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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

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ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

The trial begins of a Fairhope pain doctor accused of prescribing opioids to former 3 Doors Down guitarist Matt Roberts, who died of an overdose.

COMMENTARY

Is the governor’s race a retread of days gone by?

BUSINESS

According to the Baldwin County Association of Realtors, it’s a seller’s market.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

A consistent place where you’re not likely to get a bad meal, Aroy Thai may be the best of its kind east of I-65.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA MATTEI Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com

COVER

We take a deep dive into the money and spending in the last days of campaigning before the legislative primaries.

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BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com DAVID GRAYSON Advertising Sales Executive david@lagniappemobile.com

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ARTS

A profile of Katia Garza, an international star recently tapped as the new director of the Mobile Ballet.

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: J. Mark Bryant, Asia Frey, Gabi Garrett, Brian Holbert, Randy Kennedy, John Mullen, Jeff Poor, Ken Robinson, Ron Sivak ON THE COVER: ALABAMA CAPITOL BUILDING COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@ lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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Emerging rock outfit Greta Van Fleet, whose sound has been compared to Led Zeppelin, will make its local debut at Hangout Fest.

FILM

Director Aaron Sorkin and star Jessica Chastain deal a royal flush with “Molly’s Game.”

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

The Hangout Music Festival, Pork & Politics and the Eastern Shore Art Center’s White Linen Night are just a sample of the many things to do May 16-22.

SPORTS

Baldwin Bone & Joint collected 2,383 pairs of shoes during the 2018 Many More Miles Campaign.

STYLE

A pedicure turns romantic in Boozie this week.

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GOING POSTAL

Mayors say Baldwin bridge is needed Editor: It’s always amazing how some people can misinterpret the facts. A case in point is the recent controversy over the proposed coastal bridge in Baldwin County (“Landowners, residents dispute state’s proposed bridge project,” Lagniappe, May 9). It’s hard for us to comprehend the opposition because we live here. Opponents have deemed it a “bridge to nowhere,” but that couldn’t be further from the truth because the Gulf Coast is Alabama’s largest economic engine. There isn’t a place in Alabama that contributes more tourism revenue than the cities of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach. Check our state budgets for the revenue we contribute. Check the studies performed to assess our economic impact to the state. This new bridge is headed to the future of our state.  The fact is, we are at capacity in our transportation system with the exception of a toll-paying option for a privately owned, unregulated bridge many motorists aren’t willing to choose. Drivers will approach that toll bridge, but then cut across to Highway 59. That was fine when we had 10,000 to 15,000 visitors a day, but now those numbers are increasing at an overwhelming rate. Today, traffic is backing up through Foley toward Summerdale, putting traffic at a standstill during peak seasons.  This can have a damaging impact on state revenue because, not only does congested traffic make our visitors less likely to return, but we can’t grow our capacity when the transportation infrastructure won’t handle the load. Their “bridge to nowhere” is our bridge to the future.  Those few who oppose it say there haven’t been enough studies and that it hasn’t been proven to be in the public interest. We would invite anyone with any concern to take a ride to our beaches. They are welcome to study the parking lot called Highway 59. Approaching the cities of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach, they will witness the traffic bottleneck caused by a bridge which is woefully over capacity.

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Building a bridge wasn’t our first option. There was an attempt to purchase the existing toll bridge. But why would we want to pay more for a bridge than we could build a new one ourselves?  And speaking of the bridge owners, let’s get down to who’s really opposing this project. Outside of a handful of local residents, the real opposition comes from the toll bridge company. After previous liquidation and bond actions, their investors want to get their money back. They have launched an ambitious but misleading campaign to stop the project so they can sell their bridge for hundreds of millions in taxpayer money.  These bridge owners want to attack this project as not being in the public interest. Let’s be honest with ourselves: Who really thinks the bridge owners have the public interest at heart? Furthermore, when the public drives on Highway 59 or the proposed new coastal bridge, that is without a doubt a public interest.  As elected mayors, we’ve both served our communities for over a decade. And as such, we know what is in the public interest. There is no need for additional studies. We’ve listened to the travelers and our residents who must navigate our congested roads. We realize there is a desperate need for infrastructure expansion to move the growing traffic to and from the cities of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach. Doing so will improve the daily lives of our local citizens and entice our guests to return for years to come. And it will create more and more revenue for the state of Alabama. It’s time to put the wishes of the driving public first. And, it’s time to look after the interests and needs of those who live on the Gulf Coast and the millions who visit here every year. Tony Kennon, Mayor  Orange Beach            Robert Craft, Mayor Gulf Shores


BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Opioid overdose trial

DOCTOR TIED TO GUITARIST’S OVERDOSE DEATH ON TRIAL BY JASON JOHNSON

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he drug addiction of Matthew Roberts has been a focal point in his former doctor’s ongoing criminal trial, but jurors are being asked to weigh competing narratives about who the real victim in the tragedy of his death was. Roberts was the lead guitarist and a founding member of rock group 3 Doors Down, but according to federal investigators he was also plagued for years by an addiction to opioid painkillers, which ultimately claimed his life in 2016. According to Michael Burt, a special agent with the Drug Enforcement Administration, Roberts died in Wisconsin while traveling to perform with the band NIX. He was found in the hallway of the hotel where he was staying with his father, a guitar case beside him and a transdermal fentanyl patch on his body. Fentanyl is the most potent opioid on the legal market. The only federally approved use for it is to treat breakthrough pain in cancer patients who are not getting relief from other pain medications. However, doctors can — and do — prescribe fentanyl “off label” for other reasons. The physician who prescribed Roberts those patches, as well as two other narcotic pain medications found with his belongings that morning, was Richard Snellgrove — a longtime, respected doctor of internal medicine on the Eastern Shore with offices in Fairhope and Spanish Fort. Snellgrove was indicted on six counts of unlawfully prescribing controlled substances to Roberts and for writing prescriptions to members of the Roberts family. He was later accused of health care fraud and causing Roberts’ death in a superseding indictment — for a total of 13 federal charges. Last week, Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Bodnar told the jury Snellgrove knew Roberts was abusing the drugs he’d supplied for more than a decade, but continued to supply them because they had become friends and he was enamored of the guitarist’s “celebrity status.” Over several years, Snellgrove provided Roberts with oxycodone, lorazepam and eventually fentanyl through prescriptions the government contends were written outside the usual course of professional practice and for no legitimate medical purpose. Prosecutors say between January 2015 and August 2016, Snellgrove prescribed some type of controlled substance to Roberts on 31 different dates without any record of Roberts actually having visited one of his offices, which included some after-hours visits. Snellgrove, however, has maintained his innocence since his indictment, and his lawyers have painted Roberts out to be a “doper” who manipulated a good doctor to get controlled medicines. But Bodnar said regardless of whatever problems Roberts had with drug use, the core of the criminal case boils down to how Snellgrove prescribed dangerously addictive medicines and whether or not those drugs directly caused Roberts’ death in Wisconsin. “No one is disputing Matthew Roberts had a drug problem,” he said in the government’s opening argument. “The question is, what killed him? The United States contends Matthew Roberts died from the fentanyl prescribed to him by the defendant.” In his response, defense attorney Dennis Knizley accused the government of building a case from Roberts’ death because he had “some sort of notoriety” as a founding member of well-known rock band, though he noted Roberts hasn’t played with the group since 2012. Knizley said the government “worked back-

ward” from Roberts’ overdose to target a “lawabiding” doctor because a “rockstar” who had taken a lot of drugs overdosed and died. “He was not a subject of an investigation before [Roberts] died,” he said. “This is not a malpractice case. It’s not about whether [Snellgrove] was a great doctor. This is a criminal case for distribution of a controlled substances just like the cocaine dealer on the side of the street.” The prosecution team bringing the case against Snellgrove is the same that saw former doctors John Couch and Xiulu Ruan convicted on 19 criminal charges in 2017. The motive in that case, Bodnar said at the time, was “greed” and the two doctors’ willingness to put “profits over patients.” Knizley emphasized Snellgrove is not accused of pocketing money or receiving kickbacks from drug companies. He also noted the insurance fraud Snellgrove is accused of stemmed from $168 and $65 payments made not to him, but to pharmacies. He told jurors Snellgrove had tried to wean Roberts off drugs, but was misled by an addict and members of his own family on several occasions. As an example, Knizley said Roberts once claimed his medication was stolen, and Snellgrove demanded a police report before refilling it. “Why would he have to make up these lies about stolen medication if he could just get it so freely?” he asked the jurors. Earlier this week, DEA Investigator Michelle Penfold went over her investigation into Snellgrove, which she acknowledged only began after Roberts’ death. She noted that no medical or patient records were found for Roberts’ father or older brother during a DEA raid in 2016. Despite that, Penfold testified to obtaining records for prescriptions Snellgrove wrote for both men — one of which was found with Roberts’ belongings in Wisconsin. She also went over security footage obtained from a local pharmacy before Roberts and his father left on the trip. According to Penfold’s testimony and an affidavit previously filed by Burt, Matthew Roberts texted Snellgrove asking to visit his office before he left and, over the course of a few hours, Snellgrove wrote him prescriptions for several medications, including one after business hours. On cross examination, Snellgrove’s other attorney, Arthur T. Powell III, questioned the direction of Penfold’s investigation. She testified that when her efforts were launched, she was looking into “Snellgrove and anyone else in violation of the Controlled Substances Act.” However, Powell asked whether she and other DEA agents ignored other people from whom Roberts was repeatedly obtaining prescription opioids illicitly. Penfold acknowledged the DEA did obtain phone records of of exchanges between Roberts and two individuals known as “B. Young” and “Low.” She said there were 117 text messages exchanged between “Low” and Roberts that showed the guitarist seeking other prescription medications, though she was unable to determine whose phone number it was despite the DEA’s “tremendous resources.” Assistant U.S. Attorney Deborah Griffin noted Penfold “followed where the investigation led.” According to previous court filings, there could be another two to three weeks of testimony before the jury in Chief U.S. District Judge Kristi K. DuBose’s courtroom renders a verdict. If convicted, Snellgrove could face up to 240 years in prison and $2.8 million in fines. M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 5


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Off the grid REGULATORS: FEW OPTIONS TO ADDRESS UNLICENSED GROUP HOMES

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BY JASON JOHNSON

ocal health inspectors have more authority over where people cook crawfish than over who can operate makeshift nursing homes with no medical training. That’s the picture Brad Phillips, district manager of inspection services at the Mobile County Health Department (MCHD), painted when asked about unregulated boarding homes in the area. “It’s very frustrating to know that, unless you can get the city or county to cite [an unlicensed facility] for a building or zoning violation, really all you can do is document what’s going on and try to see if somebody has some teeth they can sink into it,” Phillips said. Such facilities are not licensed through any state agency and are not inspected to ensure quality of care, adequate staff training or basic living standards. They hide in plain sight. The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) acknowledges there are many of these homes locally, though exactly where is a guessing game. Typically located in residential neighborhoods, some of these homes house patients with mental illnesses, the elderly or both. Even when such a facility is suspected, the task of addressing it often falls between the cracks of regulatory authorities. When MCHD inspectors receive reports about an unlicensed facility, Phillips said there are very few options to do anything about it. “With hotels, we’ve got regulations we go by that clearly define what the conditions need to be, the standards for how it’s supposed to be built and the level of cleanliness required,” He said. “With homes, though, there’s nothing to go on, and there’s usually not anything we can do unless

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we see signs of definite abuse or neglect.” The ADPH licenses and inspects hundreds of nursing homes and assisted living facilities, which are required to comply with dozens of detailed health and safety standards. The regulatory burden is even higher for those housing residents with cognitive impairments such as Alzheimer’s. With the closure of Searcy Hospital in 2012, the area has also seen an increase in the number of group homes licensed through the Alabama Department of Mental Health (ADMH) housing patients with mental illnesses, developmental disabilities or substance abuse problems. “Community service providers” go through ADMH certification to provide these services in residential homes or apartments. In recent years, ADMH has logged inspections at more than 300 residences in Mobile County, including 88 with mentally ill patients. Then there are the homes offering similar services but without any certification or oversight. Over the past three months, two citizens have reached out to Lagniappe after complaining to state agencies about what they believe are unlicensed group homes operating in the neighborhoods they live in. Both said they’ve seen little done, though. But Cynthia Granger, a registered nurse and ADPH inspector, said there are hurdles to address group homes at the state level, too. With limited funding, she said, it’s difficult for ADPH to find time and the personnel needed to investigate reports of unlicensed homes and regulate hundreds of licensed facilities across Alabama. “We’re down to four and a half surveyors for 350 licensed facilities throughout the entire state of Alabama,” Granger said. “We have shut down [unlicensed] places in

the past, but that would be based on lots of time spent investigating egregious things.” ADPH has shut down unlicensed group homes before, including one in Mobile County, as recently as 2008, but those efforts require lengthy litigation and have even faced pushback in the past because — in some cases — the residents there may have no place else to go. One homeowner in Mobile, who did not wish to be identified, said she’s spoken with ADPH investigators as well as the Alabama Department of Human Resources about what she suspects is an unlicensed home in the Park Forest subdivision off Zeigler Boulevard. So far, though, the only action she’s seen has been from the city of Mobile. The home, located on Challen Circle, is associated with businesses run by Meoshi Nelson, though a relative appears to be listed as the actual owner. Nelson owns and manages By Faith Living Transitional Housing and has declined to discuss her business operation multiple times. Posts to her public Facebook account as well as a page set up for By Faith Living Transitional Housing indicate Nelson operates at least a dozen homes in Mobile, Prichard and Whistler, but there is no record of those facilities being licensed through ADPH or ADMH. One of the only available records pertaining to Nelson’s business activities is a business license for a By Faith Cleaning Service LLC filed with the Alabama Secretary of State’s office in 2010 — a business tied to federal fraud charges Nelson pleaded guilty to in 2015. According to her sentence, Nelson should still be serving a five-year probation sentence for submitting more than $100,000 worth of fraudulent claims after the 2010 BP oil spill, though the probation office would not confirm the current status of her sentence. Court records indicate the city of Mobile recently cited Nelson with a zoning violation for operating a business in a residential area at the Challen Circle address subject to the 311 complaint mentioned above, which the complainant confirmed. City Attorney Ricardo Woods said Nelson was scheduled to appear in municipal court April 11 over the zoning citation but never showed up, adding that a bench warrant had since been issued for her arrest. However, over a month later, jail records indicate no arrest has been made. In the time since, By Faith Living Transitional Housing has continued to operate openly. In fact, it was recently named “Best Group Home” at the 2nd annual Black Owned Business Awards hosted by Unique Enterprises Worldwide LLC — an award the business has taken home two years in a row.


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Big-ticket items MOBILE PLANNING COMMISSION TO TAKE UP CONTROVERSIAL PLANS BY DALE LIESCH

Photo | City of Mobile

A portion of the former Graf Dairy property on the corner of Dauphin Street and Sage Avenue is being considered for a car wash.

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wo items on the Mobile Planning Commission agenda have raised the ire of residents in midtown. At issue for some residents is the application of Robert Myers asking to consider the amendment of a planned unit development to allow a car wash at the southeast corner of Sage Avenue and Dauphin Street. Helena Roldan, who lives in a neighborhood adjacent to the site, said she and other Cromwell Place residents oppose the development for a number of reasons. The group, she said, has four arguments against the plan. For one, Hillburn Street already floods and she fears bigger flooding issues if the currently undeveloped property is paved. The plan also calls for an easement to allow the developer a second curb cut onto Sage, Roldan said, creating cut-through traffic. The change would make it harder to leave the neighborhood during afternoon rush hour, she said. “Turning left onto Dauphin from Maury between [3 p.m. and 6 p.m.] is just about impossible,” Roldan said. “There was no traffic study done.” Noise will also be a factor for residents, Roldan said, with 37 vacuum stalls on the property. “It’s going to destroy our quality of life,” she said. “We won’t be able to sit on our back porches anymore.” Roldan said the residents were not told what the car wash’s hours of operation would be. Finally, Roldan complained the nearly 38-acre property, which she said was the last “pristine” piece of land in midtown, would better serve the public as a natural space. She fears the car wash will lead to more development and hurt nearby property values. Planning staff recommended the item for denial at a meeting scheduled April 18. The application was initially held over at a May 3 meeting and is on the agenda for public hearing on Thursday, May 17.

A denial would not kill the project, but would not allow the three lots to be connected. The property currently has a low-density residential land use designation, according to the staff report. According to news reports from the time, developers sought to build condos or apartments on the property before the housing bubble burst around 2008. In a letter submitted as part of the April 18 staff report, Emil Graf, owner of property that includes the planned development, wrote that the family was “shocked” that the city has designated the property in question for lowdensity residential housing. “This property has been used commercially for decades as a dairy, and we had portions of it rezoned from residential to commercial for our intended development 10 years ago,” he wrote. “To now say that this property cannot be used for commercial purposes is wrong, and a possible illegal taking. Until we find a buyer for this property, it should remain in its current zoning classification.” The Graf Dairy operated pastures and collected milk on the site from the 1920s until the 1970s. In another public hearing, the Planning Commission will decide if the Infant Mystics will be allowed to rezone property on the southwest corner of Broad and Dauphin streets to commercial to allow the group to construct a float barn. In a letter to concerned residents, Henry Caddell, president of the Old Dauphin Way Historic District, opposed the development by Historic Restoration Society. “The Old Dauphin Way Historic District is a beautiful neighborhood where I have lived since August 1981,” he wrote. “Our ongoing hope for this neighborhood is that development would only proceed in a fashion that would beautify and enhance the unique historic character of our neighborhood. … The last thing we need at this time is a rezoning to allow an unsightly float barn.” M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 7


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

A new chapter MCKAY LEAVING AS DIRECTOR OF GULF COAST EXPLOREUM BY DALE LIESCH

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fter almost four years at the helm of the Gulf Coast Exploreum, Executive Director Jan McKay has resigned. In a telephone interview, McKay said she’s leaving on her own terms to move back to the Cleveland, Ohio, area to take care of her ailing mother. “I was on family leave most of last month, helping them out,” McKay said. “I need to get back up there and help my sisters out.” McKay called her time at the science center since August 2014 a “wonderful, wonderful experience.” “The staff has been wonderful to work with,” she said. “The Exploreum has come a long way.” Since the time McKay took charge, the science center welcomed 12 traveling exhibits through its doors. The exhibits gave visitors a little bit of everything, which fit into McKay’s philosophy to present “all sciences, cultural, history and art” programs. The highlights of those traveling exhibits include Leonardo da Vinci, chocolate and guitars. “There have been a lot of exhibits,” she said. The focus on traveling exhibits brought with it an increase in attendance, McKay said. She also touted an increase in attendance among school groups, especially for a drug awareness exhibit that drew a 15 percent increase over normal attendance. For school groups that haven’t been to the Exploreum, McKay said outreach was a priority. All of those efforts allowed McKay to leave the Exploreum better than when she took over, Board of Trustees Vice President David Trent said. “The Exploreum has done well under her ten-

ure,” Trent said. “She brought in a lot of special exhibits.” McKay pointed out some challenges her replacement would need to address. For one, the center’s IMAX dome theater needs to go digital, she said, although this would carry a hefty price tag. She also mentioned better training for staff going forward. The board doesn’t yet have a replacement for McKay in mind, but Trent said they would be embarking on a search shortly. It’s unclear whether the board will conduct a local search, a national search or both to find a new executive director. Each approach has its advantages, Trent said. A local candidate could have a good idea of who the area donors are and have a good network to reach out to, he said, whereas a national candidate could have a good regional or national network of potential donors. As for McKay, she has not yet found a job close to Cleveland but will continue to look. The center’s current traveling exhibit is “Permian Monsters: Life Before the Dinosaurs,” on display through June 3. According to the Exploreum website, the exhibit “showcases an amazing collection of fossils and models from this relatively unknown time period.” General admission for the exhibits including the IMAX theater is $16 for adults, $15 for ages 13 to 17, $13.50 for ages 7 to 12 and $8 for ages 4 to 6. An exhibit-only admission costs $3 to $3.50 less, depending on age. Tickets for just the IMAX theater run $5 to $8.75, based on age. Memberships are also available.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Harkins resigns PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR MOVES ON TO POSITION WITH CATHOLIC SCHOOL

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BY DALE LIESCH

ayor Sandy Stimpson announced last week that Public Works Executive Director Bill Harkins was stepping down to pursue a career within the Catholic Church. Former mayoral candidate John Peavy will move from the engineering department to take over as interim director of public works until a permanent replacement can be named, city spokeswoman Laura Byrne said. Peavy will be in contention for the permanent job, she said. The move comes as department employees have alleged harassment and demanded raises at recent City Council meetings. Despite the outcry from some employees, Byrne said Harkins has planned to study canon law and teach theology at McGill-Toolen Catholic High School in midtown for several months. She called the timing a “coincidence.” A source from McGill confirmed the hiring of Harkins, who is a deacon at St. Ignatius Catholic Church, has been planned for some time. As for the claims of harassment from department employees and claims that supervisors were put in a room they called “the box,” Byrne said that’s a reference to mandatory manual training employees disagreed with. As for the raises, Byrne said the city compares pay for city employees with peer cities in Alabama. In the past, she said, Mobile has been near

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or above average when it comes to public works. Before joining Stimpson’s team, Peavy served as the president of the Peavy Construction Co., which specializes in highways, small bridges and other infrastructure projects. Prior to taking ownership of the company, he was the operations officer at Spring Hill College and worked for the city of Mobile as the grant-in-aid coordinator. Peavy is a graduate of Mobile’s Davidson High School and holds a bachelor of arts degree in political science and a master’s degree in public administration from the University of South Alabama. “I am thrilled to be asked by Mayor Stimpson to lead the fine men and women of the public works department of the city of Mobile,” Peavy said in a statement. “Assuming the position my father once held is extremely gratifying. I look forward to the challenge associated with this position and serving the citizens of the city.” Once a replacement is selected the Mobile City Council will have a vote to confirm the candidate recommended by Stimpson. As interim director, Peavy does not need to be confirmed, Byrne said. In its meeting Tuesday, the council approved funding for a new basketball court at Figures Park. The $243,700 contract was awarded to Aiker Construction. The council also denied the vacation of an unopened right-of-way at Wimbledon Drive at Byrnes Boulevard.


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BAYBRIEF | ELECTION 2018

Up for debate PERMANENT PENNY TAX SPARKS DISCUSSION AMONG BALDWIN COMMISSION CANDIDATES

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BY JOHN MULLEN

an we get a show of hands? Moderators during the Republican debate among Baldwin County Commission candidates asked who supported the recent extension of a penny sales tax in perpetuity. Commissioners passed the tax 4-0 in January 2017. Five candidates supported the commission acting without a referendum and four said they’d rather have seen a vote. Voters go to the polls for primary elections June 5 with the two top vote-getters likely facing off in a July 17 runoff. Those sitting commissioners for the vote — Frank Burt in District 1, Tucker Dorsey in District 3 and Skip Gruber in District 4 — all threw their hands along with District 1 challenger Jeb Ball and District 2 hopeful Joe Davis. District 2 candidate John Lake, District 3 challengers Will McDaniel and Billie Jo Underwood, and District 4 challenger Jerry Johnson all said they’d rather have seen a vote of the people on the tax. It sparked the liveliest discussion of the night, as the incumbents said the tax provided a much-needed boost for the county system to fund its pay-as-you-go building project to ease massive overcrowding. The school system was able to borrow $60 million with the new guaranteed tax coming in and is building four new schools or additions to schools with the funds. The permanent tax also funds about $5 million per year to the commission for road work, Burt said in citing

one of the reasons he supported it. Another 10 percent of the collections of this specific tax also goes to the district attorney’s office. Challengers agreed the money was needed but said it should have come to a vote of the people, not just passed by a vote of the four commissioners. The question came up during the second round of the debate or the “lightning round,” where the candidates heard five questions and were asked to raise their hands in support. Each was given a chance to explain their positions after the vote. Both McDaniel in District 3 and Johnson in District 4 questioned the school board’s use of the money it receives. “I think the people should have voted on it and I think the board of education needs to show us a budget,” McDaniel said. “We need to know where and how they are spending our money, and if any of it’s being wasted, then we need to hold them accountable before we just write them a blank check.” Johnson said it was also about accountability. “When you remove the accountability of the citizens, then it’s not the right thing to do,” Johnson said. “The accountability is to the board of education. They should be able to clearly transmit all of their finances and budgets and what’s going on. There should be a relationship of trust there and I don’t think there is.” Commissioner Dorsey said not extending the tax would not hurt or punish the school board but hurt the students

instead. He also said the finances of the system have been highly scrutinized. “There’s no way we could let the schools have a budget year this year which would have an expiration of the tax,” Dorsey said. “The school board has worked diligently with a lot of pressure from a lot of people in this room, a lot of people from around the county, to manage their money very efficiently.” Not every decision can be put to a vote of the people, Commissioner Burt said, or the commission would have a hard time accomplishing anything. “We are a representative government, we’re here to represent you,” Burt said. “Everything we do, if we waited until the people voted on it before

ROADS AND INFRASTRUCTURE WERE BIG TOPICS AS WELL AS THE GROWTH FACING THE COUNTY AND HOW IT SHOULD BE DEALT WITH THE COMING FOUR YEARS. OTHER TOPICS INCLUDED FINDING A TENANT FOR THE SOUTH ALABAMA MEGA SITE, PRESERVING THE ENVIRONMENT AND UPGRADING AGING SEWER SYSTEMS THAT CONTINUE TO CAUSE SPILLS IN THE BAY AND LOCAL WATERS.” we acted we wouldn’t be a representative government. The Legislature has given us the authority, we had the opportunity, the school needed the money, we also needed the approximately $5 million we get out of this action to work on roads.” Roads and infrastructure were big topics as well as the growth facing the county and how it should be dealt with the coming four years. Other topics included finding a tenant for the South Alabama Mega Site, preserving the environment and upgrading aging sewer systems that continue to cause spills in the bay and local waters. To see the entire debate, visit the Baldwin County Republican Party’s Facebook page.

