saw him put people’s lives away for acts they had committed,” Zoghby said. “District court, for a lot of people, is the first and only court they see. They need a judge who’ll listen to them and rule according to the law.”

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BAYBRIEF | ELECTION 2018

Wills and estates

PROBATE CANDIDATES URGE VOTERS TO TURN OUT JULY 17 BY JOHN MULLEN

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eeping the votes they earned in the primary is a key component for Republican probate judge candidates Harry D’Olive and Alan Lipscomb. But drumming up interest for the runoff is also paramount, both candidates say. “The problem with any runoff is getting people back to the polls to vote, so my message is not only to vote for me, but to please remember and make the effort to go back to the polls on July 17,” D’Olive said. Baldwin County has more than 150,000 registered voters but only 24 percent turned out for the June 5 primaries. “Historically, runoff elections have a much lower turnout than other elections,” Lipscomb said. “My basic strategy remains getting in front of as many voters as possible. I also plan on trying to ‘get the vote out.’” D’Olive was the leader in a five-candidate primary race with 8,866 votes or 31 percent, and won 34 boxes plus the absentee box. Lipscomb garnered 6,789 votes or 24 percent, and won 10 boxes plus the provisional box. Max Hansen won one box, Matt McKenzie one box and Lynn Perry two boxes. “My strongest areas seemed to be north and central Baldwin, which was what I had expected with the other four candidates being from the Eastern Shore area,” D’Olive said. “I will continue to concentrate more along the Eastern Shore and work to pick up as many of the other candidates’ support and votes.”

Lipscomb says he will appeal to voters who backed the three candidates who fell short of the runoff. “I was strongest on the Eastern Shore and central Baldwin,” Lipscomb said. “I have been appealing to voters of other candidates in those areas to try and pick up additional votes. It doesn’t really affect my strategy as to trying to win more boxes. I do hope to pick up a larger percentage of the more populated areas such as Gulf Shores and Orange Beach.” Currently an assistant district attorney in Baldwin County, D’Olive says he has experience in all areas covered by the probate office. “I am still the only candidate with ‘hands-on’ experience in every aspect of the probate office including, tags, licenses, elections, recording and the probate court,” D’Olive said. “A vote for me is a vote for the most experienced candidate.” A more streamlined office, particularly for the real estate industry, will be a goal for Lipscomb if he wins on July 17. “My basic message remains the same, but I am targeting Realtors and title agents about the advantages of electronic filing of legal documents that would streamline the real estate closing business significantly,” Lipscomb said. “Implementing electronic filing is at the discretion of each county’s probate judge. I am also a title agent and I have 20-plus years of experience in real estate.” The winner faces no Democratic opposition in the November general election.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

HUD charge

LOCAL HOME-STAGING FRANCHISE SLAPPED WITH DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINT

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BY DALE LIESCH

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he United States Department of Housing and Urban Development has charged the Mobile franchise of a home-staging company with discrimination. Showhomes of Mobile and Baldwin counties was charged about four years after a woman was not allowed to stay in a home because she had more than two children, according to a statement from HUD. “Rules that limit the number of children in housing violate the Fair Housing Act,” HUD Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Anna María Farías said in the statement. “Today’s action reaffirms HUD’s commitment to protecting the right of families with children to obtain the housing of their choice.” The action was a response to a complaint filed in May 2014 by a woman who said she was denied a rental because she had more than two minor children. According to the charge, an employee at the Showhomes franchise told the woman, who was trying to become a “home manager,” having three children made her ineligible because of the nature of Showhomes’ business. After the complaint was filed the Mobilebased Center for Fair Housing conducted a test. The tester was given the same information. HUD just recently notified the Showhomes franchisee of the charge. Showehomes owner Bert Lyles said the former franchisee doesn’t believe the allegations are valid. For one, Lyles said, the charge is based on a one-minute phone conversation with a Showhomes Mobile employee. Showhomes could not find a record of the phone call in question. Also, Lyles said Showhomes is a staging company employing what are referred to as “home managers,” as a opposed to a full-fledged

rental company. Home managers live in homes for sale and pay a reduced rent, or “monthly fee,” as it’s described on the company’s website, but must keep the house properly staged. “The whole context is different than a rental,” he said. “Our advertising reflects that. This is not a rental, it’s an opportunity … .” According to the charge, HUD makes no distinction between a rental property and a homestaging property. “It is unlawful to refuse to rent or negotiate to rent or otherwise make unavailable or deny a dwelling to any person because of familial status,” the charge states. “It is unlawful to discriminate against any person in the terms, conditions or privileges of rental of a dwelling, or in the provision of services or facilities in connection therewith, because of familial status.” One of the requirements to become a home manager is having a maximum of two minor children. Lyles said the restriction is set because a manager has to be ready to “show a home on 30-minute notice.” “To my knowledge, across all franchises, we’ve always supported compliance with fair housing because it’s the right thing to do,” Lyles said. “We place people who can meet our requirements.” Lyles said the complaint is against the former franchisee. The company has offered assistance, but she is the one who must respond to the charge. The current Mobile franchisee no longer offers the home manager service. Lyles said Showhomes requires franchise owners to offer all the company’s services, but added it is not enforced. In the interest of full disclosure, Lyles is a minority investor in Lagniappe.


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

The press is not the enemy ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

ON THIS FOURTH, CELEBRATE THIS GREAT COUNTRY, REVEL IN OUR UNIQUENESS AND REALIZE THAT DESPITE OUR DIFFERENCES OF OPINION, THIS HAS BEEN MOSTLY A WILDLY SUCCESSFUL ENDEAVOR OVER THE PAST 242 YEARS.”

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I do understand his frustration with some reporting that occurs, but calling the press the enemy of the American people is ignoring the hundreds of years of reporting that have helped keep this country free. Just think about it on the local level. How would we as a community function if we couldn’t get the facts about possibly moving the airport or putting tax dollars into USA’s new football stadium? How would the people of Fairhope know the details about efforts to possibly change their entire form of city government? Without a free press the Luv Guv might still be there groping away, and the citizens would know nothing of the shenanigans that got former Speaker of the House Mike Hubbard convicted. Facebook and Instagram are great for showing your friends the pretty sandwich you had for lunch, but hardly a replacement for a well-researched news story. In a time when the politicians running this country have built up a $21 trillion debt and committed us to endless war, it’s bizarre to think the free press would be considered the enemy of the people. Americans who are upset with the media owe it to themselves to turn off the TV and spend 10 minutes finding the many well-written and researched stories published by reputable news outlets that are easily available for those who want the news without spin. On this Fourth, celebrate this great country, revel in our uniqueness and realize that despite our differences of opinion, this has been mostly a wildly successful endeavor over the past 242 years. And say a prayer for those five people who lost their lives in Maryland last week playing their role in keeping this country great.

THEGADFLY

larger statement about displeasure with the press, but it was still about journalists doing their jobs and apparently bringing down the wrath of a madman. If the story about the shooter’s displeasure with having been the subject of a story in the Gazette is true, these people indeed lost their lives in the service of journalism and, ultimately, of free speech. Some people become so lost in politics they forget the basic necessity of what journalists do. Just last week, commentator Milo Yiannopoulos was quoted in the New York Observer as saying, “I can’t wait for vigilante squads to start gunning journalists down on sight.” His timing was nearly perfect. Yiannopoulos is a right-winger who subscribes to the notion that the “liberal media” is at the root of the problems facing President Donald Trump, and therefore deserve to be shot. On sight. I’m sure there are people out there who think Yiannopoulos deserves to be shot on sight for some of the things he says, but let’s go on record here that killing someone because you don’t like what they say or write isn’t going to help bridge the ideological divide currently tearing this country apart. I will freely admit there is some very bad reporting done in regard to President Trump. There are people who go on television and say outlandish things about him on a daily basis because they dislike him. But the power in that type of “journalism” comes directly from the people who have decided to only consume media that aligns with them politically. If being unbiased and neutral on the issues was actually rewarded with higher television ratings, inane “panel discussions” after every story would disappear.

Unfortunately, when it comes to national media, the American public has seemingly abandoned the desire for fair and balanced news in favor of partisanship dressed up as journalism. President Trump has famously and repeatedly labeled the media as the “enemy of the American people” because he is frustrated with the daily torrent of critical stories and comments, whether accurate or “fake.” Like any good politician, Trump never admits wrongdoing and always blames reporters or media outlets for stories that are negative. This isn’t a new play, Trump is just a lot better than the average politico at getting people to listen to his whining. But think about the reality of saying something like the media is the enemy of the American people. Does he believe media should be abolished? What would the United States be without journalists? Does President Trump even recognize it was the dreaded “liberal media” that exposed Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server to handle classified information — an issue that almost certainly tipped the scales enough to put him in office? Do those who subscribe to the notion of the press as an enemy of the people realize how much of what they know about Washington corruption was uncovered by members of the mainstream media? Thomas Jefferson is well known for his support of a free press and recognition that it is essential for a free country. Privately he gnashed his teeth that the partisan rags of the day were tearing him apart and printing stories that couldn’t be believed. Still, he wrote, “The only security of all is in a free press.” I’m not trying to blast Trump, because

Cartoon/Laura Mattei

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reedom isn’t always an easy thing. One of its most unfortunate side effects is having to endure points of view we neither agree with nor respect. The Founding Fathers seemed to recognize this, which is why after they were done with the U.S. Constitution, someone said, “You know, this thing really isn’t finished. We should make some amendments to it!” The very first of those is, well, the First Amendment, which establishes freedom of speech and freedom of the press. On this 242nd celebration of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, which ultimately led to the formation of the finest country this old world has ever seen, it’s a nice time devote some thought to those concepts and what they mean in 2018. The mass shooting at the Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Maryland, last week should serve as a tragic reminder that working within the framework of the First Amendment is not a danger-free endeavor. In doing the jobs necessary for providing their community with a newspaper — an institution the founders believed so necessary to freedom that they explicitly protected it in the First Amendment — five people lost their lives. Granted, this attack does not appear to have been motivated by any particular political credo or to make a

SOMEBODY DIDN’T GET THE FIREWORKS SAFETY MEMO THIS FOURTH OF JULY


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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

MOB to BFM? Volume Two ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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ire up the grill, grab your watermelon and fireworks, and crank up the ol’ ice cream freezer, it’s time to celebrate our independence from Meghan Markle’s ancestors-in-law. Geez, Meg, how quickly we forget! But before we celebrate the 4th together as a nation, I just wanted to follow up on my column from last week regarding plans to move the airport from Mobile Regional to Brookley. So without further adieu, I am going to “dieu” just that.

Airport Authority exec director answers questions

The Mobile Airport Authority recently released the findings of a study it commissioned to determine if it was feasible to move commercial service from Mobile Regional (MOB) to Brookley (BFM). The study found it was feasible, and more cost effective, to move the airport to Brookley, in downtown Mobile, rather than building a faster, more accessible roadway to Mobile Regional in WeMo, which carriers have complained is “painful” to get to, especially for those travelers on the Eastern Shore. In the June 27 issue I posed some questions I still had about this, though. Specifically, if legacy carriers, like Delta and American, would come in and start dumping their prices to put these lowcost carriers out of business, as they have in the past. And if they did that, would we essentially be in the same boat (or plane) — as far as pricing goes — no matter if the terminal was at Regional or Brookley? Mobile Airport Authority Executive Director Chris Curry called me last week and offered insight into how the airline industry has changed over the last decade and how this would work, so the low-cost carriers (LCCs) and the legacy carriers could happily coexist. He said Mobile Regional’s location is a huge turnoff to low-cost carriers. “If I called up and asked them [LLCs] to come to Regional, that phone call would last about a minute,” Curry said. While I still don’t quite understand why, if it is proven people are willing to drive a little farther/longer for a better price, the LCCs wouldn’t at least give Regional another shot to see if they would work there, Curry says they just won’t. Brookley is the only option because the

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drive time to it is more predictable and reliable, especially for those in Baldwin County. So, operating under this premise — that the LCCs are only willing to come to Brookley, — how do they compete with the legacy carriers once they’re all at Brookley? He said MAA would not even recruit a low-cost airline to come in and compete with a destination the legacy carriers already serve — for example, they would never get a LCC to come in and try to compete with Delta for flights to Atlanta. They would try to get LCCs that offered direct flights to locations the legacy carriers do not. For example, he hopes they can get LCCs to offer direct flights to Newark, Washington, D.C., and Denver. Those flights would not compete with ones Delta or American currently have flying out of Mobile. And he said this is sort of the new way these low-cost and legacy carriers are sharing space in markets across the country, which does make more sense. I still look forward to getting more details in the coming months as they develop their more extensive master plan. Stay tuned!

Happy Fourth of July!

I just wanted to wish everyone a very Happy Fourth of July. In the current political climate we live in, it is easy to lose sight we still live in the greatest country on this planet. While we may be bitterly divided along partisan lines, at least we all have the right to have and express the very opinions we hate each other for (and unfollow people on Facebook over). Though we have made many mistakes as a nation since our Founding Fathers declared independence, I still believe we are a country that tries to right its wrongs and we end up better for it. It has never been an easy journey to get to those better places, though. Just think of the bitterly divisive issues folks have debated and died for in our country’s history — from slavery to women’s rights to civil rights to fighting in wars we may or may not feel are just. It hasn’t always been pretty, but we eventually find our way. I have faith we will continue to do that. Happy Birthday, America! You may not be perfect, and you may be a big ol’ hot mess right now — literally and figuratively — but you’re our mess, and we love you from sea to shining sea.


COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Baldwin County’s shameless gimmick politics BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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s the overused saying from former White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel goes, you never let a crisis go to waste. In this case, if you’re Rep. Bradley Byrne, Baldwin County Commissioners Tucker Dorsey and Chris Elliott, and Baldwin County Sheriff Huey “Hoss” Mack, if you don’t have a crisis not to let go to waste, make one up. Last month, Time magazine reported the Trump administration was considering “remote bases in California, Alabama and Arizona” to house the potential tens of thousands of illegal immigrants detained as a result of its zero-tolerance illegal immigration policy. There is no indication the Trump administration was actually going to follow through with this leaked proposal. Yet a political hot-button for a couple of local Baldwin County races was born. I mean, the campaign flyers practically wrote themselves. “Baldwin County is bursting with growth,” one of Elliott’s latest mailers reads. “Our schools are already crowded and I can’t imagine dealing with the crime which could come as a result of this facility. Who thinks a tent city with no sewer, no water and no power in the Deep South along hurricane alley is a good idea? This is ridiculous and I promise you this will NOT happen on my watch!” Imagine that arriving in your mailbox one day. You might think these illegal immigrants would escape from a detention center and immediately rob a bank, but not before enrolling for classes at Foley Intermediate School. This Baldwin County delegation successfully batted down an alleged effort by the Obama administration to implement a similar plan when an influx of underage illegal immigrants was underway years earlier. I suppose we’re to believe a Trump administration, one that would perceivably be friendly to the county’s local power structure led by the Republican Party, would finish the job Obama couldn’t? Nonetheless, last week this group of Baldwin County politicians took a trip to Washington, D.C., and reportedly told members of Alabama’s congressional delegation, “Not in our backyard!” There were also a few photo-ops. I think we can figure out what is going on here. Step one: Get people riled up over something. Step two: Swoop in and pretend to be a hero. Step three: Use this faux heroism to supercharge your political chances. In the cases of Elliott and Dorsey, both of these fine public servants face tough runoff contests in a few weeks. For Byrne, it’s the worst-kept secret in Alabama that he has visions of taking on Doug Jones for his United States Senate seat, which is

up for grabs in 2020. What a county commissioner and an Alabama state senator can do to stop the federal government from doing anything, other than perhaps lobbying federal elected officials, isn’t clear. As for Byrne, this type of gimmick politics is a little early. Perhaps if he were 10 points down a week out from a Republican primary, rather than two years out in the U.S. Senate election cycle, a Hail Mary pass of stirring up illegal immigrant fears 860 miles from the nearest U.S.-Mexico border crossing would be in order. This type of demagogic politics has some consequences. Even if candidate x, y and z get a bump from the illegal immigrant detention facility scare, it validates criticisms from opponents of conservative ideology and Republican Party politics in Alabama. John Archibald, Roy Johnson, Kyle Whitmire and J.D. Crowe are licking their chops looking for something like this to bash over the heads of Republicans. “See, guys, we told you they were nothing but racist brown-people haters! You don’t want to be a racist brown-people hater, do you? Don’t be a racist brown-people hater. Be like us! Support insane left-of-center public policy and you won’t be a racist brown-people hater.” It’s not that what those guys say moves the needle in Alabama, at least for right now. However, outside of Alabama, it allows them to portray themselves as rational purveyors of political discussion. Furthermore, it may even allow some of our economic competitors seeking to land that next big auto manufacturing facility to make the case that our state’s opposition to illegal immigration isn’t born out of opposing the expansion of the social welfare state, the strain on our infrastructure and schools or the impact it has on employment and wages. Instead, they’ll say, “Look at how racist Alabama is. They weren’t going to house those illegal immigrants in Baldwin County anyway. But those politicians sure stirred them up to think as much. And that’s Baldwin County, one of Alabama’s more affluent counties. Imagine what it would be like to locate your multibillion-dollar manufacturing facility in a more rural part of that state.” Why risk being branded as such for a couple of insignificant local elections and a head start on the race for the 2020 U.S. Senate Republican nomination? This is just a bad look, guys. It may work on a few people, but the people that pay attention to stuff, that are engaged with it on a daily basis – they can spot phony alarmism miles away.