Baldwin probate race

House District 64

CROWDED FIELD HEADED TO REPUBLICAN PRIMARY ON JUNE 5

VETERAN EDUCATOR, CHAPLAIN IN BATTLE FOR HOUSE SEAT

BY JOHN MULLEN

BY JOHN MULLEN

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ive Republicans are vying to replace Baldwin County Probate Judge Tim Russell in the June 5 Republican primary to thin the crowd, with a runoff likely on July 17. No Democrats qualified to run for the job. Three of the candidates are attorneys by trade, one is a corporal in the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency and one is a private investigator. All are Baldwin County natives and most are also lifelong residents, some leaving the county for service in the military or for other jobs. Attorneys running are Harry D’Olive, Alan Lipscomb and Lynn Perry. Max Hansen runs his own private investigations firm and Matt McKenzie oversees nine counties in the southern part of Alabama as an ALEA supervisor. All five said they believe enhancing service in the probate office as the county’s population grows will be important in coming years. “The probate office is the largest customer service center in Baldwin County, and we will look at ways to increase efficiency and improve the experience that people have when dealing with probate,” Hansen said. Lipscomb said improving how records are kept and filed will help streamline the office. “We need to implement electronic filing and recording,” Lipscomb said. “This should make the office more ‘user-friendly’ and save the taxpayer’s money.” D’Olive says the volume of cases handled by the court warrants technological upgrades. “Last year, the Probate Court handled approximately 1,500 court cases and that number

will also continue to increase,” D’Olive said. The probate office is also one of the biggest revenue generators for the county, contributing more than $40 million in 2017 alone and handling the more than 400,000 cars licensed in Baldwin County. McKenzie said to face this volume of activity, he would work on ways to make doing business with the probate office easier. “I would like to work to implement an online scheduling system, add kiosks in municipalities and add additional offices throughout the county,” McKenzie said. Perry received his business degree from Mississippi State University and his law degree from Mississippi College School of Law. He is actively involved in the Baldwin County Bar Association and the Alabama State Bar Association, where he also serves as a Bar Commissioner for the district. Perry, a partner at Daniell, Upton and Perry PC in Daphne, said he believes his 29 years in law practice, providing counsel to clients in such areas as contracts, wills and trusts as well as real property matters, give him the needed experience for the position. Current Probate Judge Tim Russell is ineligible to run again because of a state law requiring that candidates be under the age of 70 on election day to seek a judgeship in Alabama. Russell was appointed to the office in 2010 by Gov. Bob Riley to finish the term of retiring Adrian Johns, who had served the prior 15 years. The position pays about $120,000 per year and is for a six-year term.

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pair of retired veterans— one from the military and one from the Baldwin County Board of Education — will square off in the June 5 Republican primary for the Alabama House District 64 seat. Incumbent Harry Shiver seeks his fourth term in the seat that represents a portion of central Baldwin County up through the northern end and a southern portion of Monroe County. Retired military chaplain Steve Sexton is challenging Shiver for the seat. The winner June 5 will face Democratic newcomer Amber Selman-Lynn in the November general election. All three are South Alabama natives, with Shiver a lifelong resident of Baldwin County. Sexton was born in Florala in Covington County and traveled with his military and pastoral careers before settling in Baldwin County permanently in 2013. Selman-Lynn was born in Baldwin County and grew up in Georgia but has maintained strong family ties in the county. She moved back to Daphne with her family in 2017. Shiver spent 32 years coaching and teaching before first seeking office in 2004. He said he wants to continue the work he’s started during his 12 years in the Legislature. “We have cut spending while maintaining services, encouraged economic growth and begun the process to improve education,” Shiver said. “Infrastructure, education and prisons will continue to be issues that we will face in the upcoming term. We are working to improve highways and bridges in Baldwin County and across Alabama.” Sexton, who first entered politics in a 2014

run for Senate District 22, believes jobs are a big issue for District 64 and would like to help bring more to the area. “It is time to fill empty buildings with small businesses and manufacturing,” he said. “We have railroads, waterways, interstate highways and a seaport. We have an abundance of natural resources available. If we all get on board and face challenges, then nothing is too hard to accomplish.” Selman-Lynn wants to help lead a wave of change in how Montgomery does business. “I want to help turn the tide in Alabama and start a new tradition of trust and transparency in our state Legislature and set new priorities, such as excellence in education and health care,” Selman-Lynn said. Another theme running throughout Baldwin County is population growth and the impact it is having on roads and bringing more students into an already overcrowded school system. “Growth will continue to be a challenge that will affect many aspects of life in District 64 and throughout coastal Alabama,” Shiver said. “We are going to have to improve roads and other infrastructure to meet the demands of a growing number of residents and visitors.” Sexton said offering more opportunities for the increasing numbers of students would be a focus for him. “One of my priorities will be to look at the educational system providing students with life skills,” Sexton said. “Not every student is college bound. There is a lack of technical skill and labor skill facing Alabama.”


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BAYBRIEF | ELECTION 2018

Race for the bench JUDICIAL CANDIDATES DISCUSS BONDS, COURT FUNDING, MENTAL HEALTH BY JASON JOHNSON

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uring a public debate at Dublin Irish Pub & Eatery last week, the three attorneys vying to replace retiring Mobile County District Judge Bob Sherling each gave their take on several issues facing the local judicial system. With no Democratic challengers in the general election, the June 5 GOP primary between Spiro Cheriogotis, Derrick Williams and George Zoghby is a winner-take-all scenario. Cheriogotis previously worked as a prosecutor in the Mobile County District Attorney’s office, and Williams has had a similar role as a prosecutor for the city of Mobile. Zoghby, whose father was a circuit court judge, has been in private practice for 24 years. While many topics were covered, debate moderators asked specific questions about the candidates’ positions on juvenile justice and bonds granted to repeat offenders — something local prosecutors and law enforcement officials have publicly criticized judges for in recent months. “Teenagers and adults are treated differently under the law. Yet, some commit the same type of crimes,” Zoghby said. “Some may not have the same mental capacity as an adult, but teenagers at a certain age know a crime they’re committing is wrong. They can’t plead innocence to that.” Like Zoghby, Williams said he’d support expanding the crimes that teenagers can be tried for as adults, noting the recent surge in teenage violence. Cheriogotis didn’t disagree per se, but said such an expansion wouldn’t be necessary given what the law already allows. “Currently, under the law, the youngest someone can be tried as an adult in Alabama is 14 years old, but there’s

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no restrictions on which crimes that can be done for,” Cheriogotis said. “That’s something the district attorney’s office can undertake.” All of the candidates agreed it should not be easy for repeat offenders to bond out of jail, but noted judges are required by law to weigh certain factors when considering whether to issue or revoke bond for an accused criminal. Cheriogotis said criminals who routinely “create victims” should be given “special attention” by the court, and his opponents agreed. Zoghby also noted that the families of both the victim and the offender are affected when crime occurs. The candidates also addressed the lack of mental health services in the area and its impact on the local courts and jails. Williams called the closure of Searcy Hospital in Mt. Vernon “the worst decision in recent memory.” Cheriogotis said “mental health and crime often intersect” but jail isn’t always the best fit for someone suffering from a mental illness. However, he said district judges, specifically, are limited in what they can do for those defendants. “We don’t even have the authority to order a mental health evaluation because that’s something left up to circuit court,” Cheriogotis said. “We have to streamline how we handle people with mental health issues because the sooner we can get these people into the system, the more likely we are to get a positive result.” Funding district and circuit courts receive from the state also came up during the debate. As Lagniappe has reported, local courts have been working with smaller

staffs for several years, despite managing one of the state’s largest caseloads. Presiding Judge John Lockett expects layoffs to be inevitable this fall after money the Mobile County Commission provides — which finances more than a dozen support staff positions — dries up. The county doesn’t intend to renew the allocation, but at least two candidates believe it should. “There were 40,000 cases filed in district court alone, and the men and women in the clerk’s office are working their tails off,” Zoghby said. “I know the court system is a function of the state, but if it would help provide better justice to the people, the city and the county should help.” Cheriogotis noted Jefferson County and other areas of the state already help subsidize their local court systems. He said by November each judge could only have one support staff member, compared to four just a few years ago. “Justice will suffer,” he said. “People will remain in jail that are not supposed to be there, and people will be let out of jail that should be there.” In fact, that exact thing happened last month when a capital murder suspect was mistakenly released from Mobile Metro Jail. District Attorney Ashley Rich’s office blamed the mixup on funding cutbacks in the circuit clerk’s office. While Williams didn’t say counties and cities should have no role in funding the local court system, he said he believes the state Legislature shouldn’t be let off the hook that easily, either. “I think it’s a state problem, and I don’t think you should put the burden entirely on cities and towns because, speaking for the city of Mobile, we could say the same thing,” he said. “We’re understaffed, too. We need more clerks, more prosecutors and probably more judges, based on the volume of cases we deal with on an everyday basis.” The candidates also fielded a question from the audience about racial bias in the court system. Zoghby said it’s “a judge’s role to make sure everyone is treated equally” regardless of their race or ethnicity. Based on his experience, Cheriogotis said he doesn’t believe the justice system is “rigged against any race.” He said “socioeconomic factors can be far more important.” Williams, the only African-American in the race, said he would stop short of calling the justice system “rigged” against anyone, but believes there are “certain facets of the criminal justice system that can serve to the disadvantage of people of color.” “Everyone should be treated fairly regardless, but I think in some systems everyone is not, and that’s a problem we have to deal with,” Williams said. “I think that’s why you need diversity on all levels — to ensure no one is getting set up for failure.”


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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Officer arrested DEPUTY ACCUSED OF RAPE, SODOMY OF MINORS

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BY JASON JOHNSON

he Mobile County Sheriff’s Office announced Tuesday that one of its deputies had been arrested for allegedly abusing two children under the age of 16. MCSO spokesperson Lori Myles announced that Lt. Paul Bailey had been arrested by the Alabama State Bureau of Investigation (SBI) and charged with first- and second-degree rape, two counts of sexual abuse and second-degree sodomy. According to a statement released by the Mobile County District Attorney’s office, all of the charges against Bailey involved a minor child over the age of 12. Mobile County Sheriff Sam Cochran was previously made aware of the charges by District Attorney Ashley Rich, who was the first to receive allegations about Bailey’s behavior. Rich said her office then requested that SBI conduct a thorough investigation. After grand jury proceedings earlier this month, a four-count indictment was handed down against Bailey, who was arrested on Tuesday, May 15, at around 2:30 p.m. According to jail records, Bailey doesn’t have any

arrest history within Mobile County. “We are continuing to work with SBI on this investigation and will begin our disciplinary procedures immediately,” Cochran said Tuesday in his only public statement on the arrest so far. Bailey joined the MCSO in 2002 and was promoted to lieutenant in 2017, according to the department. All of the charges he faces come with potentially severe penalties. First-degree rape is a Class A felony, punishable by 10 to 99 years in state prison as well as a potential life sentence. Second-degree rape carries a punishment of two to 20 years in prison. Both sex abuse charges, which are misdemeanors, are punishable by up to a year in jail. The grand jury that indicted Bailey also included a recommended bond of $127,000 for all counts against him, which included stipulations for electronic monitoring and to have no contact with the two victims if he is released from jail. According to Rich, the cases against Bailey will proceed to circuit court for a jury trial.

BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Life spared JURY RECOMMENDS LIFE SENTENCE IN CAPITAL MURDER RETRIAL

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BY JASON JOHNSON

hroughout a five-day retrial, a man once sentenced to death for murdering a 59-year-old woman in her Grand Bay home managed to convince a jury his life should be spared. On May 10, 25-year-old Derek Tyler Horton was convicted of capital murder for his role in the death of Jeanette Romprey, who was found deceased from two gunshot wounds to the head in her burned-down home in April 2010. After six years on death row, Horton’s original conviction was overturned because prosecutors had improperly introduced into evidence “prior bad acts” he committed. It was one of a handful of local cases that have been overturned with assistance from the Equal Justice Initiative. Though he strongly encouraged him not to, Judge Michael Youngpeter granted Horton’s request to act as his own attorney last October. Ultimately, court-appointed shadow council Glenn Davidson handled most of the testimony. At trial, Davidson asked witnesses a few questions at Horton’s direction, including some about Romprey’s activity before she was murdered. None of the answers the defense received provided much information, and some of state’s forensic experts were not cross examined at all. According to those witnesses for the prosecution, Horton’s palmprint was detected on the driver’s door of a PT Cruiser stolen from Romprey’s house the night she was murdered. The car was later found, with an empty gas

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tank, on the side of Interstate 65. Investigators also found “a lot” of Horton’s DNA on the steering wheel, which they say was likely from sweating, and a toboggan he often wore was found with his blood on it nearby. DNA evidence recovered from the weapon used to kill Romprey was not sufficient enough to make a match. The jury spent only about two hours deliberating before they unanimously convicted Horton on three capital murder charges. Afterward, Horton gave the indication that he wasn’t much interested in his sentence. He said in court that he planned to appeal his second conviction. Horton also briefly addressed the members of the jury, telling them they’d “made a mistake” and “I forgive you.” He also asked them to look at his family members, many of whom were in the courtroom throughout most of the trial. After about 30 minutes in the jury room, seven jurors recommended sentencing Horton to life without the possibility of parole, which beat the five who wanted to sentence him to death for a second time. Alabama judges are no longer allowed to overrule a jury’s recommendation to enforce the death penalty, so it’s likely that sentence will stand. A formal sentencing hearing for Horton will be held June 28 in Mobile. An extended version of this story is available on lagniappemobile.com.


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Ghosts of governor’s races past? ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

WHILE THIS IS NOT AN ENDORSEMENT OF EITHER HIGHTOWER OR BATTLE, IT IS HARD TO BELIEVE THEY ARE NOT GAINING MORE TRACTION AGAINST IVEY, WHO AT THIS POINT IS REMINISCENT OF THE COLONEL SANDERS CHARACTER IN THE KFC COMMERCIALS.”

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loophole used to keep Gov. Bentley from being prosecuted. Signing a monuments protection bill drafted by the Legislature and taking credit for Alabama’s part in the nationally improving economy is hardly worth mentioning either, as neither required her work. And a pat on the back from Trump should be expected of any Republican governor running for re-election. Ivey is already on the record as being against constitutional reform, tax reform and a statewide lottery to help improve our woeful educational system. Her one answer to everything seems to be “more jobs will mean more taxes.” As rudimentarily correct as that is, it’s not a plan. In Southwest Alabama we should wonder why Ivey, as Lt. Gov., stood by and watched us get screwed out of a hundred million dollars in BP money without saying a word. It would be nice to hear her tell us why it was OK for the counties actually damaged by the oil spill to not even get half of the money. Has anyone heard her say anything about our sorely needed Interstate 10 bridge? What’s her plan there? Republicans in Alabama should take a hard look at Ivey and think about what just happened in the U.S. Senate race. Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox is certainly a quality candidate in the Democratic primaries, and former Supreme Court Chief Justice Sue Bell Cobb was looking strong until her campaign sent a sex offender door-to-door soliciting votes last week. Oops. The general election won’t be a cakewalk, especially if Ivey is forced from behind the curtain. As the primaries approach, this is the moment when there is an opportunity to avoid the kind of regret experienced eight years ago.

KAY D E G N LLE I CHA O A DUEL IVEY T BATE BUT DE A D N A SED U F E R SHE .. BOTH.

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dumpster diving instead of bellying up to the table with the rest of the states that have selected dynamic, forwardleaning leaders. I fear we find ourselves in much the same place eight years later. Particularly troubling is the Republican side of the slate this go-around. If the few polls released are to be believed, Gov. Kay Ivey has a good shot of staying in the governor’s mansion, and I find myself wondering why. I’ll say up front there is nothing clearly objectionable or obnoxious about Ivey as governor, but that shouldn’t be the criteria for selecting the person to lead a state that clearly needs fresh ideas and direction. Ivey’s nearly 40 years on Goat Hill offer little evidence she’s sitting at home with a notebook full of bright ideas. Ivey faces two opponents — Sen. Bill Hightower and Huntsville Mayor Tommy Battle — who both more closely fit the mold of dynamic leadership called for by Alabama’s current condition, and have government experience. The other challenger, Scott Dawson, is an evangelist, and I’ll just leave it at that. While this is not an endorsement of either Hightower or Battle, it is hard to believe they are not gaining more traction against Ivey, who at this point is reminiscent of the Colonel Sanders character in the KFC commercials. She seems mostly like a brand hustled out to make people think about the good ol’ days, while pushing the kind of diet we should have learned to avoid long ago. She’s going to hand you a big, greasy, warm piece of fried chicken and tell you to go relax on the sofa until it’s time for your heart attack. Ivey refuses to debate, so we can’t see whether she is mentally nimble or can promote any plans she might have. Instead, she sits back and essentially tells us “Every-

thing is really great in Alabama right now. Why change?” She hides behind a series of vapid commercials reminiscent of the cringe-worthy Tim James ads from 2010 that proclaimed “This is Alabama, we speak English!” while presenting his sorely needed plans for revamping the state driver’s license test. Ivey’s latest commercial shows a couple of guys at a shooting range talking about how sick they are of “D.C. politicians” and why they think Ivey is “tough as nails,” “cleaned up that Bentley mess” and “protected our monuments.” They also laud her for “record jobs” creation and mention that President Trump called her a “great governor.” All this before three gunshots ring out to reveal Ivey standing there with a smoking pistol and a wry smile. So let’s just dissect this a bit. First, what exactly did Ivey do to “clean up the Bentley mess?” Do we know who was contributing to the secret fund paying Rebekah Mason’s salary? No. Did Ivey lead the charge to have Big Luther investigated for selling out his office? Nope. Did Ivey say anything about the Bentley mess when she was Lt. Governor? Not a word. So far it seems all Ivey has done to “clean up the Bentley mess” is move into the governor’s mansion. In fact, it’s probably worth asking Ivey what she did during any of the scandals that have rocked Montgomery over the past decade. I don’t remember her saying much at all about House Speaker Mike Hubbard’s ethical issues, or any others for that matter. Ivey is more likely to go down in history as the next Annie Oakley than as the scourge of Goat Hill corruption. She also signed a new ethics law that actually reduces the amount of people and things covered — the very

Cartoon/Laura Mattei

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ast your memory way back to 2010. If you’re having trouble, break out your trusty smartypants phone and Google “Alabama governor Robert Bentley and Ron Sparks.” Up should pop many stories about the man who would go on to become the infamous Luv Guv defeating the ethically hobbled Ron Sparks in the general election. It’s like a bad dream coming back to you now, right? You may even ask yourself, “How did THAT happen? How were those two bottom-feeders the nominees?” Scroll down some and you’ll start to see stories about Bentley and Sparks winning the Republican and Democratic primaries, defeating challengers who, in the light of day, or really in a pitch-black closet, appear to be better in almost every way than the eventual nominees. On the Republican side, Bentley sneaked past nowU.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne, who may not be the far right’s idea of a rock-ribbed conservative, but who also clearly is bright and able to conduct himself with decency as this area’s representative in Congress. On the flip side, the sleazy Sparks beat very moderate Democrat (now Republican) Artur Davis, a man who also has the kind of intellect and independence we should have wanted in a governor, but who didn’t excite the far left. In other words, in 2010 Alabama voters chose to go


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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Our little secret will not be safe for much longer ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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ecently, my husband read a friend of a friend of a friend’s Facebook post aloud to me. Don’t you just love it when someone does that? (I know, but in this case it was nice.) Anyway, this person was from California and was announcing he and his family were moving to Mobile. The biggest reason he mentioned was housing. He described our housing market as “plentiful and affordable for us.” Since they are in California, I imagine he does think that. Every time I watch “Flip or Flop” or “House Hunters” on HGTV, I yell at the Californians on the tube. They could have a totally updated waterfront mansion here for what they are paying for an 1,800-square-foot shabby ranch with urinestained carpet there. They never listen to me for some reason. But it wasn’t all about housing for this gentleman. He went on to say he found Mobile to be very “beautiful” and “hospitable,” with a “burgeoning music scene” with music festivals whose “lineups rival anything I’ve seen here.” He also let his friends on the West Coast know what we already do: We are only an hour away from beautiful beaches with “water warm enough to swim in” (I guess it is too cold in California? Well, welcome to swimming in a bathtub, friend!) and only two hours from New Orleans, “like a trip to Monterey,” he said. He described the city as “vibrant” and compared us to Austin and New Orleans, saying it is a “scene that is waking up with a creative drive that is young and refreshing.” I don’t know this person who penned this post and he could be completely crazy for all I know, but I swear, as my husband was reading this to me, chill bumps popped up on my forearms and I got a little misty. I know this was just one random person making observations we all already know to be true, but, man did it make me proud of my city. There’s just something about an outsider noticing your awesome-ness that means a little more. Especially since we all know the stereotypical way people from elsewhere view our state as a whole. Cue the “Deliverance” music! So welcome to Mobile, random Facebook poster from California. You are going to love it here. While our California guy was singing the praises of what we already have, Mayor Sandy Stimpson and County Commission President Connie Hudson gave us a glimpse of the “greater things yet to come” at the Annual State of the City and County luncheon last week. And we do have so many exciting, transformative things on the horizon. Mayor Stimpson spoke of the continued impact Airbus is going to have on the community, especially just four years from now, when they are slated to be producing 12 jets per month. Has anyone told Sen. Patty Mur-

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ray this yet? #stillbitter #grudges #boeingsucks He also spoke of the Interstate 10 bridge (it’s finally happening, y’all) and the growth of the medical and university communities and the port expansions and the deepening of the shipping channel. Meanwhile, Commissioner Hudson beamed about the Amazon and Walmart distribution centers, as well as improvements to the county’s roads, bridges and buildings. And, of course, the soccer complex she has championed for years. Though she had originally proposed a $20 million version, it was ultimately voted down in 2016, after her fellow commissioners felt it was too costly and/ or had problems with the location. But after years of debating this, they recently all agreed on a much smaller 10-field site with a $3.7 million price tag. I think this was the perfect compromise, and it will be a tremendous asset to our area. Kudos! Mayor Stimpson also talked about a potential plan to move the airport from WeMo to Brookley, citing how Pensacola’s airport now has a million more enplanements per year than Mobile’s, which has led to them having cheaper and more direct flights, he said. “Today, those in leadership of our airports are embracing change by challenging the status quo,” Stimpson said. “They envision a vibrant downtown airport with easy access and affordable flights to great destinations.” Why do I feel like this is one of those Mobile things that’s already a done deal and we just don’t know it yet? Don’t get me wrong, I think this could be really, really cool. Lord knows, no one likes having to drive to West Jesus to catch a flight, especially during rush hour. And certainly no one would balk at lower fares to more destinations. And it definitely makes more sense for easy access to the interstates, hotels and convention center. BUT, we do need some informational sessions and a period for public comment on this. While I do love the idea of all of the aforementioned things, I still want to know how this is going to affect the skies over my own neighborhood and house, and I am sure everyone else feels that way too. Dear “those in leadership,” please just make sure to keep us all in the loop as this is being “studied.” Pretty please. In addition to all of these great things, we have the Three Mile Creek Greenway, stunning downtown residential developments, new breweries and restaurants, and announcements of new businesses coming to town all the time now. And I haven’t even really mentioned the bay, the delta, the oak trees, the azaleas or Mardi Gras. What’s wrong with me? Nothing! We are just so much more now. We really are all so fortunate to call this place home. As Mr. California said in his post, “I suspect Mobile will be found out before too long.” I suspect he is right.


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COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

‘Politician’ shouldn’t be a dirty word BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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he service was one of mourning, but more of a profound celebration and acknowledgment of a life fully and well lived. The televised funeral service of Barbara Bush elicited tears, laughter and thoughtful reminiscing. It was a fitting tribute to someone who was lovingly and rightly described as the nation’s “grandmother.” Praised and admired by those of varied political affiliations, she had a reputation for being refreshingly honest and real. Pretense or feigning was not in her DNA. Her 73-year marriage to former President George H.W. Bush or “Bush 41” was and shall remain one of political legend. They set the record for being married longer than any other First Couple in our nation’s history. They made quite a team. In 1945, little did the then Barbara Pierce know when she married her high school sweetheart that she would one day become the matriarch of a political dynasty. Little did she know that her dashing young naval aviator husband would go on to become one of modern America’s most accomplished political figures. Congressman, ambassador, director of the Central Intelligence Agency, vice president and then president, George H.W. Bush, or “Poppy” as she called him, would be the longest-lived president in history. The two of them — and he especially — have cast a long political shadow. But that for which her husband is most praised now, his long and distinguished political service to his country, was often used against him. He was routinely derided as the “resume candidate.” Having served in various political positions, the dreaded “career politician” label would frequently be attached to him.

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The esteemed presidential biographer Jon Meacham noted that Bush 41 would often record his thoughts in a diary, and frequently mused, “What’s wrong with having experience? What’s wrong with knowing what to do in government?” Like Bush Sr., I often find myself wondering the same thing. As election season has ramped up and the airwaves have become inundated with political campaign ads, one of the standard mantras heard is “I’m not a politician.” However, we are bombarded, ad nauseam, with how this or that candidate has taught Sunday School since they were 8 years old, or shot every type of weapon ever made. The candidate may not be a politician, but by golly, he or she is the “rootin’ tootin’ gun shootinest,” Bible-carrying-est person you ever seen! And we all know such credentials is what makes for an outstanding public servant. Like our nation, or maybe even more so, Alabama has some very serious issues that need addressing — issues that, in order to be solved, will require disciplined and sober-minded individuals who have the intellectual capacity and attention span to intently focus on them and work with others. They don’t have to be perfect — who is? — but like Bush 41, they need to approach the job with the earnestness and seriousness the people’s business demands. When it comes to politics and public policy, ignorance is not a virtue. Yes, the word “politician” carries with it some negative baggage. The word has been in use in the English language for around 400 years. Its standard meaning

has always been “one engaged in conducting the business of a government.” However, unfortunately the word has been used derisively as well. “Crafty schemer” or “shrewd” person would often be the meaning when someone was referred to as a “politician.” Yet politics, “the activities associated with the governance of a country or other area,” and politicians, those engaged (and hopefully skilled) in conducting those activities, are of high importance if a democratic society is to function well and thrive. Bush 41’s generation understood this. It’s why so many, after serving their country in combat, chose to serve their country through positions in political office. The same qualities that make for a good soldier, airman or Marine make for an excellent politician as well. Love of country; integrity and a strong sense of fairness; commitment and willingness to serve for the best in-

THE SAME QUALITIES THAT MAKE FOR A GOOD SOLDIER, AIRMAN OR MARINE MAKE FOR AN EXCELLENT POLITICIAN AS WELL. LOVE OF COUNTRY; INTEGRITY AND A STRONG SENSE OF FAIRNESS; COMMITMENT AND WILLINGNESS TO SERVE FOR THE BEST INTEREST OF THE GROUP AND NOT ONESELF; DISCIPLINED AND FOCUSED ATTENTION ON DOING ONE’S JOB OR DUTY. TO THEM BEING A POLITICIAN WASN’T ANYTHING BAD OR SEEDY, IT WAS A NOBLE AND HONORABLE CALLING. IT’S A SPIRIT WE NEED TO RECAPTURE.” terest of the group and not oneself; disciplined and focused attention on doing one’s job or duty. To them being a politician wasn’t anything bad or seedy, it was a noble and honorable calling. It’s a spirit we need to recapture. If our state and nation are to excel and progress, we must put in place leaders who are committed to excellence and progress. We must be willing to elect leaders who “know what to do in government.” Showmanship, shallowness, ignorance and buffoonery are qualities better suited for a clown in a circus, not a leader in government. Being a politician in the true sense of the word is serious business for serious people. We can never be better if we don’t look for, and expect, better from our leaders.


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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Dems will make gains, but don’t expect a ‘blue wave’ BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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e’re less than six months away from November’s midterm election. It’s supposed to be a tsunami for Democrats. That’s just accepted as conventional wisdom. Not only is it a post-new presidency midterm, which historically means the party of the president in the White House suffers losses, there are also signs pointing to foreboding losses for Republicans, such as special elections in Pennsylvania’s 18th congressional district last March and in Alabama’s U.S. Senate race last year. Democrats will have a decent night on Nov. 8, but not nearly what they could have, or even

Perhaps they had to overplay it. It’s possible congressional Democrats had to introduce worst-case scenarios to slow down any possible major policy changes Republicans were seeking to institute with control of both chambers of Congress and the White House. They had an assist from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Little has been accomplished by Republicans thanks to McConnell, who has slow-walked much of what has been passed in the House of Representatives. Trump supporters seem to still have much of their enthusiasm. This is different from the last time Democrats took control and the dynamic that existed between the public and President George W. Bush in 2006. Democrats had finally figured out how to tap into an anti- Bush sentiment. Bush was blamed for fumbling the response to Hurricane Katrina a year earlier. The blood and treasure that was expended in the name of the country’s involvement in the Middle East was too high of a cost in the eyes of many Americans. While Trump is unpopular, his unpopularity isn’t as widespread as Bush’s was in 2006. If you want to win an election on the basis of a president’s unpopularity, that unpopularity has to extend beyond the “Acela Corridor” in the East and the Sierra Nevada Mountains in the West. For Democrats, that just doesn’t exist yet for Trump. There is also this idea of anti-Trump fatigue. For the last three years, the talking heads in the media and Democratic politicians have castigated Trump. Three years is a long time. Now the law of diminishing returns is taking effect. You can gin up your crazies, but you can’t expect them to maintain an anti-Trump fervor the entire time and kick it into an even higher gear when the midterms come around. In fact, many of them are looking around and seeing that all of the awful things that were to happen with a President Trump haven’t happened. That might not dissuade those same people from being anti-Trump. But they aren’t going to be as motivated. Every little bit counts in a midterm election for Democrats. Traditionally, there is a much larger turnout drop-off going from a presidential election cycle to a midterm election cycle for Democrats compared to Republicans. That is how Republicans did well in midterms during the Obama presidency, but couldn’t win in 2012 with Mitt Romney. Yes, Democrats will still do well. But don’t expect the numbers needed for articles of impeachment and conviction in the Senate. They left a lot of the gains they could have had on the table by going all-in with every hand so early in the game.

A LOT OF PEOPLE THOUGHT TRUMP WAS REALLY GOING TO EXERCISE PRESIDENTIAL POWER IN AN UNPRECEDENTED WAY, AND THEY WERE SCARED AND ANGRY. AS IT TURNED OUT, THAT HASN’T BEEN THE CASE. should have. A lot of that is their own fault. Back on April 10, 2016, the Boston Globe published a “mock front page” that portended the future of the country under a President Donald Trump on April 9, 2017. Some of the headlines included “DEPORTATIONS TO BEGIN – President Trump calls for tripling of ICE force; riots to continue,” “Markets sink as trade war looms” and “New libel law targets ‘absolute scum’ in the press.” Although those were “mock” headlines, there were a lot of people who believed if Trump were elected, we would have similar situations on our hands. There was fear in the marketplace of ideas. The days and months after Trump was sworn into office, protests broke out everywhere and ginned-up Democrats were showing up at random congressional town hall meetings all over the country. A lot of people thought Trump was really going to exercise presidential power in an unprecedented way, and they were scared and angry. As it turned out, that hasn’t been the case. Things could be better, but that is always true no matter who the president is. Even the most frantic left-wing kook would have to admit Trump is not as bad as most thought he would be. There are no roving deportation squads. The global economy isn’t in a depression. Trump’s not even going out and grabbing women by the p*ssy against their will. Democrats overplayed the looming national disaster that was supposed to follow in the wake of Trump’s inauguration at the very beginning. Democrats are not going to have as big of an election result as they could have because of it.

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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

BCAR report shows Eastern Shore seller’s market BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

A

ccording to the Baldwin County Association of Realtors (BCAR), the residential market is apparently ripe for Eastern Shore homeowners to list their properties for sale if they want make a profit. Reportedly there’s a significant shortage of properties listed and available compared to the number of qualified buyers. Per a BCAR news release, the total residential active inventory last month was 3,217; 704 properties were sold in April, an increase of 12.5 percent from 626 properties sold in April 2017. Properties are also staying on the market fewer days compared to 2017, decreasing 42 percent from 147 days last year to 85 days in April 2018. Total residential sales increased 27 percent in April 2018 as well, rising to $210,397,481 from $165,473,678 in April 2017. “The average sales prices of residential properties in Baldwin County continue to creep up,” according to the BCAR study. “Last year, the average sales price was $264,334, and this year it sits at $298,860.” Here is a breakdown of the residential MLS statistics, by area, from the April report: Central Baldwin Residential properties sold in April 2018: 167 Average sales price: $184,398 Average days on market: 81 Average sales price change from April 2017: up 7.4 percent Coastal condos Residential properties sold in April 2018: 145 Average sales price: $408,502 Average days on market: 73 Average sales price change from April 2017: up 17.2 percent Coastal homes Residential properties sold in April 2018: 69 Average sales price: $430,341 Average days on market: 147

Average sales price change from April 2017: up 10.2 percent Eastern Shore Residential properties sold in April 2018: 223 Average sales price: $304,660 Average days on market: 83 Average sales price change from March 2017: up 15.2 percent North Baldwin Residential properties sold in April 2018: 12 Average sales price: $138,239 Average days on market: 50 Average sales price change from April 2017: up 16 percent BCAR is a trade association supporting more than 2,000 real estate professionals in the Baldwin County area. BCAR supports members through professional education, peer networking and MLS services. For more information about the association, visit its website.

Peavy tapped for Mobile public works

Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson recently selected John Peavy to be the city of Mobile’s senior director of public works. He will oversee streets and sidewalks, storm drain maintenance, equipment services, ditches right-of-way and park maintenance — as well as acting as serving as interim executive director of public works while the city conducts a search to fill the role. Peavy began his tenure with the Stimpson administration in 2016, charged with managing capital improvement projects with a focus on accessibility and environmental compliance. “John has significantly advanced capital projects and is uniquely qualified due to his previous experience at City Hall,” Stimpson said. “He has demonstrated outstanding leadership, and I have full confidence in his ability to move our city forward.”

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Before joining the mayor’s team, Peavy was president of Peavy Construction Co., specializing in highways, small bridges and other infrastructure projects. Prior to taking ownership of the company, he was the operations officer at Spring Hill College and worked for the city of Mobile as the grant-in-aid coordinator. Peavy is a graduate of Davidson High School and holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and a master’s degree in public administration from the University of South Alabama. “I am thrilled to be asked by Mayor Stimpson to lead the fine men and women of the public works department of the city of Mobile,” Peavy said. “Assuming the position my father once held is extremely gratifying. I look forward to the challenges associated with this position and serving the citizens of the city.” Bill Harkins, the former executive director of public works, left his post to pursue a job opportunity with the Catholic Church, according to a news release. His last day at City Hall was Friday, May 11. “Bill has earned my gratitude and respect for his honorable service to the citizens of Mobile,” Stimpson said. “Under his leadership, we raised the bar for city services and improved the quality of life for our residents, including expanding recycling efforts and implementing the city’s very first litter patrol.” Greg Beckham will also continue as the senior director of public services supervising garbage, trash, litter, recycling and urban forestry, according to a news release.

Austal USA receives safety award

On May 11, American Equity Underwriters (AEU) honored Austal USA with the AEU Large Shipyard Safety Award. AEU is one of the nation’s larger providers of workers compensation insurance for maritime employers. James Burgin, AEU vice president of loss control, presented Austal with the award at the vessel completion yard before a significant audience of managers and employees. Austal USA is one of over a thousand members of the American Longshore Mutual Association (ALMA), and has earned the award three times previously. The accolade is given each year to top-performing ALMA members and is based on such metrics as the number of accidents realized and severity of accidents recorded for a given calendar year. Austal USA is also a 10-time Shipbuilders’ Council of America (SCA) safety award recipient and was the 2017 winner of the SCA Excellence in Safety award. The accolades bode well for an industry with recent statistics showing that shipyard workers face an injury rate roughly 80 percent higher than construction jobs, according to the most recent labor figures. Based in Mobile, Austal USA employs more than 4,000 workers. It designs and constructs two classes of ship programs for the U.S. Navy — the Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (even-numbered hulls) and the Expeditionary Fast Transport vessels. The company’s supplier network includes more than 1,155 companies across 44 states supporting more than 34,000 U.S. jobs. Austal is currently as the fifth largest shipbuilder in North America. 


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CUISINE THE REVIEW

The best Thai east of Interstate 65 BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

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Photo | Daniel Anderson / Lagniappe

I

t was an average day like any other. The most exciting event thus far was that Katie had been sent home from work due to an extreme case of laryngitis. My good friend Carlos Danger was in town looking to chill out and visit with us for the first time since we found out we were expecting, so lunch plans were a must. Carlos is a bit of an Asian food junkie and was curious about the new (to him) Aroy Thai Cuisine at the corner of Government and Common. If there’s one thing you can count on Carlos for, it’s a good laugh when friends are together. If there’s a second thing, it’s that he’ll be 10 minutes late. Every time. I like that kind of dependability, and it gave Katie and me the chance to find a seat, order appetizers and brush up on her rudimentary sign language. We began with crispy tofu ($4). Little triangles of good quality tofu were fried and served with a thin sauce favoring garlic and slightly bitter. If you’re not normally a fan of tofu, maybe give this a try. About the time Carlos walked in we were treated to a couple of orders of summer rolls ($6.95). These come in pairs, and at this price you get the shrimp model. If summer rolls are on the menu, I bite. Always. Cold and fresh, these rice paper wraps were filled with rice noodles (that seemed a little thicker than most) and the usual lettuce, carrot and cucumber. The peanut-hoisin dipping sauce was what you’d expect. Through a sweet dance of pointing and squeaking, poor Katie managed to convey to our waitress that she wanted tom kah. It seems the waitress was looking out for us and mentioned that if she gets the lunch special ($8.95) it comes with a vegetable spring roll and choice of soup. She politely brought Katie her Tom Ka ahead of schedule to aid in the soothing of an obviously aching throat.

AROY THAI CUISINE 966 GOVERNMENT ST. MOBILE 36604 251-408-9001

Summer rolls and curry Katie has since made a full recovery and reported the soup was fairly light with no overpowering flavors, on the brothy side with some mushrooms and little to no chicken. Nothing offensive about it, it may not be the dish you order if you want a big bowl of tom ka as your meal, at least not this lunch version. The included veggie spring rolls were good, with a small, perfectly measured tub of sweet dipping sauce, but the yellow curry with chicken she ordered was really good. With yellow and red curry powder, this dish took on the flavors with a good amount of heat and the right amount of coconut milk. The carrots were like crinkle-cut French fries and there was enough chicken and onions in every bite of the well-cooked jasmine rice. This is great for me because, despite her condition, she eats like a bird and curry is, in my opinion, the best leftover Asian food. Carlos has yet to grasp the concept of trying something different when we are reviewing lunch. He’s a sweet kid, but he gets tunnel vision once the menu is open. “I’ll have curry,” he said. The same soup, the same spring roll, the same presentation, but Mr. Danger chose red curry with shrimp. With red curry, there are more vegetables. Bell peppers, bamboo shoots, eggplant, green beans and basil leaves are the norm, but our friend had them hold the eggplant. I guess eggplant is a little too dangerous. A good amount of shrimp matched the powerful flavor. The only peep we heard from the little fella was him suggesting the curry wasn’t as hot as he personally would have

liked, but he understands you can’t go overboard when feeding the masses. With a name like his, it’s probably a good thing they don’t match his heat expectations, although I’d be game. Maybe next time he will ask if they can fire it up. Even though it was lunch, I was searching for the dish that best represents what Aroy is going for. From what I can tell it’s the Pineapple Express ($14.95). This seemed to be a popular dish during my previous visit so I figured I’d go for it. A half pineapple is hollowed out and filled with fried rice, eggs, chunks of pineapple, cashews, peas, carrots, curry powder, chicken and shrimp. I know, I know, I sort of had curry in a pineapple without coconut milk, but mine was very different. This is a lot of food. I can say it’s good enough that I’d consider ordering it again, but more than likely I’ll be more adventurous should I return. I think of Aroy as a solid, consistent place where you’re not likely to get a bad meal. The Oakleigh crowd still sings its praises as a favorite, but there are too many other fantastic Thai spots to compare it to. They’ve been around long enough to have their legs under them and I hope they maintain their momentum. For those within walking distance, it may remain a hotspot. If you’re looking for the best Thai in town you may have to hit Schillinger or St. Elmo. If you’re looking for a quick, decent meal, you’ll find it appropriately situated at the corner of Government and … Common.


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FATHOMS LOUNGE

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($)

$10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BIG WHITE WINGS ($)

405 S Wilson Ave. • Prichard• 301-7880

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 378-8378

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$) CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 622-0869

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

12 N Royal St • 415-1700 107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

2159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) BREAKFAST, HOT LUNCH & GREAT DESSERTS 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 5701 Old Shell Rd Ste 100 • 442-4846 29160 US Hwy 98 • Daphne •621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

1956 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) 15 N Conception St. • 378-9377

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 3694 Airport Blvd • 342-2352 5300-C Halls Mill Rd • 660-0995 3075 Government Blvd B105 • 461-6080 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730 6890 US-90 #6 • Daphne • 625-8723 9912 Dimitrios Blvd • Daphne • 626-7827 113 S Greeno Rd • Fairhope • 990-3970

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($)

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768 6860 US-90 • Daphne • 626-4278

NOURISH CAFE ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($)

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228

FIVE ($$)

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 Eastern Shore Center • Spanish Fort • 625-6544

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 29660 AL-181 • Daphne • 626-3161 3151 Daupin St• 525-9917 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 S Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-4334

JUBILEE DINER ($-$$)

A VARIETY COMFORT F00D. BREAKFAST ALL DAY. 6882 US-90 • Daphne • (251) 621-3749

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government Blvd. • 665-4547

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3915 Gov’t Blvd. • 219-7922 3226 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 219-7086 920 Industrial Pkwy • Saraland • 378-5314

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THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$) TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St/RSA Building • 444-0200 9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

HEALTHY WHOLE FOODS & MORE 101 N Water St. (Moorer YMCA)• 458-8572

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($) PANINI PETE’S ($)

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($) BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

R BISTRO ($-$$)

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910 MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. • 602-1973

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 432-8000

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. • Daphne • 222-4120

320 Eastern Shore Shopping Center •Fairhope • 929-0055 3055 A Dauphin St. • 479-3200

HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

HOOTERS ($)

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477 334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890 LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-1689

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 7450 Airport Blvd. A • 634-3454 570 Schillinger Rd. • 634-3454 29740 Urgent Care Dr.• 626-1160

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($) COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

WILD WING STATION ($)

1500 Government St. • 287-1526

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. • Fairhope • 990.8883

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • Fairhope •990-6192

‘CUE

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 4715 Airport Blvd/Regency Square • 304-1155

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 6890 US-90 • Daphne • 621-2271 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 460-9191

LAUNCH ($-$$)

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$)

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

NOJA ($$-$$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$) EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 2058 Airport Blvd • 476-0516

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820 MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 9 Du Rhu Dr Suite 300 • 378-2678 1539 US HWY 98•Daphne • 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

4513 Old Shell Rd. D• 473-0007

AROY THAI ($$)

966 Government St.• 408-9001

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR ($$) TRADITIONAL JAPANESE WITH HIBACHI GRILLS 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

2904 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

BAY BARBECUE ($)

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

CHARM THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR ($-$$)

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

CHINA DOLL SEAFOOD RESTAURANT($)

ROLY POLY ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($) ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000 1539 US-98 • Daphne • 517-3963

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE 3211 Moffett Rd • 473-4739

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 829-9227

SOUTHERN NATIONAL ($$-$$$)

THE TASTE OF MOBILE 59 N Florida St. • 408-9997

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682 BBQ AND MORE 6882 US-90 G2/Jubilee Square •Daphne• 210-2151 1390 W D6 Tingle Circle East/McGowin Park• 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. E100/Westwood Plaza • 380-8957

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400 360 Dauphin St • 308-2387

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219 CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd./Ambassador Plaza• 633-9077

BENJAS ($)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 US-90 • 661-5100

960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470 3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

CHEF 181 ($)

ASIAN FUSION RESTAURANT 10179 Eastern Shore D • Spanish Fort • 621-2104

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

A LITTLE VINO

FUJI SAN ($)

MEAT BOSS ($)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

HALAL CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898 5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842 BARBEQUE & MUSIC 4672 Airport Blvd. • 410-6377 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 3385 Schillinger Rd N #1 • 410-7428 6423 Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-7427

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

DOMKE MARKET

FOOD PAK INTERNATIONAL FOODS POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888 LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd.• 380-6062

ICHIBAN ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

RED OR WHITE

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

THE CHEESE COTTAGE ($$)

DROP DEAD GOURMET

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIQUID SUSHI LOUNGE ($$)

THE BLIND MULE ($)

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

SOUTHERN NAPA

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($)

AT FLY CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766 SPECIALTY GROCER/DELI 650 St. Louis St. • 251-308-8488

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

THE GALLEY ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

THE HARBERDASHER ($) 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

BAY GOURMET ($$)

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$) GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 312 Schillinger Rd • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494 LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000 BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS 7 SPICE ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109 3964 Government Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367 2601 S McKenzie St •Foley • 943-4648


SHO GUN ($$)

JAPANESE ENTREES, SUSHI & HIBACHI TABLES 7038 Airport Blvd • 304-0021

STIX ($$)

10240 Eastern Shore Blvd • 621-9088

SUSHI 9 THAI & JAPANESE ($$) 720 Schillinger Rd • 607-7073

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366

RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318

TEAK HOUSE

LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

9091 US-90 • Irvington • 957-1414 1703 US-98 • Daphne • (251) 625-8680

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd • 725-6078

UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FROM THE DEPTHS

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Battleship Pkwy • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/ MUDBUGS DIP SEAFOOD ($)

PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168 • 479-0123

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$) TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 805 S Mobile St • Fairhope • 929-2322 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($) CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

OFF THE HOOK MARINA & GRILL ($) CAJUN INSPIRED/FRESH SEAFOOD & MORE 621 N Craft Hwy • Chickasaw • 422-3412

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Alabama 181 • Fairhope• 281-2663

LUCKY IRISH PUB ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 1108 Shelton Beach Rd •Saraland • 473-0757 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & OTHER AMERICAN CHOW 104 N Section St • Fairhope • 929-2219

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

PAPA MURPHY’S

TAKE ‘N’ BAKE PIZZA 3992 Government • 287-2345 7820 Moffett Rd. • Semmes • 586-8473 2370 Hillcrest Rd • 661-4003 3764 Airport Blvd • 338-9903 705 Highway 43 • Saraland •308-2929 27955 US 98 • Daphne • 621-8666

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$)

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$) MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

POOR MEXICAN ($)

TAQUERIA CANCUN ($)

PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

MAMA MIA!

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$)

3172 International Dr. • 476-9967

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 • Spanish Fort• 375-0076

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$)

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($)

IS THE GAME ON? PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 2453 Old Shell Rd • 479-3278

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 3206 Joe Treadwell Dr • 378-2444 6880 US-90/Jubilee Square • Daphne • 625-4695 BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 36 Hillcrest Rd • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$)

WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832 25755 Perdido Beach Blvd •Orange Beach • 981-3041

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464 3947 AL-59 Suite 100 • Gulf Shores • 970-1337

1715 Main St. (Next to Manci’s) Daphne. • 264-2520 GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GRIMALDI’S ($)

3299 Bel Air Mall B1 • 476-2063

GUIDO’S RESTAURANT ($$) FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

SEMMES HOUSE OF PIZZA ($) 3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

MARCO’S PIZZA ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 625-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 2409 Schillinger Rd S • 525-8431 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911 2303 S McKenzie St •Foley • 970-1414

MIRKO ($$)

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

VIA EMILIA ($$)

OLÉ MI AMIGO! AZTECAS ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 US-90 • 661-5509

BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582 FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

MIGNON’S ($$$)

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$) INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TREASURE BAY:

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839

WIND CREEK CASINO:

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

FIRE ($$-$$$)

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($) AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

615 Dauphin St • 308-2655

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SCARLET PEARL:

9380 Central Avenue D’Iberville • 800266-5772

CHEF WENDY’S BAKING ($-$$)

MADE-TO-ORDER FESTIVE TREATS AND SPECIALTY CAKES.

UNDER THE OAK CAFE ($-$$)

CLASSIC ALL-AMERICAN CASUAL CUISINE WITH OVER 100 OPTIONS.

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

WATERFRONT BUFFET ($$-$$$)

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

CHOPSTX NOODLE BAR ($-$$)

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

5713 Old Shell Rd.• 338-9697

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

THE BLIND TIGER ($-$$)

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

PALACE CASINO:

ITALIAN COOKING

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

FUZZY’S TACO SHOP ($)

RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

STALLA ($$)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8619

SEAFOOD

BLU ($)

LOCAL SEAFOOD AND 40+ BEERS

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

FUEGO ($-$$)

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

JIA ($-$$)

29669 Alabama 181 • Spanish Fort • (251) 625-3300

EL PAPI ($-$$)

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

CQ ($$-$$$)

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

EL MARIACHI ($)

ISLAND VIEW:

COAST SEAFOOD & BREW ($-$$)

HARD ROCK CASINO:

DON CARLOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

THE DEN ($-$$)

AMAZING ARRAY OF MOUTH-WATERING FOOD.

TERRACE CAFE ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

THE BUFFET ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

C&G GRILLE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

THIRTY-TWO ($$$)

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

ROOSTER’S ($)

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($)

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$)

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

IP CASINO:

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

BUSTER’S BRICK OVEN ($-$$)

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 Navco Rd.• 479-0066

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE

UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1530 Battleship Pkwy • 626-6710 DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2200

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($)

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Battleship Pkwy • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$)

MANCIS ($)

ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

quality food and simple unique cocktails

SOUPS, SALADS, FRESH SEAFOOD, AND MORE

VIETNAMESE SANDWICHES, PHO, AND APPETIZERS.

SCARLET’S STEAKS & SEAFOOD ($$$) SAVORY STEAKS AND SEAFOOD

BUTLER’S BAR & LOUNGE ($$) EXTRAORDINARY DRINK MENU, COCKTAILS

M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 29


CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

Rooster’s Latin American holds fundraiser for Memorial Day BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR

tainment destination in Foley. “I have selected my favorite recipes to serve to my guests family-style in an atmosphere just like my home,” Deen said. “It’s all you can eat, so come hungry, y’all!” You just totally read that in her voice. The restaurant has other locations in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; and Fairview and San Antonio, Texas. Ours will be accompanied by a retail store featuring items hand-selected by Deen to reflect her taste and Savannah’s rich cultural heritage. I’m certain OWA is buzzing about her fried chicken. We will let you know as soon as it opens.

Forest to Table with Hank Shaw

It will be an evening of heavy hors d’oeuvres as the Noble South welcomes James Beard Award winner Hank Shaw of Great Days Outdoors and author of “Pheasant, Quail, Cottontail” on Thursday, May 31, 6:30-9:30 p.m. For $75, guests will be treated to beer, wine and recipes straight from the cookbook as well as a copy of the book to take home. Tickets are available at www.thenoblesouthrestaurant.com.

Photo | knightsofheroes.org

Poke Luau coming to Pinebrook Shopping Center

Get ready to get your Hawaiian on. Poke Luau is coming soon to Mobile’s Pinebrook Shopping Center, competing with the likes of China Doll and Rockn-Roll Sushi for Pacific influence. That whole area is ripe with restaurants. Let’s welcome another.

Rooster’s and other downtown restaurants will donate a percentage of sales during Memorial Day week to Knights of Heroes, a charity that sends children of fallen soldiers to a wilderness adventure summer camp in Colorado.

M

onday, May 28, is Memorial Day, but Rooster’s Latin American Food will celebrate May 29 through June 3 by raising funds for a charity that hits close to home for owner Frankie Little. In honor of Little’s brother, Lt. Col. Mark Stratton, who lost his life in Afghanistan in 2009, Rooster’s will donate a portion of its sales from the aforementioned week to Knights of Heroes. This charity sends the children of fallen soldiers to a wilderness adventure summer camp in Colorado.

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Other restaurants are following suit, such as Mama’s, Mediterranean Sandwich Co., Bob’s Downtown, Pizzeria Delphina, Costco and The Haberdasher. For more information visit www.roostersdowntown.com. More importantly, go eat there.