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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Portico development breaks ground in Fairhope BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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ast week Haley Development LLC broke ground on Phase I of the Portico development in Fairhope, located on 3.5 acres at 561 Fairhope Ave., the site of a former self-storage facility adjacent to the U.S. Post Office downtown. The first phase consists of five Class A commercial units in a two-story building with a central elevator lobby and onsite parking. Among the incoming tenants is ServisFirst Bank. Phase II will bring an additional 10,000 square feet of Class A commercial space and 10 prime residential condominium units to downtown Fairhope. Additional phases will potentially bring another 25,000 square feet of mixed-use space to Portico and the Fairhope community. “This project would not have been possible without the collective efforts and talents of everyone involved,” project management develop Chris Haley said. “I anticipate Portico will set a new standard of architecture and quality for the growing market, appealing to discerning business owners and residents alike.” According to a news release, architectural design was handled by Pfeffer Torode of Nashville; design consultation managed by McCown Design; construction work performed locally by Rogers & Willard; commercial leasing handled by Jeff Barnes with Stirling Properties; and residential sales by Morgan Ashurst of Ashurst Niemeyer. Completion of Phase I is anticipated for January 2019. • A new 89-suite Marriott International TownePlace Suites recently opened in Saraland. The new hotel is located at 2954 Township Blvd. and will operate as a Marriott franchise, owned and managed by Ascent Hospitality of Buford, Georgia. “We are excited to introduce the TownePlace Suites brand to the Saraland area,” Diane Mayer, vice president and global brand manager, said.

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Amenities will include complimentary daily hot breakfast service in the lobby area, cooking areas on outdoor Weber grills, 24-hour coffee service, an outdoor swimming pool, 24/7 exercise room access, laundry facilities, Wi-Fi, onsite business services and pet accommodations. • Hand Arendall Harrison Sale LLC announced in a news release that its Mobile office has relocated to Merchants Plaza as the anchor tenant effective June 25. The firm is now located at 104 St. Francis St., Suite 300, moving from the RSA Battle House Tower, where it leased two floors covering some 35,000 square feet. The law firm is reportedly the first new tenant in the commercial site downtown and now occupies three floors of the eight-story office building, covering some 27,000 square feet. The Merchants Plaza development is located near the corner of St. Francis and Royal streets. Heritage Land and Development Co. LLC purchased the $30 million redevelopment project in downtown Mobile in 2017. • Cameron Weavil, vice president of the Weavil Co., recently reported property at 210 and 214 Dauphin St. has been sold to local investors for $650,000. The addresses encompass a 5,500-square-foot vacant building next door to the Crescent Theater, as well as an adjacent parking lot. Per Weavil, there are plans to open a bar/restaurant/music venue in the space. Trey Langus with Langus Real Estate worked for the buyer, Weavil for the seller. • American Car Center is leasing the 2,800-square-foot former Valero gas station space located in the Tillman’s Corner area at 5447 U.S. Route 90 in Mobile. Jeff Barnes, broker with Stirling Properties, and Michael Murray with Shannon Waltchack represented the tenant in the transaction. Nathan Handmacher, leasing executive with Stirling Properties, worked for the landlord. • Employee Liability Management, a local payroll, human

resource and benefits administration company, has purchased the 10,113-squarefoot professional office building at 210 S. Washington Ave. in downtown Mobile for $1.3 million. The small business is relocating from its current site in midtown, 3213 Executive Park Circle. Bradford Ladd of Roberts Brothers Commercial and Property Management represented the sellers. David Dexter with NAI Mobile worked for ELM.    • A local-area investor recently acquired the 3,033-square-foot former Arby’s space and drive-thru located at 800 N. Navy Blvd. in Pensacola for $660,000. Angie McArthur with Stirling Properties represented the buyer and is currently listing the property for lease. Michael Carro with Sperry Van Ness worked for the owner.

Tool-sharing app unveiled locally

Matt Gray, a Mississippi State graduate in mechanical engineering turned app developer, recently launched his LEVELD app. The Mobile-based application reportedly shares similar business model services with such Bay Area behemoths as Uber and Airbnb. In essence, the concept behind the tech is tool-sharing as opposed to ride-sharing and/or travel and tourism space-sharing. One of the first companies Gray approached was Mighty, a Mobile-based creative agency that works primarily with growth-focused companies. “When Matt approached us we immediately recognized the growth opportunity and began to assemble a strategy to take the app from launch to market expansion,” Mighty co-founder and CEO Jarrett McCraw said. “It’s been roughly 18 months since concept to development and we are currently in the early stages of establishing a foundational user base to accelerate the adoption of LEVELD in markets across the country.” Other advisers include: Todd Greer, dean of the University of Mobile School of Business; Bo Megginson, executive director of Gulf Coast Angel Investment Management Group; Hunter Adams and Alexa Stabler-Adams of Adams IP LLC; Mel Washington, Small Business Development Center regional director; and Mat Trawick, owner of Trawick Insurance Brokerage. “I think you’re going to see more local entrepreneurs, like LEVELD, continue to push the boundaries in the near future. There’s going to be more expansion down St. Louis Street, St. Anthony Street and on Church Street,” Scott Tindle, co-owner of The Fort of Colonial Mobile, said during the launch party he hosted in late June. The app’s technology works similar to other applications. Owners with tools and renters looking to use specific tools connect to each other through the app. Users can search within specific geographic areas, exchange money directly through the app and are protected through liability insurance. The platform also includes a review system to encourage a better connection between users by allowing both parties to rate their experience. Users set their own prices and receive payment in two to three days once the transaction is processed. LEVELD is currently available for free on iTunes. A Google Play Store version for Android is expected to be rolled out in six to nine months. More information can be found at www.getleveld.net.


CUISINE | THE DISH

Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl and stir well. Refrigerate up to 3-5 days. Usually painted or drizzled on after the fact, some people add a light orating at the end of cooking. Great with chicken.

Barbecue Red, White and Blue

And the Blue

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

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ell boys and girls, we are in the throes of one of the hottest summers I can remember and it seems it isn’t letting up. Across the state, including Mobile, more than a couple of record highs were recorded in May and you, the live-free-or-die outdoor chef, refuse to back down. You’ll stare this heat in the face and raise the pot by firing up that charcoal, gas grill or smoker, adding more notches to the already maxed-out thermometer. We will do almost anything to prove we are tougher than we are. Let’s hope you have a couple of squirrel-cage fans, several blocks of ice and a garden hose nearby because you will certainly need them. In the spirit of Independence Day you’re going to barbecue the red, white and blue into every empty belly of every guest at your freedom soirée while singing along to your specially made playlist full of John Cougar Mellencamp anthems, John Phillips Sousa instrumentals and one Lee Greenwood song. A little extra heat isn’t going to stomp out that patriotic flame burning inside you. Somewhere between “Pink Houses” and “R.O.C.K. in the U.S.A,” you’re going to need to take a break to rehydrate. You may love your country, but these American beers are awfully hoppy these days. Be sure to get some water or Gatorade in you, which, as you know, also comes in red, white and blue. But now for the sauces.

The Red

Red barbecue sauce is as American as the stripes on the flag. Every section of the nation has its version of tomato-based barbecue sauce. We have so many readily available in our supermarkets and specialty shops that you could take a tour of the country on red sauce alone. This sauce handles the lion’s share of my grilling and works with chicken, pork or brisket. I don’t mean to straddle a fence here, but in our climate I believe the better barbecue has to have some sweet and some heat. The balance for me is the further sweet you get, the more heat you’ll need. No matter what, you must have Worcestershire sauce.

WORD OF MOUTH

Bay Bites Food Truck Festival coming July 25

The Bay Bites Food truck Festival is once again making its way to Cooper Riverside Park on Wednesday, July 25, from 5-9 p.m. The list of trucks is still being finalized but we do know we’ll enjoy live music by Roadside Glorious, craft beer from Sweetwater Brewing, lawn games and kids’ entertainment. Strike now to get advance tickets for only $15 through July 8. Prices go up to $20 the 9 and $25 on the day of the festival. One ticket includes three drink tokens (beer or Coke products) and access to the trucks. Food is sold separately. The event is rain or shine and does have a tendency to sell out, so act fast while it’s on

It’s almost as important as the tomatoes. ½ stick butter 1 small white onion, minced 1 cup brown sugar 1 ½ cups ketchup (just grab a cheap brand) ½ cup white vinegar ½ to ¾ cup water 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce ½ teaspoon garlic salt ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper 4 turns of a pepper mill 2-4 dashes of hot sauce, depending on the heat you seek In a skillet, start by melting the butter over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook until you can see through them. Add brown sugar and ketchup, and stir for about a minute. Add rest of ingredients and bring to a simmer. Turn off heat and let it rest. This goes on anything mopped on in the last few minutes of grilling.

The White

In any city in northern Alabama it’s pretty easy to get your hands on white barbecue sauce. Mobile is no exception. A lot of our local restaurants do this sauce justice, a fitting tribute to what many credit Big Bob Gibson with creating nearly a century ago in his iconic restaurant in Decatur, Alabama. Here’s a workable version. 1 cup Duke’s, Hellman’s or Blue Plate mayonnaise Juice of a lemon ½ cup apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons prepared horseradish 2 teaspoons Creole mustard 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper ½ teaspoon sugar Salt and pepper to taste

the cheap. Visit www.mobilebaykeeper.org to purchase.

Callaghan’s keeps winning

It’s hard keeping this place a secret when they keep winning awards, but I can’t say Callaghan’s Irish Social Club doesn’t deserve it. The readers of Alabama magazine must feel the same way, as they have voted our beloved Cally’s the Best Burger in Alabama seven years in a row! That’s strong praise. Another reason to get there early, I suppose. Congratulations, John Thompson and crew. You guys are doing a great job and are food ambassadors for our fair city.

Cheese Cottage hosts cheese classes Cheese 101 is ready for summer enroll-

There aren’t that many naturally occurring blue foods in this world. You’ll find blue potatoes and carrots every now and again, but this column is about sauces. Our favorite blue food is the blueberry, and it makes one dandy of a sauce. In May I wrote a piece about the two bushes in my yard. My crop is all gone, save a few in the freezer, but you may still find fresh ones here and there. It’s a global market these days. When making a sauce, though, if you have to use frozen berries from the middle cooler of the grocery, it won’t be the worst thing in the world. You’re going to be cooking this down a bit. I find this sauce a great flavor and stain for medallions of pork tenderloin, but the best use is on a thick bone-in pork chop. Brush it on when the other white meat turns white. Serve a little on the side. 1 cup blueberries 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup diced red onion 1 teaspoon minced garlic ¼ cup balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon sugar ¼ cup Grand Marnier ¾ cup blueberry sparkling water (lemon if unavailable) 2 sprigs fresh thyme Salt to taste In a medium saucepan over medium heat, soften onions in olive oil. Add garlic and cook for another 30 seconds. Add the balsamic vinegar, blueberries and sugar, cooking until the blueberries begin to pop. With a potato masher (or fork), mash the blueberries Add the Grand Marnier and cook for 1 minute. Add blueberry sparkling water and bring to a boil. Throw in the thyme and taste for salt. Reduce heat to simmer. At this point we can either strain this as a sauce to be brushed on the meat or keep it chunky and spoon it over the meat at the end. A third option is to use an immersion blender. The fact that I love America means I also love power tools, so immersion blender it is. This way you’ll have a sauce thin enough to brush on the meat while it’s cooking and thick enough to top it off after you plate it or use it as a dipping sauce.

ment at the Cheese Cottage. These two-hour events will be an educational experience, where each participant will learn the history, uses, types and pairings for different types of cheese. A sampling of each and a wine specifically selected to pair will be provided. July dates are sold out, but be on the lookout for August and September. Perhaps another date will pop up soon enough? Fingers crossed.

Grilling woes? Call Longhorn!

Maybe you’re a novice, maybe you want to try something different, but if you’ve got troubles at the grill Longhorn Steakhouse has the answer. For the first time ever Longhorn will have our country’s top grill masters as the certified experts on hand for their Grill US Hotline.

Wednesday, July 4, from 10 a.m to 4 p.m eastern time, backyard chefs in need will be able to call 1-855-LH-GRILL (1-855-5447455) to speak with a group of finalists from Longhorn’s Steak Master Series competition, in which top-performing grilling experts from around the country have been competing since February. The finals took place June 28. Gather your questions and call before you do something stupid, like set your deck on fire or serve a ribeye with ketchup. Remember, mid-rare is a job well done.

Haberdasher launches new menu soon In our next issue we’ll provide details, but a heads up that the Haberdasher will launch its new menu July 5. Get ready! Recycle!

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EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($)

5602 Old Shell Rd. • 219-7086 920 Industrial Pkwy • Saraland • 378-5314

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

FATHOMS LOUNGE

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

15 N Conception St. • 378-9377

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285 $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BIG WHITE WINGS ($)

405 S Wilson Ave. • Prichard• 301-7880

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 378-8378

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$) CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 622-0869

CLEAN EATZ ($)

7335 Airport Blvd. • 654-1575

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

12 N Royal St • 415-1700 107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 3694 Airport Blvd • 342-2352 5300-C Halls Mill Rd • 660-0995 3075 Government Blvd B105 • 461-6080 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730 6890 US-90 #6 • Daphne • 625-8723 9912 Dimitrios Blvd • Daphne • 626-7827 113 S Greeno Rd • Fairhope • 990-3970

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768 6860 US-90 • Daphne • 626-4278

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($)

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($) MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 Eastern Shore Center • Spanish Fort • 625-6544

NOURISH CAFE ($)

HEALTHY WHOLE FOODS & MORE 101 N Water St. (Moorer YMCA)• 458-8572

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($) 562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

PANINI PETE’S ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($) BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

R BISTRO ($-$$)

HOOTERS ($)

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 29660 AL-181 • Daphne • 626-3161 3151 Daupin St• 525-9917 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 S Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-4334

JUBILEE DINER ($-$$)

A VARIETY COMFORT F00D. BREAKFAST ALL DAY. 6882 US-90 • Daphne • (251) 621-3749

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government Blvd. • 665-4547

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477 334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

ROLY POLY ($)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2904 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000 1539 US-98 • Daphne • 517-3963

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$)

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 432-8000

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 4715 Airport Blvd/Regency Square • 304-1155

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St/RSA Building • 444-0200

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. • Daphne • 222-4120

320 Eastern Shore Shopping Center •Fairhope • 929-0055 3055 A Dauphin St. • 479-3200 33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

LAUNCH ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 7450 Airport Blvd. A • 634-3454 570 Schillinger Rd. • 634-3454 29740 Urgent Care Dr.• 626-1160

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) BREAKFAST, HOT LUNCH & GREAT DESSERTS 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 5701 Old Shell Rd Ste 100 • 442-4846 29160 US Hwy 98 • Daphne •621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

1956 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

1500 Government St. • 287-1526

NOJA ($$-$$$)

WILD WING STATION ($)

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. • Fairhope • 990.8883

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • Fairhope •990-6192

‘CUE

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824 INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$)

BAY BARBECUE ($)

SOUTHERN NATIONAL ($$-$$$)

BENJAS ($)

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 829-9227

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

THE TASTE OF MOBILE 59 N Florida St. • 408-9997

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

BBQ AND MORE 6882 US-90 G2/Jubilee Square •Daphne• 210-2151 1390 W D6 Tingle Circle East/McGowin Park• 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. E100/Westwood Plaza • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) TEXARBAMA ($)

112.5 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope

360 Dauphin St • 308-2387

THAI & SUSHI 5369 US-90 • 661-5100

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

A LITTLE VINO DOMKE MARKET

16 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 4 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051 GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 312 Schillinger Rd • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

CLASSIC STEAKHOUSE + FRESH FISH 17107 Tennis Club Dr. • Fairhope • 517-7700

CHARM THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR ($-$$)

CHINA DOLL SEAFOOD RESTAURANT($) 3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

CHEF 181 ($)

ASIAN FUSION RESTAURANT 10179 Eastern Shore D • Spanish Fort • 621-2104

FUJI SAN ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

HALAL CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

FOOD PAK INTERNATIONAL FOODS POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171 2370 Hillcrest Rd.• 380-6062

ICHIBAN ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

LIQUID SUSHI LOUNGE ($$)

RED OR WHITE

CHAR 32 ($$$)

THE GALLEY ($)

DROP DEAD GOURMET

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd./Ambassador Plaza• 633-9077

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500

TRADITIONAL JAPANESE WITH HIBACHI GRILLS 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

SOUTHERN NAPA

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

966 Government St.• 408-9001

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

AROY THAI ($$)

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE 3211 Moffett Rd • 473-4739

THE BLIND MULE ($)

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

4513 Old Shell Rd. D• 473-0007

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 2058 Airport Blvd • 476-0516

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

FAR EASTERN FARE

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

THE CHEESE COTTAGE ($$) SPECIALTY GROCER/DELI 650 St. Louis St. • 251-308-8488

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 9 Du Rhu Dr Suite 300 • 378-2678 1539 US HWY 98•Daphne • 273-3337

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR ($$)

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($)

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

AT FLY CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 460-9191

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

2159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

D NU SPOT ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 6890 US-90 • Daphne • 621-2271 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-1689

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($)

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

MAMA’S ($)

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) FIVE ($$)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

BARBEQUE & MUSIC 4672 Airport Blvd. • 410-6377 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 3385 Schillinger Rd N #1 • 410-7428 6423 Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-7427

LODA BIER GARTEN ($)

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

3915 Gov’t Blvd. • 219-7922 3226 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000 BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

7 SPICE ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD.

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Government Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367 2601 S McKenzie St •Foley • 943-4648


SHO GUN ($$)

OFF THE HOOK MARINA & GRILL ($)

SIAM THAI CUISINE & SUSHI BAR ($$)

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

JAPANESE ENTREES, SUSHI & HIBACHI TABLES 7038 Airport Blvd • 304-0021 915 Hillcrest Rd. Suite C • 380-9111

STIX ($$)

10240 Eastern Shore Blvd • 621-9088

SUSHI 9 THAI & JAPANESE ($$) 720 Schillinger Rd • 607-7073

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 • Irvington • 957-1414

TEAK HOUSE

1703 US-98 • Daphne • 625-8680

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Battleship Pkwy • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/ MUDBUGS DIP SEAFOOD ($)

PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168 • 479-0123

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Battleship Pkwy • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1530 Battleship Pkwy • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2200

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($) 30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($) CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

CAJUN INSPIRED/FRESH SEAFOOD & MORE 621 N Craft Hwy • Chickasaw • 422-3412

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464 3947 AL-59 Suite 100 • Gulf Shores • 970-1337

MANCIS ($)

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA MURPHY’S

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

MUG SHOTS ($$)

TAKE ‘N’ BAKE PIZZA 3992 Government • 287-2345 7820 Moffett Rd. • Semmes • 586-8473 2370 Hillcrest Rd • 661-4003 3764 Airport Blvd • 338-9903 705 Highway 43 • Saraland •308-2929 27955 US 98 • Daphne • 621-8666

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318

BAR & GRILL 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Alabama 181 • Fairhope• 281-2663

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$)

LUCKY IRISH PUB ($)

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($)

UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 1108 Shelton Beach Rd •Saraland • 473-0757 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000 WINGS, BURGERS & OTHER AMERICAN CHOW 104 N Section St • Fairhope • 929-2219

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 805 S Mobile St • Fairhope • 929-2322 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335

MAMA MIA!