Paula Deen coming to OWA

OWA fans, get ready for some good eating! Paula Deen and the Poarch Band of Creek Indians have announced plans to open Paula Deen’s Family Kitchen at the enter-

Catbird Seat replacing Cream & Sugar

A sign is up but everyone is being tight-lipped. The Catbird Seat has a “coming soon” sign outside the former Cream & Sugar. Questions as to whether or not it is affiliated with the Nashville restaurant of the same name quickly arose, but we are assured it is not. That’s all we have at the moment, but expect some action soon.

Chat A Way Café closed

I’m embarrassed to say I didn’t know the answer, but when a reader recently asked me if Chat A Way Café in Spring Hill Village Shopping Center was closed I had to look it up. According to the shopping center’s Facebook page, the café closed in February. Sorry we missed it. Let’s hope another charming eatery can open next to Rouses soon.


M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 31


COVER STORY

Campaign fundraising increases as June 5 primary election nears

payment to Alabama Power in April. Jones was forced to reimburse his 2013 mayoral campaign after Lagniappe uncovered he improperly paid the business expenditures of a tenant in the building on Costarides Street. Thomas has spent $9,567 total, year to date. Harris has spent $7,286 year to date.

DALE LIESCH/REPORTER

House District 102

A

labama’s legislative races are heating up as Harris was recently backed by Mobile’s chapter of the New South Coalition. The coalition had previously supthe June 5 primaries approach, and that means ported Jones in other races. Harris, 32, said the support collecting and spending political donations has of the elders in the community means a lot to him. moved center stage for most candidates. “ … They understand the direction we’re heading in,” That may be particularly true of the lone Republican Harris said. “Those types of decisions restore my faith in in the House District 99 race, who has quite the fundraisMobile and renews in me the idea that there are people ing hill to climb when pitted against eight Democrats. In who want to push Mobile beyond today.” fact, Charles Talbert has only raised $1 in cash contribuTwo of the candidates in the race to fill the seat vations so far, according to his campaign finance docucated by retiring Democrat James Buskey have yet to file ments. any financial reports and another filed all of his reports The contribution, Talbert said, came from a relative in in May. Cleveland, Ohio. Henry Haseeb, who has previously run against “I accept whatever comes in,” he said. Buskey for the position, was late filing most of his Talbert, who claims he was born and raised conserreports. According to Fair Campaign Practice Act filings vative, said he plans to keep pushing forward until the maintained by the Alabama Secretary of State, Haseeb’s November general election, despite competing for a seat reports for January, February, March and April were all long held by Democrats. filed on May 1 and 2. Haseeb did not return a call seek“I’m very confident we’re going to win,” he said. “It’s ing comment on the filings, but John Bennett, a spokesnot necessarily about money.” man for Secretary of State John If that’s the case, Talbert won’t Merrill’s office, wrote in an email have to focus as much on the that candidates who file late are asfundraising deficit between him sessed a penalty. For a first offense, and the Democratic opponent who a candidate’s committee is assessed emerges victorious in the June 5 the lesser of $300 or 10 percent party primaries. of the amount of contributions or On the other side of the aisle, THE LONE REPUBLICAN IN expenditures. The fine grows with former Mobile Mayor Sam Jones each offense until the fourth, where has a substantial monitary lead over THE HOUSE DISTRICT 99 Merrill’s office can notify the attorhis competitors so far, with attorney RACE HAS QUITE THE FUNney general’s office, or the appropriGregory L. Harris II and former ate district attorney’s office. Burton judge Herman Thomas coming in at DRAISING HILL TO CLIMB LeFlore and Greg Parker have yet to second and third, respectively. To date, the Jones campaign has WHEN PITTED AGAINST TOP file reports. LeFlore said he didn’t file due to raised $57,409 in cash contributions an issue with filing the reports elecwhile Harris has banked $11,476 DEMOCRATS IN THE RACE. tronically. He said he didn’t have and Thomas has collected $10,750. access to the portal until recently The largest contributors to the because Merrill’s office didn’t get Jones campaign include several a signature page needed for access. political action committees (PACs), LeFlore said he expects to file reports from February, businesses and his mayoral campaign. In March, Jones’ March, April and May within the coming days. He said 2017 mayoral campaign donated $20,971 to his campaign he also expects to be fined. for the District 99 seat. In a phone interview, Jones said As for the campaign, LeFlore said it’s building mostate law requires a candidate to start a new committee in mentum despite a lack of enthusiasm from the constituorder to run for a different race. He said he transferred the ency for the race to this point. money left over from his mayoral bid to the new campaign “One of the biggest issues right now is the low level committee. of interest,” he said. “I think it’s due to the large number In addition, a number of PACs have donated to the of candidates.” Jones campaign in varying amounts, totaling $21,500 He called the situation “really sad.” since March. “No one is talking about the issues,” LeFlore said. Jones said the support has been important, especially “No one is talking about advancing their platforms.” with eight competitors in the crowded Democratic field. Rico Washington, who has raised $4,257 in cash He expects his support to increase should he proceed to contributions so far, said his campaign is going well but the general election. it’s not fair to be in a race against candidates who don’t Thomas, who resigned from the bench while he was follow the rules. He said it’s especially important given under investigation and has since been disbarred from the history of recent corruption in the State House. practicing law in Alabama, has raised the bulk of his “I expect everyone to follow the same rules,” he said. money through a series of smaller donations. None of the “It’s like they don’t care. It’s not right.” contributions to the Thomas campaign has been larger Franklin McMillion has raised $2,165 in cash contrithan $1,000 and the campaign has no contributions from butions so far, according to reports. PACs. The Jones campaign has also spent more than its Harris has support from two large individual contributwo best funded competitors have raised combined. The tions, including $3,000 from Raclare S. Thomas and year-to-date report on Alabama Secretary of State John $1,000 from retired Maj. Gen. Gary Cooper. He has the Merrill’s website shows Jones has spent $35,047 so far. backing of one large corporate donor in $1,000 from the Among the expenditures is a series of payments to law firm of Jackson Harris, where he and his father both Alabama Power. One of those payments totaled more practice. than $1,600 for advertising. When asked, Jones said the The other donations Harris touts come from smaller, $1,691 expenditure was labeled incorrectly. According individual contributions. Harris said he’s pleased with to an amended report filed on Saturday, May 12, the payfundraising so far. ment went to Alabama Computer Forms and Printing. “I think our support is pretty strong right now,” he The payment of $709.14 in March to Alabama Power, said. “One hundred percent of our support comes in the Jones said, represents a utility payment made for all form of individuals in the community, or entities conthree portions of a building Jones owns and is using as a cerned with the community.” campaign headquarters. The campaign made a $310.93

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A local newspaper publisher takes on the former Citronelle police chief and a Penelope House board member in the Republican primary for House District 102. There is no Democratic opposition, so if the winner of the June 5 primary earns more than 50 percent of the vote, he or she will earn the right to take the seat vacated by Jack Williams, who is running for the Alabama Senate. Willie Gray, co-owner of The Call News in Citronelle, is lapping the field when it comes to fundraising for the primary. He has raised $70,246 in 2018 compared to $12,865 raised by Shane Stringer and the $5,081 raised by Belinda Shoub. At $25,567, Gray has spent more on the campaign than his rivals have raised combined. Jon Gray, a political consultant and campaign spokesman for Willie Gray’s campaign, wrote in an email that the campaign has been going “great.” The two Grays are not related. “Willie has knocked on over 6,000 doors and is completely humbled at the amount of support he has received not just financially but on the doorsteps throughout our community,” Jon Gray wrote. “Willie has lots of support and is polling very high in the race, but there are weeks to go and we need to keep working hard.” The newspaper owner has a large amount of in-kind contributions from Gray & Gray Inc. in Citronelle, including two contributions totaling more than $1,600 in March. Larger contributions totaling almost $4,000 came from Gray & Gray in April and smaller ones totaling more than $1,400 arrived in May. In the email message, Jon Gray described Gray & Gray as a holding company “that operates several businesses.” He didn’t go into specifics, except to write that there are “a lot of in-kind contributions that the company has donated … some of which might include” the paper Willie Gray publishes. “I’m not able (nor going) to get into any details about how much is or is not in one publication over another nor any campaign strategies, but I would tell you that it would be incorrect to assume that all of that is from The Call News,” Jon Gray wrote. Willie Gray has been the bell cow when it comes to PAC funds in the District 102 race. Since March, the newspaper publisher has raised $47,486 from PACs. Gray’s opponents have mixed feelings about running against the local newspaper publisher. While Stringer acknowledges the uphill battle and Gray’s “power of persuasion” through the newspaper, he said he, Stringer, has name recognition from his service as police chief. “In Citronelle, they know me,” he said. Stringer realizes he’s in a fundraising hole, but touted local support as the key to the race. “I think it has been awesome,” he said of the campaign. “I’ve met a lot of great people.” Shoub said she isn’t concerned about it, but she also doesn’t think advertising her candidacy in The Call News would be worth the money, given that her opponent is the publisher. Like Stringer, she said she is well known within the community. “I tried to get out and meet people,” she said. “People know me … I go and speak to everybody and everybody knows about it.” Shoub said she spoke to Willie Gray early on and he ran a story on her candidacy. Other stories in The Call News referencing his opponents have been sparse, according to a search of back issues of the paper from April 2017 to January 2018. The publisher ran a half-page column on his decision to run for office. The newspaper also featured a story about Willie Gray recently being honored for saving someone from a disabled vehicle three years prior. The Call News also ran a front-page photo that included its publisher with state Sen. Rusty Glover, Mobile County Public Schools Superintendent Martha Peek and others at the opening of a school. In the cutline, Willie Gray is listed as a candidate for District 102. Shoub filed in April of last year. Willie Gray and Stringer both filed in June 2017. As for advertising within the publication, Jon Gray wrote that The Call News publisher has sold advertisements to his opponents in various publications. Shoub contends she had her campaign manager call about pricing in the paper, but never ran an advertisement. As for any requirement for Willie Gray, as publisher of a local paper, to sell advertisements to opponents, Bennett said there is none. “Because he’s the owner of the paper, our legal team says not much can be done,” he said. “That’s his decision to make.”

Baldwin County

Candidates in one of Baldwin County’s two State House races have reached six-figure territory in the fundraising battle. The campaign to re


COVER STORY place retiring State Sen. Trip Pittman of District 32 has seen County Commissioner Chris Elliott report $122,230 in cash contributions. His nearest competitor, dentist David Northcutt, has raised $96,220. Also on the GOP primary ballot is Jeff Boyd, who has reported $38,850 in cash contributions and Bill Roberts, who has reported $304. The winner will face Democrat Jason Fisher in the general election in November. Meanwhile, House District 64 incumbent Harry Shiver has reported $52,850 in cash contributions, while Stephen Sexton, his GOP primary competitor, has reported $6,943 in cash contributions. The lone Democrat in that race, Amber Selman-Lynn, has reported $2,200 in cash contributions.

Fundraising benefits, contribution limits

While the money raised during campaign season is important in any race in the United States, having the most money doesn’t ensure victory. Jaclyn Byrd, PhD, an associate professor of political science at the University of South Alabama, said there are two caveats when dealing with fundraising. “One is that funding only goes so far,” she said. “Studies have shown that after a certain funding threshold there are significant diminishing returns on campaign spending.” Secondly, she said, massive fundraising may not be as effective if a race isn’t competitive, or if the person raising the money already has name recognition. “We may also see the diminishing returns more quickly on the local level as the individual running for office may already be well known,” she said. While it doesn’t have as much of an impact on smaller, more local races, Byrd said Alabama failing to have a contribution limit contrasts with many other states. “Only 10 other states fail to place individual limits on campaign contributions,” she said. “All other states place some form of cap, ranging in gubernatorial elections from as little as $500 (Alaska) to as much as $44,000 (New York).”

House District 96

The race to replace Republican Rep. Randy Davis features two candidates on the Democratic side and one on the Republican side. Democrats Maurice Horsey and Richard “Web” Whiting will face off in the primary for the right to take on Matt Simpson in the general election in November. Horsey has raised $3,782 so far, while Whiting has raised $899. Simpson, who has no primary opponent, has so far raised $20,675 in his bid to win the November election.

most PAC money, with $36,500 collected from February to May. Dockens leads the pack behind Brown, with $5,399 in cash contributions in 2018. Bentley has raised $1,920 so far and Oglesby $1,875.

Senate District 33

Incumbent Vivian Davis Figures faces two Democratic challengers in the June 5 primary for state Senate District 33. Figures has outpaced Victor Crawford in fundraising, while Michael Cooley has failed to file any disclosures as of Tuesday, May 15. Figures has raised $57,000 in 2018 and appears to have been a month behind in filing her February and March reports. Figures did not return a call seeking comment. She has spent $69,727, which is less than she spent in 2014 when she was without primary opposition, according to state records. Crawford has raised $18,000, the vast majority coming from himself. He has spent $16,845.

Senate District 34

Current State Rep. Jack Williams is outraising his opponent Mark Shirey by a wide margin, as both candidates are vying for the Republican nomination for the seat held by departing State Sen. Rusty Glover. Glover is running for lieutenant governor. Williams has raised $119,795 year to date, while Shirey has raised $40,923. From March to May, reports show Williams has been the preferred candidate for several statewide PACs. During this stretch, the Williams campaign has received $71,000 from various PACs. Williams has spent $38,636 year to date. Advertisements have appeared for Williams in The Call News, but did not appear on his financial reports. Political consultant Jon Gray of Strategy Inc. said Strategy purchased those advertisements and they will show up on the reports as soon as he is able to send an invoice to Williams. Williams did not return two phone calls seeking comment for this story. Shirey, an optometrist and health care advocate, said he understands the hole he’s in when it comes to fundraising, but he’s not discouraged. He has even touted his own support from various PACs, including Alabama Optometric PAC, which gave him $15,000. So far he has raised $16,000 in PAC money. “I’ve had really good support,” he said. “We’ve got a good campaign. We’re walking door to door and we’ve met a lot of people.” Shirey has spent $24,783 in 2018. He said he’s spent money on mailers and radio.

Candidates without primary competition

Democratic incumbent Adline Clarke is facing an opponent in the primary race, Levi Wright Jr. However, Wright has not yet filed a financial disclosure form. As for Clarke, she has raised $36,525 and spent about $7,000 of that. On the GOP side, Stephen McNair doesn’t have a primary opponent, but has so far raised $14,555. He has spent $6,493.

Republican State Rep. David Sessions has no primary competition for the District 35 Senate seat, but he will face Democrat Tom Holmes in the general election. So far, Sessions has raised $75,300 this year. Holmes has raised considerably less to this point, with $5,855 in cash contributions year to date. Republican incumbent Margie Wilcox will ease into the general election, but will face Democratic challenger Arlene Easley for the State House District 104 seat. To date, Wilcox has raised $14,700 in cash contributions. Easley has raised $1,370.

House District 105

Candidates with no competition

House District 97

Four Republicans are on the ballot for the House District 105 seat vacated by David Sessions, who is running for Senate. Matthew J. Bentley, Chip Brown, Cody Dockens and Janet Brown Oglesby will face off on June 5 without any opposition in November. Brown is outpacing his opponents, with $53,248 raised in 2018. He has taken by far the

Incumbent State Reps. Steve McMillan in House District 95, Victor Gaston in House District 100, Chris Pringle in House District 101 and Barbara Drummond in House District 103 are all poised to be re-elected without qualified competition. Jason Johnson and Gabriel Tynes contributed to this report. M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 33


34 | L AG N I A P P E | M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

NIGHTLIFE BEST ALL AROUND BAR A B C D E F

Alchemy Tavern Callaghan’s O’Daly’s Pour Baby The Brickyard The Haberdasher

BEST BARTENDER A Adam Yunker, Royal Street Tavern/Alchemy B Cary Scott, Gabriel’s C Pero Bringhurst, The Dublin D Randy Jennings, Sidecar Lounge E Rickey Havens, Pour Baby F Roy Clark, The Haberdasher

BEST BARTENDERESS A Courtney Anthony, Butch Cassidy’s B Jana Padgett Dunn, Brickyard C Shannon Frodge, Boondocks D Susan Richardson, Pelican Pub E Tasha Tupa, The Haberdasher F Tyger Kunz, Hayley’s

HOTTEST BARTENDER A Derek Dunn, Boo Radley’s B Hunter Vanderlinde, The Brickyard C Jay LeBlanc, Sunset Pointe D Rickey Slayton, B Bob’s E Ricky Havens, Pour Baby F Sergio Muris, Alchemy Tavern

HOTTEST BARTENDERESS

BEST DIVE BAR A B C D E F

Hayley’s Papa Buddha’s Patches The Garage Top of the Bay Veet’s

BEST E-SHO BAR A B C D E F

Manci’s Antique McSharry’s Plow Pour Nelson’s Tongue & Groove Top of the Bay

BEST WEMO BAR A B C D E F

Boondocks Bubble Lounge Cockeyed Charlie’s Key West Lounge Pour Baby The Dublin

BEST MIMO BAR Ashland Midtown Pub Butch Cassidy’s Lucky Irish Pub Mellow Mushroom Airport E Red or White F Silver Horse Pub A B C D

BEST LODA BAR A B C D E F

Kazoola LoDa Bier Garten O’Daly’s OK Bike Shop The Blind Mule The Haberdasher

BEST SOMO BAR A B C D E F

Dority’s Bar & Grill Islanders Pelican Pub River Shack Waves DI Zebra Club

A Carrie Manning, Beef O’Brady’s B Chasity Varner, Ashland Midtown Pub C Crystal Dees D Jana Padgett Dunn, Brickyard E Leann Neilson F Stevi Lynn

A B C D E F

BEST NEW BAR

BEST FANCY DRINK BAR

A Baumhower’s Victory Grille B SanBar Courtyard C Serda Brewing D The Dublin E Waves DI F Wet Willie’s

A B C D E F

BEST WINE BAR Domke Market Firehouse Le Bouchon Pour Baby Red or White Southern Napa

Flybar Royal Street Tavern Ruth’s Chris Sidecar Lounge The Haberdasher Tongue & Groove Drinkery

BEST HAPPY HOUR BAR A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Dauphin’s Flip Side Sunset Pointe The Brickyard The Garage

BEST E-SHO HAPPY HOUR A B C D E F

California Dreaming District Hall Flybar McSharry’s Sunset Pointe Top of the Bay

BEST SPORTS BAR A All Sports Bar and Billiards B Baumhower’s Victory Grille C Buffalo Wild Wings D Draft Picks E Heroes Sports Bar & Grille F Touchdown Tavern

BEST WATERFRONT BAR A B C D E F

Bluegill Flora-Bama Pelican Pub Pirate’s Cove Sunset Pointe The River Shack

BAR WHERE YOU ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET LUCKY A B C D E F

B-Bobs Hayley’s McSharry’s Midnight Rodeo O’Daly’s Saddle Up Saloon

BEST PLACE TO SHAKE YOUR BOOTY A B C D E F

B-Bobs Boo Radley’s Boulevard Kazoola Midnight Rodeo Saddle Up Saloon

BEST GAY BAR A B C D

B-Bob’s Flip Side Gabriel’s Midtown Pub

FAVORITE CRAFT BEER A Abita Purple Haze B Fairhope Brewing Take the Causeway IPA C Fat Tire D Goose Island IPA

E Lagunitas Lil Sumpin’ Sumpin’ Ale F Sweetwater 420

FAVORITE IMPORT BEER A B C D E F

Corona Dos Equis Guinness Newcastle Pilsner Urquell Stella Artois

FAVORITE DOMESTIC BEER A B C D E F

Bud Light Budweiser Coors Light Mich Ultra Miller Lite Samuel Adams

BEST SPECIALTY COCKTAIL

BEST OVERALL STYLIST – BALDWIN

A Cool as a Cucumber Sunset Pointe B Dragon’s Eye - Flybar C Easy Tiger - Haberdasher D La Primavera - Haberdasher E Paloma - El Papi F Swampwater - Felix’s

A Brandi Hoover - Sanctuary Salon B Chandise Hampton - The March Hare C Cherry Wiggins - Fireflies Salon D Kayla Smith - Sanctuary Salon E Kristen Watler - Salon Royale F Tami Williams - Tami’s Mask & Mirror

BEST BAR TRIVIA Blind Mule Fairhope Brewing Fuzzy’s Taco Mellow Mushroom Airport E Moe’s BBQ F Serda A B C D

BEST LOCALLY BREWED BEER

BEST GENTLEMAN’S CLUB

A Big Beach Brewing Satsumo Wit B Fairhope Brewing Judge Roy Bean Coffee Stout C Fairhope Brewing Take the Causeway IPA D Haint Blue IPA E Serda Brewing Clear Prop F Serda Brewing Tidewater

A B C D

BAR WITH BEST TAP BEER SELECTION A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Draft Picks Island Wing LoDa Bier Garten Mellow Mushroom Montego’s

FAVORITE CASINO A Beau Rivage B Hard Rock C Harrah’s Gulf Coast Casino D IP Casino E Palace Casino F Scarlet Pearl

BEST MARGARITA A B C D E F

Café del Rio Dauphin St. Taqueria El Papi Fuego Hacienda San Miguel Sunset Pointe

BEST BLOODY MARY A B C D E F

Blind Mule Brick and Spoon Kitchen on George Moe’s BBQ Pelican Pub Wintzell’s

Candy Store Cookies N Cream Diamonds Lionz Den

SHOPPING & SERVICES BEST SALON – MOBILE A B C D E F

Genesis Hair Salon Harlow Inspire Salon & Gallery Salon DMH Salon West 5400 Studio PH

BEST SALON- BALDWIN A B C D E F

Fireflies Salon Hair-Do Salon Salon Royale Sanctuary Salon Tami’s Mask & Mirror The March Hare

BEST OVERALL STYLIST – MOBILE A Jennifer Freeman - Salon DMH B Julie Burrus - Inspire Salon & Gallery C Lydia Belle Sexton Inspire D Phrankey Lowery - Studio PH E Vanna Uptagraft - All About You F Whitney Vittor - Salon West 5400

BEST COLORIST A Jennifer Freeman - Salon DMH B Julie Rhames - Harlow C Lauren Holmquist D Tami Williams - Tami’s Mask & Mirror E Taylor Jane Westwood Inspire F Vanna Uptagraft - All About You

SCISSOR WIZARD (BEST HAIRCUT-TER) A Brandi Hoover - Sanctuary Salon B Caitlin Trehern - Salon 8:31 C Chandise Hampton - The March Hare D Jakob Dozen - Studio PH E Julie Burrus - Inspire Salon & Gallery F Laura Vendetti - Laura Vendetti

BEST BARBER A B C D E F

Gentlemen’s Barbershop Hillcrest Barbers Johnny Sullivan Mayo’s Barber Shop Mike’s Barber Shop Tillman’s Barber Shop

BEST MAKEUP ARTIST A B C D E F

Alexis Ruby Ashley West Cassidy Hester Kelsey Copeland Fields Kendall Smith Megan Layton

BEST HOOHA WAXER A Anna Bishop - LA Bikini B Crystal Quattrone - Primp C Elizabeth Spence - Tami’s Mask & Mirror D Jill McKinley - Revive Skin and Body E Jitka Boyd - Salon Royale F Karen Vogtner - Nouveau on Dauphin

M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 35


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST PLACE TO GET MANI/PEDI A B C D E F

J&T Nails Lilly’s Royal Day Spa Tami’s Mask & Mirror Venetian Nails Vivian’s

BEST ESTHETICIAN A Crystal Quattrone- Primp B Hanna Hogle - Sunrise Dermatology C Jade Kittrell - MPRSD D Karen Vogtner - Nouveau on Dauphin E Kayla Mitchell - Dr. Kimberly Donnellan - Skin & Laser Specialists F Kim Graves - at Lyons Elite Med Spa

BEST DAY SPA A Battle House Spa B Greater Mobile Laser & Aesthetic Center C LumaLife Therapy & Wellness Spa D Lyons Cosmetic & Laser Surgery Center E MedSpa at the Park F Nouveau on Dauphin

BEST TANNING SALON A B C D E F

Brush of Bronze LA Bikini Southern Glow Sunkissed Spray Tans Tiffany Tans Tuscan Sun

BEST MASSAGE THERAPIST A Hannah Boltz - Therapeutic Arts Massage & Bodywork B Jessi Coors, LMT C Kathryn Mixson - Mountain Massage & Day Spa D Kelsea Tupa - Epione Massage & Bodywork E Massage Envy F Roderick Gibbs - Dynamic Orthopedic Massage Therapy

MOBILE BAY’S BEST DOCTOR A Dr. Charla Evans - Infirmary Health Diagnostic Medical Clinic B Dr. Clare Carney - Alabama Medical Group C Dr. Gamil Dawood - Hillcrest Urgent Care D Dr. John T. Houston - IMC Family Medical of Mobile West

E Dr. Morgan Ashurst - Alabama Medical Group F Dr. Susan Sweeney Greater Mobile Urgent Care

MOBILE BAY’S BEST SPECIALIST (MD) A Dr. Adam Handwerger The Orthopedic Group, P.C. B Dr. James West, III - - The Orthopedic Group, P.C. C Dr. Ronald O’Gorman - O’Gorman Vein and Vascular D Dr. Steven G. Alsip - Alabama Medical Group E Dr. Thomas Barbour, III The Orthopedic Group, P.C. F Rihner, Gupta & Grosz Cardiology, P.C.

BEST HOOHA DOCTOR A Dr. Danilo Herrera- Bay Area Physicians for Women B Dr. Glenn Gallaspy III Azalea City Physicians for Women C Dr. Helen Rogers - Bay Area Physicians for Women D Dr. Lauren Lambrecht Azalea City Physicians for Women E Dr. Patton Morrison Barton - Mobile Bay OBGYN Center F Dr. Quin Bixler - Mobile Bay OBGYN Center

BEST BOOB DOC A Dr. Charles Dyas, Bay Area Plastic Surgery Associates B Dr. Christopher Park, MPRSD C Dr. James Koehler, Eastern Shore Plastic Surgery D Dr. Kitti Outlaw - Outlaw Plastic Surgery E Dr. Randy Proffitt - Randy Profitt MD F Dr. William Burden, Destin Plastic Surgery

BEST FACELIFT DOC A Dr. Chris Park, MPRSD B Dr. Henry Barber, Martin Center C Dr. James Koehler, Eastern Shore Plastic Surgery D Dr. Kimberly Donnellan, Skin & Laser Specialists E Dr. Michael B. Lyons, Lyons Cosmetic & Laser Surgery Center F Dr. Stephen Martin, Martin Center

36 | L AG N I A P P E | M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8

BEST DERMATOLOGIST A Dr. Amy Morris, Center for Dermatology B Dr. Harold Hawkins, The Dermatology Center C Dr. Kathryn Dempsey, MPRSD D Dr. Ryan Ramagosa, Sunrise Dermatology E Dr. Scott Freeman, Sunrise Dermatology F Dr. Scott VanLoock, Mobile Dermatology

BEST WEIGHT LOSS DOC A Dr. Amy Armstrong, La Bella RX B Dr. James Q. Jardine, Medi Weightloss C Dr. Lawrence Carpenter, Aesthetics & Weightloss D Dr. Michelle Jackson, Slim & Trim E Dr. Ruth Shields, Healthy Weight 4 Me F Dr. William Urquhart, Medi Weightloss

BEST “DOC IN THE BOX” CLINIC A Compass Urgent Care B Eastern Shore Urgent Care C Greater Mobile Urgent Care D Hillcrest Urgent Care E Southern Rapid Care F Urgent Care by the Bay

BEST BACK CRACKER (CHIROPRACTOR) A Advanced Spine & Therapy B Corsentino Chiropractic Clinic C Dr. Cevin Cormier, Cormier Chiropractic & Physical Therapy D Dr. Ken Bishop, Tillman’s Corner Chiropractic Clinic E Dr. Spencer Callahan, Bayview Optimal Performance F Family Chiropractic & Health Center

BEST DENTIST Dr. David Salter Dr. Kristopher Portacci Grelot Dental Knollwood Dental Group Maitre & Crabtree Dental Group F Noblet Family Dental

A B C D E

BEST FITNESS FACILITY A Hillcrest Fit Body Boot Camp

B C D E F

JH Crossfit Mission Fitness Orangetheory Fitness ProHealth Springhill Fitbody Bootcamp

BEST PERSONAL TRAINER A Emily Powell, ProHealth B Jessica Callahan, Mission Fitness C John Burgard, Relentless PT D John Seddon, Life Plus Personal Fitness Training E Josh Foster, Josh The Trainer F Victor Fischer

BEST VETERINARIAN A Dr. Christopher Boudreau, Boudreau Veterinary Hospital B Dr. Madison Gordon, Westside Veterinary Hospital C Dr. Mary Katherine Cross, Old Shell Animal Hospital D Dr. Roxy Leslie, Village Animal Clinic E Mitchell Animal Clinic F Rehm Animal Clinic

BEST PET GROOMER A B C D E F

Addicted to Dogs Adorable Do’s Jeremy Henderson Lola Bell’s Paws on Pinehill Paws to Pamper

BEST FLORIST A B C D E F

All A Bloom Bay Flowers Belle Bouquet Lush Home and Garden Rose Bud Flowers & Gifts Wildflower Floral Design

BEST PHOTOGRAPHER/ STUDIO A Abigail Wellinghurst Photography B Evan Davis Photography C K Rae D Melinda Mercer Photography E Shane Rice Photography F Toni Riales

BEST YOGA STUDIO A B C D E F

Above and Beyond Glow Yoga Sterling Hot Yoga Sway Synergy Thrive Yoga & Massage

BEST CARWASH/DETAIL A Alabama Auto Clean B Bebo’s C Bumper 2 Bumper Auto Detailing D Down South Detail E Rich’s F Ultra Car Wash

BEST LAWYER IF YOUR SPOUSE IS A HO (DIVORCE) A B C D E F

Alison Herlihy Jerry Pilgrim Josh Boone Karol Kemp Molly Sullivan Stephen Johnson

BEST LAWYER TO KEEP YOU OUT OF PRISON (CRIMINAL) A B C D E F

Chase Barber Dennis Knizley Grant Gibson Jeff Deen Tom Walsh Walter Gewin

BEST LAWYER TO SUE THE PANTS OFF SOMEONE (TRIAL)

C D E F

Donna Gatlin - State Farm Julie Henson - Alfa Patrick Collins - Farmers Rachael Kidd - State Farm

BEST MORTGAGE BROKER/FIRM A Bay Mortgage B Embrace Home Loans C Jeanine Fowler, DSLD Mortgage D Magnolia Mortgage E Mortgage Team 1 F New Horizons Credit Union

BEST INVESTMENT BANKER/FINANCIAL PLANNER A Billy Williams, Williams Financial Group B Carl Dekle, Plan Sponsor Consultants C Chase Robinson, Northwestern Mutual D Coldsmith, Ryder & Associates, Ameriprise Financial Services Inc. E Keith Woodham, Edward Jones F Ryan Mahtani, BB&T Investments

BEST CAR DEALERSHIP

A Clay Massey & Associates B Cunningham Bounds C David J. Maloney D Eiland & Ritchie E Greene & Phillips F Moore Law Firm

A B C D E

BEST REAL ESTATE FIRM

BEST CPA

A B C D E F

Bellator Courtney & Morris Diamond Properties LLB&B Roberts Brothers Stirling Properties

Bay Chevrolet Eastern Shore Toyota McConnell Automotive MCD Motors Palmer’s Toyota Superstore F UJ Chevrolet

A B C D E F

BJ Gilbert Gina McKellar Karen Simmons Rita Byers Robinson Tax Service Ted Crabtree

BEST REALTOR

BEST LANDSCAPER

A Andrew Dickman - Stirling Properties B Brandon Norstedt - Better Homes & Gardens C Chris Clarke - Roberts Brothers D James Henderson - Bellator E Laurye Brunson - Roberts Brothers F Team A & C - Diamond Properties

A B C D E

BEST INSURANCE AGENT OR AGENCY A Allison Horner - State Farm B Cory Luckie - C.A.Luckie Insurance

A Bloom Garden Center Bay Landscaping Cotton State Services Krob Landscape, Inc Southern Landscape Solutions F Weatherford’s Fountain & Lawn

BEST CONTRACTOR/ HOMEBUILDER A All Weather Roof & Construction B Batten Builders C Bo Wilder Contracting D GLH Homebuilders E Lipford Construction F Truland Homes


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER A B C D E F

Allyn Cameron Augusta Tapia Caitlyn Waite Lindsey Feenker Pat O’ Neal Randi Wilson

BEST HARDWARE STORE A Andrews Ace Hardware B Blankenship’s Universal Supply C Dawes Hardware D Eastern Shore Ace E Smith Hardware F Springhill Ace

BEST PEST CONTROL A B C D E F

Aegis Pest Control Arrow Cook’s Knockout Pest & Termite Semmes Pest Control Terminator Pest Control

BEST CLOTHING CONSIGNMENT STORE A B C D E F

Back on the Rack Hertha’s Plato’s Closet Rave Reviews Revolution Resale Second Edition Boutique

BEST DEPARTMENT STORE A B C D E F

Belk Dillard’s JC Penney Kohl’s Steinmart TJ Maxx

BEST PLACE TO GET MARDI GRAS ATTIRE A B C D E F

Fancy That Bridal Francia’s Formal Affair JoVi’s Bridal & Formal Metzger’s Putting on the Ritz Randall’s Formal Wear

BEST PET STORE A B C D E F

B&B Pet Stop Bella & Bows Pet Market Dog Days Barkery Pet Supplies Plus PetSmart The Waggy Tail

BEST FINE JEWELRY A B C D E F

Friedman’s Goldstein’s John Cauley Karat Patch Lou’s Zundel’s

BEST ANTIQUE STORE BEST DRY CLEANERS

Antiques at the Loop BackFlash Antiques La La Land Boutique Olde Mobile Antique Gallery E The Brothers Gallery F The Shop Around the Corner

A B C D E F

BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE

BEST HOME CLEANING SERVICE

A B C D

A B C D E F

CK Collection D&K Down South Native G Harvell McCoy Outdoor Metzger’s

BEST LINGERIE/NAUGHTY SHOP A B C D

NT Lingerie The Gift Spot The Little Drawer Victoria’s Secret

BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE A B C D E F

Crimson Blue Boutique Hemline Kenzlee Grace LTD Fashions Pink Post Office Boutique Ruby Blue Boutique

Champion Cleaners Gulf City Jaguar Cleaners Master Cleaners Paragon Waite’s

A Maids a la Mode B Mandy’s Cleaning Service C Scrub-N-Suds D Sweet Home E The Maids F Two Gals & a Mop

BEST OUTDOORS STORE A B C D E

Alabama Outdoors Bass Pro Shop Field & Stream McCoy Outdoor Quint’s Red Beard’s Outfitter

BEST LOCAL PHARMACY A B C D E F

Christopher Pharmacy Dawes Pointe Pharmacy McConaghy Pharmacy Midtown Pharmacy Saraland Pharmacy Semmes Pharmacy

BEST SHOE STORE – ATHLETIC A B C D E

Academy Fleet Feet Sports McCoy Outdoor Run-N- Tri Shoe Station

BEST LADIES’ SHOE STORE A B C D E F

CK Collection Dillard’s DSW Gallery Shoe Boutique Shoefly Shoe Station

BEST GIFT SHOP A B C D E F

Domke Market Marcie N Me Meggie B’s Oak Ridge Pharmacy Robert Moore Timeless Treasures

BEST HOME FURNISHINGS STORE A B C D E F

Black Door Studio Designer Collection Luke Phillips Lush M A Simons Woman In the Moon

BEST FURNITURE CONSIGNMENT SHOP A All Around the House B Fairhope Furniture Consignment C High Cotton D Kaglen’s E Something Special F White House Antiques

BEST VAPE SHOP A B C D E F

Cloud 9 Parlor Vapes The Vapor Hut Vapemosphere Vapor Dreamz Vapors Smoke Shop

BEST BANK OR CREDIT UNION A Army Aviation Federal Credit Union B BBVA Compass C Iberia D New Horizons Credit Union E Regions F Renasant

KIDS BEST KIDS’ CLOTHING STORE – NEW A B C D E F

Charming Darlings Creating Cuties Gigi & Jay’s Little Monkey Toes Sweet Magnolia Smocks The Holiday

BEST KIDS’ CLOTHING STORE – CONSIGNMENT A Carousel Kids B Kids Klozet C Kids Kottage Upscale Resale D Kids Wearhouse E Savvy Mom Sale F Wee Exchange

BEST SUMMER CAMP A Bayside Academy B Dauphinway Baptist C Eastern Shore Repertory Theater D Gulf Coast Exploreum Center E St. Dominic Catholic School F St. Luke’s

BEST DAYCARE/MOTHER’S DAY OUT A Christ United Methodist B Springhill Baptist Child Development Center C St. Mary’s D Training Wheels Childcare E Weinacker’s Montessori F Westminster Presbyterian

BEST PRESCHOOL A B C D E F

Corpus Christi Catholic St. Dominic Catholic School St. Luke’s St. Paul’s EEC Weinacker’s Montessori Westminster Presbyterian

BEST BIRTHDAY PARTY PLACE A Altitude B Get Air C Gulf Coast Exploreum Lazer Zone D Pete’s Party Castle E Pump It Up

MOST KID FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD A B C D

Brookwood Jackson Heights Ravine Woods Regency

E Ridgefield F Rosswood

BEST KID-FRIENDLY LOCAL ATTRACTION A Bellingrath Gardens and Home B Dauphin Island Sea Lab C Gulf Coast Ducks D Gulf Coast Exploreum Center E OWA F The Fort of Colonial Mobile

BEST DANCE STUDIO A B C D E F

Classical Ballet Debbie’s School of Dance Grace Dance Center Mobile Ballet Sheffield School of Dance Turning Pointe

BEST PEDIATRIC DENTIST A Dr. Maureen Baldy B Dr. Trey’s Children’s Dentistry, Dr. Trey Fellers C Malbis Pediatric Dentistry, Dr. Kelly Jones D Mobile Pediatric Dentistry - Dr. Stephen E. Greenleaf, III E Pediatric Dentistry of Mobile, Dr. Joel Welford and Dr. Marion McMurphy, Jr. F Thomas and Moore Pediatric Dentist

BEST ORTHODONTIST A Donaghey Orthodontics B Glass Orthodontics C Harvey & Thomas Orthodontics D Hicks & McMurphy Orthodontics E Oliver Orthodontics F Pickett Orthodontics

BEST PEDIATRICIAN A B C D E F

Dr. Faye Roberts Dr. John Sands Dr. Lisa McDonough Dr. Matthew Cepeda Dr. Nancy Wood Dr. Robin McNair

BEST KID PHOTOGRAPHER A Chad Riley Photography B Jamie Roberts Photography C Janie Long Photography D Laura Cantrell Photography E Leslie Walley Photography F Paisley Studios G Samantha Vickers Photography

BEST PUBLIC SCHOOL A ACCEL Day and Evening Academy B Collier Elementary C Dawes Intermediate School D E. R. Dickson Elementary School E Mary G Montgomery High School F Phillips Preparatory

BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL A Corpus Christi Catholic B McGill Toolen Catholic High School C Mobile Christian School D St. Luke’s Episcopal School E St. Paul’s Episcopal School F UMS Wright

COOLEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER A Allison Dennis, Corpus Christi Catholic School B Amy Hodges, St. Paul’s Episcopal School C Caroline Graham, Semmes Elementary School D Elizabeth Partsch, E.R. Dickson Elementary E Jeremy Smith, O’Rourke Elementary F Jessica Sanders, Allentown Elementary

COOLEST MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER A Alison Burrow, Semmes Middle School B Amanda Richardson, Causey Middle School C Elizabeth Campbell, St. Paul’s Episcopal School D Jeanette Connally, St. Dominic Catholic School E Peter Stoyka, Corpus Christi Catholic School F Rosalie Hyatt, Grand Bay Middle School

COOLEST HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER A Eric Browne, Baker High School B Jeremiah Quattrone, Citronelle High School C Joseph Moody, Mary G. Montgomery High School D Margaret Delaney, UMS Wright Preparatory School E Mollie Betsch, Mary G. Montgomery High School F Yohanna Jimenez, St. Luke’s Episcopal School

M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 37


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

CITY LIFE BEST MOBILIAN EVER A B C D E F

Dr. William Gorgas Eugene Walter Hank Aaron Jimmy Buffett Joe Cain Lonnie Johnson

BEST MOBILIAN RIGHT NOW A B C D E F

Chief Slacambamarinico IV Jake Peavy Judge Edmond Naman Mayor Sandy Stimpson Scott Tindle Uncle Henry

BEST HOTEL A Hilton Garden InnDowntown Mobile B The Admiral C The Battle House D The Grand Hotel E The Hampton Inn F The Riverview

BEST HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND Baker High School Davidson High School LeFlore High School Mary G Montgomery McGill Toolen Catholic High School F Murphy High School A B C D E

BEST MARDI GRAS PAQUINTESSENTIAL MOBILIAN RADING SOCIETY A Chief Slacambamarinico IV B City Councilman Fred Richardson C Gen. Gary Cooper D Mayor Sandy Stimpson E Preston Griffith F Suzanne Cleveland

A B C D E F

BEST MOBILE POLICE OFFICER

BEST MARDI GRAS MARCHING SOCIETY

A B C D E F

Officer Justin Billa Officer Justin Billa Officer Justin Billa Officer Justin Billa Officer Justin Billa Officer Justin Billa

BEST MOBILE FIREFIGHTER A B C D E F

Chad Sprinkle Jimmy Lilley LeAnn Tacon Marty Demouy Ronnie Gilmore Wesley Foster

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD/STREET A B C D E F

Church Street East Copeland Island Jackson Heights Oakleigh Garden District Regency South Lafayette Street

BEST ANNUAL FUNDRAISING EVENT A American Cancer Society Chili Cook-off B Camp Rap A Hope Turkey Trot for Hope C Downtown Cajun Cook-off D Feeding the Gulf Coast’s Annual Chef Challenge E Junior League of Mobile Christmas Jubilee F Mitchell Cancer Institute Go Run

A B C D E

Crewe of Columbus Mystic Stripers Mystics of Time Order of Inca Order of LaShes Order of Polka Dots

Cain’s Merry Mistresses Cain’s Merry Widows Dauphin Street Drunks Skeleton Krewe Wild Mauvillians

BEST MARDI GRAS BALL A B C D E F

Crewe of Columbus Fifty Funny Fellows Infant Mystics Knights of Revelry Mystics of Time Order of Polka Dots

COOLEST CHURCH OR HOUSE OF WORSHIP A Christ United Methodist B City Hope C First Baptist Church of Mobile D Government Street Presbyterian E St. Dominic Catholic Church F Wings of Life

BEST CLERGYMAN/PASTOR/SPIRITUAL LEADER A Dr. Brett Burleson, Dayspring Baptist B Dr. Robert Couch, Christ United Methodist C Father Chris Boutin, St. Dominic Catholic Church D Father Mark Neske, Holy Family Catholic Church E Pastor Chris Patrick, Wings

38 | L AG N I A P P E | M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8

of Life F Trey Doyle, First Baptist Church of Mobile

D The Mulligan Brothers E The Red Clay Strays F The Underhill Family Orchestra

C D E F

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (ATTRACTION)

BEST NEW LOCAL BAND

BEST SOLO MUSICIAN

Average Joes Brigham Cason Trio Delta Smoke Lauren Murphy & The Psychedelics E Paid To Pretend F Sloth Racer

A B C D E F

A Bellingrath Gardens & Home B Bienville Bites Food Tour C Gulf Coast Ducks D Mobile Carnival Museum E OWA F USS Alabama

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (RESTAURANT) A B C D E F

Dauphin’s Dumbwaiter Felix’s NoJa Osman’s Wintzell’s

COOLEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY A Bay Breeze Apartments, Daphne B Charleston Apartment Homes C D’Iberville Apartments D La Maison, Saraland E Marine Street Lofts F The Vinings, Spanish Fort

BEST LOCAL COMPANY TO WORK FOR A Crow Shields Bailey B Cunningham Bounds C Express Employment Professionals D FTZC (Foreign Trade Zone Corporation) E Greene & Phillips F Rihner, Gupta & Grosz Cardiology

NAPPIE CATEGORY 2019 A Best Automotive Repair B Best Local Author C Best Rehab/Physical Therapist D Best Scientist E Best Tattoo Artist F Coolest Preschool Teacher

MUSIC

A B C D

BEST COUNTRY BAND/ PERFORMER A B C D E F

Anna McElroy Bruce Smelley Hunter Landry Jesse Howard Jordan Capers Sugarcane Jane

BEST METAL/UNDERGROUND BAND A B C D E F

D.R.E.A.D. Excessum Love the Hate Satan & The Sunbeams Subjugate Venom

BEST BLUES BAND/ARTIST A B C D E F

Chronic Blues Delta Smoke Jamell Richardson Johnny No Lisa Mills Rick McNaughton Band

BEST CLUB TO SEE LIVE MUSIC A B C D E F

Callaghan’s O’Daly’s Soul Kitchen The Brickyard The Merry Widow Veet’s

BEST OUTDOOR BAR TO SEE LIVE MUSIC A B C D E F

Bluegill Dority’s Flora-Bama LuLu’s The Frog Pond The Hangout

BEST LOCAL BAND

BEST VENUE TO SEE LIVE MUSIC (NON-BAR)

A Marlow Boys B Modern Eldorados C Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet

A Cedar Street Social Club B Mobile Civic Center Theater

Saenger Theatre The Listening Room The Steeple The Wharf

Abe Partridge Anna McElroy Bruce Smelley Eric Erdman Laurie Anne Armour Ryan Balthrop

BEST JAZZ MUSICIAN A B C D E F

Blake Nolte Chip Herrington John Cochran Rebecca Barry Roman Street Shawn Wright

BEST HIP-HOP ARTIST A B C D E F

2Face Bigmatt Miller Deago Peyton Mr 88 Tommy Chayne Young Tax Return

BEST MUSIC/RECORD STORE Bay Sound Dr Music Fairhope Music Lovin’ Vinyl Records Mobile Flea Market E Mobile Records F Picker’s Paradise A B C D

BEST LOCAL RECORDING STUDIO A B C D E F

Admiral Bean Studio Dauphin Street Sound Day 6 Entertainment Group Dogwood Productions Studio 78 Studio H20

BEST GUITAR PLAYER A B C D E F

Anthony Crawford Ben Cook Corky Hughes John Cochran Phil Proctor Zac Baugh

BEST AREA SINGER/ VOICE A B C D E F

Brandon Coleman Lauren Murphy Ross Newell Savana Lee Crawford Steven Laney Symone French

BEST AREA DRUMMER A B C D E F

Greg DeLuca John Milham Karl Langley Roy Durand Travis Patch Tyler Goodwin

BEST AREA BASSIST A B C D E F

Andrew Wood Ben Leininger Joe Grove Louis Bustin Stan Foster TJ Thompson

BEST PIANO PLAYER/ KEYBOARDIST A B C D E F

Andrew Ayers Blayne Pierce Chris Spies Jacob Hall John Anthony Scott Morlock

BEST DRAG QUEEN PERFORMER A B C D E F

Amber Douglas Champagne Munroe Jawakatema Davenport Miss Cie Venus Zamareyah Dawn

BEST DJ (MIXIN’, MASHIN’UP KIND) A B C D E F

David Jones DJ Dean Cruz DJ Lynch DJ Mbezzle Russell Combs Twiggins

BEST AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL A Frank Brown International Songwriters Festival B Gulf Coast Ethnic & Heritage Jazz Festival C Hangout Music Fest D SouthSounds Music Fest E St. Mary’s Crawfish and Bluegrass Extravaganza F TenSixtyFive

ARTS BEST LOCAL PAINTER A B C D E F

Adam Underwood Ardith Goodwin Austin Boyd Cat Pope Christopher Murray E. Allen Warren


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST LOCAL SCULPTOR A B C D E F

April Livingston Bruce Larsen Frank Ledbetter Freddie Blache Harlan Schwall Steven Dark

BEST LOCAL GRAPHIC DESIGN ARTIST A B C D E F

Andy Scott Bay Paperie James Currie Mallory Godwin Tara McMeans Tripp Gustin

BEST MIXED MEDIA ARTIST A B C D E F

Chris Cumbie Darryl Wilson Emily McCrocklin Julia Greer Fobes Riley Brenes Trey Oliver

BEST ART GALLERY A Alabama Contemporary Art Center B Ashland Gallery C Cathedral Square Art Gallery D Gallery 450 E Innova Arts F Sway

BEST MUSEUM A GulfQuest Maritime Museum B History Museum of Mobile C Mobile Carnival Museum D Mobile Medical Museum E Mobile Museum of Art F USA Archaeology Museum

BEST THEATRE GROUP

BEST ARTS EVENT

A Chickasaw Civic Theatre B Company 11 C Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre D Joe Jefferson Players E Mobile Theatre Guild F Playhouse in the Park

A Fairhope Arts & Crafts Festival B LoDa Artwalk C Mobile Art Council Art Throwdown D Orange Beach Festival of Arts E SouthSounds Arts Festival F Theatre on the Bluff, Fairhope

BEST PLAY OR PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR A Annie - Joe Jefferson B Assassins - Mobile Theatre Guild C Cabaret - Joe Jefferson D Newsies - ESRT E Peter and the Starcatcher - Joe Jefferson F Vagina Monologues Company 11

BEST LOCAL ACTOR A B C D E F

Brooklyn Norstedt Lisa Costa Maslin Brown Matt Kridel Mollie Betsch Nick Smith

BEST DANCER A B C D E F

Carol Odom Caroline McGrath Caylee Farni Isabella Benton Rebekah Howard Shey Thorn

BEST THEATRICAL SINGER A B C D E F

Anabelle Steele Jasyn Fowler Larry Andrews Mollie Betsch Nick Smith Stacey Driskell

EATS & DRINKS BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT Briquettes Steakhouse Dauphin’s Felix’s Fish Camp Osman’s Restaurant Sunset Pointe at Fly Creek Marina F The Noble South

A B C D E

C D E F

BEST CHEF A Allie Henderson - The Harbor Room & Fathoms B Arwen Rice - Red or White C Chris Rainosek - The Noble South D Emmanuel Theris - Georgia Roussos Catering E Jeremiah Matthews, Southwood Kitchen F Weston Simpson - Pour Baby

BEST ATMOSPHERE A B C D E F

BEST NEW RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Char 32 El Papi Southern National Southwood Kitchen The Cheese Cottage The Dublin

LuLu’s Gulf Shores Pirate’s Bar and Grille The Flora-Bama Yacht Club The Gulf

Bluegill Dauphin’s NoJa Pour Baby Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse Sunset Pointe at Fly Creek Marina

MOST INNOVATIVE MENU A B C D E F

Dragonfly Food Bar Kitchen on George Pour Baby Southern National The Noble South Von’s Bistro

Shrimp C Five - Baked Avocado D Heroes Crawfish and Spinach Dip E Mamies Famous Cheese Wafers F Pour Baby - Cheese Flight

C D E F

BEST ENTRÉE IN MOBILE

A Cammie’s Old Dutch Ice Cream Shoppe B Delish Desserts C EllenJay D Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse E Sno Dash Frozen Treats F Stevie’s Kitchen

A Chicken & Grits, Pour Baby B Filet Oscar, Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse C Hanger Steak, Red or White D Jaeger Schnitzel, Osman’s Restaurant E Lamb Chops, Royal Scam F Mobile Bay Stew, Dauphin’s

BEST HOME COOKIN’/ SOUL FOOD A B C D E F

Big Time Diner Delish Desserts Judy’s Place Mama’s on Dauphin Mary’s Southern Cooking Stevie’s Kitchen

BEST SERVER (SERVER NAME AND RESTAURANT)

A B C D E

A April Baker - Camellia Café B Clyniece - Heron Lakes C Dane Batley - Stevie’s Kitchen D Emily Muncaster - The Noble South E Mandy Pringle - Butch Cassidy’s F Stevie P - Dauphin’s

BEST BEACH RESTAURANT

BEST APPETIZER

BEST SERVICE OVERALL (RESTAURANT)