IS THE GAME ON?

1715 Main St. (Next to Manci’s) Daphne. • 264-2520

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 36 Hillcrest Rd • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$)

WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832 25755 Perdido Beach Blvd •Orange Beach • 981-3041

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$)

BUSTER’S BRICK OVEN ($-$$)

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$)

ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

RAVENITE ($)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 3206 Joe Treadwell Dr • 378-2444 6880 US-90/Jubilee Square • Daphne • 625-4695 BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 • Spanish Fort• 375-0076

GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($)

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$)

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 2453 Old Shell Rd • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) GUIDO’S RESTAURANT ($$) FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

SEMMES HOUSE OF PIZZA ($) 3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

MARCO’S PIZZA ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 625-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 2409 Schillinger Rd S • 525-8431 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911 2303 S McKenzie St •Foley • 970-1414

MIRKO ($$)

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

VIA EMILIA ($$)

OLÉ MI AMIGO! AZTECAS ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 US-90 • 661-5509

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

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J u l y 4 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 17


CUISINE | THE BEER PROFESSOR

Local summer styles for Independence Day BY TOM WARD/THE BEER PROFESSOR

A

18 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 4 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Photo | Lagniappe

s you celebrate the Glorious Fourth, remember that the Founding Fathers would have thought nothing more appropriate than to raise a glass of local brew to toast our independence. The Sons of Liberty planned the Boston Tea Party at the Green Dragon Tavern — probably sustained by some of Sam Adams’ beers — while presidents Washington, Jefferson and Madison all brewed their own suds. During his presidency, James Madison proposed the idea of a federal brewery, while George Washington’s handwritten recipe for “Small Beer” can be found on in the internet. (He also distilled his own whiskey!) If you don’t want to brew your own, we’re lucky to have a number of great local options to choose from this Independence Day. Serda Brewing recently received a Can Can Award for its Hook, Line and Lager, which won the gold medal in the German-style Pilsner category. It’s a lighter beer, but with good flavor, and should be a favorite of those sitting in Serda’s Beer Garden on Government Street on these warm evenings. The Can Cans are awards reserved for craft beers distributed in cans, and there were more than 350 entries in this year’s competition. Created to promote canned craft beer, which currently represents only about 9 percent of the craft beer market, the Can Can awards promote the benefits of canned beer, namely its ease of opening, environmental benefits (aluminum is much more easily recycled than glass) and preservation of the beer (protection against UV rays that can skunk beer). Serda just finished its third canning run of 800 cases of its Hook, Line and Lager and its Tidewater Vienna, both of which can be found not only at the brewery, but at a number of grocery stores in our area, including Rouses’ and Piggly Wiggly. Serda will also can its special summer style, the Homeport Hefeweizen, in a couple of weeks. I sampled the Homeport on a recent visit to the taproom and really enjoyed it. A wheat beer with lemon and coriander flavorings, it is an excellent summertime brew. Meanwhile across the bay, Fairhope Brewing Co. also has a summer brew, created in homage to that great American patriot, Hulk Hogan. Hop Hogan is a double IPA in the tradition of the fine IPAs at FBC, but, at 9 percent alcohol by volume, it will hit you like a leg drop from the Hulkster himself. It’s an excellent IPA, similar to FBC’s Take the Causeway but lighter in color and with a good, bitter finish. Hop Hogan is available both

at the taproom in Fairhope and also in bottles at grocery stores throughout the area. Make sure to check out the great bottle artwork! “Whatcha gonna drink, brother?” So enjoy one of our local summer beers this Fourth of July, either at the taprooms or at home in bottles or cans, and remember the wise words of Benjamin Franklin: “Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.”


J u l y 4 , 2 0 1 8 - J u l y 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 19


COVER STORY

Mobile’s place in the National Lynching Memorial BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR

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n a shrine to silence and shame, Mobile has a marker for its regrets. It’s perched atop a wall beneath an overhang, like a bird poised between flight and shelter. Mobile’s marker is near a corner of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery. Commonly called the National Lynching Memorial, it hallows victims of the racially inspired domestic terrorism that marred the United States from 1877 to 1950. In design, it’s impeccable. Visitors enter on ground level, through a phalanx of rusty, upright steel boxes built like paupers’ caskets. Each bears the name of a U.S. county along with the names and dates of its lynching victims. The floor slowly drops away as the bloodcolored caskets rise. Finally they hang, a forest of lynched souls dangling above visitors’ heads. All told, 800 slabs venerate nearly 4,500 victims. In emotion, it’s undeniable. Voices lower, footsteps soften as visitors read descriptions of the capricious reasons murderous mobs arose. A concrete wall sheeted by cascading water pays tribute to undocumented victims. “When it comes to lynching, the individuals died twice. Once with the actual murder but the second part was their lives were lost to history, because lynchings aren’t made to be recovered,” said Dr. John Giggie, director of the Summersell Center for the Study of the South at the University of Alabama. Sunlight cuts across Mobile’s marker, pulling seven names and dates from the shadows. Zachariah Graham, 03.31.1891 • Richard Robinson, 10.06.1906 • Will Thompson, 10.06.1906 • Moses Dossett, 09.22.1907 • Richard Robertson, 01.23.1909 • William Walker, 07.31.1910 • James Lewis, 06.06.1919. Questions buzz like slaughterhouse flies. Who were these men? What put them here? Why have they been forgotten?

Putting faces to names

Mobile adores its past. Its 316 years feel deep and rich, like the Black Belt soil that bestowed King Cotton’s lucrative favor on the port city. A romantic sheen glistens across Mobile’s wrought-iron balconies and columned mansions. It cavorts with Mardi Gras revelers through ancient graveyards and under massive live oaks shaggy with resurrection ferns. The past is given deference. Myth and reality commingle, eventually indistinguishable to many. Despite Mobile’s nostalgic haze, racial violence was always a specter. “[This reality] doesn’t sit well with people invested in moonlight and magnolias, who want to capture a version of the Old South or the New South that is about white-gloved ladies and cotillion dresses and finely dressed men in grey neo-Confederate suits,” Giggie said. Zachariah Graham claimed to be from the West Coast, bound for New York and taking work along the way. He was in Mobile just long enough to die. On May 31, 1891, Whistler’s Justice of the Peace Ira Pringle ran into O.P. Page, who was dragging Graham through the little community just beyond Mobile city limits. Page was a section boss of the Mobile and Ohio rail line. He claimed the roughly 30-year-old Graham had “attempted assault” on Page’s 12-year-old daughter the previous day.

Pringle looked over the cowed captive, 5-feet, 6-inches, a slight moustache and chin whiskers. He told Page to follow the law, to make an affidavit then go to trial. “I heard he’s wanted in Texas. There’s a $50 reward upon his delivery to Sheriff Holcombe in Mobile,” Page said. Pringle went home while Page awaited the train into downtown Mobile. At 6 p.m. a black man knocked on Pringle’s door. A bloodthirsty crowd at the Whistler depot was looking for Graham. “There was a good deal of excitement,” Pringle drily told a reporter about the 100-person mob he encountered. Pringle wanted custody of Graham. He told a nervous Page trial by jury was best. “A trial is as good as an acquittal,” Page said as he shook his head. Deputy Sheriff Chris Mitternight arrived and helped secure Graham in a small office in the depot, away from the mob’s clutches. Pringle wired the sheriff to come immediately from Mobile since Graham’s train wouldn’t arrive there until 9:30 p.m. The outside frenzy continued. At 7 p.m., the mob fetched a Miss Sweeney from Turnerville. She glimpsed Graham and denied he was her attempted assailant from a week prior. Unarmed, Mitternight, Page and Pringle questioned Graham. He never mentioned guilt or innocence. At 8 p.m., the mob clambered through the office windows and unlocked the door. Shots were fired, the lights extinguished. The mob pulled at Graham. Mitternight, Pringle and Page hung on vainly. Finally, the mob disappeared into the woods with their terrified prize. Minutes later, Pringle heard shots. He didn’t see Graham again. The 9:30 p.m. train arrived in Mobile with no prisoner. A reporter took the next train to Whistler and found a small crowd at the depot. They pleaded ignorance to a lynching. The men asked if the reporter was with law enforcement. He said no. One man said a “Negro” prisoner escaped from officers earlier. He supposed the runaway was “hid down there in the swamp.” “My advice to you, young man is to get on the next train for Mobile and not to ask any questions while you stay here,” the man said. “It is reported the Negro went to heaven by the hemp route,” another added. No corpse discovery was reported. An editorial criticized the incident and it otherwise disappeared. “After the Civil War, you have notions of the Southern white woman as honorable, deified as the apotheosis of Southern culture,” Giggie said. “They were to be respected and kept apart from the supposed base passions, the unrestricted indignation of black men.” Any interaction between black men and white women was suspect and incendiary. “It was an easy excuse if you simply wanted to kill a black man who demanded greater wages on the farm. You’d simply blame him for assaulting a white woman. More than enough reason for inciting to lynch,” Giggie said. Racial friction dominated Mobile’s wealth of daily newspapers in the 1900s. News of lynching and riotous calamity from across the nation lit-

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tered the front pages regularly. Editorials denounced lynching as mob rule. They weren’t as kind otherwise. Mobile Register Editor Erwin Craighead — the namesake of Craighead Elementary School, which reported 100 percent African-American students last year — deemed whites “the superior race” and claimed black men slept through the day, fed vices at night and their women paid for it all. He said vagrancy made them steal, fight and beat women, that their cocaine and alcohol addictions made blacks “ruthless madmen” and stirred “black terror.” Max Hamburger’s Daily Herald claimed Plateau and Magazine Point were rife with alcohol and gambling. The Herald described “weekly orgies” in their gathering spots. “The city’s own brand of segregation … actually contributed to a growing atmosphere of hostility, estrangement and fear,” Dr. David Alsobrook, former director of the History Museum of Mobile, wrote in his meticulous 1983 doctoral dissertation. On June 27, 1900, a statue of Confederate Rear Adm. Raphael Semmes was erected at the prominent intersection of Government and Royal streets. A popular Mobilian, Semmes spent his post-war years as a lawyer and man of letters. In 1869, he penned a steadfast defense of the Confederacy’s “Lost Cause.” For dedication day, the Daily Register described a citywide holiday, an elaborate parade and thousands of cheering spectators. An artillery salute sounded and a band played “Dixie” as the Semmes statue was unveiled. “These Confederate monuments celebrate a version of the past in which slavery is vanished and white slaveholders and soldiers fighting for the Confederacy are all glorified,” Giggie said. “There’s no representation of black life at all.” In 1901, Alabama adopted a new constitution. As stated by Convention President John B. Knox in opening remarks, its purpose was to “establish white supremacy in this state.”

aggerated the facts … if the Negro had a fair and impartial trial he would probably be convicted of nothing above a misdemeanor.” Webb noted the state’s medical evidence seemed to exonerate Thompson but rumors inflamed the public. Sheriff John Powers sensed trouble, so deputies took Thompson to Birmingham. On Aug. 29, roughly 500 heavily armed Mobilians violently stormed Mobile jail seeking the accused. The Register said the mob “later increased by several thousands.” The Daily Item said the crowd “included men of distinction and those who move in all walks of life in Mobile.” A mob of 300 attacked the next evening. Powers dispersed them using a telegraph from Birmingham verifying Thompson’s custody. Nature heightened tensions when a catastrophic hurricane struck Mobile on Sept 27. A nearly 10-foot storm surge tossed oceangoing ships onto the debris-strewn riverfront. Christ Episcopal Church was in ruins, its steeple and roof in a pile. Across Mobile County, an estimated 5,000 houses were damaged. Electric and telegraph service was mostly gone. While only one person died in the city, the Register proclaimed 79 fatalities in the Southern half of the county, 31 of them in the seaside village Coden. Hundreds of county residents were without food, drinking water and shelter. NOAA estimates of damage were $1.65 million. Adjusted for inflation, that’s more than $42 million in today’s dollars. Register headlines shouted “NEGROES LOOTING HOMES OF DEAD” and described theft and corpse mutilation by blacks. A later investigation negated those details. On Oct. 2, another lynch mob attacked the jail, this time looking for Cornelius “Dick” Robinson. The 17-year-old, unemployed Clarke County native was accused of assaulting a white girl. Anticipating trouble, Powers moved Robinson to Birmingham as he had Thompson. The fevered rioters fatally shot white law enforcement agent Roy Hoyle during their siege. The governor On Nov. 9, 1902, Lewis Wyatt was charged ordered militia to Mobile. with “assaulting” a white child just west of On Oct. 6, Powers and a deputy stood on a Springhill and Broad. A mob gathered while poBirmingham train platform with Thompson and lice officer Newell held the black man and waited Robinson, bound for court in Mobile. Daily Item on a police wagon. reporter C.J. Fiourney joined them. One incensed man tried to stab Wyatt but Near Mount Vernon, eight men in white Newell thwarted the attacker as the crowd’s fermasks boarded the train. They held Powers and vor grew. The police employed multiple wagons his man at gunpoint and demanded the prisoners. and subterfuge to confuse the riotous throng. One told a reporter the vigilantes were “leadA 300-person mob marched on the police sta- ing businessmen of Mobile.” They told Powers tion at 10 p.m., some armed. “In the crowd were lynching was best done outside city limits. Othermany citizens of the better class and many who wise, it would “leave a stain upon Mobile that were merely spectators,” the Register reported. would take years to wipe out,” the Item reported. Authorities dispersed the vigilantes. For them, lynching was a given. Location was “This is actually how people thought. This the question. wasn’t just one guy living in a trailer park Other black passengers were terrified. One somewhere deep in the woods. This was general masked man approached them and said “no public knowledge consumed and approved of by harm would come to them if they stayed where most white citizens,” Giggie said. they were.” “The cultural power of lynching — indeed, At Creola, more masked men joined with rope the cultural power of white supremacy itself — and straps. By the time they ordered the train rested on spectacle,” Amy Louise Wood wrote stopped near Plateau, there were 45 in the lynchin 2009’s “Lynching and Spectacle: Witnessing ing party. Racial Violence in America, 1890-1940.” As they left the train with the prisoners, Mobile The 2000 book “Without Sanctuary” contains Herald publisher Max Hamburger was there. By nearly 100 lynching photos used as souvenirs then a state senator, he implored the mob to let the and postcards. prisoners “stand trial and be ‘legally hanged.’” “Assaults on our women must stop or we Will Thompson left Selma at age 16. After [may] kill every Negro in Mobile County,” the four years in Birmingham, he turned southward mob leader replied. and ended up a waiter in Mobile. The party marched eastward toward Plateau, In August 1906, two white girls claimed an independent-minded community founded by Thompson lured them to a vacant house where freed slaves. About 200 spectators trailed the they were “inhumanely treated.” After arrest, execution crew. his preliminary hearing provided lurid newspaAccording to the Item, they left Holt Road per copy. and 100 yards later — The New York Times estiThompson was unrepresented by counsel. mated 300 yards — threw the ropes over live oak County prosecutor James Webb wrote the gover- limbs. A mob member called an AP reporter over nor and explained “newspapers have greatly exto Robinson, certain of a confession. The


doomed man “screamed” his innocence. Both were hanged about 12:30 p.m. Onlookers swarmed forward as the bodies swayed in the wind. The site was near the streetcar lines, so sightseers from Mobile poured onto the scene; Alsobrook cited as many as 3,000. Frustrated attendees fired shots at the bodies. A suggestion to burn the bodies was snuffed. Some took photos of the dangling corpses to use for postcards. Others snagged bits of rope, tree bark or the victims’ clothes, even their shoes, for souvenirs. The victims were finally cut down around 4 p.m. A justice of the peace held a quick inquest and declared they died from strangulation by “persons unknown.” The newspapers decried mob rule. On Oct. 12, Craighead opined Northern blacks shouldn’t agitate “the Negroes in the South” who “are fairly well satisfied with their lot, and have good reason to be.” In the space above the editor’s remarks, an announcement boasted of $1,400 raised for a monument to Father Abram Ryan, the “Poet Laureate of the Confederacy.” In 1913, the adherent to “Lost Cause” style verse would be honored with a statue in a park bearing his name. The nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) conceived and built the lynching memorial. It opened in late April 2018. Lynching “was intended to terrorize communities of color … It was the optic of this raised violence that made the threat, the menace even more powerful,” EJI founder and Director Bryan Stevenson told CNN. On Sept. 22, 1907, Whistler deputies loaded Moses Dossett onto a wagon for a rainy ride to Mobile’s jail. Earlier that evening, the prisoner had crept into the Widow Beeder’s home as the 90-year-old read a newspaper. She spied the intruder and stood. Dossett “lunged” and “caught her” so Beeder screamed. He fled. Neighbors came. Angry searches erupted. Deputy Charles Smith arrested Dossett two miles west of Whistler, “near Wolf Ridge.” Beeder identified Dossett, who said he entered the home “looking for a match.” Smith and Hutch Adams knew local crowds were riled and feared mob action. They opted for an indirect route down Old Telegraph Road to fool the fevered, setting out near midnight. “More than two miles from Whistler,” a dozen armed men in long coats, masks and “slouch hats” sprang from both sides of the road. The deputies moved to protect Dossett. The mob warned interference meant death. The masked men seized Dossett and disappeared into the woods “with a yell.” He was hanged on a tree “within yards” of where Thompson and Robinson were murdered in