A Cobalt B Fisher’s Dockside

A Bluegill - Flaming Oysters B Bonefish Grill - Bang-Bang

A Dauphin’s B Felix’s Fish Camp

BEST EASTERN SHORE RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill Camellia Café Char 32 Gambino’s Italian Grill Southwood Kitchen Sunset Pointe At Fly Creek Marina

BEST OUTDOOR DINING Bluegill El Papi OK Bicycle Shop Old 27 Grill Sunset Pointe at Fly Creek Marina F The Cheese Cottage

NoJa Pour Baby Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse Sunset Pointe at Fly Creek Marina

BEST DESSERT

BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST A B C D E F

Kitchen on George NoJa Pour Baby Red or White Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse Trellis Room

BEST WINGS A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Butch Cassidy’s Café Heroes Sports Bar & Grille Hooters Moe’s Original BBQ Wemo’s Famous Wings

BEST CHICKEN FINGERS A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Café Chick-fil-A Foosackly’s Raising Cane’s Wemo’s Famous Wings Zaxby’s

BEST ICE CREAM/ YOGURT/GELATO A Baskin Robbins B Cammie’s Old Dutch Ice Cream Shoppe

M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 39


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T. C D E F

Kraze Frozen Treats Mr. Gene’s Beans Serda’s Coffee Co. Sno Dash Frozen Treats

BEST LUNCH SPOT A B C D E F

Bob’s Downtown Restaurant Butch Cassidy’s Café Heroes Sports Bar & Grille Judy’s Place Panini Pete’s Stevie’s Kitchen

BEST EASTERN SHORE LUNCH SPOT A B C D E F

Bluegill Dragonfly Food Bar Eastern Shore Café Guido’s/My Cousin Vinny’s Panini Pete’s Sunset Pointe at Fly Creek Marina

BEST WINE/GOURMET SHOP OR GROCERY A B C D E F

Domke Market Pour Baby Red or White The Cheese Cottage The Fresh Market Whole Foods

BEST WINE SELECTION – RETAIL A B C D E F

Cottage Hill Package Domke Market Greer’s CashSaver Pour Baby Red or White Rouse’s Market

BEST BEER SELECTION – RETAIL A B C D E F

Bebo’s Market Cottage Hill Package Domke Market Greer’s CashSaver Piggly Wiggly Rouse’s Market

BEST ANNUAL FOOD EVENT OR COOK-OFF A American Cancer Society Chili Cookoff B Bay Area Brunchfest C Downtown Cajun Cookoff D Feeding the Gulf Coast Annual Chef’s Challenge E Greekfest F Gulf Shores Shrimp Festival

BEST FOOD TRUCK A Bleus Burger Restaurant, Bar & Food Truck B Smokin’ Gringos

C Texarbama BBQ D Tin-tin’s Rock n Roll Food Truck E Von’s Food Truck F Yellowhammer Coffee

BEST GUMBO A Bob’s Downtown Restaurant B Dew Drop Inn C Original Oyster House D Stevie’s Kitchen E The Royal Scam F Wintzell’s Oyster House

BEST PO BOY A Bluegill B

C D E F

Mudbugs - DIP SeafoodCravin’ Cajun

Mudbugs at The Loop R & R Seafood The Boling Pot Wintzell’s Oyster House

BEST SUSHI Chuck’s Fish Fuji San Master Joe’s Rice Asian Grill & Sushi Bar E Rock-n-Roll Sushi F Wasabi A B C D

BEST BAKERY Bake My Day Flour Girls Bakery Pollman’s Bake Shop Sally’s Piece-a-cake Sugar House Custom Cakes F Sweet Ryn’s Bakery A B C D E

BEST CATERER A B C D E F

Bay Gourmet Chef Rob Delish Desserts Georgia Roussos Catering Naman’s Catering Stevie’s Kitchen

BEST BURGER A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Café Callaghan’s Irish Social Club Heroes Sports Bar & Grille LoDa Bier Garten Mugshots Grill & Bar Old 27 Grill

BEST STEAK A B C D E F

Briquettes Steakhouse Jesse’s Restaurant Longhorn Steakhouse NoJa Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse Texas Roadhouse

40 | L AG N I A P P E | M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8

BEST SEAFOOD Felix’s Fish Camp Half Shell Oyster House Original Oyster House R & R Seafood Sunset Pointe at Fly Creek Marina F Wintzell’s Oyster House

A B C D E

BEST BRUNCH A Bob’s Downtown Restaurant B Brick & Spoon C Callaghan’s Irish Social Club D Spot of Tea E Sunset Pointe at Fly Creek Marina F The Noble South

BEST ETHNIC RESTAURANT 7 Spice Grocery and Grill Hala Cuisine of India Jerusalem Café Mediterranean Sandwich Co. E Rice Asian Grill & Sushi Bar F Yak The Kathmandu Kitchen

A B C D

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT A Agave Mexican Restaurant Fairhope B Fuego C Hacienda San Miguel House of Tequila D La Cocina E Roosters F Taqueria Mexico

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT A Gambino’s Italian Grill B Guido’s/My Cousin Vinny’s C Olive Garden Italian Restaurant D Pizzeria Delphina E Roma Café F Via Emilia

BEST PIZZA A B C D E F

Buck’s Pizza Cortlandt’s Pizza Pub Mellow Mushroom Pizzeria Delphina The Ravenite Pizzeria Trattoria Pizza & Italian

BEST COFFEEHOUSE A Caffeine Corps B Carpe Diem Coffee & Tea Co. C Moka’s Coffee House D Serda’s Coffee Co. E Soul Caffeine F Starbucks

BEST EASTERN SHORE COFFEEHOUSE A B C D E F

Refuge Coffee Serda’s Coffee Co. Soul Caffeine The Burrow Coffee & Co. The Coffee Loft Warehouse Bakery & Donuts

BEST LOCAL GROCERY STORE A B C D E F

Allegri Farm Market Domke Market Greer’s CashSaver International Food Pak Old Shell Market Virginia’s Health Food

BEST GROCERY CHAIN A B C D E F

Fresh Market Piggly Wiggly Publix Rouse’s Market Whole Foods Winn-Dixie

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODSMOBILE A B C D E F

Li’l Brian’s Produce Market in the Square Mobile Flea Market Old Shell Market Sessions Farm Ted & Nancy’s Fruit & Vegetables

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS – BALDWIN A B C D E

Allegri Farm Market Burris Farmers Market Fairhope Health Food Greer’s Market Hazel’s Market

C D E F

Meat Boss Moe’s Original BBQ Saucy Q Bar-B-Que Texarbama BBQ

BEST RAW OYSTERS A B C D E F

Bluegill Felix’s Fish Camp Half Shell Oyster House Original Oyster House Papa Rocco’s Wintzell’s Oyster House

BEST CUPCAKE Delish Desserts EllenJay Flour Girls Bakery Sally’s Piece-a-cake Simply Sweet Cupcake Boutique F Sugar House Custom Cakes

A B C D E

BEST SEAFOOD MARKET A Billy’s Seafood B Lartigue’s Seafood Market C Market by the Bay D Mudbugs - DIP SeafoodCravin’ Cajun

E Mudbugs at the Loop F Southern Fish & Oyster

BEST HANGOVER FOOD A Bob’s Downtown Restaurant B Foosackly’s C LoDa Bier Garten D Old 27 Grill E Rice Asian Grill & Sushi Bar F Waffle House

MEDIA

BEST BARBECUE RESTAU- FAVORITE RADIO RANT STATION FM A B C D E F

Cotton State BBQ Dreamland Bar-B-Que Meat Boss Moe’s Original BBQ Saucy Q Bar-B-Que Sonny’s BBQ

BEST BARBECUE SAUCE A B C D E F

Cotton State BBQ Dreamland Bar-B-Que Meat Boss Moe’s Original BBQ Saucy Q Bar-B-Que Texarbama BBQ

BEST RIBS A Dreamland Bar-B-Que B McMillan Barbecue

A B C D E F

96.1 The Rocket FM TALK 106.5 WABD 97.5 WBLX 93.9 WKSJ 94.9 WZEW 92.1

FAVORITE RADIO STATION AM A Archangel 1410 AM B WABF 1480 C WNTM News Radio 710

BEST LOCAL DJ A Gene Murrell WZEW B Mystic Marge - WZEW

C D E F

Nick at Nite - WBLX Shelby Mitchell - WKSJ Tony Plosczynski - WZEW Twiggins - WABD

BEST DJ TEAM A Dan Brennan & Shelby Mitchell - WKSJ B Matt McCoy & Gossip Greg - KISS 107.3 C Mobile Mornings with Sean, Dalton & Kelly - FM Talk 106.5 D Sip & Chew with Mike & Stu, FM Talk 106.5 E Sports Drive - Randy & Creg - WNSP F TLC in the Morning - Tim and LeeAnn Camp WZEW

BEST MORNING SHOW/ DJ A Mobile Mornings with Sean, Dalton & Kelly - FM Talk 106.5 B The Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shirvanian - WNSP C TLC in the Morning - Tim and LeeAnn Camp WZEW D Uncle Henry - News Radio 710

NAKED DJ VOICE – HIM (BEST VOICE) A Dalton Orwig - FM Talk 106.5 B Gossip Greg - Kiss 107.3 C Matt McCoy - Kiss 107.3 D Tony Plosczynski - WZEW E Twiggins - WABD F Uncle Henry - News Radio 710

NAKED DJ VOICE – HER (BEST VOICE) A Bambi - 93BLX B Jolene Roxbury - FM Talk 106.5 C Kelly Finley - FM Talk 106.5 D LeeAnn Camp - WZEW E Mystic Marge - WZEW F Shelby Mitchell - WKSJ

BEST TALK RADIO HOST/ SHOW A Midday Mobile – FM Talk 106.5 B Mobile Mornings with Sean, Dalton & Kelly - FM Talk 106.5 C Sip & Chew with Mike & Stu, FM Talk 106.5 D Sports Drive with Randy & Creg - WNSP E The Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shirvanian – WNSP


F Uncle Henry

BEST SPORTS RADIO HOST/SHOW A John Racciatti Golf Show - WNSP B Paul Finebaum -FM Talk C Prep Sports Report - FM Talk D Sports Drive with Randy & Creg - WNSP E Tee Time for the Gulf Coast - FM Talk F The Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shirvanian WNSP

BEST LOCAL EVENING TV NEWSCAST A FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST LOCAL MORNING TV NEWSCAST A FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST ANCHOR A B C D E F

Bob Grip - WALA FOX 10 Darwin Singleton - WPMI Devon Walsh - WKRG Greg Peterson - WPMI Mel Showers - WKRG Rose Ann Haven WKRG

BEST METEOROLOGIST A B C D E F

Alan Sealls - WKRG Jason Smith - FOX 10 John Nodar - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Michael White - FOX 10 Thomas Geboy – WKRG

BEST TV INVESTIGATIVE

REPORTER A B C D E F

Andrea Ramey - WPMI Cassi Fambro - WPMI Hayley Minogue - WKRG JB Biunno - WKRG Kati Weis - Fox 10 Peter Albrecht WKRG

BEST SPORTS COVERAGE A FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST WEEKEND TV NEWS TEAM A FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSMAN A B C D E F

Bill Riales - WKRG Darwin Singleton - WPMI Jason Smith - FOX 10 Lance Crawford - WPMI Michael White - FOX 10 Peter Albrecht – WKRG

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSWOMAN A B C D E F

Chasity Byrd - FOX 10 Devon Walsh - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Lenise Ligon - FOX 10 Megan Gannon - WPMI Shelby Myers - FOX 10

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE WRITER A B C D E

Andy MacDonald, Cuisine Asia Frey, Film Dale Liesch, Reporter Jason Johnson, Reporter Jeff Poor, Commentary

F Kevin Lee, Arts

County

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER STORY

FAVORITE LOCAL WEBSITE OR BLOG

A Barley Legal by Dale Liesch & Jason Johnson B Cost of Water By Gabriel Tynes, Jason Johnson & Dale Liesch C Hooked by Jason Johnson D Love Bugs by Dale Liesch E Shell Shock by Jason Johnson F Undaunted by Dale Liesch

A B C D E F

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER IMAGE A Across the Barricade by Laura Rasmussen B Cost of Water by Laura Rasmussen C Deep Blue by Dan Anderson D Hooked by Laura Rasmussen E Nappies Cover 2017 of Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig & Kelly Finley by Dan Anderson F Shell Shock by Dan Anderson

FAVORITE AL.COM CONTENT CREATOR A B C D E F

Ben Raines JD Crowe John Archibald John Sharp Lawrence Specker Michelle Irvin

FAVORITE GLOSSY MAGAZINE A B C D E F

Access Exalte Mobile Bay Monthly Mobile Bay Parents Mobile Mask Relocating Baldwin

All Things Mobile Arrested in Mobile Centsible Blonde Lemon Baby Mobile Mask The Wanderlust Dietician

BEST LOCAL TV AD A B C D E F

David J. Maloney Eiland & Ritchie Greene & Phillips Infirmary Cancer Care Joe Bullard Wind Creek

BEST WEBSITE DEVELOPER A B C D E F

Altegra Technologies Blue Fish Mighty Optera Creative Option 3 Media Southern View Media

BEST MARKETING/ EVENTS COMPANY A JJPR B Marissa Thetford Marketing C Muller Marketing Group D Option 3 Media E Oyster Shell Strategies F Portside Adverstising

POLITICOS HARDEST WORKING OFFICIAL - CITY OF MOBILE (ELECTED OR APPOINTED) A Chief of Police Lawrence Battiste

B City Attorney Ricardo Woods C Director of Communications George Talbot D Finance Director Paul Wesch E Mayor Sandy Stimpson F Public Safety Director James Barber

HARDEST WORKING MOBILE CITY COUNCILPERSON A B C D

Bess Rich Fred Richardson John Williams Levon Manzie

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL MOBILE COUNTY A Mobile County Commissioner Connie Hudson B Mobile County Commissioner Jerry Carl C Mobile County Commissioner Merceria Ludgood D Mobile County DA Ashley Rich E Mobile County License Commissioner Nick Matranga F Mobile County Sheriff Sam Cochran

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIALEASTERN SHORE A Dane Haygood, Daphne Mayor B Jack Burrell, Fairhope City Councilman C Jimmy Conyers, Fairhope City Councilman D Karin Wilson, Fairhope Mayor E Kevin Boone, Fairhope City Councilman F Michael M. McMillan,

Spanish Fort Mayor

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL BALDWIN COUNTY A Baldwin County Sheriff Hoss Mack B County Commissioner Charles Gruber C County Commissioner Chris Elliot D County Commissioner Frank Burt E County Commissioner Tucker Dorsey F David Tarwater, Baldwin County School Board, District 2

HARDEST WORKING LOCAL STATE LEGISLATOR A B C D E F

Rep. Chris Pringle Rep. David Sessions Rep. Margie Wilcox Rep. Randy Davis Sen. Bill Hightower Sen. Rusty Glover

WHO WILL BE THE NEXT GOVERNOR OF ALABAMA? A B C D E F

Bill Hightower Kay Ivey Scott Dawson Sue Bell Cobb Tommy Battle Walt Maddox

BIGGEST SCANDAL OF THE YEAR A Daphne Sewer Spill B Fairhope Mayor Council Drama C Mobile City Council President Impasse D Prichard Chief of Staff Arrest E Roy Moore Accusations

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ART ARTIFICE

International star arrives at Mobile Ballet

BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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obile must have powerful allure. A new artistic denizen left the most permanent home she’s ever had for the Azalea City. “We were downtown, sitting outdoors having lunch yesterday and said ‘we think we’re going to like this.’ We really like this downtown area,” Mobile Ballet Artistic Director Katia Garza said. Garza and husband Israel Rodriguez relocated from Orlando in early May where Garza has worked for the last 18 years. For dancers, that kind of permanence is an exception. “We’re super, super happy for the opportunity. It’s something of a goal for this year, to come and make everything better and to be our best,” Garza said. Rodriguez boasts his own dance chops, hence his role as Mobile Ballet’s ballet master. The Cuba native has more than a quarter century of experience performing, teaching and choreographing. For Garza, the dancer’s life came naturally. Her mother taught ballet, with Katia taking her first lessons at age 3. By age 10 she was in professional ballet school. There was movement offstage, too. Garza said her parents moved to 13 different states in Mexico before settling in urban Monterrey where her career began. The youngest of three daughters, constant adaptation could explain Katia’s ebullient personality. The family’s creative seeds blossomed in the cultural opportunities of big-city life. Garza described her oldest sister as a Mexico City architect, actress, producer, opera singer and “into arts” but not a dancer. “She’s just like a critic, kinda,” Garza groaned playfully. The middle sister was a principal dancer with the Mon-

Upstart theatrical troupe holds auditions

will begin once the show is cast. Go to company11.org/auditions for details and an audition packet.

Artists needed for state project

The Mobile Arts Council is pitching in on the state’s bicentennial effort for next year when “Alabama 200 for 200” will celebrate the individuals and groups who shaped the state. MAC will commission 200 portraits of Alabamians who have made a significant impact and will utilize state artists for duty. The show is slated to open in September or October 2019. Artists must engage in an application process during which they will suggest a few of their top subject choices. The final date for application is May 31. Notification of selection

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FOR GARZA, THE DANCER’S LIFE CAME NATURALLY. HER MOTHER TAUGHT BALLET, WITH KATIA TAKING HER FIRST LESSONS AT AGE 3. BY AGE 10 SHE WAS IN PROFESSIONAL BALLET SCHOOL.” November show highlighting various master composers along with Gershwin and Louis Armstrong. “It will be sort of jazzy, more dedicated to people in Mobile and will bring in all the history in their music,” Garza said. There’s the customary “Nutcracker” in December and the spring brings “The Little Mermaid,” based not on Disney but Hans Christian Andersen. Garza said a special designer will be needed for costumes and sets. Meanwhile they’re enjoying the charm of their new town. Rodriguez finds it reminiscent of his time in Louisville, Kentucky. “We discovered a lot of things in downtown, the area and the houses. It’s such a pretty place, very beautiful,” Garza said.

will be sent out starting July 1. Artists will be given their assignments of the five to 10 individuals or groups no later than Aug. 1. The RFP for artists is available now and artists can apply online at webportalapp.com/ webform/al200for200 through May 31.

Ballet lawsuit dropped

A 2017 lawsuit against Mobile Ballet has ended. Plaintiffs’ attorney Ray Thompson filed a motion for dismissal without prejudice dated May 10, ending a contentious squabble that divided Mobile’s dance community. A group of then former and current Mobile Ballet board of directors filed the action alleging procedural and financial improprieties by various people, including board members and

Mobile Ballet Director Karen Kennedy. They claimed violation of state and federal law. Defendants decried the lawsuit as “false and reckless” while their counsel cited ulterior motives. A new school, Classical Ballet of Mobile, was established later the same year employing former Mobile Ballet Artistic Director Winthrop Corey. Mobile County Circuit Judge Jay York dismissed some lawsuits on Sept. 7, 2017, without striking a claim for injunctive relief. The new motion for dismissal cited the departure of Kennedy and Sandra Parker from the board presidency as contributing factors. Kennedy told Lagniappe she tendered her resignation on Feb. 7 after six years in the position. Jill Ringold succeeded Parker as board president.

ARTSGALLERY

After Company 11’s overwhelming success with “The Vagina Monologues,” they’re ready to tackle a new project. Enter Marsha Norman’s “’night, Mother.” Winner of a Pulitzer Prize and a Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, this work centers on a young woman’s decision to end her life and the following interactions with her mother. Cory Olson will direct a two-person cast, one woman aged 35-45 and another woman 55-plus. Auditions will be held May 21 and 22, 6 p.m. at 60 N. Ann St., the corner of Ann and Old Shell. Auditions will consist of memorized one-minute monologues of the actors’ choosing and cold readings from the script. Show dates are July 26 through Aug. 4, Thursday through Saturday nights. Rehearsals

terrey Ballet. Katia cited her as inspirational. The youngest Garza girl’s path was a little harder. She described a dehumanizing process, where school officials would measure young dancers’ bodies — leg size, torso proportions, parents’ builds — to weed out those who varied from willowy norms. “I’m not a teeny, classic-style ballet dancer. Everybody asks if I work with weights and I never have. My body is just strong naturally,” Garza said. Her athletic physique prompted discouragement from most teachers but she ignored them. At 16, she became an apprentice at Monterrey Ballet. At 18, she was hired and six months later became a principal dancer. “My husband and I say we don’t have any power to tell anybody they are not going to succeed in this career. I believe it depends on the fire in the student and the support they get from families and teachers,” Garza said. The professional experience also ushered in romance, despite sibling rivalry. A principal dancer at Monterrey Ballet, Rodriguez paired with Katia’s older sister. He noticed a young apprentice who looked like his partner. Katia mimicked the response: “Ugh, that’s my younger sister.” Rodriguez frequently visited the Garza home as one of the middle daughter’s pals. “I really hated him a lot because I was so jealous of her,” Katia sneered in jest. The middle sister moved on and the youngest ascended to principal. She began to dance with Rodriguez. Familiarity became friendship, then something more intense.

Their wedding ceremony was in a theater. Invitations were patterned after event posters and guests had tickets for entrance. Television crews were present. “We did it onstage, in tutus and costumes, a ballet performance,” Garza said. July marks 18 years since that event. They chose Orlando as their base for new professional and personal voyages. Both were principals with Orlando Ballet — Garza became a U.S. citizen in 2007 — yet traveled extensively across the South and internationally. Garza was chosen one of Mexico’s most successful choreographers and invited to return for guest work. The documentary film “My Life in Dance” detailed her struggles and triumphs. “There’s a thousand stories like mine but we wanted to let other generations know they can do it,” Garza said. She’s already at work. Plans for the upcoming season include “Ovation,” a


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have siblings in bands, it can be a volatile situation. You’re the only non-sibling. What’s it like being the only non-brother on the road with the band? Does everybody get along? Wagner: Yeah! They’ve all grown up together, and like I said, we all grew up in this very small town. So they were kind of forced to spend a lot of nce again, Gulf Shores is play- time in the same household growing up. They all ing host to one of the world’s get along very well. Jake and Josh are twins. So, most epic beach parties as The I firmly believe in telepathy; they’re on the same Hangout Music Festival mixes wavelength, so that helps communication. a plethora of music styles with I’ve been going to school with Sam since the sun and sand. From hip-hop to first grade. He and I have known of each other EDM, this festival’s lineup has for quite some time. This is our first band. None a little something for everyone. of us have played in bands before. We’ve learned Greta Van Fleet, with members ranging in age everything as a unit. I think that’s pretty important from 19 to 22, will give the festival a healthy dose in recognizing our relationship on the road. We get of early ‘70s, Led Zeppelin-style proto-metal and along really well. roots rock translated for the modern age. With its Centanni: You’ve got two releases: “Black latest “double EP” release “From the Fires” mainSmoke Rising” and “From the Fires,” which is taining the band’s momentum, Greta Van Fleet has “Black Smoke” plus a few more songs. I’ve seen been alternating between the studio and the road in “From the Fires” billed as a “double EP.” What an effort to release the band’s first full-length. made you guys want to do a double EP? Ahead of taking the Mermaid Stage on Sunday Wagner: Well, we released “Black Smoke Risat 6:30 p.m., drummer Danny Wagner phoned Laing” as a statement piece with a single on it just to gniappe to discuss the upcoming album, the band’s dip our toes in the water and see what the rock ‘n’ Hangout set and life in Greta Van Fleet. roll world was like. It was our debut piece, so we deStephen Centanni: How did a young guy like cided to keep it a less-is-more kind of deal. It really you get focused on such a classic rock sound? started happening. “Highway Tune” started spreading Danny Wagner: You know, I believe it’s a comworldwide, which was really fun to watch. bination of my upbringing and where I’m from. I’m What happened was we started getting busier from a very, very, very small town (Frankenmuth, and busier and [there was] a demand for more mateMichigan) that only holds four or five thousand peorial, because it was a four-song EP. We decided that ple. So it’s very isolated. Being that was the case, I didn’t listen to a whole lot of pop radio growing up. “Black Smoke Rising” maybe wasn’t a complete It was mainly just CDs and cassettes and vinyls that thought yet. We thought we would extend it with were laying around the house. That was what I grew songs that were older and a couple of covers to show our influences as a band. We decided after up listening to. That’s how I developed my style. adding those four new songs that it was closer My influences all come together in a variety of difto a complete thought and more of a piece of art. ferent ways and a variety of different instruments. That was our way of getting more material out and Centanni: Speaking of your hometown, what keeping the buzz, because we’re working on a fullwas it like trying to break out of there as a band? length right now. Wagner: I mean, there’s no doubt that it’s been Centanni: Marlon Young and Al Sutton were crazy for the past year. So I have to say it was easier producers on this album, and their experience inthan was planned or expected at all. At the same cludes Kid Rock and Hank Williams Jr. That blows time, it was great, because we can always go home my mind when I listen to your album because you and there’s lots of support. There’s been support guys are worlds away from that. What made you from the very beginning of this whole band from want to go with those two? the local community and local figures and groups Wagner: We met and started collaborating with of families and friends. It’s really remarkable to Al Sutton originally. The way we heard about him go home. Everyone treats everyone the exactly the was through a lot of other people we met locally in same, and I love that. Michigan. We met the singer of the band Sponge Centanni: One red flag that I’ve gotten from Greta Van Fleet is that you have three siblings (Josh that comes out of Michigan; his name is Vinnie Dombroski. We had met up with him a couple of Kiszka, Jake Kiszka and Sam Kiszka) in the band times, and he was giving us a push as a very young and you. Rock history has taught that when you

MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Greta Van Fleet making their mark Band: Hangout Music Festival Date: May 18-20 Venue: The Hangout, 101 E. Beach Blvd. (Gulf Shores), www.hangoutmusicfest.com Tickets: $319, available through festival website

O

Photo/ Republic Records

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It’s been a whirlwind year for Greta Van Fleet, an emerging rock outfit whose sound has been compared to Led Zeppelin. band before management companies and labels and all that. We had just been recommended Al Sutton. They all basically said, “If you want the best rock ‘n’ roll, you have to go with Al Sutton at Rustbelt Studios in Royal Oak. It’s the dirtiest, most rock ‘n’ roll studio with the most dirty rock ‘n’ roll sound that you can catch.” We went there and made an appointment to collaborate and see how it worked. It worked pretty well from the beginning, and we developed a great relationship ever since. Centanni: Let’s talk about the new album. Tell me everything you can about that. Wagner: I’ll do my best. We decided that 2018 would bring a lot of new things, and it would be a great time, coincidentally with everything is scheduling in our crazy touring adventures, we would have some off-time dedicated throughout the year. We took January, February, bits of March and a little time in April. We’re still bouncing back and forth. We have been diligently working on this new album. We’re about to release more material than we have out right now. It will be all new material and all original material. I’m very excited, because we took the exact, same crew that we’ve always had back home and moved the recording process to Nashville at Blackbird Studios. That studio is just amazing. It’s like a little chunk of heaven in Nashville. We love it. Because of that, we were able to record very quickly, and we’re almost to completion, which is incredible. Centanni: How much of that original material will we be hearing at Hangout Fest? Wagner: That’s a good question! Generally at our shows, we’ll play the classic material, and we always throw in some new stuff. Depending on how long the full set time is, you’ll definitely hear a few new songs.