1906. A Register reporter described the mob as “orderly” and said the storm obscured the crime from nearby residents. Crowds endured a downpour to visit the crime scene after dawn. Some clipped rope and clothing bits for souvenirs. Dossett’s relatives claimed his body at 8:30 a.m. Days later, the Sept. 28 Register reported a notice posted at the Whistler railroad workshop gates. It notified three black men, “Edward Thomas, Mosley and Cole, that they had been talking too much and reminding them that ‘there were plenty of ropes and trees left.’” The precise lynching location for Dossett, Robinson and Thompson is unknown. One account said it was off Holt Road and another mentioned “Old Whistler Dirt Road,” neither found on historical maps. Another account said it was a half-mile from the intersection of the Whistler and Magazine Point streetcar lines, just north of where Wilson Avenue currently passes beneath Interstate 165. A half-mile east from there toward Plateau is Whitley Elementary School, where Prichard Junior High once stood. It faces a street named for a family who smuggled the last shipload of enslaved Africans into the U.S. Where kids swung from playground equipment, men may have once hung from trees. Erwin Craighead was grateful lynching occurred beyond city limits. Scotty Kirkland, historian and author of a forthcoming book on Mobile’s racial politics, said this feeling was common among city leaders. “It gave those in town opportunity to blame it on the less-cultured residents in the country. That was their ‘out’ for looking the other way while this went on,” Kirkland said. On Jan. 21, 1909, Deputies W.N. McCarron and Phillip Fatch tried to serve an assault warrant on mulatto carpenter Richard Robertson. Robertson pulled a .38 pistol. Gunfire wounded all. Robertson was arrested before Fatch died. On Jan. 23 at 1 a.m., roughly 25 men stormed the jail at Church and Royal streets. They held deputies at bay, secured keys and seized Robertson. Out the back, they took the alleyway to Church Street and turned west. A half-block later they stopped at a tree on St. Emanuel Street, across from the city’s oldest church, newly rebuilt Christ Episcopal. Robertson fell to his knees and cried out. Three shots rang. Witnesses say Robertson was still kicking when hoisted on the rope. The mob dispersed and residents of the prestigious neighborhood gathered. Deputies removed Robertson’s corpse an hour later. The coroner found three fresh bullet holes and a broken neck. Condemnation was widespread. William Armbrecht, U.S. Attorney in Mobile, organized state prosecution of Sheriff Cazalas for ignoring rampant lynching rumors. Cazalas was impeached

and replaced by John Drago. The new sheriff was credited with stopping three lynching deaths between July 1909 and August 1910. On July 31, 1910, William Walker assaulted and robbed Nettie Gibson, a 21-year-old white woman in Axis, slashing her young brother in the process. He stole her rifle, with which he shot and killed Jesse Brown, a black man nearby. Enraged citizens combed the countryside. Walker attempted to jump a train and nearby witnesses said a group fired several shots. Rewards were offered. When reports said a posse had Walker trapped in a swamp, he was presumed dead. That information was published in the Register, the Atlanta Constitution and the Macon Daily Telegraph. However, the Register reported Walker atlarge the following day. Nearly every day for a week it continued alerts and rumored sightings, until the Aug. 10 front page announced Walker’s imprisonment in Mobile. He had been arrested in Biloxi Aug. 8 and returned. Walker stood trial in early September and quickly was found guilty of murdering Brown and assaulting Gibson. He was hanged by the state on June 2, 1911. Walker was adjudicated and executed by the state, not lynched. The overwhelming volume of cases EJI researched nearly ensures errors. In Walker’s case, a lynching was initially reported. Noted UAB historian Dr. Glenn Feldman referenced 12 lynching cases for Mobile County in a 1995 Alabama Review article. He gave no individual listing. Feldman died in 2015. No explanation of his additional lynching cases was available. James Lewis was shot June 6, 1919 as he walked through Prichard. The Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology listed the cause as “race hatred.” Alsobrook said it stemmed from “trouble between white and colored workers in [a] cotton mill.” Lewis spoke with Sheriff William Holcombe Jr. before he died. The laborer described his journey home and passing by a group of white men near Coleman’s Station. “James Hamilton, aged 20 is charged with inciting a riot and Robert Hamilton, Clarence Hall, Tom Tyson, Dewey Kimball, Jeff Kelly, Fay Croker, Ben Warner and Edward Cleveland, ranging in age from 16-21, are charged with assault to murder … They are each held in $5,000 bond,” the Register reported. Further Register reports on the case and defendants could not be discovered. Nothing was found in the Daily News-Item. The name missing from the memorial is the one Mobilians know best: Michael Donald. In 1981, Klansmen randomly lynched the 19-yearold. His body was found on a residential mid-

town street now renamed for him. The lynching memorial only covers deaths through 1950. Donald wouldn’t die for 31 more years. Federal courts prompted a 1985 change to Mobile city government. Blacks would finally hold elected office. On June 25, 2000, another grand event celebrated the centennial of the Raphael Semmes statue. Uniformed re-enactors, artillery and music were there. The commander of a local Sons of Confederate Veterans group called the statue “the most important piece of historical outdoor art in the city.” Semmes still stands resolute and defiant, hand on hip. His gaze crosses Mardi Gras Park, straight to the front of Christ Church, where Richard Robertson was killed. In 2005, Mobile elected its first black mayor. He was re-elected in 2009. When Hilton Hotels assumed control of the historic Admiral Semmes Hotel in 2014, renovation was in order. The stylish spot is now just The Admiral. An African-American Heritage Trail began in 2006. With 41 stops, it adds to Mobile’s vast wealth of historical markers and plaques. A four-by-two-by-one-foot Plexiglas box filled with soil from lynching sites sits at the memorial. Touches of emerald have appeared in its multihued strata, moss and sprouts unintentionally included but fed by the moist earth and sunshine. One visitor thought it symbolized the hope something positive can grow from attendees discovering shared humanity. “Like a rose from the concrete,” she said wistfully. In the outer yard around the main structure, more steel caskets lie in neat rows. There is a twin — same counties, same names — for every blood-colored slab inside. These are intended for claim by their respective counties, for public display, recognition and acknowledgement. Coalitions from the respective places can apply for ownership. “You can’t live in a community where most people came out and cheered while someone was tortured and hanged and expect to be a healthy community by never talking about it. It just doesn’t work that way,” EJI’s Stevenson told The Guardian in April 2018. EJI staffer Jonathan Kubakundimana wouldn’t estimate how many communities have applied for their markers. “We’re actively working with an untold number,” he said. Unclaimed markers will remain as testimony — to reluctance, the forgotten and the lost. Corten steel protects them from corrosion. Unlike the corpses they represent, they are resistant to time and exposure. For the man behind it all, ownership of these markers isn’t about blame. It’s hope and redemption. “Each one of us is more than the worst thing we’ve ever done,” Stevenson said.

July 4, 2018 - July 10, 2018

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ART ARTIFICE

Historical revival takes team effort BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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his column might be irrelevant beyond the context of this issue, but that’s the breaks. Some things just need to be said. Like most of humanity, Mobilians are fascinated more by their past than with actual history. We eagerly spin yarns of secret tunnels, apocryphal explorers, ruined utopias and rumored festivals, evidence or lack thereof be damned. However, as a more talented Alabama columnist wrote in the last few years: “History is a discipline, like science. It’s a way by which we pull back the tarp of mythology from the past and look at what’s underneath — all of the parts and pieces, causes and effects — with a critical eye and a healthy dose of skepticism.” In April, I read the roll call of Alabama victims on the National Lynching Memorial. I lingered on a pair of dead listed merely as “Unknown.” Robbed not only of their lives, they weren’t even afforded identity. It was especially tragic. I discovered Mobile County had seven victims, but none was familiar. How was that possible in a historian’s playground like Mobile? The tools for research were available. Answers would take time. It also took the invaluable assistance of others, for which I’m grateful, to produce this week’s cover story. David Alsobrook’s doctoral dissertation on Progressive Era Mobile was marvelous. It gave a detailed roadmap for research. Scotty Kirkland suggested it and supplied his own insight. Gideon C. Kennedy aided with research, snapped photos in Montgomery and generally helped a guy with lousy

Historic commission grants available

lungs handle Alabama’s summer swelter. He also supplied a fresh set of eyes to look at a first draft. Thanks to Janet Nodar for reading, notating and not rapping my knuckles too hard. Mobile Public Library’s local history branch is invaluable, just as with Lagniappe’s previous historical cover stories. Maps, newspapers, scholarly publications — they’re all there for anyone to utilize. Chuck Torrey and Lani Kosick at the History Museum of Mobile pointed the way to valuable information. Torrey highlighted a photo of the October 1906 Thompson and Robinson lynching currently hanging in the museum. Kosick discovered a curious artifact listed as the Cholly Hightower manuscript in their collection. We wondered if it was a clue about unknown victims. The narrative followed the aforementioned Hightower and a throng of curious Mobilians who headed to Plateau to witness a lynching. The protagonist tried to convince the mob to stop but he was ignored and retreated in shame back to town. Its time period is shortly after “the recent war in Cuba” but an event at “the old Spanish Jail on Broad Street” made no sense. Architectural historian John Sledge confirmed the “Old Spanish Guard House” was at the corner of Conti and St. Emanuel, not Broad, and was torn down in 1892. When the Spanish-American War began in 1898, the Old Spanish Guard House was rubble. Hightower is shown as publisher and editor of a small Mobile paper, the Picayune. He’s also a state senator.

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Fairhope ballet starts summer workshop

IN APRIL, I READ THE ROLL CALL OF ALABAMA VICTIMS ON THE NATIONAL LYNCHING MEMORIAL. I LINGERED ON A PAIR OF DEAD LISTED MERELY AS ‘UNKNOWN.’ ROBBED NOT ONLY OF THEIR LIVES, THEY WEREN’T EVEN AFFORDED IDENTITY. IT WAS ESPECIALLY TRAGIC.” — a jar of soil from Richard Robinson’s lynching location — was accepted with grace. Alsobrook accessed oral histories from our African-American community for his 1983 dissertation. Some 35 years later, that resource seems to have evaporated. Kern Jackson, Ph.D., is a folklorist and director of the University of South Alabama’s African-American studies program. Joél Lewis Gillespie, Ph.D., is a descendant of Plateau’s legendary Clotilda survivors and produced a new documentary about the saga. Both said they were unaware of lynching stories handed down. The absence of oral history and the entire experience clarified what historians already know. Like “love” and “hate,” “remember” is an active verb.

Bay Shore Ballet Academy (305 Fels Ave., Fairhope) announced its Summer Dance Intensive Dance Workshop and Performance is set for July 9 through Aug. 3. Sessions will be Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. It is designed for intermediate to advanced-level dancers with a minimum of four years of training. A flexible tuition rate is offered, with up to one week of vacation during the four-week session. Tuition costs $275 to $375, depending on whether registration is for a three-week or a full four-week workshop. Lessons and choreography include pieces from “La Bayadere,” “Giselle,” “Swan Lake,” “Paquita” and other classics. Classes include dance history, pantomime, pointe, variations and vocabulary. Faculty include Janet Carole, Kristiana Bell and Stephanie Barfield. The workshop concludes with an in-studio performance and reception for family and invited guests. For more information, call 251-990-9744 or visit bayshoreballet.com.

Animation fest looking for talent

The Mobile Animation Film Festival’s goal is to present the best student, national and international animation to local audiences. The showcase is dedicated to presenting a variety of mediums, genres and styles. The festival organization is currently seeking entries. Earlybird deadline is Aug. 1, regular deadline is Sept. 1. Films must be completed within the last two years and be no more than 10 minutes in length. Submissions must be made by the film’s creator or someone with express permission from the creator to submit. Non-English films should have English captions or subtitles. Festival director is Karl Jahnke. Judges are Jeremiah Roberts and Matthew Johnson. Festival organizer is Elizabet Elliott. This year’s event will be held at the Mobile Museum of Art on Oct. 6. A Best-in-Category prize will be awarded. For more specifications, go to filmfreeway.com/MobileAnimationFilmFestival.

ARTSGALLERY

The Alabama Historical Commission (AHC) will administer a $750,000 state-funded grant program in fiscal year 2019 (Oct. 1, 2018, through Sept. 30, 2019) for improvements as well as educational programming at historic sites in Alabama. Grants will be awarded to public or private entities that own and operate historic sites in Alabama. Grants will go to entities that have an education-based mission and educational programming and reflect the state’s geographical diversity. Preference goes to publicly owned battlefields, structures dated 1840 or prior on the National Register and historic schools. Grants are limited to no more than $20,000 per entity. Applicants must complete an official 2019 Historic Sites Grant application available on the AHC website, which also provides application guidelines.     Applications must be hand-delivered or mailed to Tryon McLaney, Contracts and Grants, Alabama Historical Commission, by Aug. 15. Faxed or emailed applications will not be accepted. AHC will announce grant awards in October.

In reality, Alabama State Senator Max Hamburger owned and edited the Mobile Daily Herald in the same time frame. As the cover story tells, he failed to dispel the 1906 lynch mob. Other similarities with 1906 are folded into what is obviously a later attempt to fictionalize Hamburger’s experience. Curiously, it was typed on the blank back pages of business correspondence bearing New York City letterhead. John Giggie, Ph.D., was helpful and forthcoming. It’s evident in the story. Anne Reynolds brought Nelson Malden to meet us at the National Lynching Memorial. Malden was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s barber for the six years King was a preacher there and witnessed American Civil Rights history from the inside. He also claims to cook the best seafood gumbo in Montgomery, a sign of his Gulf Coast roots. The Equal Justice Initiative’s Jonathan Kubakundimana was integral and supplied access to needed reference material. The gift of gratitude we brought


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n recent years, those following the Azalea City music scene have witnessed the steady growth of local rock, folk, country and hip-hop artists. Now a new music project from two longtime friends might be laying the foundation for the development of a local rhythm and blues/pop scene. Marcus “Fraziiaga” Frazier and Laron “SurReal” Martin invite Mobile and the rest of the world to join The Guest List. The Guest List is giving the scene a fresh, homegrown batch of infectious pop sounds blending bright, danceable pop and soulful R&B with “a sprinkle of hip-hop.” The Guest List is providing Mobile with a musical style not yet tackled in the local scene. Their two-track introduction is undeniably impressive, both in their grooving R&B pop arrangements and high-quality local studio production. Even though he acknowledges the group’s sound is heretofore unheard of in Mobile, Frazier hopes The Guest List will set standards that will encourage more local pop artists to step to the forefront. “[The Guest List] is just a way to do something different from what pretty much everyone is doing,” Frazier said. “The pop scene is fairly small and still growing. We hope to change that.” Even though the group claims Mobile as its base of operation, The Guest List originally formed in Montgomery. When they met, both Frazier and Martin were attending Alabama State University. The duo were members of the same college organization and both busy with their own

musical pursuits. In fact, Martin was attending Alabama State on a choral scholarship, which he earned from his experience with traveling choirs. Frazier says he was impressed with Martin’s musical style, his song concepts and his vocal ability. Frazier began to establish an artistic chemistry and friendship with Martin, but The Guest List still took some time to take form. “I bugged him about it [starting a project],” admitted Frazier. “I said, ‘Let’s start a band and do a group project.’ He said, ‘I don’t know.’ We were in the studio, and I gave him a track and told him my idea for the song. After we recorded the song, we had a little listening session after that. He called me back after that day and said, ‘I’m with it. This would be great.’” Once the duo combined their talents, the music began to flow and their artistic bond solidified. The Guest List’s songwriting techniques were cooperative experiences where Frazier and Martin found pleasure in “bouncing ideas off of each other.” Their individual egos were nonexistent, and criticisms of each other’s ideas were taken in a positive, constructive manner. Both then and now, Frazier says no one is afraid to say “no” or “it doesn’t sound good.” This creative method has done nothing but strengthen the duo’s combined artistic endeavors and ability to recognize each other’s opinions in a variety of situations. “Nine times out of 10 I know what he’s thinking, and he knows what I’m thinking,” explained Frazier. “If we’re sitting down picking beats, and

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MUSIC

I

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Get on The Guest List

I’m not with him, he knows what I like, and I know what he likes. It works good, because I can speak on his behalf and he can speak on mine. We know what each other would say and how each other would react to it. We’ve been around each other for so long.” When the group began showcasing their R&B pop, The Guest List began to realize the biggest challenge to spreading their sound. While Alabama’s hip-hop scene is strong and continues to grow, The Guest List found very few outlets for its regionally unique sound, which has made “getting the brand out and the music out” challenging. When the group performed at various showcases, the audiences initially didn’t know what to think about a sound The Guest List was marketing as “a blend of pop and R&B with a sprinkle of hip-hop.” Once they took the stage, those witnessing their sound in a live setting were impressed. For Frazier, the public response to The Guest List has been the most satisfying aspect of this project. “People do not expect the type of music that we do,” Frazier said. “Once we start and finish, they want to hear it again or ask where they can get it. It’s about that reaction and the way our music affects people. I’ve had an instance where we have a song, and my wife played it for her friend. It brought her to tears. So, it really is the effect that it has on people.” The Guest List’s next step is to release thier debut EP, “Spectrum.” To complete this task, the group has been laying tracks with seasoned studio engineer Matt D’Amico (Jada Studios, Integrity Music) in the sleek, professional confines of Day 6 Entertainment in West Mobile. Frazier notes the Day 6 staff’s positive energy and D’Amico’s guidance kindled the production process. While there, The Guest List devised “Spectrum” as a concept album dealing with both spectrums of a relationship. The public has gotten its first taste of this effort through the release of two singles on Apple Music and Google Play. “One Time” is a shining addition to the world of dance pop. Smooth hip-hop flow and spirited vocal work weave their way through bright synths and hypnotic beats that have yet to be experienced within the Azalea City music scene. “Nobody But You” is an emotional profession of love posing as a summertime party anthem with an arrangement that pulls influence from the late ‘80s/early ‘90s pop scene. The regionally innovative nature of both of these tunes will leave listeners anticipating “Spectrum” and wondering why pop radio hasn’t already embraced The Guest List. After the completion of post-production and “tying up loose ends and paperwork,” Frazier hopes “Spectrum” will have a worldwide release in August.


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Hip-Hop Week

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Alabama Hip-Hop Week Date: July 9-15 Venue: Visit alabamahiphopweek.com for more information Tickets: Some events may require a cover.

E

leven years ago, local hip-hop devotee Kalenski “DJ Dirty Dan” Adams conceived an event that would combine his love for music and the community. Over the years, Adams’ Alabama Hip-Hop Week (AHHW) has grown into one of the Mobile Bay area’s premier music events. Adams not only attracts hip-hop artists and enthusiasts to the Azalea City for this weeklong celebration, he also organizes a number of events focused on live performances, industry workshops and community service projects. On Monday, July 9, AHHW will begin with its welcome party at Kazoola (558 Dauphin St.). Sponsored by the Mobile Arts Council and Opportunities 4 Entertainers, this event will be both a meet-andgreet and a fundraising event for The Lupus Foundation. Tuesday will bring a day of community service in a “blighted” area, yet to be determined. The third day of AHHW will bring a youth summit and community fair to the James Seal Community Center, focusing on job opportunities and education for area youth. On Thursday, Soul Kitchen will host “over 100 DJs and tastemakers” and “100’s of artists” at the AHHW Music Conference and Workshop, and on Friday AHHW will take over Cathedral Square for the July installment of Artwalk.

Bigger is better Band: Webb Dalton Date: Saturday, July 7, 5 p.m. Venue: Lucy Buffett’s LuLu’s, 200 E. 25th Ave. (Gulf Shores), www.lulubuffett.com Tickets: Free Independence Day serves as a climax to the summer vacation season along the Gulf of Mexico. After the fireworks and the charcoal have cooled, many will want to finish their beachside holiday experience with a relaxing weekend. LuLu’s invites the public to come spend a Saturday sunset listening to the cool sounds of Webb Dalton. Dalton was born in Montgomery, where he was raised on the sounds of such classic country artists as Merle Haggard and Johnny Cash. Dalton relocated to the music-filled streets of Memphis and fell in love with such legends as Elvis Presley, B.B. King and Jerry Lee Lewis. He has pooled all of these diverse musical influences into his own original material. Dalton’s 2011 release “Mine’s Bigger” serves as a great example of his unique style. Throughout this album, Dalton pulls his suave, baritone vocal work from the same honky-tonk world that gave rise to artists like Toby Keith and George Strait. From backwoods rock to emotional anthems, Dalton’s music should be perfect for fans of country and Southern rock.

Underground rock

Band: Amazing Energy, Chives, Solid Freex Date: Friday, July 6, 8 p.m. Venue: The Blind Mule, 57 N. Claiborne St., www.theblindmule.net Tickets: $7 at the door

The fireworks may come to an end at the conclusion of Independence Day celebrations, but The Blind Mule will kick off the following weekend with an explosive evening of underground rock, starting with a healthy dose of Amazing Energy. This Azalea City band is a musical experiment in madness gone beautifully awry. Amazing Energy’s volatile formula walks a very thin line between noise rock and pop punk, with intricate overtones of jazz and ambient. While this combination might seem impossible to some, the group does an impressive job of genre-wrangling. Indianapolis band Chives will add to the evening’s experimental vibe. This band will bring a psychedelic (and sometimes psychotic) minimalist fusion of electronic and rock set to infectious rhythms. Solid Freex, representing Wisconsin, has taken punk rock back its roots with a vehement, adrenalized sound that shows no mercy.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | July 4 - July 10 Please send upcoming music to listings@ lagniappemobile.com by MONDAY before Wednesday’s paper.

WED. JULY 4 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz, 8p Bluegill— Matt Neese, 6p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Felix’s— Jimmy Lumpkin Flora Bama— Jay Hawkins Duo, 11a / Al and Cathy, 1p // Mario Mena Duo, 1p /// JoJo Pres, 2p //// Neil Dover, 2p ///// Tim Roberts, 4p ////// Kyle Brady, 5p /////// Jimmy Lumpkin and the Revival, 5:30 //////// Rhonda Hart Duo, 6p ///////// Whyte Capps, 6p ////////// Jason Abel, 8p /////////// Kyle Wilson Band, 10p //////////// Mario Mena Duo, 10:15p //////////// Bruce Smelley and JJP, 10:30p Gambino’s Italian Grill— Scott Morlock, 7:30p Hangout— The Chillbillies, 12p Lulu’s— Rogerwood, 5p Original Oyster House — Drew Bentley, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jimmy Lee Hannaford, 11a

THURS. JULY 5 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz, 8p Bluegill— Dale Drinkard Duo, 6p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Callaghan’s— Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ JJ, 10p Felix’s— Soulshine Duo Flora Bama— Wade Reeves, 1p / Wes Loper, 2p // Tim Roberts, 5p /// Dueling Pianos, 5:30 //// Kevin Swanson, 6p ///// Mark Sherrill, Chris Newberry, James Daniel, Jose Santiago, 6p ////// River Dan Band, 6p /////// Lee Yankie and the Hellz Yeah, 10p //////// Al and Cathy, 10:15p ///////// Braxton Calhoun, 10:30p Gambino’s Italian Grill— Scott Morlock, 7:30p IP Casino (Studio A)— Thompson Twins’ Tom Bailey, 8p Lulu’s— Lamont Landers Band, 5p Manci’s— Emily Stuckey Off The Hook— Sugarbabies Karaoke Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Gringo Fife, 6p

FRI. JULY 6 Beau Rivage— Gary Allan, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Crackerjack Diamonds, 6:30p Blind Mule— Chives + Solid Freex + Amazing Energy Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12p / Shelby Brown & Hannah McFarland, 6p Callaghan’s— Sergio and the

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Satin Dogs Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill, 10p Dauphin Street Blues Co— John Hart Project, 10p Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Flora Bama— Lea Anne Creswell Duo, 11a / Bruce Smelley, 1p // Augie Savage Duo, 2p /// Sean Gasaway, 4p //// The Big Earl Show with Jack Robertson, 5:30p ///// Scott Kohen Duo, 6p ////// Ty Taylor and the Kinfolk, 6p /////// Wes Loper, 6p //////// Brandon White Duo, 8p ///////// The Foxy Iguanas, 10p ////////// Bruce Smelley Duo, 10:15p //////////// Braxton Calhoun, 10:30p Gambino’s Italian Grill— Scott Morlock, 7:30p Hangout— The Chillbillies, 10p IP Casino (Studio A)— Boy George and Culture Club, 8p The Keg— The Chillbillies, 10p Listening Room— Eric Erdman, 8p Lulu’s— Jimmy Lumpkin & The Revival, 5p Manci’s— Camm Lewis Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — C Dub and the Money Monies, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Phil & Foster, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Jamie Adamson, 6:30p Off The Hook— Melissa Robertson, 7p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Jimmy Lee Hannaford, 11a / Michael McCall, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Mac Walter Duo, 6p Zebra Club— Funkhouse Fever Trio

Lulu’s— Web Dalton Band, 5p Manci’s— Phil & Foster Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Charlie Wilson Duo, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Chris Hergenroder, 6:30p Off The Hook— Elaine Petty, 7p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Soul Food Junkies, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Gringo Fife, 11a / Kyle Brady, 7p Waves DI— Journey to Mars, 9p

SAT. JULY 7

MON. JULY 9

Blind Mule— Dead Lizardz + Psuedobox + Phuklezz Bluegill— Jimmy Lumpkin, 12p / Fat Lincoln, 6p Callaghan’s— Modern Eldoradoes Dauphin Street Blues Co— Brandon White Band, 10p Felix’s— Stephen Sylvester Duo Flora Bama— Jay Hawkins Duo, 11a / JoJo Pres, 1p // Wes Loper, 1p /// Al and Cathy, 2p //// M U S T A N G, 2p ///// Smokey Otis Duo, 4p ////// Mike Diamond, 5p /////// The Big Ear Show with Jack Robertson, 5:30p //////// Hung Jury, 6p ///////// Johnny Barbato Trio, 6p ////////// Tony Ray Thompson Duo, 8p /////////// Ty Taylor and the Kinfolk, 10p //////////// Brian Hill Duo, 10:15p //////////// Spunk Monkeys, 10:30p Gambino’s Italian Grill— Scott Morlock, 7:30p Hard Rock (Live) — The Ultimate Queen Celebration w/ Marc Martel, 8p Listening Room— Shannon LaBrie w/Chip Herrington, 8p

Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Triggerproof, 8p Callaghan’s— Felix’s— Byrant Gilley Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 2p / Sean Gasaway, 5p // Bruce Smelley, 5:30p /// Open Mic w/Cathy Pace, 6p //// JoJo Pres, 10p ///// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

SUN. JULY 8 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Triggerproof, 8p Big Beach Brewing— The Poarch Ninjas, 4p Bluegill— Quintin Berry 12p / Fly By Radio, 6p Callaghan’s— Felix’s— Matt Bush Flora Bama— Smokey Otis Trio, 12p / Al and Cathy, 1p // Songs of Rusty w/Jason Justice, 1:30p /// Brandon White Duo, 2p //// Sean Gasaway, 2p ///// Lee Yankie, 5p ////// Brian Hill Band, 5:30p /////// JoJo Pres, 6p //////// Perdido Brothers, 6p ///////// Ja’ Rhythm, 10p ////////// Smokey Otis Trio, 10:15p Hangout— The Chillbillies, 6p Lulu’s— Wes Loper Manci’s— Eric Erdman Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 4p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Soul Food Junkies, 11a / Mason Henderson, 6p Waves DI— Johnny Barbatos, 3p

TUES. JULY 10 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Triggerproof, 8p Bluegill— Justus Browning, 6p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Callaghan’s— Felix’s— Johnny Hayes Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p / Lee Yankie, 5p // Wes Loper, 5:30 /// Perdido Brothers, 6p //// Yeah, Probably, 10p ///// Trevor Finlay, 10:15p Lulu’s— Light Travelers, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Bob Erickson, 6p Original Oyster House — Phil Proctor, 6p


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FILMTHE REEL WORLD

Taut and cinematically gorgeous

T

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA

THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Road South Mobile, AL (251)639-1748 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin St Mobile, AL (251) 438-2005 REGAL MOBILE STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Drive Mobile, AL (844) 462-7342 AMC JUBILEE Square 12 6898 Highway 90 Daphne, AL (251) 626-5766

he intense Ridley Scott drama “All the Money in the World” does not just draw on a true story for its plot. The making of the film ended up becoming a drama when Christopher Plummer had to be cast to replace disgraced star Kevin Spacey, after his filming was finished. It is impossible to imagine anyone but the magisterial Plummer as icy oil billionaire John Paul Getty, who cares more about money and art than his family, by a pretty substantial margin. His family loyalty is put to a harrowing test when his grandson, John Paul Getty III, is kidnapped in Rome. Flashbacks to the grandson’s childhood show a charming, useless father who has no contact, financial or otherwise, with his own famously wealthy father. Their desperate, resourceful mother, Gail (Michelle Williams), reaches out to Getty Sr. when the family is broke, and soon the whole clan is in Rome to meet the elusive captain of industry. Fast forward to 1973, when the unfortunate third John Paul Getty, a charmingly dissolute young man strolling through Rome, is tossed into a van and held captive by a group of masked men who assume the grandson of the wealthiest man of all time will quickly yield the demanded ransom. But their

brutality is nothing compared to that of Getty himself, who claims to love Paul but refuses to part with the cash, blames his grandson for getting kidnapped, and is only too happy to buy into the theory that the grandson and his mother orchestrated the whole thing to soak him, conveniently absolving the old geezer of responsibility. The chief architect of the self-kidnapping theory is Fletcher Chase (portrayed by Mark Wahlberg; more on this guy later), a trusted adviser who frequently makes deals for Getty. Eventually, he comes to believe that Paul is truly in danger, and works with Gail to free him. Meanwhile, the kidnapper Cinquanta, played by a very compelling French actor named Romain Duris, comes to sympathize with Paul and frequently voices his criticism of the cold-hearted billionaire who won’t rescue the suffering teenager. “All the Money in the World” is beautifully shot and almost painfully intense. Plummer is masterful, and Michelle Williams is as wonderful as ever in the role of a woman who must face kidnappers, criminals and the richest, most selfish man on earth to save her son’s life. She is strong but not “flinty,” and Williams is simply one of the best actresses working today — which is what makes the

plot twist of the real story of filming the movie so enraging. At the eleventh hour, after all filming with Spacey was completed, director Ridley Scott decided to reshoot the role with Plummer in only nine days. For this Herculean effort, everyone had to pitch in to save the film, including, of course, Michelle Williams and Mark Wahlberg. For these efforts, Williams accepted the minimum scale she could be paid in order to save the film they’d worked so hard to create, which came to $1,000. Wahlberg, on the other hand, demanded and received, well, all the money in the world: $1.5 million, compared to $1,000. He eventually donated the amount after the heinous discrepancy came to light, but I really don’t think he negotiated that amount initially with the goal of donating it to the MeToo legal defense fund. All of these true stories certainly amount to a compelling and memorable onscreen drama, and I cannot imagine Spacey in the role, particularly his age, compared to Plummer. We will never know how that would have worked, but the eventual result is riveting, harrowing, fascinating and always cinematically gorgeous. “All the Money in the World” is currently available to rent.

NEXUS CINEMA DINING 7070 Bruns Dr. Mobile, AL (251) 776-6570 AMC CLASSIC WHARF 23151 Wharf Lane Orange Beach, AL (251) 981-4444 COBB PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 923-0785 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 State Hwy 181 Spanish Fort, AL (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Photos | Giles Keyte / Gunpowder & Sky

From left: Christopher Plummer stars as John Paul Getty in “All the Money in the World,” the true story of the kidnapping of 16-year-old John Paul Getty III and the desperate attempt by his devoted mother to convince his billionaire grandfather to pay the ransom. In “Hearts Beat Loud,” Nick Offerman and Kiersey Clemons play a father and daughter who form an unlikely songwriting duo in the summer before she leaves for college. NEW THIS WEEK HEARTS BEAT LOUD

A delightful change of pace from the summer blockbuster, this crowd-pleasing festival favorite stars the always delightful Nick Offerman as an aging hipster musician playing music with his reluctant teen daughter the summer before she leaves for college. Crescent Theater

ANT-MAN AND THE WASP

Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) is grappling with the consequences of his choices as both a superhero and a father. Approached by Hope van Dyne and Dr. Hank

Pym, Lang must once again don the Ant-Man suit and fight alongside the Wasp. All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining.

THE FIRST PURGE

To push the crime rate below 1 percent for the rest of the year, the New Founding Fathers of America test a sociological theory that vents aggression for one night in one isolated community. But when the violence of oppressors meets the rage of the others, the contagion will explode from the trial-city borders and spread across the nation. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING SICARIO: DAY OF THE SOLADO All listed multiplex theaters. UNCLE DREW All listed multiplex theaters. JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM All listed multiplex theaters, Crescent Theater. GOTTI Regal Mobile Stadium 18 THE SEAGULL Regal Mobile Stadium 18 INCREDIBLES 2 All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining. SUPERFLY All listed multiplex theaters. TAG All listed multiplex theaters.

HEREDITARY All listed multiplex theaters. OCEANS 8 All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining. ADRIFT All listed multiplex theaters. SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining. DEADPOOL 2 All listed multiplex theaters. BREAKING IN All listed multiplex theaters. AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR All listed multiplex theaters. RAMPAGE All listed multiplex theaters. A QUIET PLACE Regal Mobile Stadium 18


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS JULY 4, 2018 - JULY 10, 2018

INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATIONS

• SEMMES: City of Semmes Liberty Day, Tuesday, July 3, 6:30-9 p.m., Mary G. Montgomery High School. Food, music, fireworks. The Wharf: Independence Day Street Party, Tuesday, July 3, 6-9 p.m. Fireworks display at 8:45 p.m. Free admission. • MOBILE: • Fireworks on the Fantail, Wednesday, July 4, 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Enjoy

Photo | Gulf Bay Photography / USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park

live 1940s jazz by the band Swing, barbeque buffet, ice cream bar, children’s activities. View fireworks by the city of Mobile from the bow of the USS Alabama. Parking included. Tickets available online at www.ussalabama.com or by calling 241-433-2703. • GulfQuest 4th of July Wednesday, July 4. Multiple activities from 2-8 p.m. on Riverfront Promenade. $5 admission 2-6 p.m. VIP Extravaganza 7-9 p.m. with beer, wine, heavy hors d’oeuvres. Tickets are $50 per person. Enjoy music, food, drinks and panoramic views of downtown Mobile and the Mobile River from GulfQuest’s private balcony. Dauphin Island: Fireworks show on Dauphin Island Beach starting at sunset, Wednesday, July 4.