MUSIC BRIEFS

Get funky

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Big Sam’s Funky Nation Date: Wednesday, May 23, with doors at 7:30 p.m. Venue: The Merry Widow, 51 S. Conception St., www.themerrywidow.net Tickets: $15, available through Ticketfly

Photo | Submitted | Big Sam’s Funky Nation

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fter recuperating from Hangout Fest, locals should consider rebounding with Big Sam’s Funky Nation. Trombonist Sammie “Big Sam” Williams reigns supreme over this brass-heavy funk outfit. Williams himself is a founding member of the Stooges Brass Band and has spent time in the ranks of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band. Big Sam’s Funky Nation is setting standards for the new-school funk outfits coming out of the Big Easy. “Brass and funk in New Orleans right now is stronger than it’s ever been,” Williams said. “I thought [Hurricane] Katrina was going to get rid of the culture altogether, but we’re pretty resilient and kept the culture alive. You can’t get

rid of us. We’re here to stay.” Williams and his Funky Nation plan to fill The Merry Widow with sounds from the band’s latest effort, “Songs in the Key of Funk, Vol. 1.” The collection of tunes is a welcome flashback to the R&B-infused days of funk that made household names of such groups as The Gap Band and Morris Day & the Time. Throughout the album, vigorous rhythms are met with a classic synth sound that sets this style apart. As far as the live delivery of these tunes, Williams said “Poke Chop” has become a favorite for both the band and its crowds. He also added that if “things go well,” the band expects to release “Songs in the Key of Funk, Vol. 2” next year.

EP release party

Band: Love the Hate Album Release Party Date: Saturday, May 19, 9 p.m. Venue: Touchdown Tavern, 5441 U.S. Route 90 W., 251-622-7543 Tickets: Call for more info. Love the Hate could be one of the most tenacious and committed rock outfits in the Azalea City. Drawing inspiration from such mainstream metal outfits as Chevelle and Breaking Benjamin, Frank Killian (guitar), Leon Craft (bass) and Johnny Love (drums) mix intricate guitar work with thundering rhythms, creating a path for frontman Butch Howell’s soaring vocal work. Love the Hate will be celebrating the release of its EP “Burn.” Off the Grid will open.

On “Burn,” Love the Hate drops into a modern perception of American society with the anthemic “Bleed the Weak.” The EP provides undeniable contrast to “Bleed the Weak” with the album’s title track. Instrumentally, the quartet channels Love the Hate’s rage into a sonic concentration tamed by Howell’s vocals. This collection is a perfect cross-section of the band’s sound and a perfect introduction for new listeners.

Punk ‘n’ roll

Band: Roman Gabriel Todd, S.O.S.S., Scraepers Papers, Blotchouts Date: Saturday, May 19, 9 p.m. Venue: The Blind Mule, 57 N. Claiborne St., www.theblindmule.net Tickets: $5 at the door

Roman Gabriel Todd has shocked and energized with his intense and sometimes blasphemous form of rock ‘n’ roll. Armed with a junior bass, Todd has fronted projects ranging from Supreme Dispassion to RGT’s Beast Rising Out of the Sea. Todd recently has been performing as the “Man Alone.” He may be the only person on stage, but Todd has no problem ensnaring crowds in his sonic frenzy, which he’s delivered nationwide in relentless tour runs.

S.O.S.S. will lend support, playing homegrown garage punk from its self-titled debut on Jeth-Row Records. This show marks the return of Scraepers Papers to The Blind Mule. The trio’s experimental organ-fueled punk and memorable lyrics provide hope for the future of the Azalea City underground scene. Billed as “tite weirdness from local weirdo Yacob,” Blotchouts complete this insane mix of local talent. M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 45


AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | May 16 - May 22 Please send upcoming music to listings@ lagniappemobile.com by MONDAY before Wednesday’s paper.

WED. MAY 16 Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz Blind Mule— Matt Neese Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Brickyard— Chad Davidson Band Cockeyed Charlie’s— Karaoke JJ, 9p Felix’s— Matt Bush Duo Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p // Alabama Lightning, 5:30p /// Rhonda Hart Duo, 6p //// Mario Mena Band, 10p ///// Bruce Smelley Duo 10:15p Lulu’s— Adam Holt with Jimmy Lumpkin, 5p

THURS. MAY 17 Beau Rivage (Coast Nightclub)— Triggerproof Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz Belle Fontaine Sandbar— Shelby Brown, 8p Bluegill— Adam Holt Blues Tavern— Art & Friends Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Brickyard— Yellowhammer Callaghan’s— Nordista Freeze Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ JJ, 10p Felix’s— Jeri Flora Bama— J. Hawkins Duo, 2p // Mason Henderson, 5p /// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p //// Al & Cathy, 6p ///// Mark Sherrill, Chris Newbury, James Daniel & Jose Santiago, 6p ////// Bruce Smelley & Jo Jo Pres, 10p /////// Delta Smoke, 10:15p //////// Yeah, Probably, 10:30 Lulu’s— Justin Yawn, 5p Manci’s— Ross Newell Off The Hook— Sugarbabies Karaoke Patricia’s— Nick Wood, 7p

FRI. MAY 18 Beau Rivage (Coast Nightclub)— Triggerproof Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz Belle Fontaine Sandbar— Jimmy Lumpkin & the Revivalists, 9p Bluegill— Lee Yankee, 12p // Blind Dog Mike, 6p Blues Tavern— Fat Lincoln Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese Duo Brickyard— Tyler Mac Band Cockeyed Charlie’s— Chad Davidson Dority’s Bar and Grill— Black Mouth Cur, 6p Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Flora Bama— Destiny Brown, 1p // LeaAnne Creswel Duo,

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2p /// Zachary Diedrick, 4p //// Jack Robertson a.k.a. The Big Earl Show, 5:30p ///// Alabama Lightning, 6p ////// Lee Yankie & The Hellz Yeah, 6p /////// Kevin Swanson & Jon Puzan, 8p //////// Foxy Iguanas, 10p ///////// Brandon White Duo, 10:15p ////////// Yellowhammer, 10:30 Golden Nugget— Steve Earle & The Dukes, 8p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Cam Pyle Band, 9:30p Listening Room— The Red Clay Strays w/Camm Lewis, 8p Lulu’s— Jeri, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Ryan Balthrop, 8p Manci’s— Josh Ewing Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Soulphonics, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Denver Hawsey, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (OBA) — Pale Moon Rising Off The Hook— Keith “The Mailman” Burns Patricia’s— Doobious, 8p Wind Creek Casino— Tommy Morse Band

SAT. MAY 19 Beau Rivage— Lee Greenwood, 8p Beau Rivage (Coast Nightclub)— Triggerproof Beau Rivage (Eight75)— Dian Diaz Belle Fontaine Sandbar— Sheets to the Wind, 9p Big Beach Brewing— Brigham Cason, 6:30p Bluegill— Jamie Adamson, 12p // Jason Justice & the Hung Jury, 6p Blues Tavern— Doobious Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Boudreaux’s Zydeco Brickyard— Mario Mena Trio Callaghan’s— Greg Padilla Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ MBezzle, 10p Dority’s Bar and Grill— The Foxy Iguanas Felix’s— Jamie Adamson Duo Flora Bama— Rebecca Barry Duo, 12p // Al & Cathy, 1p /// Wes Loper, 1p //// Big Muddy, 2p ///// Sugarcane Jane 2p ////// Brittany Grimes, 4p /////// Greg Lyons, 5p //////// Jack Robertson Show a.k.a. Big Earl, 5:30p ///////// Ja Rhythm, 6p ////////// Zach Diedrick, Kevin Swanson, & Jon Puzan, 6p /////////// Dave Chastang, 8p /////////// Red Clay Strays, 10p //////////// Cloverdale, 10:15p ///////////// Oliver’s Twist, 10:15p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Cam Pyle Band, 9:30p IP Casino— Styx, 8p Listening Room— Shannon McNally, 8p Lulu’s— Bill Wharton, 5p Manci’s— Camm Lewis Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Jonny Hollis, 4p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Hundred Dollar Car Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Phil and Foster, 6:30p

Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Chris Hergenroder Off The Hook— Mike Rowland Patricia’s— Delta Smoke, 5p // LA South, 8p Waves DI— Cosmic Bullets, 8p Wind Creek Casino— Tommy Morse Band

SUN. MAY 20 Big Beach Brewing— Johnny Mullen + Brittany Bell, 4p Bluegill— Quintin Berry 12p // Ty Taylor & the Kinfolks, 6p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Andy Cloninger Brickyard— Jake Burford Callaghan’s— Molly Thomas and The Rare Birds Cockeyed Charlie’s— Karaoke Jordan Bramlett, 10p Felix’s— Jimmy Lumpkin Flora Bama— Smokey Otis Trio, 12p // J. Hawkins Duo, 1p /// Songs of Rusty McCugh w/ Jason Justice, 1:30p //// Al & Cathy, 2p ///// Bruce Smelley Duo, 4p ////// Lee Yankie, 5:30p /////// Cloverdale, 5:30p //////// Little Texas, 6p ///////// Perdido Brothers, 6p ////////// Bruce Smelley Duo, 10:15p /////////// Mario Mena Band, 10:30p Joe Cain Cafe— Laurie Armour Listening Room— Ryan Balthrop, 7p Lulu’s— Light Travelers, 5p Off The Hook— Open Mic w/ Elaine Petty Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Veets— Gypsypearl, 8p Zebra Club— Tony-Ray Thompson

MON. MAY 21 Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Blind Dog Mike Brickyard— Brennan & Christian Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 2p // Zachary Diedrick, 5:30 /// Open Mic w/ Cathy Pace, 6p //// Whyte Caps, 10p ///// Petty & Pace 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p Soul Kitchen— Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul

TUES. MAY 22 Bluegill— Quintin Berry Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— Jerry Powell Felix’s— Jamie Adamson Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p // Kyle Wilson Duo, 5:30p /// Perdido Brothers, 6p //// Jo Jo Pres, 10p ///// Logan Spicer, 10:15p Lulu’s— Three Bean Soup, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Emily Stuckey


STYLE BOOZIE

Fairhope teen prepares to ‘Pedal the Pacific’ against human trafficking

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BY GABI GARRETT/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

adi Warner just graduated from an often confusing time — high school — but talking to her, you would assume she was a young adult in her early 20s. She not only holds herself well and speaks eloquently, but her drive to change the world is impressive. Warner plans to major in English at The University of Alabama this fall. Prior to rushing her favorite sorrority on Aug. 11, though, she has a world to change. In just a few weeks, she heads to Seattle to participate in Pedal the Pacific, a group started by three young women last year to raise awareness of human trafficking. Pedal the Pacific is in its second year, but was originally meant to be a one-time event to spark conversation about human trafficking and the estimated 30 million to 45 million people who are trapped in modern-day slavery today. Among the 83 women that applied, Warner is one of 11 who are selfproclaimed “hilariously unathletic” yet passionate about fighting the sex trafficking phenomenon facing not only our nation, but the world. Warner is the youngest of the 11 and traveling the farthest from home. When asked if Warner was intimidated by this month-long, naturally out-of-comfort-zone adventure, she said, “Yes.” But without hesitation, she continued. “I finally did my 60-mile ride, and it was so difficult that at the 40-mile mark my body felt so tired, I began to cry. I had a coach with me and she encouraged me. ‘It’s just pain,’ she said,” Warner said, “Then, I connected the dots. This small about of pain I’m feeling is just discomfort compared to the horror victims of human trafficking are facing.” This realization coupled with the pop song “This Is My Fight Song” kept Warner going to the last 10 miles, which she noted flew by because she was fueled by such passion for this cause.

“The reason Pedal the Pacific is so important to me is the girls are just regular girls, just like me, but they’re doing something to help end human trafficking,” Warner said. “When I saw them on social media I thought ‘This is crazy and I want to help.’” The organization raised $60,000 last year, which will build a Refuge Ranch in Texas for minors rescued from human trafficking. It will house 48 girls ages 11-19 and will serve as a model for future refuges, it is hoped. According to recent research conducted by the University of Texas, 79,000 people are victims of human trafficking in the state of Texas alone. Without the ranch, there are only 24 beds for victims in Texas today. The contrast of those numbers is startling. The goal for this summer’s ride is $250,000, which will continue to increase support for victims around the United States. After the ride concludes, Warner hopes she will arrive at The University of Alabama which such strong legs the ground will shake as she walks onto campus. “It’s always been my dream to teach English. Since I was little, every grade I graduated I decided that was the ‘best year so far,’ so that’s the year I wanted to teach,” laughed Warner. “Since I’ve learned of human trafficking, though, I can’t imagine myself not being part of the fight.” Warner hopes during her quiet pedal time — 60 miles per day — she will have time to develop her thoughts and reaffirm her plans for the future. Even if you’re just one person facing a seemingly impossible challenge such as human trafficking, Warner reminds me, you can still make a difference. Help support the cause by visiting: pedalthepacific.com/donate. Editor’s note: The author of this story donated her compensation to Madi Warner’s cause.

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FILMTHE REEL WORLD

Aaron Sorkin deals a royal flush

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BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA

THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655

aron Sorkin has found his muse in Jessica Chastain, who is certainly up to the task of bringing the signature Sorkin hyperarticulate dialogue to life as the star of “Molly’s Game.” When she’s not trading verbose quips with the equally formidable Idris Elba, she is narrating the film, and in her capable hands a complex and dense story is made clear and exciting, despite a somewhat bloated run time. As real-life character Molly Bloom, Chastain portrays a person bred for success by her demanding father (Kevin Costner) and, when her Olympic skiing career is derailed by an injury, she turns her prodigious abilities to excel in any field to a completely unexpected one. A low-paying job in the office of a real estate mogul changes her life forever when she starts running his weekly, secret, high-stakes poker game. Molly quickly learns more than her boss about his game and his high-profile clients and, when the timing is right, she poaches the whole affair and makes it her own. This whole turn of events is fun and exciting to witness, as Molly goes from Googling poker terminology to managing a game with a $50,000 buy-in.

This film and Molly’s character are created entirely from action: Molly has no life beyond what she does. She has no love interest, no personal life, nothing like that is on display in this film. Every bit of her character is external, yet Chastain creates a character from this. She is a fascinating portrait of almost pure ambition that is rare to see in a female role. Aside from her wardrobe, however, she doesn’t exist much as a male or a female; she is a brain determined to make money, and a voice telling us how she did it. Depending on your taste, this is a shortcoming, or it’s just a facet of the film. Is it a statement that to be this driven, everything else must fall away? Or is this just Sorkin’s particular way of telling his story? If creative writing classes teach you “show, not tell,” Sorkin was absent that day. All Molly does is tell and tell and tell. But it’s a fascinating story she’s telling. The cast of poker players rounds out the film nicely. Michael Cera plays a movie star Molly simply refers to as Player X, and Cera makes him matterof-factly despicable. His desire to win is motivated by his need to make other people lose, and his glee is perfectly underplayed. Cera brings a lot to his

character beyond his default nerd setting, and it’s a weirdly powerful role for him. “Stranger Things” fans will delight in the presence of Joe Keery as a trust-funded gambler, and Chris O’Dowd gives us some of the film’s rare moments of human emotion, even if it isn’t very noble. This film is so devoid of human feeling that even the gorgeous women paid to hang out aren’t paid for anything sexual. This is a purely cerebral movie, like an action film. Except the action isn’t car chases or shootouts, it’s lost fortunes and courtroom reveals. When Molly gets nabbed by the Feds, her reluctant lawyer (Idris Elba) tries to figure out why she will go so far as to name names in a tell-all book she just published, but won’t name others to keep herself out of prison. With the Russian mob involved, the stakes are pretty high. I do think the film could have been shorter, but with Aaron Sorkin directing an Aaron Sorkin script, I can see how cutting anything was unlikely. A fascinating story brought to life by a spellbinding star, “Molly’s Game” is Chastain’s film, and a gripping journey through a rarefied world. “Molly’s Game” is currently available to rent.

RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266 CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Photos | STX Entertainment / Twentieth Century Fox

From left: “Molly’s Game” is the true story of Molly Bloom, an Olympic-class skier who ran the world’s most exclusive high-stakes poker game and became an FBI target. Ryan Reynolds returns as Deadpool, who brings together a team of fellow mutant rogues to protect a young boy of supernatural abilities from the brutal, time-traveling mutant, Cable. NEW THIS WEEK DEADPOOL 2

NOW PLAYING BREAKING IN

Foul-mouthed hero Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) joins forces with some other mutants to protect a boy (the adorable kid from “Hunt for the Wilderpeople”) from the evil Cable (go-to villain Josh Brolin). All listed multiplex theaters, Crescent Theater, Nexus Cinema Dining.

All listed multiplex theaters.

BOOK CLUB

AMC Mobile 16

A few ladies of a certain age, including Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen, Mary Steenburgen and, inevitably, Diane Keaton, read “Fifty Shades of Gray” in their book club and go buck wild. All listed multiplex theaters.

OVERBOARD

All listed multiplex theaters.

LIFE OF THE PARTY

All listed multiplex theaters.

ISLE OF DOGS

Regal Mobile Stadium 18

THE LEISURE SEEKER BAD SAMARITAN AMC Mobile 16

AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR

Nexus Cinema Dining, all listed multiplex theaters.

TRAFFIK

Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC

Mobile 16

I FEEL PRETTY

All listed multiplex theaters.

SUPER TROOPERS 2

All listed multiplex theaters.

BLUMHOUSE’S TRUTH OR DARE All listed multiplex theaters.

RAMPAGE

All listed multiplex theaters.

A QUIET PLACE

All listed multiplex theaters.

BLOCKERS

All listed multiplex theaters.

READY PLAYER ONE

All listed multiplex theaters.

SHERLOCK GNOMES

All listed multiplex theaters.

BLACK PANTHER

All listed multiplex theaters.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS MAY 16, 2018 - MAY 22, 2018

PORK & POLITICS IN THE PARK COME ON TO BATTLESHIP MEMORIAL PARK TUESDAY, MAY 22, 6-8 P.M. FOR ANOTHER ROUND OF THE MOBILE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE’S PORK & POLITICS IN THE PARK. MEET WITH LOCAL, STATE AND FEDERAL OFFICIALS TO FIND OUT WHERE THEY STAND ON CRITICAL LEGISLATIVE ISSUES. TICKETS ARE $25. CALL 251-4318621 TO RVSP. Photo | www.ussalabama.com/

GENERAL INTEREST Electrical worker job fair Join us Thursday, May 17, at 3 p.m. at the IBEW Local 505 at 2244 Halls Mill Road to speak with NECA contractors and hear about immediate job openings. Great wage, health insurance, pension. Learn more at http://electrical-job-fairs.com/ ibew-local-505-mobile-al. Chauler Coffee grand opening Please join us on Friday, May 18, 2-6 p.m. at our new location, 1714 Dauphin St., for free drip coffee. Opening at 7 a.m. for pastries, espresso drinks and more. Find us on Facebook @chaleurcoffee. Hangout Music Festival May 18-20 at the The Hangout (101 E. Beach Blvd., Gulf Shores), it’s the Hangout Music Festival. Major acts include Kendrick Lamar, The Chainsmokers, The Killers and Halsey for a weekend of music across multiple stages on the beach. Thursday kickoff party, $50 for shuttle passes. For details visit HangoutMusicFest.com.

board games followed by the annual lawn festival Saturday, May 19, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Prince of Peace Catholic Church (formerly St. Vincent dePaul), 454 Charleston St. Call 251-295-7070 or 251463-3612 for more information. Miss Bessie’s Birthday Celebration Join us Sunday, May 20, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the 140th anniversary of Mrs. Bellingrath’s birthday. We’re celebrating with our annual “Buy Like Miss Bessie Sale” in the Bellingrath Gift Shop. Visit bellingrath.org for more information. 5 Rivers Market Join us for an outdoor market at 5 Rivers Cypress Gift Shop and Welcome Center on Sunday, May 20, 12:30- 4:30 p.m. Featuring local artisans and crafters as well as outdoor-themed items from the 5 Rivers Cypress Gift Shop. Call 251-621-0782.

Justin Billa Memorial Appreciation Picnic To show our appreciation to the community for the support offered during a very difficult time for Officer Billa’s family, we want to say thank you and Murder on the group tour invite everyone to join us on Sunday, Mobile Mystery Dinners will host murder May 20, from 12-3 p.m. at Cottage on the group tour on Saturday, May 19, at 7 p.m. at Mobile’s Renaissance River Hotel. Hill Park for face painting, free food, inflatables and fun. Find us on Facebook @ Come on down and see if you can help us TheJustinBillamemorialFoundation. find out whodunit! Advance reservations are required; call Lisa Russell, 251-4153092 or visit www.mobilemysterydinners. Pancake breakfast com. Join the St. Mary KOC for a monthly pancake breakfast Sunday, May 20, from 9:30-11:30 a.m. in the school gym. Lawn festival at Prince of Peace Pancake breakfast plates cost $3 each Join us Friday, May 18, 2-7 p.m. for adult

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and include pancakes, sausage, grits and orange juice. Mimosas and Irish coffee are also available. Contact Sean Dudley at sdudley@burr.com or the St. Mary Parish Office, 251-432-8678. Spring festival Come out and join us on Sunday, May 20, for games, live music, food, prizes, a car show, Azalea Trail Maids, a fire truck and a blood drive. Come rain or shine to St. Vincent de Paul Parish starting at 11 a.m. for a fun family event. Downtown reveal tour Tour six downtown projects as renovations are nearing completion, including residential, office and restaurant space. Meet Monday, May 21, 2 p.m. at the corner of Royal and St. Michael streets to board the bus. Wine and beer reception will follow the tour. Tickets are $20 for Downtown Mobile Alliance members, $25 for non-members. Contact Fred Rendfrey, fred@downtownmobile.org. Alabama Coastal Foundation 25th anniversary Come celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Alabama Coastal Foundation on Tuesday, May 22, at 5 p.m. at the Saenger Theatre. Ann Bedsole will be presented with the Lifetime of Conservation Achievement Award. There will be a special screening of the award-winning documentary “The Underwater Forest” and a Q&A session with the film’s director, Ben Raines. Admission is free but you must register at www.joinACF.org/donate.

Archaeology story time Join us for a reading of the book “The Pot that Juan Built” by Nancy Andrews-Goebel on Tuesday, May 22, at 10 a.m. at The Archaeology Museum. After the reading, make your own air-dry clay pot. Admission is free, but space is limited to 20 children. Please email Candice at ccravins@ southalabma.edu. Pork & Politics in the Park Come on to Battleship Memorial Park Tuesday, May 22, 6-8 p.m. for another round of the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce’s Pork & Politics in the Park. Meet with local, state and federal officials to find out where they stand on critical legislative issues. Tickets are $25. Call 251-431-8621 to RVSP.

FUNDRAISERS Dinner with a View Downtown tour by land and water, making stops at your favorite restaurants. Join us Thursday, May 17, from 5-9 p.m. at Gulf Coast Ducks/The Fort of Colonial Mobile. Donations go to the Fuse Project. Visit www.gulfcoastducks.com. Gumbo Cook-Off The Propellor Club/Port of Mobile will sponsor the 21st annual Rufus B. Lee Gumbo Cook-Off on May 18 from 5-8 p.m. at Cooper Riverside Park. Proceeds benefit GulfQuest. Children under 15 accompanied by an adult admitted free. Visit propellerclubmobile.club.


Cornhole tournament Join us at Heroes (36 Hillcrest Road) on Saturday, May 19, 2-6 p.m. for some cornhole for a good cause. Bags, drinks and food to support Baysox Baseball Academy and help young men reach their dreams of playing baseball. Find us @ baysoxbaseballacademy on Facebook. Saltwater Finaddicts Join Saltwater Finaddicts on Saturday, May 19, at 6 p.m. at the Greater Gulf State Grounds for food, drinks, vendors, door prizes and live music by The Well Born. A portion (15 percent) of ticket sales will benefit the Sgt. Foster L. Harrington Detachment Marine Corps League, which supports local veterans. Tickets available at Gulf Coast Tire, The Grounds and MobileFair.com. Cornhole tournament The Inaugural cornhole tournament to benefit The Children’s Miracle Network on Saturday, May 19, at 9 a.m. will be hosted by RE/Max of Gulf Shores. This event will be held at the Orange Beach Community Center rain or shine. Each team will consist of two players. Entry fee is $50 per team. To register your team, please contact Ashley at culture@remaxgs.com or 251923-1062. Motherhood tea and fashion show The inaugural Motherhood Tea and Children’s Fashion Show will be held Sunday, May 20, at 2 p.m. at The Battle House Hotel, with proceeds benefiting Children of the World Adoption and Relief Agency. For more information and ticket pricing, visit www.childrenoftheworld. como/events/motherhoodtea. Bikers for Boobs Join us at Boondocks Bar & Grill on Sunday, May 20, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. for a dice run, live and silent auction with live music and late lunch. All monies raised are donated to the Mitchell Cancer Institute and Victory Health Partners for the education, detection, treatment and research of breast cancer. Find us on Facebook @ BikersforBoobsofLowerAlabama. “Picking for Pat” Come join us for a benefit event for Pat Murphy on Wednesday, May 23, 7-10 p.m. at Callaghan’s Irish Social Club. Raffles for items donated by local restaurants along with live music by the Cottage Hillbillies and special guests. Help us raise money for Pat and Benita Murphy. Donations may be made via PayPal at murphycompound@ gmail.com.