GENERAL INTEREST Grand Bay Watermelon Festival Come to Grand Bay Odd Fellows Festival Park (10327 Taylor F. Harper Blvd.) on Tuesday, July 3, 3-7 p.m. for the Grand Bay Watermelon Festival. Festival continues July 4, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., with $5 per vehicle admission for all-you-can-eat free watermelon, music, games and open car show. Visit grandbaywatermelonfestival.org. Park system improvement plan Give input on Mobile’s parks and recreation programs at the following locations: Thursday, July 5, HarmonThomas Community Center, 1611 Belfast St.; Friday, July 6, Robert Hope Community Center, 850 Edwards St.; Monday, July 9, 5055 Carol Plantation Road; Tuesday, July 10, MAWSS Main Office, 4725 Moffett Road; Wednesday, July 11, Joseph Dotch Community Center, 310 Bank Ave., #A. Meetings begin at 6 p.m. Visit mapformobile.org/Parks or search “Mobile Parks” on Facebook. Ice cream social The Spanish Fort Public Library celebrates summer with its second annual SFPL Ice Cream Social Thursday, July 5, 6-8 p.m. Free ice cream, local entertainment and open to the public. “Glow in the Park” The city of Fairhope returns with the 4th annual “Glow in the Park” summer movie series. Bring a blanket or lawn chair Thursday, July 5, 8 p.m. to Fairhopers Community Park to see “Despicable Me 3.” Call 251-929-1466. Dauphin Island family movie series Dauphin Island’s West End Beach is the site for free family movie nights. Thursday, July 5, see “Frozen”; Friday, July 6, see “Zootopia.” Visit dauphinislandtourism. com/calendar for complete summer lineup. Friday at the firehouse Come visit the new firehouse station in Crichton on Springhill Avenue (across

• FAIRHOPE: City of Fairhope hosts a 4th of July concert and fireworks display on Wednesday, July 4, at Henry George Park and Fairhope Municipal Pier. Baldwin Pops Band begins at 7 p.m. with fireworks at approximately 9 p.m. • GULF SHORES: City of Gulf Shores will present a fireworks display and other

family-friendly activities on Wednesday, July 4, 9 p.m., Gulf State Park Pier. Daphne: Water slides, inflatables, games and more on Wednesday, July 4, beginning at 5 p.m., Al Trione Sports Complex. Fireworks begin at dusk.

from Popeye’s and Dollar Tree) at an open house Friday, July 6, 5:30-7 p.m. The public is encouraged to tour the fire station, trucks and equipment and meet firefighters. Free and open to the public on Fridays throughout the summer. For more information and locations, follow Mobile Fire-Rescue on Facebook. Greyhound meet and greet Come meet the dogs and folks from “It’s a Grey Area” Greyhound Rescue and discover if adopting a retired racer is the right choice for you and your family. Saturday, July 7, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at B&B Pet Stop. Adoption fee (tax deductible) is $200, which includes all vet work, heartworm testing, dental care, a muzzle and a collar. Veterans appreciation day Give thanks to our honored guests — veterans, active-duty military, fallen soldiers and their families — hosted by the Coastal Response Center in Coden on Saturday, July 7, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Lunch is free. Come and enjoy serving those who have served us. Find us on Facebook @CoastalResponseCenter. Market at the Pillars Enjoy live music and local food at the Pillars Sunday, July 8, at noon. Have a fun afternoon with local makers, bakers, crafters and artists. Open to the public and pet friendly. Find us on Facebook @ themarketatthepillars. Republican Party committee meeting Committee meeting held Monday, July 9, at Westminster Presbyterian Church (2921 Airport Blvd.). Meet-and-greet begins at 6 p.m. with regular meeting at 7 p.m. Bring a friend and/or family member. Find us on Facebook @MobileGOP. State Senate and County Commission debate Hosted by Baldwin County Young Republicans Monday, July 9, 7 p.m. at the Spanish Fort Community Center. Moderated by Greg Peterson and open to the public. All four candidates have been invited. Visit

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baldwincountyyoungrepublicans.org for more information. Pop Culture Trivia Challenge Grab some friends and join us Tuesday, July 10, at Beef O’Brady’s in Spanish Fort for a Pop Culture Trivia Challenge. Winner receive prizes. Find us on Facebook @ BeefOBradysSFAL. Democracy for Y’all Mobile DSA will hold its general meeting Tuesday, July 10, at Taylor Park at 6 p.m. Come to discuss socialism, campaigns and projects underway. Find us on Facebook @MobileDSA. Dog River Clearwater Revival meeting Learn what’s being done to combat Mobile’s litter problem at this general meeting at the Grand Mariner Tuesday, July 10, 6-8 p.m. Visit dogriver.org. Tech Tuesdays at MPL Explore technology through a variety of projects and resources on Tuesday, July 10, 4-5 p.m. at the Ben May Main Branch. Call the children’s department at 208-7086 or email crhodes@mplonline.org. Hands-on Habitat Kids and adults alike can learn about our ecosystem and interact with the animals that live here in this fun and educational nature series. Join us at Tacky Jack’s in Gulf Shores on Tuesday, July 10, at 11 a.m. Free for all ages, 11 a.m. to noon (arrive 15 minutes early), no RSVP required. Visit tackyjacks.com for more information. General snake ID Come to the Environmental Studies Center on Tuesday, July 10, at 6:30 p.m. for a general snake ID class hosted by Reptile Education Conservation & Husbandry (R.E.A.C.H.). Find us on Facebook@REACH1CHANGE1. Wonderful Wednesdays at Bellingrath Join us Wednesday, July 11, 10:3011:30 a.m. as Tom McGehee, curator of the Bellingrath Museum Home, helps us

decode some of the mysteries of Mrs. Bellingrath’s silver serving pieces. If you have a mystery piece at home, bring it — McGehee may be able to determine what it is. Visit bellingrath.org for the full schedule; call 251-459-8864 to register.

FUNDRAISERS Bike Nite Join us at Bob’s Downtown Diner for Bike Nite Tuesday, July 10 at 4 p.m. for live music, food, beer and door prices. Proceeds benefit St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital in the name of Fairhope’s Georgia Byrd. Find us on Facebook @ corneroffatandhappy.

ARTS Cathedral Square “Gone Country” Bring your lawn chairs and coolers and listen to Matt Bartoli’s original music plus great country covers. Free and open to the public. Saturday, July 7, at 8:30 p.m. in Cathedral Square in downtown Mobile. Garden sketch club Come to Bellingrath Gardens every Friday for a relaxing afternoon of sketching in the gardens. All levels of experience are welcome. General admission is $5 for nonmembers. “Tornado Alley” Join “Storm Chasers” star Sean Casey and the researchers of VORTEX 2, the most ambitious effort ever to understand the origins and evolution of tornadoes, on this exciting science adventure. Through July 8. Call 251-208-6893 or visit exploreum.com for showtimes. “Born to be Wild” Narrated by Morgan Freeman, “Born to be Wild” transports moviegoers to the lush rainforests of Borneo and across the rugged Kenyan savannah as scientists and their teams rescue, rehabilitate and return these incredible animals to the wild. July 9-15. For ticket information and showtimes visit exploreum.com.


MUSEUMS “Water’s Extreme Journey” An exciting quest that transforms “you” into a drop of water entering a watershed and traveling to oceans while learning how clean choices keep our drops healthy and moving toward a clean ocean. Daily through Sept. 3 at Gulf Coast Exploreum. Visit exploreum.com for details. “Ice Age Imperials” History Museum of Mobile through Aug. 26. Imagine traveling 20,000 years into the past when fierce cats, enormous mastodons and woolly mammoths, 6-foot-tall beavers and other giant creatures roamed the land and every day was a struggle for survival. Visit historymuseumofmobile.com or call 251301-0266. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all Mobile County residents. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES BayBears vs Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp The Mobile BayBears host Jacksonville in a four-game series starting July 4 at 6:35 p.m. Also enjoy one of the best fireworks shows along the Gulf Coast following the game. For more information visit www. mobilebaybears.com or visit BayBears offices at Hank Aaron Stadium.

Piyo Tone Mondays and Thursdays through Aug. 2 at Stott’s Park (2150 N. Demetropolis Road), 6-6:45 p.m. Class fee $21. Call 251-4637980. Table Tennis Club Mondays, 5:30-8 p.m., and Tuesdays, 6-8:30 p.m. (adults only), at Laun Park (5401 Windmill Drive). Mike Ho, Baker HS table tennis coach, will help everyone with their game. Paddles provided or bring your own. All levels welcome; $1 at the door. Call 251-463-7980.

WORKSHOPS “State of the South” Mobile Museum of Art in partnership with Mobile United welcomes Alabama Shakespeare Festival for an exciting workshop focusing on how Southern storytelling is changing. Saturday, July 7, 6 p.m. Arrive by 5:45 p.m. and enjoy a pre-talk reception. Wine will be available. Visit mobilemuseumofart.com for more information. “Sew & Tell” The Moorer Branch of Mobile Public Library is offering a Counted Cross Stitch Fox class on Saturday, July 7, 10:30 a.m., for ages 8 and up. Call 251-470-7770 or email ftigner@mplonline.org. “Reasons to Believe” Government Street United Methodist Church invites you to learn about the scientific support of the Genesis creation account and historical evidence to confirm the ministry, crucifixion and

post-resurrection appearances of Jesus. Monday, July 9, 6:30 p.m., 901 Government St. Call 251-438-4714.

PUBLIC MEETINGS

Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com.

Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www.baldwincountyal.gov.

Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope.com.

Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre.com.

Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www. cityoffoley.org.

Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450.

Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope. com.

Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov.

Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973.

Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., www. cityofmobile.org.

Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142.

Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St., www.urban.cityofmobile.org.

Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com.

Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach.com.

Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville

Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. thecityofprichard.org.

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STYLE GARDENING

The dog days are here

BY ALICE MARTY, MOBILE MASTER GARDENER | COASTALALABAMAGARDENING@GMAIL.COM

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he old saying “the dog days of August” usually refers to the long, hot, dry days when our gardens — as well as ourselves — are waiting out summer and hoping for an early fall. My definition of “dog days” is when the spider mites show up in my garden. Spider mites, unlike other living things, love the long, hot, dry days of summer, and this year they showed up in my garden early after the hot, dry May weather. My battle with the nasty little mites has gone on for several years. I can’t say I’ve ever actually won the summer battle, but I’m becoming craftier each summer, so a draw feels almost like a win. Spider mites are related to spiders, not insects, but will attack several types of plants and can be a major problem for agricultural crops. They look like tiny white spiders on plants but can also appear to be tan, red or black. Since they are so small, spider mites aren’t noticeable until their population explodes — and their damage becomes noticeable. Spider mites multiply very quickly and, in the right conditions, can double their population every couple of weeks. In a few weeks an adult female can lay hundreds of eggs. When those eggs start to hatch, the result is an exponential population growth in a very short time. They become fully grown about a week after they hatch. All mites have needle-like piercing-sucking mouthparts. They feed primarily on the underside of leaves by penetrating the plant tissue with these mouthparts. They spin fine strands of webbing on the host plant — hence their name. Mite feeding causes a stippled-bleached effect, and later the leaves turn yellow, gray or bronze.

New leaves may look deformed. Complete defoliation may occur if the mites aren’t controlled. Some of their favorite edibles are hydrangea, brugmansia and hibiscus, as well as many annuals and perennials. To detect spider mites, examine the undersides of the leaves closely for mites and webbing. A more efficient technique is to place a sheet of white typing paper beneath the leaves and tap the foliage sharply. The mites will fall onto the paper and can be more easily observed and identified than on the green foliage. Brush the paper lightly with your hand; if the paper smears reddish yellow, it is probably spider mites. Spider mite remedies Now that you have identified the problem, what can you do about it? If you are a veteran gardener with previous spider mite experience, perhaps you have started control before the mites showed up this year. That would be the best practice. But many gardeners (including some Master Gardeners) will have been busy planting, weeding and enjoying their garden and react only when problems present themselves. One method used to control spider mites and other garden pests is releasing beneficial insects. The larval or adult stages of these prey on other insects. Their eggs can be purchased in large numbers to place in your garden. Lady bugs are one of the more well-known species for that use. Other insects for natural control are predatory spider mites, minute pirate bugs, six-spotted thrips, lacewings and lady beetles. This is a solution that is most effective earlier in the season when the spider mite population is small. The hot weather the mites love is problematic

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when it comes to remedies. Almost all pesticide sprays suggest not using in hot temperatures because spraying during hot temperatures will burn plant leaves. Insecticidal soaps and oils such as Neem should be considered first when a pesticide is required. They are effective against mites and the least toxic to people, other nontarget organisms and the environment. Some oils can be used in any season. They still should be used carefully during hot weather by confining your spraying to late evening or early morning, when temperatures lessen a bit. This timing also will help protect pollinators like bees and butterflies. A few plants react badly to certain chemicals, even the ones considered somewhat mild, like insecticidal soap. Try a small, inconspicuous test area to see how it will react before covering your entire plant. There are chemical pesticides that are specifically designed for mites, but spider mites may develop resistance to them after a few applications. Synthetic pyrethroids fall into that category. Pyrethrins are naturally occurring compounds extracted from chrysanthemum plants and used to make pesticides.  Pyrethroids have the same basic chemical makeup as pyrethrins but are not naturally occurring. Pyrethroids are man-made products that are also used as pesticides. The similarity of these two names is frequently confusing. Alternating methods or chemicals used each time you treat for mites will help keep resistance from becoming a problem. Whatever method you choose will need to be repeated to keep up with

the hatching of new spider mite life cycles for a few weeks. Using a broad-spectrum insecticide will kill all insects, even the beneficial varieties. When choosing a pesticide, read all instructions on the label. You will learn what chemicals are used, what insects it will affect and what plants or wildlife it may damage. It is also imperative that you know all first aid needed if a chemical accident occurs. One of the more important lessons taught about IPM (Integrated Pest Management) in Master Gardener classes is “Read the label! Read the label! Read the label!” Not a misprint — it’s that important! For more information about spider mites and other garden pests, contact either the Mobile or Baldwin county offices of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System. These folks have a wealth of knowledge about plants and will be happy to share it with you.

GARDENERS, CHECK THIS OUT

What: Market in the Square (look for the Master Gardener tent for gardening information) Find: Local produce, homemade bread, jams, preserves, honey, crafts, music Where: Cathedral Square, Mobile When: Saturdays through July 28, 7:30 a.m. to noon MBG: Mobilebotanicalgardens.org for information on fall classes and events. Master Gardener Helpline: 1-877-252-4769 or send your gardening questions to coastalalabamagardening@gmail.com.


THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE CREATURE FEATURE BY TIMOTHY POLIN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 “Friendly” cartoon character 7 Pro 14 Symbols in calculus 20 Simple kind of antenna 21 Expenditures’ counterpart 22 Lacking a break 23 Add surreptitiously 24 Worrisome sight for a swimmer 25 With spite 26 Some Houdini feats 28 John of spy fiction 30 Something extraordinary that won’t soon be forgotten 32 Some northern Europeans 35 Bit of hydrotherapy 38 Caffeinated drink with tapioca balls 39 Doled (out) 41 Opposite of colorblindness? 42 “____ Jacques” 43 Ones eligible for marathon prizes 45 “Don’t bite the hand that feeds you,” e.g. 46 Flight-board abbr. 47 Sinking feelings 50 Mistrusts 53 Mother or sister 54 Does more than ask 56 Dr. ____ Sattler, “Jurassic Park” paleobotanist 57 Energy giant that fell into ignominy in 2002 58 Elevs. 59 Peevish quality 61 Get a new mortgage 63 [Kiss] 65 Powerful D.C. lobby 68 Scylla or Charybdis 74 Speedy wide receiver, perhaps 80 Skill 81 [Fingers crossed] 82 Buzz out in space 83 And so on: Abbr. 84 Staff leader? 86 & 87 What might cost you an arm and a leg? 88 Silver-tongued 89 2004 also-ran 91 Martin who wrote “The Pregnant Widow” 92 Evening, in ads 93 Southern sandwich 94 Is there in spirit? 96 Zen Buddhist goal 98 Makes fun of 99 Menace in 106-Down 104 Bad-mouth 106 Add spice to 107 Metaphor for deliberate ignorance 109 Gobbled (down)

111 Seriously uptight 112 Fictional setting for 106-Down 115 “A ____ believes no one” (old saying) 116 Pottery 117 Caffè ____ 118 Justin Bieber or Justin Timberlake 119 Concerning 120 Conventions: Abbr. 121 “There, there” 122 Disgustingly obsequious 123 Class with drills DOWN 1 Things investors take an interest in? 2 Suffer 3 106-Down director 4 Pink, e.g. 5 Brought out 6 Christen anew 7 Tidiness 8 Proud, fiery types, they say 9 Save for later, in a way 10 Fathers or brothers 11 Santa ____ 12 No longer in force 13 Gives meaning to 14 Horn of Africa native 15 Neon, e.g. 16 Transmission 17 Like the menace in 106-Down 18 Common knee injury site,

briefly 19 Locale for a trough 27 Fairy-tale “lump” 29 Hack 30 Hit BBC comedy, briefly 31 Peter of “The Maltese Falcon” 32 Handles deftly 33 Utmost degree 34 Farm machine 36 Something to angle for 37 “In Dulci Jubilo” and others 39 Modest skirts 40 Modern subject of F.A.A. regulation 43 TV show with the season’s highest rating, often 44 “____ U.S.A.” (1963 hit) 48 Sports arbiter 49 Pixielike 51 Cabaret accessory 52 Country-music channel, once 55 Decorative pillowcase 58 Adjudicate, as a case 60 “This is looking bad” 62 Lyricist Sammy 63 Singer Haggard 64 Golfer’s obstacle 66 Ska-punk band with the 1997 song “Sell Out” 67 Sunning area 68 Ax

69 Seasonal quaff 70 Small herrings 71 Is a crowd 72 Actor Morales 73 Deteriorates 74 Beginning 75 Precollege, for short 76 Text tweaks 77 Midcrisis hire, perhaps 78 Word with black or blood 79 Frozen-dessert chain 85 Leaves nervously exhausted 88 Thugs 90 Aromatic yellow citrus 93 Preppy wear 95 Himalayan native 97 Cheap and gaudy 98 Charged 99 Scrap 100 Actress Salma 101 Movie org. whose “100 Years … 100 Thrills” list has 106-Down at No. 2 102 Takes a load off 103 Superman, by birth 105 “Coo-oo-ool!” 106 1975 summer blockbuster 107 Morse clicks 108 Indian blueblood 110 Teensy amount 113 Yogi’s accessory 114 Oscar ____ (Hollywood honor, informally)

ANSWERS ON PAGE 37

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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

USA views many projects, celebrates another Bubas award BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

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he big news involving the University of South Alabama lately has involved the proposed construction of an on-campus football stadium. In fact, Mayor Sandy Stimpson presented a plan for helping to finance the project at the recent City Council meeting. However, there is more going on in West Mobile than just football. Here is a glance at several projects that have been completed or are still in the planning stages. • The new Jag Fitness Trail officially opened during the spring semester. The 1.5-mile exercise path, located alongside USA North Drive, Aubrey Green Drive and Health Services Drive, has a crushed rock walking surface and three stations for stretching and strength training. “The University of South Alabama is committed to providing opportunities for fitness and wellness for our community,” USA President Dr. Tony Waldrop said. “The Jag Fitness Trail is part of the commitment. I invite you to join me and take advantage of this new trail.” Julee Waldrop, an athlete herself as well as an advocate of physical activity, said she and her husband walk each morning at 5 a.m. as they prepare for their busy days. It is a chance for the two to communicate “without the distraction of electronics.” “We are lucky that in Mobile there is rarely a day when you cannot go outside and get moving,” she said. “Embrace your environment and get outside and play.” Jag Fitness Trail features include: scenic views; an 8-foot-wide path; core fitness, balance and flexibility exercises; muscular fitness; lighting for night-time activity; benches and drinking fountains; and existing parking available. The Jag Fitness Trail borders the wooded Glenn Sebastian Nature Trail and USA’s disc golf course.

• The Jaguar Training Center, which collapsed while under construction in July 2017, has been rebuilt and is expected to be open soon. While the covered 96,000-squarefoot facility will be primarily utilized by the USA football team, it also will be available for other athletic department and university functions. • The Department of Athletics is pursuing external funding to construct the Jon Lieber Clubhouse. The new facility will be constructed parallel to the foul-ground fencing in left field of Eddie Stanky Field. It will nearly double the square footage of the current clubhouse, which was officially dedicated in 2005, and will feature an upgraded locker room, weight room, conference room and additional office space. USA officials said this overhaul, along with the facelift of the Luis Gonzalez hitting facility during the past year, ensures baseball is able to stay proactive from a facility standpoint and compete within the ever-changing landscape of college baseball. To get involved in the project and learn about current naming opportunities, visit jaguarathleticfund.com. • The slab was poured last week for a cutting-edge practice facility for the men and women’s golf programs. The building — which will be at the west end of the driving range at the Robert Trent Jones Magnolia Grove Golf Course — is set to include a 2,000-square-foot clubhouse featuring two hitting bays equipped with golf swing analysis cameras, plus men and women’s locker rooms. The complex will feature a short-game area containing chipping greens, putting greens and a bunker. In addition to providing opportunities to improve for student-athletes in the two programs, USA officials said the complex is

expected to aid in future recruiting. The men’s golf team (Birdie Club) and women’s squad (Chip in Club) each have specific support clubs to accept donations that go directly to support of their programs. You can learn more at either jaguarathleticfund.com.

Other USA happenings

USA athletics recently claimed the Vic Bubas Cup — presented to the Sun Belt Conference school with the top all-around program — for the fourth consecutive year and 14th time overall. USA finished with 130.5 points; Texas State was next with 125.5. “In a year in which the namesake of this award passed away, we should pause and recognize Commissioner Bubas and his impact on the Sun Belt Conference,” USA Director of Athletics Dr. Joel Erdmann said. “The Bubas Cup highlights the collective competitive spirit of all student-athletes and programs of our 12 Sun Belt institutions. This achievement is the result of effective leadership within all aspects of the department — student-athletes, coaches, support systems and fans.” The Jaguars won the award backed by regular-season championships in women’s soccer and tournament championships in women’s soccer and men’s tennis. USA also saw success in women’s cross country (third), women’s indoor track and field (second), women’s tennis (second) and women’s outdoor track and field (third). Men’s golf finished fourth overall in the team standings and made it to their first match play semifinals. Women’s basketball also had a strong showing in 2017-18, winning 21 games overall and 11 in conference play. Women’s volleyball set a new program record with 12 conference wins and posted the teams’ most overall wins (17) since the 1994 season. • In another story involving USA, a partnership with Adidas has been announced. The Portland, Oregon-based company will be the official athletic apparel and accessories brand for the Jaguars. “We are excited about this partnership with Adidas,” Erdmann said. “The aspects of the agreement will obviously have a positive impact on our financial bottom line, but equally important is our access to the direct team sales program and Adidas’ sincere desire to have South Alabama Athletics representing the Adidas brand. Recognition must to go to Deputy Athletic Director Daniel McCarthy, as he has been the point person throughout this process and will continue to lead the transition over the next several months.” The new deal began June 1 and runs through May 31, 2025. As part of the agreement, Adidas will supply all footwear, apparel, uniforms, accessories and equipment for each of South’s 17 sport programs. Additionally, the university will participate in the Adidas Team Program, which features direct team sales.

SPORTS FROM BEHIND THE MIC

St. Paul’s loss in court doesn’t mean the school is wrong BY RANDY KENNEDY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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he Alabama High School Athletic Association claims it needed to pass a Competitive Balance rule in order to make sure the same private schools with all of their advantages and privileges didn’t keep winning all the championships. The problem with that logic is that the same schools are not winning all the championships. Laat football season, two of seven state champions were private schools. The previous year there were zero, just like there were none in 2009, 2010 and 2011. There has never been a year in which more than two state championships were awarded to private schools. In fact, since the first state champion was officially crowned in 1966, only 20 of 270 have been private schools. That’s less than 8 percent of the championships won by private schools. That’s a lower number than the total of state championships that have been won by teams from Jefferson County. But you don’t see anyone considering a state law to crack down on Hoover and Homewood and those schools that also work hard to excel. So let’s get to the real reason for “competitive balance.” The reason the rule was passed was to make a public showing that the AHSAA was taking a stand against those evil, successful private school people living in their mansions and driving their new SUVs with their better-thanyou school crests on the back window.

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That’s it. This unfair and petty rule was born out of pure jealousy and was intended to be a public showing of punishment for those private schools that dared to make a commitment to excellence in academics as well as extracurricular activities. I understand the tough spot the AHSAA and Executive Director Steve Savarese are in. Savarese and every other person associated with the AHSAA I’ve ever met have the best interest of the student-athletes in mind every day. Even after this punitive and ill-advised move, I completely believe that. The issue for Savarese is that he desperately wants to keep all the decision-making about high school sports where it belongs — inside the AHSAA. When some jealous public school parents caught the attention of some opportunistic state legislators, that decision-making power was threatened. Thus, there was the need for a public flogging of the most successful private school programs in an effort to show there was no need for the government to get involved. I understand that reasoning. But it doesn’t make it right to punish private schools for being successful while not doing the same to public schools that have had even more success while enjoying many of the same advantages. Last week, St. Paul’s lost its initial court filing against the AHSAA and Savarese. The school was asking for an

emergency injunction that would have allowed St. Paul’s to continue to play in Class 5A instead of moving up to the larger Class 6A based on the school’s football success in recent years. The judge, William Steele (the greatest name for a federal judge ever), was correct in denying the injunction. As much as I side with St. Paul’s in the school’s assertion it is being treated unfairly, the key point has always been that St. Paul’s isn’t required to be a member of the AHSAA. If school officials can’t work within the organization to find a suitable answer to any issue, then they are always free to literally take their ball and go home. Judge Steele was almost completely right in his ruling. But I take great exception to the following portion of the ruling: “With respect to the equal protection claim, St. Paul’s has made an insufficient showing that the Association was motivated by ‘bare animus’ against private schools; therefore, the challenged classification must be evaluated using deferential rational-basis review.” I don’t for one second think anyone at the AHSAA has animus toward St. Paul’s or any other private school. But there is no question that the competitive balance rule was intended to publicly show that the AHSAA was willing to go along with the jealous and petty parents and politicians who most certainly were motivated by animus. St. Paul’s and all other private schools were already playing in a higher classification than their enrollment numbers would indicate. According to the AHSAA, the enrollment in grades 10-12 at St. Paul’s is 310 students. That number would make St. Paul’s one of the smallest Class 4A schools in the state. But once the 1.35 multiplier is applied for all private schools, that number goes to 418. That makes St. Paul’s a Class 5A school. Now, pile on top of the multiplier this competitive balance nonsense and the Saints will be playing in Class 6A. To get an idea of what kind of jump that is, consider this: The largest school in Class 6A has an enrollment of 1,046 students. The smallest school in Class 6A has an enrollment of 606 students. St. Paul’s has 310. Look at those numbers and try to convince yourself animus didn’t fit into this equation somewhere. Randy Kennedy writes a weekly column for Lagniappe and is co-host of “Sports Drive” every weekday from 3-6 p.m. on WNSP 105.5 FM, the country’s first all-sports FM station.


STYLE HOROSCOPES THE THIRD BRANCH

tempt to reassure St. Paul’s timid football program before the 2018 CANCER (6/22-7/22) — Falling season, you’ll invite yourself to the into a comfortable sleep during a athletic department and deliver tubing trip down Styx River, you’ll Sgt. Hartman’s “Full Metal Jacket” bypass the finish point and float speech. Your nominee for Supreme in the Gulf of Mexico. Detained by Court Justice is Judge Greg Mathis. ICE, you’ll appear in campaign ads LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — After for Tucker Dorsey and Chris Elliott. reading about emerging Mobile pop Your nominee for Supreme Court group The Guest List, their single Justice is Judge Judy Sheindlin. “Nobody but You” will become LEO (7/23-8/23) — You’ll think your summer 2018 anthem. Your you’ve spotted Bigfoot during your nominee for Supreme Court Justice inaugural walk on the Jag Fitness is Judge Joe Brown. Trail, but it turns out it’s just Luther SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — UnStrange lobbying the trees to be dertaking your own adventure to harvested for lumber. Your nominee the Mobile-Tensaw Delta to gaze for Supreme Court Justice is Judge upon the American lotus in bloom, Harry T. Stone. you’ll discover a well-preserved VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — In an atVHS copy of “Matilda.” Your nomi-

AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — Trying to find an agreeable middle ground SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) for the Ladd Stadium debate, you’ll — After failing to read the instrucpropose to transition the Jaguars tions, you’ll realize you’ve somehow to an indoor football league with mishandled your new Big Green games at the Mitchell Center. Your Egg when your face ages 20 years nominee for Supreme Court Justice and you’re suddenly addicted to is Judge Joseph Dredd. nicotine. Your nominee for Supreme PISCES (2/19-3/20) — HearCourt Justice is Judge Henry Bone. ing some rather salacious rumors CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — about a certain local political race, You’ll simultaneously mourn the you’ll buckle up, grab your popcorn closing of the Fairhope Hardee’s and shield your kids’ eyes. Your and celebrate the grand reopening nominee for Supreme Court Justice of TexarBama BBQ with a custom is Judge Roy Snyder. Fairhope Float from Mr. Gene’s ARIES (3/21-4/19) — You’ll start Beans. It’ll be topped with Bacon a private garbage collection service Bits. Your nominee for Supreme to compete with the dysfunctional Court Justice is Judge Glenda city of Mobile Public Works DepartHatchett. nee for Supreme Court Justice is Judge Margaret W. Wilbur.

ment. Finding that it really isn’t that difficult, you’ll offer curbside recycling as well. Your nominee for Supreme Court Justice is Judge Lynn Toler. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — Misunderstanding the purpose of a “tool sharing” app, you’ll discover LEVELD is not a marketplace to trade one of your stupid and facetious friends for another. Your nominee for Supreme Court Justice is Judge Chamberlain Haller. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — Inspired by the sinking of the New Venture, you’ll front a Jimmy Buffett tribute group called the Artificial Reefer Band. Your nominee for Supreme Court Justice is former Judge Herman Thomas.

F U T U R E S H O C K

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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendor’s Lien retained in Deed from O.A. Gerges and wife, Lidia Gerges to Tom McGoogan and Cynthia McGoogan, dated June 16, 2006, and Recorded in Book 5991, Page 1392 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama;  notice is hereby given that the undersigned as holder of said Vendor’s Lien will under power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on July 18, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: Parcel One Commencing at the Southeast corner of the North Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 19, Township 6 South, Range 1 West and run thence North 89 degrees, 54 minutes, 45 seconds West 604.44 feet to a point for the point of beginning and from said point of beginning, run North 00 degrees, 01 minute, 00 seconds West 210 feet to a point; thence run North 89 degrees, 54 minutes, 45 seconds West 350 feet, more or less, to the center of Deer River, thence Southwardly along the center of said river to the point of intersection with the South line of said North Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 19, and run thence South 89 degrees, 54 minutes, 45 seconds East 400 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, being the same property described in Deed recorded in Real Property Book 4803, Page 1093, of the records in the office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel Two Beginning at the Southeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 19, Township 6 South, Range 1 West, Mobile County, Alabama, thence run North 00 degrees, 20 minutes, 09 seconds West along the East line of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter a distance of 523.68 feet to a point at the Southeast corner of property heretofore conveyed to Clarence Ray Pieper, Ill by deed recorded in Real Property Book 2454, Page 741, of the records in the office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, thence run North 89 degrees, 54 minutes, 45 seconds West along the South line of the property of Clarence Ray Pieper, Ill and of Mary Christina Pieper Gobin, a distance of 492.42 feet to a point at the Southeast corner of the property heretofore conveyed to the said Mary Christina Pieper Gobin by deed recorded in Real Property Book 3896, Page 473; thence run North 00 degrees, 11 minutes, 20 seconds West along the West line of the property of Gobin, a distance of 154.89 feet to a point on the North line of the South Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 19; thence run North 89 degrees, 54 minutes, 45 seconds West a distance of 512 feet, more or less, to the center of Deer River; thence run Southwardly along the center of Deer River 210 feet, more or less, to the North line of the property heretofore conveyed to Clarence R. Pieper, Jr. and wife by deed recorded in Deed Book 685, Page 634; thence run South 89 degrees, 54 minutes, 45 seconds East along the North line of the property of Clarence R. Pieper, Jr. a distance of 470 feet, more or less, to the Northeast corner thereof; thence run South 00 degrees, 50 minutes, 03 seconds East a distance of 129.78 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees, 40 minutes, 10 seconds East a distance of 130.02 feet to a point; thence South 00 degrees, 37 minutes, 08 seconds East a distance of 218.42 feet to a point on the South line of said Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence run South 89 degrees, 53 minutes, 35 seconds East along the said South line, a distance of 600.69 feet to the point of beginning. Being the same property described in deed recorded in Real Property Book 4869, Page 875, of the records in the office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: Commencing at the Southeast corner of the North Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 19, Township 6 South, Range 1 West and running thence West a distance of 600 feet to a point, which is the point of beginning of the easement herein described; thence North a distance of 660 feet, more or less, to a point on the South line of Sunset Drive, thence run East 25 feet to a point; thence run South 660 feet, more or less, to a point; thence run West a distance of 25 feet to the point of beginning. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS”  BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF THE PROBATE WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/

OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. O.A. Gerges and Lidia Gerges Holder of the Vendors’ Lien John T. Bender McFadden, Rouse, & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 Lagniappe HD June 20, 27, July 4, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain mortgage executed by William Dursch and Anita Dursch, husband and wife to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (MERS) acting solely as nominee for Lender, Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp., and Lender’s Successors and Assigns dated March 26, 2009, and Recorded in Book 6515, page 449 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, which said mortgage was subsequently assigned to Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC by instrument recorded in BK LR7188, Page 536 and corrected by instrument recorded in Book LR7509, Page 1216 in said Probate Court records; notice is hereby given that the undersigned as mortgagee will under power of sale contained in said mortgage, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on the July 24, 2018, at the front door entrance of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government St., Mobile, Alabama 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 50, SECOND ADDITION, LARTIGUE SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 9, PAGE 380 IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA; TOGETHER WITH A 2005 PATRIOT 3532N MANUFACTURED HOME, SERIAL NUMBER PAL19170AAL AND PAL19170BAL. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. This property will be sold on an “as is, where is”  basis, subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions reflected in the mortgage and those contained in the records of the office of the judge of the probate where the above-described property is situated. This property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title, use and/or enjoyment and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC Mortgagee Beth McFadden Rouse McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 11, 2018

PROBATE CONDEMNATION NOTICE Notice is hereby given to any unknown heirs and next of kin of Alsie Harris, Deceased; or any other person or persons in interest of the following proceedings in the Probate Court of Mobile County, AL, viz: IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA CASE NO. 2017-2292 STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE, Plaintiff -VSHeirs at Law and Next of Kin of Alsie Harris, deceased, JERRY AND GLADYS WILKERSON, INEZ HUGHES, CATHERINE POLLACK, CARRIE BRACIE, BRENDA MOORE, MILDRED HENDRIX, DYRONE WILKERSON, QUINCY LATRELLE HARRIS, JANICE CROCKETT PARKER, KIM HASTIE, as REVENUE COMMISSIONER FOR MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA, Defendants COMPLAINT FOR CONDEMNATION Heretofore came the County of Mobile, by and through its attorney, K. Paul Carbo, Jr., Esq., its attorney, and filed a Second Amended Complaint to Condemn Lands in writing seeking to condemn for the uses and purposes set forth in said complaint that certain real property located in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, and described as follows:

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EXHIBIT “A” TRACT NO. 45 DE 1 PROJECT NO. MCR 2014-306 (Old Military Road) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF SAMUEL DUNCAN JR SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 86, PAGE 117 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, POINT ALSO BEING ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN NORTH, A DISTANCE OF 42.56 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 70°20’22’’ WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 276.34 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 68°01’56’’WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 327.06 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 111.10 FEET TO THE WESTERNMOST POINT OF RIGHT-OF-WAY TAKING FOR OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 16.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 8.79 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89°18’11’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 61.14 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00°38’49’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89°18’11’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 69.26 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00°38’49’’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 16.62 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.0315 ACRES (1,371 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. TRACT NO. 45 DE 2 PROJECT NO. MCR 2014-306 (Old Military Road) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 2 OF SAMUEL DUNCAN JR SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 86 PAGE 117 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, POINT ALSO BEING ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN NORTH, A DISTANCE OF 42.56 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 70°20’22’’ WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 276.34 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 68°01’56’’WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 327.06 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 111.10 FEET TO THE WESTERNMOST POINT OF RIGHT-OF-WAY TAKING FOR OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 68°05’16’’ WEST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, A DISTANCE OF 25.40 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 89°18’11’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 130.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89°18’11’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 23.32 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00°41’49’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89°18’11’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 23.30 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00°38’49’’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.0107 ACRES (466 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. TRACT NO. 22 ROW 1 PROJECT NO. MCR-2014-306 (OLD MILITARY ROAD) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SAMUEL DUNCAN JR SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 86, PAGE 117 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, POINT ALSO BEING ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN SOUTH 69°30’41’’ WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD, A DISTANCE OF 21.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 15.89 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 69°23’52’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 131.95 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 16.17 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 69°30’41’’ EAST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD A DISTANCE OF 131.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.0455 ACRES (1980 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. TRACT NO. 17 ROW 1 PROJECT NO. MCR-2014-306 (JOE CARL ROAD WEST) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF WANZER PLACE SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 89, PAGE 16 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00°19’50’’ EAST, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF JOE CARL ROAD WEST (A 50 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY), A DISTANCE OF 296.64 FEET TO A POINT;

THENCE RUN NORTH 89°40’10’’ WEST ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID JOE CARL ROAD WEST A DISTANCE OF 127.35 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 00°19’50’’ EAST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID JOE CARL ROAD WEST, A DISTANCE OF 104.29 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 208.71 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN WEST A DISTANCE OF 128.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE CONTINUE WEST A DISTANCE OF 50.44 FEET TO A POINT ON A NON-TANGENT CURVE TO THE RIGHT (HAVING A RADIUS OF 295 FEET); THENCE RUN NORTHEASTWARDLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE RIGHT (CHORD BEARING NORTH 11°52’20’’ EAST, CHORD LENGTH 51.09 FEET) AN ARC DISTANCE OF 51.16 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN EAST A DISTANCE OF 22.69 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 71.25 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 17°41’31’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 30.17 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN EAST A DISTANCE OF 7.35 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 17°41’30’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 84.26 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH 70°01’35’’ EAST A DISTANCE OF 41.62 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 79.80 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN NORTH 69°30’41’’ EAST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD A DISTANCE OF 66.54 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 17.41 FEET TO A POINT ON A NON-TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT (HAVING A RADIUS OF 85.00’); THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTWARDLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT (CHORD BEARING SOUTH 39°24’48’’ WEST, CHORD LENGTH 62.92 FEET) AN ARC DISTANCE OF 64.45 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17°41’30’’ WEST A DISTANCE OF 254.61 FEET TO A POINT ON A TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT (HAVING A RADIUS OF 245.00 FEET); THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTWARDLY ALONG SAID TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT (CHORD BEARING SOUTH 13°00’26’’ WEST, CHORD LENGTH 40.02 FEET) AN ARC DISTANCE OF 40.06 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.3168 ACRES (13,800 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. TRACT NO. 17 ROW 2 PROJECT NO. MCR-2014-306 (JOE CARL ROAD WEST) A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. SAID PARCEL BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SAMUEL DUNCAN JR SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 86, PAGE 117 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN MOBILE COUNTY PROBATE COURT, POINT ALSO BEING ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY OF OLD MILITARY ROAD (RIGHT-OF-WAY VARIES); THENCE RUN SOUTH 69°30’41’’ WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD, A DISTANCE OF 185.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN SOUTH A DISTANCE OF 16.24 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 69°23’52’’ WEST, A DISTANCE OF 33.82 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 16.31 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 69°30’41’’ EAST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID OLD MILITARY ROAD A DISTANCE OF 33.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND CONTAINING 0.0118 ACRES (515 SQUARE FEET) MORE OR LESS. You are further notified that the hearing of said complaint has been set by this Court for August 6, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. in Courtroom #1, at which time you may appear and answer said complaint or file objections thereto if you so desire. THE PARTIES TO WHICH NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN SHALL BE AFFORDED AT LEAST THIRTY (30) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF THE LAST PUBLICATION TO FILE AN ANSWER OR OTHER RESPONSE WITH THE COURT AND THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF. If the application to condemn is granted by the Court, a Commissioner’s hearing will be scheduled within 30 days thereafter to determine damages which may be due the defendants. For information on the date and time of such hearing, please contact the Probate Court during regular business hours at 574-6001. Witness my hand this the 26th day of June, 2018 K. Paul Carbo, Jr., Esq., Attorney 3030 Knollwood Drive Mobile, AL 36693 Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 18, 25,2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: DORIS ELEANOR WATERS, Deceased Case No. 2018-0748 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named parties on the 19th day of June, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. RHONDA CAMPBELL WEBB and KATHLEEN CAMPBELL ABRAMS as Co-Executrices under the last will and testament of DORIS ELEANOR WATERS, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 11, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: BOBBIE MAXINE WARREN, Deceased Case No. 2018-0862 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named parties on the 15th day of June, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. ELISABETH CAROL FOSTER as Executrix under the last will and testament of BOBBIE MAXINE WARREN, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DEENA R. TYLER Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 11, 2018

ADOPTION NOTICE OF ADOPTION HEARING PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY CASE NO: 2018-1152 To: Joseph P. Little, Sr. father of DML, a minor. Please take note that a petition for the adoption of the above named minor child who was born to Susan Morrow on or about the 26th day of December, 2006, has been filed in said Court. Please be advised that if you intend to contest this adoption you must file a written response with the attorney for the petitioner named below and with the Clerk of the Probate Court, P.O. Box 7, Mobile, AL 36601 as soon as possible but no later than thirty (30) days from the last day this notice is published. Attorney for Petitioner: RICHARD E. MATHER, ATTORNEY 1008 Dauphin Street Mobile, Alabama 36604 Lagniappe HD June 20, 27, July 4, 11, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE COMPLETION NOTICE STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE NOTICE OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, NOTICE IS HEREBY given that Bellco, Inc. has completed the contract for Fire Station #5/#22 – Replacement Flooring, FD-016-18, 4710 Airport Boulevard, Mobile, Alabama 36608. All persons having any claim for labor, material or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify the Architectural Engineering Department, City of Mobile, P.O. Box 1827, Mobile, AL 36633-1827. Lagniappe HD July 3, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE JOINT MOBILE METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION (MPO)/ TECHNICAL COORDINATING AND CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING The Mobile MPO Policy Board will meet on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 at 10:00 am at the GM&O Building located at 110 Beauregard Street. The purpose of the meeting is to approve the FY 2019 Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP) adopt a Performance Measures Resolution, and adopt a corrective resolution for the Wave Transit. The MPO Policy Board will vote to approve the following amendments and modifications to the FY 2016-2019 Transportation Improvement Program: Bridge Replacement 100067045 PE; Bridge Replacement on SR 163 Over Perch Creek form MP 3.931 to 3.983      $870,000 National Highway Funds 100060153 (CN) SR-158 Extension from 0.5 Mile East of Glenwood $197,846.50 Road to West of Lott Road. Grade Drain, Base, Pave, and Bridge (EB Collins Creek, EB McCrary Road, and EB Collins Creek Tributary) (Utility Work); Previous Cost Estimate $30,005,229 Bridge Funds 100052460 Dauphin Street, Sage Ave to Springhill Memorial Hospital (Capacity Improvement) CN $7,000,000 FY 2019 (Old Estimate: $3,382,411) Copies of the proposed fiscal year 2018 Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP), which details the federally funded transportation planning activities to be undertaken in the Mobile Urban Area in FY 2017 by the Alabama DOT, the Wave Transit System, and the South Alabama Regional Planning Commission, will be available for public review and comment between Thursday, August 17, and Tuesday September 5, 2017 at the following locations: South Alabama Regional Planning Comm., 110 Beauregard Street Alabama DOT, Division Engineer, 1701 N. Beltline Hwy., Mobile The Wave Transit System, 110 Beauregard Street Mobile Community Action,  Prichard


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce, 451 Government Street, Mobile All Public Libraries within the study area All Public Housing Offices within the study area Mobile City/County Government Complex, 9th Floor, City Clerk’s Office Prichard City Hall, Clerk’s Office Chickasaw City Hall, Clerk’s Office Saraland City Hall, Clerk’s Office Satsuma City Hall, Clerk’s Office Creola Town Hall, Clerk’s Office Bayou La Batre City Hall, Clerk’s Office Semmes City Hall, Clerk’s Office Comment forms are included with the documents at each location listed above. A copy of the document may be purchased for a nominal copying fee from the Transportation Planning Coordinator at the South Alabama Regional Planning Commission, 433-6541. Written comments regarding the program are welcome prior to that date and should be submitted to: Transportation Planning Coordinator South Alabama Regional Planning Commission P. O. Box 1665 Mobile, AL   36633-1665 PHONE: 251-4336541 FAX: 251-433-6009) EMAIL: transportation@sarpc.org Physically challenged persons who need special accommodations should contact SARPC in advance so arrangements can be made to meet their needs. Lagniappe HD July 3, 2018

STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2019 Regular Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS: Relating to Class 2 municipalities; to create an alternate Self-Help Business Improvement District as authorized in Section 11-54B-40, Code of Alabama 1975; to provide procedures for any Class 2 municipality to establish one or more Self-Help Business Improvement Districts for the purpose of promoting tourism, including the creation of non-profit corporations to manage the districts; to provide certain required provisions in the articles of incorporation of district management corporations; to provide for the levy of a special assessment on a particular class of businesses located within the geographical area of the district for the purpose of promoting tourism for the benefit of businesses in the district; to provide for the expansion or reduction of real property in any self-help business improvement district; to provide for dissolution of a district and withdrawal of a non-profit corporation’s designation as a district management corporation. Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 11, 18, 2018

ABANDONED VEHICLES – NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 03, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2016 Nissan Versa 3N1CN7AP2GL908226 2001 Ford LGT Convt 1FTRW07W61KD90589 Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 03, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1105 Springhill Ave., Mobile, AL 36604. 2004 Honda Civic 1HGEM22964L014797 Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 03, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 25377 County Rd 38, Summerdale, AL 36580. 1997 Mazda B2300 4F4CR16A3VTM17845 Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 03, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 639 East Allenby St., Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Ford LGT Convt 1FTPX12506NA45671 Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 03, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 15381 Dewitt Rd., Wilmer, AL 36587. 1991 Chevrolet C1500 1GCDC14KXMZ101879 Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 03, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2401 S Octavia Dr., Mobile, AL 36605. 2006 Ford LGT Convt 1FTRF12WX6NA26548 Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 2018

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 08/01/2018 at  5781 Three Notch Rd Mobile Al. 36619 at 9 am if not redeemed. NISS    JN1HJ01P6KT231193 FORD   1FMYU22E0WUB58508 FORD    1FTRX17W8XNA87775 FORD    1FAHP35N79W148635 NISS     JN8HD17S3SW099681 MERC   WDBEA30D2KA857729 CHEV    2G1WF52E839187795 DODG    1J4GL48KX3W541345 Lagniappe HD June 27, July 3, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1998 Nissan Altima 1N4DL01D9WC106468 1995 Nissan 300ZX JN1RZ24D6SX591289

STYLE BOOZIE

Mobile continues to be national media darling BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

S

omeone get us an agent! Mobile is dominating the national media (and this time, it’s for good reasons). See us on the small screen! Read about us in some of the biggest papers and magazines in the U.S. of A.! We are hotter than a firecracker and just in case you missed all of our good ink and airtime, I have gathered it all up for you right here! So dig on in!

If you like us so much, why don’t you just marry us

The New York Times has been all about us the last week. On June 29, they published a photo essay entitled “Love in Pride in Alabama: Deep in Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 the Bible Belt, L.G.B.T. communities are fighting for greater visibility and The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August acceptance.” 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  910 Gulf Terra Dr., Mobile, AL 36605. They went all over the state and, of 2002 Dodge Neon course, made a stop in the Port City. 1B3ES26C92D580116 Their coverage of Mobile centered on Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 A bargain in the OB! churches that serve the LGBTQ comThe following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August Our beaches have made it on munity, like the Center for Spiritual 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  1106 US Hwy HGTV’s “Beachfront Bargain Hunt” Living and Cornerstone Metropolitan 98, Daphne, AL 36526. numerous times. I know I’ve caught 1998 Honda Accord Community Church. 1HGCG565XWA137234 at least four episodes, featuring beach “In a lot of churches you hear from 2012 Nissan Altima shacks for a good price from Dauphin the pulpit that your lifestyle is a sin. 1N4AL2AP2CC134522 Island to Perdido Beach. One of the things we’re working on Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 Last Sunday I saw a new one, is changing the whole idea of church The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August and what it means and to say things 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  5815 Marshall though, as a sweet family looked for their own piece of paradise in Orange like: Bottom line is love,” said the Rev. Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 1997 Chevrolet Astro Van Ruth Jensen Forbell of Cornerstone Beach. They toured condos familiar 1GNDM19W5VB117742 to all of us who have grown up on the MCC. 1996 Chevrolet Astro Van It was a nice piece, but they must 1GBDM19W2TB138624 Gulf Coast — Phoenix V, Seascape Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 sit around in their editorial board room and Tradewinds. You could spot the in Manhattan and say, “Oh my gosh. The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August iconic Sea-n-Suds in one shot. And It just be absolutely horrible to be gay then the family went bowfishing, 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 12450 Ranch Rd S., Grand Bay, AL 36541. in a backward-ass place like Alabama. which I had never seen before (and 1990 Nissan 240SX We should go study these strange it looked a little weird) but whatever, JN1HS36P8LW149215 creatures!” our little piece of the Gulf Coast still Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 Maybe not, but Mobile has had a looked gorgeous. Spoiler alert: They The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August wonderful, vibrant gay community for 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 112 E 21st Ave chose the Phoenix 5 condo, not to be confused with Phoenix 1 through 4 or many years. I just hate it when they Apt 7, Gulf Shores, AL 36542. 2004 Toyota Avalon treat us like redneck aliens. Maybe I 6 through 126. Sorry, Phoenix. BUT 4T1BF28B04U371856 am just being defensive (yes, I know there are a lot of you! Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 We hope they will enjoy their new we have a complex as Alabamians), because the very next day (June 30 The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August digs! Welcome to the Gulf Coast, 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 18921 County issue) they had a really lovely piece on random couple who chose the PhoeRd 12 S., Foley, AL 36535. our Delta that was just a beautiful love nix and are excited about its rental 2002 Chevrolet Venture letter to our area. 1GNDX03E62D151206 potential! Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 The writer Margaret Renkl was given a tour of our delta by Jimbo The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August Under the radar? Yes, we know! Meador. Renkl was looking to find 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1616 St Shhhhhhh! Stephens Rd., Mobile, AL 36603. the “mythical flower” that inhabits the 2002 Mercedes S500 Speaking of love for our beaches, delta, the American lotus. And she did. WDBNG75J42A261848 Southern Living magazine named Her descriptions of it and the entire Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 Dauphin Island one of its “Most delta were just stunning. It’s definitely The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August Under-the-Radar Beaches” recently. worth reading the whole piece at www. 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2817 Gill Rd., Yes, we know. We are trying to keep it nytimes.com/2018/06/30/opinion/ Mobile, AL 36605. that way, SL. We appreciate the love american-lotus-in-bloom.html. 2003 Ford Mustang 1FAFP40413F379081 but shhhhhh! The first paragraph alone gave me Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 Here is what they had to say: chills: “This barrier island boasts stun“From the middle of its namesake The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August ning beach and bay views, while 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 8461 Sand delta, the city of Mobile, Ala., looks Ridge Rd Lot 1, Citronelle, AL 36522. offering plenty of outdoor activities, like a mythical place: shiny skyscrap2010 Nissan Altima ers framed by cattails and marsh grass, ranging from windsurfing to fishing, 1N4AL2EP4AC159171 2006 Chevrolet HHR a city that reaches into a sky so vast it to punctuate the hours spent lazily 3GNDA13D86S571344 holds all the weather there is — bright lying on the beach. To make it here, Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 choose either to drive over the bridge sun and cottony clouds and pregnant thunderheads and torrential rain — and The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August or ride the ferry, both of which cross 10, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 310 Oak Dr., all at one time. From the middle of over Mobile Bay. Make sure to pay Mobile, AL 36617. that magnificent delta, Mobile could a visit to the charming nearby town 1996 Lincoln Town Car be Atlantis rising from the sea or the 1LNLM83W9TY652505 of Fairhope, Alabama, for the great Lagniappe HD July 3, 11, 2018 Emerald City of Oz,” it reads. local shops and restaurants. Check Magnificent? We’ll take it! Man, I out the northern shore of the island to sure love Mobile! Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe see Shell Mound Park, a beautifully HD is every Monday at 5 p.m. Lagniappe preserved archaeological site with Well kids, that’s all I got this week. HD is distributed each Thursday. shell mounds dating back hundreds Lagniappe HD offices are located at 702 Just remember, whether rain or shine, of years.” Government St., Mobile, AL 36602 dramatic or scandalous or some plain Nice! And Fairhope got a shoutFor more information or to place your ad call ol’ Delta lovin’, I will be there! Ciao! out too! Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

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