ARTS White Linen Night The Eastern Shore Art Center’s new fundraiser asks attendees to dress in their favorite white linen attire. Join us Thursday, May 17, 7-10 p.m. at the Eastern Shore Art Center (401 Oak St., Fairhope). All proceeds will benefit ESAC’s ongoing mission to educate and promote the arts. Music by Red Clay Strays, local restaurant food and special beer. Visit www. esartcenter.org. “Adventures of Pippi Longstocking” With colorful costumes, lively music and stupendous young actors and dancers, audiences of all ages will be delighted with this performance. Play runs Fridays through Sundays through May 27 at the Playhouse in the Park. Visit www.playhouseinthepark. org for details. Sunday sunset series Join us at Bayfront Park Pavilion in

Daphne on Sunday, May 20, at 6 p.m. for a concert by Mobile Big Band Society. For more information visit DaphneAL.com/ RadioAvalon.com. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” Familiar, funny favorite Andrew Lloyd Webber’s version of how Joseph rose from slave to savior, rescuing his people from famine. Through May 27 at the Chickasaw Civic Theatre. Visit cctshows.com for tickets. Garden sketch club Join us at the Mobile Botanical Gardens every Friday for a relaxing afternoon of sketching in the gardens. All levels of experience welcome. General admission $5 for non-members. Visit mobilebotanicalgardens.org. “Galapagos: Nature’s Wonderland” In the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, there is a paradise unlike any other: the Galapagos Archipelago. Explore these extraordinary islands in the stunning IMAX Dome format now thru May 26 at the Exploreum. Visit exploreum.com for showtimes. “Ice Age Imperials” Imagine traveling 20,000 years into the past to a period in our planet’s history when the environment was dramatically different than today. Step back in time and explore “Ice Age Imperials” beginning May 26 at the History Museum of Mobile. Visit historymuseumofmobile.com for more information. Fairhope’s Founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday), 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com. “Permian Monsters: Life Before Dinosaurs” Take an adventure back in time 290 million years when bizarre-looking animals dominated life on land and sea. The Exploreum will display this traveling exhibition through June 3. Visit exploreum. com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all Mobile County residents. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200. “Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is the latest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org.

WORKSHOPS Splinter Hill Bog bus trip Join us Saturday, May 19, as we explore the Splinter Hill Bog with Fred Nation and discover the many unique and fascinating plants that grow there. Depart by bus from Mobile Botanical Gardens at 9 a.m. and return around 3 p.m. Boxed lunch from Panera will be included. MBG members $50, non-members $65. Visit www. mobilebotanicalgardens.org for details.

Chair yoga for low back pain This workshop will incorporate many hip openers and lower back movements to help relieve back pain. Join us at Alabama Healing Arts, 6304 Cottage Hill Road, on Sunday, May 20, 2-4 p.m. Find us on Facebook at @alabamahealingarts. Search engine optimization Join the Women’s Business Alliance for our monthly Mobile Lunch ‘n’ Learn networking event on Tuesday, May 22, at 11:30 a.m. at Dauphin’s. Enjoy a delicious meal from one of Mobile’s finest restaurants while learning the importance of search engine optimization. Admission is $20 for Alliance members, $25 for non-members. Find us @WBAofAL on Facebook. Crime prevention class Join us at Christ United Methodist Church on Wednesday, May 23, 6-7:30 p.m. as Officer Gary Owens discusses crime trends in our community, ways and tools to prevent being a victim and state-of-the-art, affordable tools to secure your home. Visit www.christumcmobile.com.

Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Via! Bingo Bingo every Tuesday and Thursday, 1:303:30 p.m. Open to the public. Via! Health, Fitness, Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Visit viamobile.org for more information. Fitness and athletics classes Try something new this year! Classes are being offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Tai Chi, bellydance, candlelit yoga, Piyo Tone and piano. Call 251-463-7980 or visitmobilecap.org

PUBLIC MEETINGS

Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Anatomy and alignment workshop Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Join us Monday, May 21, 6-7:30 p.m. Annex Building in Robertsdale. www. at Glow Yoga for a brief lecture and Q&A baldwincountyal.gov on your body and what proper alignment means for you. Donation of $20 to support Baldwin County Planning Commission: our local kids with cancer is suggested. First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Visit www.jensensheartofgold.com. Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Dementia workshop Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre.com. Gina Germany, president of Gulf Coast Dementia Services, will be joined by Chickasaw City Council: Second and several guests for a dementia workshop, fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Wednesday, May 23, 9 a.m. to noon, at Highway, 251-452-6450. the Ben May Main Library. Registration not Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth required but strongly encouraged. For more Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251details or to register, please email jsigler@ mplonline.org or call 251-208-7085 or 251- 866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth 208-7078. Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work Memorial run sessions are the second Monday of each Alabama’s 14th annual Blue Star Salute month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. and 5th annual Memorial Run/Walk & Dauphin Island Town Council: First and 1-Mile Fun Run for Alabama’s fallen heroes will be held at the USS Alabama Battleship third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Memorial Park on Saturday, May 19, 7 Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday a.m. to 2 p.m. A patriotic day honoring of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. the state’s veterans, active duty and fallen heroes. A day of enjoyment for families and Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. children. More details at @5K.memorial.run townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth on Facebook. Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council GC Rangers FC vs. Real United meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope.com. Gulf Coast Premier League 2018 Season Fairhope Planning Commission: First home opener is on Saturday, May 19, at Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For Foley Sports Tourism. Kickoff is at 7 p.m., more information visit www.cofairhope.com. so come support your favorite Rangers FC Foley City Council: First and third Monday players as they take on Real United. Look at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work for us @RangersFCMens on Facebook sessions begin at 4 p.m., www.cityoffoley.org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Free Barre class Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www. Join us at Fresh Healthy Cafe in Spanish gulfshoresal.gov. Fort on Saturday, May 19, at 8:30 a.m. for Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at a free Barre class with fresh food available Government Plaza, 205 Government St. after, discounts and giveaways. Find us @ Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; FITbyJessica on Facebook. council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., www. cityofmobile.org. Mobile Planning Commission: First and BayBears vs. Shuckers third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government The BayBears will open a series against the Biloxi Shuckers on Wednesday, May 23, St., www.urban.cityofmobile.org. Orange Beach City Council: First and third at 6:35 p.m. Log onto mobilebaybears.com Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach for tickets or call 251-479-BEAR (2327). Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach.com. Prichard City Council: Every Thursday Group rides at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain thecityofprichard.org. Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists Satsuma City Council: First and third to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 5464 Old Highway 43 Satsuma, AL 36572, a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@ 251-675-1440. rideSamBA.com. M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 51


SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Students help Many More Miles Campaign set mark

BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

H

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Photo | Provided

undreds of people in Mobile and Baldwin coun- assistant coach in the NFL with eight different clubs. ties set a record while donating gently used shoes He will join Trevor Matich of ESPN as well as South to Baldwin Bone & Joint’s 15th annual Many Alabama head football coach Steve Campbell, Auburn More Miles Campaign. The group, primarily defensive coordinator Kevin Steele, Alabama director of consisting of students and teachers, turned in 2,383 pairs strength and conditioning Scott Cochran, Crimson Tide of shoes that will find new life. Sports Network and Reese’s Senior Bowl Executive DirecBaldwin Bone & Joint, the Port City Pacers, McCoy tor Phil Savage, SiriusXM College Sports Nation’s Taylor Outdoor Co., physician Glenn Glass and the University of Zarzour and WNSP program director Randy Kennedy. South Alabama Student Recreation Center came together “L’Arche Mobile is excited about the lineup for the to collect shoes for the homeless outreach programs of 24th annual football dinner on May 31,” L’Arche Mobile Wings of Life, Discovery Ministries and the Salvation director Marty O’Malley told Lagniappe. “We appreciate Army Running Forward program. The campaign began in the time that our speakers are giving and the faithful supJanuary and concluded with the Azalea Trail Run. port of all our sponsors and guests.” Students along the Alabama Gulf L’Arche Mobile is a Christian Coast were challenged to collect community that shares life with shoes while earning money for people with intellectual disabilities their schools’ physical education in a permanent, family-like environprograms. Baldwin Bone & Joint ment. L’Arche relies on donations awarded cash prizes to the top three and fundraisers for financial support. STUDENTS ALONG THE schools donating the most shoes. The featured guests will discuss ALABAMA GULF COAST Fairhope Intermediate collected 600 the upcoming college football season pairs to win first place ($300). Rockin the SEC and on the national scene. WERE CHALLENGED TO well Elementary in Spanish Fort took Doors open for sponsors at 5:30 p.m. second place ($200), while Mary B. and for the general public at 6 p.m. COLLECT SHOES WHILE Austin Elementary in Mobile took The evening will include a silent EARNING MONEY FOR third prize ($100). auction, dinner and the program of Of all the shoes collected, the Single tickets cost $50 and THEIR SCHOOLS’ PHYSICAL speakers. students and teachers donated 2,120 a table of eight is $400. pairs. Other schools contributing to L’Arche will also recognize EDUCATION PROGRAMS. this year’s campaign included Spanthree local high school coaches with ish Fort Elementary, Foley Intermespecial honors: the Lefty Anderson diate School, Stapleton Elementary Service Through Coaching Award to and W.J. Carroll in Baldwin County, along with Dixon Steve Mask of St. Paul’s Episcopal, the L’Arche Mobile Elementary and Leinkauf Elementary in Mobile County. Lifetime Achievement Award to Clem Richardson of Although the campaign has ended, used running shoes Baker High School and the Chuck Maxime in Memoriam for the homeless may be donated year-round at McCoy Award, which will be awarded to the family of Glen YancOutdoor Co. on Springhill Avenue in Mobile. For more ey, a 2006 inductee in the Mobile Sports Hall of Fame. information and to learn more about Many More Miles, The event is presented by Hackbarth Delivery Service, call 251-656-3843. Greene and Phillips, and Aviation Services. For more information, contact O’Malley 251-438-2094 or larchmobdev@hotmail.com. Croom added to L’Arche Football Preview Sylvester Croom, the former Mississippi State head coach and a longtime NFL assistant, has been added to the Alabama State Games coming up list of featured speakers for the 24th annual DEX Imaging/ Opening ceremonies for the 36th annual Alabama State Reese’s Senior Bowl Football Preview. The event, which Games are set for June 8 at 7 p.m. inside the Von Braun benefits L’Arche Mobile, is set for Thursday, May 31, at Center in Huntsville. The competition continues through the USA Mitchell Center. June 10 across Madison County. Croom left The University of Alabama football staff In 1983, the first ASG competition took place in Auto become the first African-American head coach in the burn. It featured 600 athletes competing in four different Southeastern Conference at MSU. Aside from coaching the sports. The 30th anniversary ASG showcased more than Bulldogs from 2004-08, Croom spent nearly 25 years as an 6,000 athletes competing in 25 different sports and more

PHYSICIANS ANDY HARCOURT AND MICHAEL CHAMBLEE DISPLAY SOME OF THE 2,383 PAIRS OF SHOES COLLECTED DURING THE 2018 MANY MORE MILES CAMPAIGN. than 100 sporting events. Registration is now open at www.alagames.com. This Olympics-style event is Alabama’s largest annual multi-sport event for youth, adults and those with disabilities. The sport competitions are open to residents of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee. The Mobile area has hosted the ASG four times in the past. The largest number of sports in the history of the games is being offered this summer, with 28 competitions from which to choose. New sports added for 2018 include pickleball, archery 3D, horseshoes, kayak racing, youth tennis, youth triathlon, 3v3 Live Soccer, baton twirling and diving. Not only can competitors win medals, they can also qualify to represent their state in the State Games of America. The national championship of State Games will take place in Lynchburg, Virginia, from July 31 to Aug. 4, 2019. For more details about the ASG sports competitions or opening ceremony activities, visit www.alagames.com.

USSA awards 5,000th degree

The United States Sports Academy in Daphne recently awarded its 5,000th degree since 1972 to Lindsey Schroeder, who is using that degree to pursue her dream of teaching and serving in a clinical position at the college level. Schroeder is an assistant professor and the clinical education coordinator for the University of North Carolina Wilmington’s Athletic Training Program within its School of Health and Applied Human Sciences. She recently earned a Doctor of Education degree in sports management with a dual emphasis in sports medicine and sports theory. She said she is proud to be the first woman in her family to earn a doctorate. “I was looking for a program that allowed me to continue to practice as an athletic trainer full time, and the Academy did that,” Schroeder said.


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SPORTS FROM BEHIND THE MIC

Senior Bowl may require dual leadership in today’s world BY RANDY KENNEDY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

t’s hard to overestimate the shock the Mobile sports landscape felt with the announcement last week that Phil Savage was out as the executive director of the Reese’s Senior Bowl. Perhaps only Mayor Sandy Stimpson could have made bigger news by relinquishing his position. That’s how big the Senior Bowl is to the identity of the city and the region. Some lifelong residents of the Gulf Coast may have a hard time seeing the forest for the trees. When I was growing up in Birmingham I knew only one thing about Mobile. I’d never heard of Mardi Gras. I never knew a Distinguished Young Woman. I didn’t even know the city had a university, I was only halfway paying attention in my third-grade Alabama history class when we were supposed to be learning about the Port of Mobile. But the Senior Bowl was the center of my universe for one week every year. I knew that, like clockwork, I could pick up the Birmingham News and veteran columnist Alf Van Hoose would give me a daily report from the exotic locale of Mobile. Back then, in the 1970s, those reports from the Senior Bowl were the only news I ever got about whether Pat Sullivan and Johnny Musso were going to be first-round NFL draft picks or undrafted free agents. The coverage of the NFL draft has certainly changed since then, just like everything else in the media. The Senior Bowl has changed right along with it, of course, including during the period Savage was the executive director. This I can say without hesitation: The Senior Bowl is far better off today for having Savage as its executive

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director. Whoever takes over will find an all-star bowl game that faces challenges but is in much better shape on many fronts than what Savage inherited six years ago. The game needed exactly what Savage was uniquely qualified to deliver — a respected presence among college coaches, scouts, the NFL and the media. With those connections he was able to make the game the first stop on the Triple Crown of the draft, followed by the NFL Scouting Combine and pro days at universities. Being able to do the dance with so many disparate groups requires a person who is not only skilled but comfortable in various settings. Savage was an A+ in all those areas. Still, the game faces challenges that were never even thought of back when Van Hoose and five minutes on the local nightly news were my only real connection to sports coverage. Today, to convince me to spend a Saturday every January at Ladd-Peebles Stadium, you first have to convince me to leave the best seat in the house — my own house. The quality and quantity of television coverage has forced promoters of every live sporting event to think creatively when it comes to getting people in the seats. The Senior Bowl has certainly not been immune to that problem. At this year’s game, bad weather was certainly an issue and the continued debate about aging Ladd-Peebles and its surroundings does nothing but convince potential customers that the experience at the stadium is far worse

than it really is. For instance, the idea that fans exiting the stadium are dodging muggers like a running back dodging tacklers is ridiculous and refuted by all the facts. But there is no question that when you look at that Triple Crown, LaddPeebles Stadium is not in the same galaxy as the quality offered at the sites of those other events. Does that mean Mobile could lose the Senior Bowl? No. Does that mean Mobile could lose the Senior Bowl as we know it? That’s a different question. The Senior Bowl is not going anywhere. I know that because the game is owned and operated by the city and the Mobile Arts and Sports Association. There would be no motivation to move the game. But the success of the event relies on two components. The first is the support of the NFL, which provides coaching staffs for the game. The league doesn’t control the game, but the supplying of coaches and the stamp of approval that implies keeps the game 10 steps ahead of all the other all-star games. There is absolutely no evidence that the NFL is anything but pleased with the operation of the Senior Bowl. That’s a good thing. The next executive director needs to have the same kind of cachet with the league Savage enjoyed to help ensure that doesn’t change. The second measuring stick for success of the game is the support and enthusiasm the local community shows for the event. For the next executive director to be an expert in all the areas crucial to keeping the product on the field at a peak level while also being a master marketer in town is probably too much to ask. I believe the MASA board would be making a home-run hire if it could find somebody to fill Savage’s shoes in terms of finding and recruiting players, dealing with the NFL and agents, and promoting the event nationally. Asking that same person to spend 365 days a year dedicated to making sure the Gulf Coast is fired up about the game-day experience is probably too much to ask. In this changing climate, it may take two people with very different skills to accomplish what the Senior Bowl needs to thrive for decades to come. But for the health of the marquee event on all of the Gulf Coast, it’s a possibility worth considering. Randy Kennedy writes a weekly column for Lagniappe and is co-host of “Sports Drive” every weekday from 3-6 p.m. on WNSP 105.5 FM, the country’s first all-sports FM station.


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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE LET’S PLAY TWO! BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Perpendicular to the ship’s middle 6 “Let’s do this!” 13 Larger of Mars’s two moons 19 Proof of purchase for some contests 21 Maines of the Dixie Chicks 22 Out of date? 23 Underwater mine? 25 Some end-of-season announcements 26 ____ Plus (grooming brand) 27 “Insecure” star Issa 28 Comparison middle 29 Peaceful protest 30 Get a copy of a 1965 #1 Beatles hit? 37 South America’s ____ Picchu 39 Left-winger 40 U.N. worker protection agcy. 41 “____ Music’s golden tongue / Flatter’d to tears this aged man …”: Keats 42 Actor Milo 43 Minute Maid Park player, informally 45 Formed for a particular purpose 47 Sultan Qaboos’s land 48 Something to be defended 50 Rather poor ambassador’s skill? 53 School in development? 54 Hat, informally 56 Bomb with the audience 57 Brand with an arrow through its logo 58 Grp. getting a pay cut? 59 “Roll Tide!” school, for short 62 Rolled ____ 65 Prefix with warrior 66 Formerly known as 67 Reason a computer program wouldn’t open? 70 Some touchdown scorers, for short 73 Zippo 74 “Am ____ sensitive?” 75 Existed 76 Thanksgiving serving 77 Things folded in the kitchen 80 “Cinderella” mouse 82 Big-eared animal 84 Past 85 Incredibly hard puzzle? 90 One with a confession to make 92 Consume 93 Responds wistfully 94 First name in fashion 96 Impressive hole 97 “____ reconsidered” 98 Padre’s hermano 99 Prefix with pressure 100 “Eww!” 101 Link a quartet of supermarket employees?

109 Aid for a tracking shot 110 Jumpy sort, for short? 111 Vehicle that often rolls over, in brief 112 ____ mater 115 Angry Shakespearean cry 117 Something you’re not allowed to do in math? 121 Mistakes 122 Bit of nonsense in a No. 1 Ella Fitzgerald hit 123 Not ruling out 124 Gadget for lemons 125 Goes back and forth (with) 126 A cylinder has two

17 Smelling of mothballs 18 Part of O.S.: Abbr. 20 Original home of Paddington Bear 24 Moves effortlessly (through) 29 Streetside hangouts 31 Draw back in fear 32 River that rises in the Cantabrian Mountains 33 Player-coach Jason of the N.B.A. 34 K-12 35 Constellation between Ursa Major and Ursa Minor 36 Kids’ rhyme starter 37 Big name in pain relief DOWN 38 Onto land 1 Band with a symmetrical logo 44 Code on a bag to Chicago 2 Bath toy 45 Annually 3 Pizzeria order 46 Like a space cadet 4 Some lawyers’ cases 47 1847 novel of the sea 5 Kind of biol. 49 “Finlandia” composer 6 Picks up later in life? 51 Rollickingly funny 7 Red ____ (sushi fish) 52 “Time was … “ 8 Irish icon, for short 55 Feature of a millpond 9 Ankle bones 60 “You couldn’t possibly 10 Relating to the pelvis mean me!?” 11 Prefix with communication 61 Oil field? 12 Hair-raising cry 63 Kind of job 13 Pigtail, e.g. 64 ____ Bird, 10-time 14 Many a “… For Dummies” W.N.B.A. All-Star book 67 Bite-size, say 15 Transmitting 68 Teaching positions can be 16 Comic who acted in part of their work “Ocean’s Eleven” 69 Chest protector

70 “La La Land” actor 71 Rolls out of bed in the morning? 72 Messy treats 73 Fluorine’s atomic number 77 “Way to go!” 78 Purple flowers 79 Longtime Walter Berndt comic strip 81 Spot for wallowing 83 All-out attack 85 Stylish 86 Cry at a happy hour, maybe 87 Cry of excitement 88 “Well, Did You ____?” 89 Gate 91 Did some documentary work 95 Bolivian capital 102 0%, in the dairy aisle 103 Highest-level 104 Nice forecast 105 Population classification 106 Settle down for the night 107 Sam who sang “Twistin’ the Night Away” 108 Corn syrup brand 113 Tiny bit 114 They always come with mayo 115 Flat-topped hat 116 Heat 117 Keyboard key 118 ____ minimum 119 Anthem contraction 120 One rampaging in 2018’s “Rampage”

ANSWERS ON PAGE 58

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STYLE HOROSCOPES ALL HAIL PRINCESS HENRY OF WALES TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — In an attempt to thwart the Royal Wedding, you’ll tell Meghan Markle that Prince Harry has never made it through an entire episode of “Suits.” Your plan will backfire when you realize nobody has. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — On vacation, you’ll amuse yourself by picking on a member of the Queen’s guard. When you kick one in the crown jewels, you’ll learn that they don’t have to stand completely still and can retaliate. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll become the first American contestant on “The Great British Baking Show,” but lose quickly when you get confused over dessert terminology. Who knew strudel was called snappledoo across the pond? LEO (7/23-8/23) — You’ll bring NBC back to prominence by creating an American version of the famed British sci-fiction series “Dr. Who.” In the Yankee version, the doctor is a gastroenterologist, which seems appropriate. Virgo (8/24-9/22) — After entering what you think is a very raucous bar, you’ll realized you’ve walked into the British House of Commons. Even more surprising, after a few drinks you’ll be accepted as a member. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — In a stunning move, you’ll be handed a management position within the Manchester United Football Club. Within two years, the historic club will be relegated, which will greatly benefit the sport as a whole. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — It will be quite the scene when you attend a Memorial Day cookout dressed as a Beefeater. No one will get the joke, but you won’t be able to say you’d prefer your steak rare. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — You’ll colonize the couch as you watch the royal wedding over the weekend, celebrating the most anticipated British and American collaboration since World War II. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — Attempting to capitalize on the next global marmite shortage, you’ll raid American shelves to resell to the British at exorbitant markups. You’ll end up trading some asshole from Liverpool for a box of mint MoonPies.

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 56

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AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — You’ll test drive a Jaguar but the salesman will know you can’t secure a loan when he hears your Cockney accent. You’ll brush up on your German and walk over to the BMW dealership instead. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — You’ll claim to be the long-lost Gallagher sibling and file a lawsuit seeking royalties from the Oasis song “Wonderwall.” Just maybeeeeeeee the jury will be the ones that saves yeeeeeeeeeee. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — After pledging allegiance to the Union Jack, you’ll be haunted by the headless ghosts of King Henry VIII’s wives. After solving some related domestic burdens, you’ll propose them all marriage.


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STYLE BOOZIE

From meat to feet, these are the days of our lives BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

I

t’s been all about moms and grads the last couple of weeks. But I did manage to scrape up a little scoop for you freaks. From meat being served on the street (literally) to a randy woman getting a little too frisky with a local pedicurist, here’s all the latest news that’s not really so fit to print. But we did it anyway! So enjoy! Well done! The Fairhope Rotary Club held its annual Steak CookOff last Friday, May 11, and my spies said it was a huge success. With music by The Krickets and more meat than you could ever eat (giggle), how could you go wrong? Well, I guess we shouldn’t ask one Baldwin County politico that question. Things did go wrong for him one night after having a little too much fun at this shindig. But that’s all ancient history, so we won’t dwell on that because we don’t want to start a beef and need to get to the 2018 winners. First Place and Grand Champion went to Point Clear Rotary. Sexton Lawn and Landscape came in second and also won the Hospitality Award. Trustmark Bank took home the bronze. Fairhope Sunset Rotary nabbed the People’s Choice Award and Hartmann, Blackmon & Kilgore PC won for Best Decorated Booth. Congrats to all the winners. I RAREly hear such good things about an event! Well done! (Did you get all of my steak jokes there? I’m here all week!) But will the goat be there? It used to be the first question many of us asked our friends each Sunday morning. No, not “did you really

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hook up with him/her?” (That was the second question.) No, the typical first Sunday morning question was: Are you going to Judge’s tonight? Everyone was saddened when the iconic and quirky BaCo bar Judge Roy Bean’s burned down years ago, but now you have a chance to reunite with fellow patrons who also loved it so! The “Judge Roy Bean Reunion” is slated for Saturday, June 9, from 3-9 p.m. at Daphne City Hall and Grounds. Organizers say this will be “a day of memory and celebration for Jack West and Phillip Calametti.” Music will be provided by the Locust Fork Band, with special guests Robert Sully and Randy Niemeyer, among others. And it’s all for a great cause, as it will benefit local charities Pilots for Christ and Anchor Cross. Tickets are $50 each. For more info, check out their Facebook page. Just asking … We hear a local male pedicurist had a little more to deal with than ingrown toenails when a “mature lady” tried to get a little too frisky with him at a local spa. And let’s just say the lady was barking up the wrong tree, because he did not play for her team. Too many mimosas, perhaps? I don’t know, but whatever the case, who wants to get randy while having dead foot funk scraped off the bottoms of your nasty feet. #notsexytime #eeewww Well kids, that’s all I got. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous or some plain ol’ inappropriate pedicurist lovin’, I will be there! Ciao!


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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by the vendor’s lien retained in that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed dated June 22, 2012 from Thomas E. Nelson and Carolyn H. Nelson, as Trustees of the Nelson Living Trust dated December 11, 2006, as grantors, to Shimaa Abdul, as grantee, recorded in Real Property Book 6907, Page 785 in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, notice is hereby given that the undersigned, as holders of said vendor’s lien, will under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien Deed, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder during the legal hours of sale on March 6, 2018 at the Government Street entrance of the Mobile Government Plaza, 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama the following described real property situated in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, described in said Vendor’s Lien Deed hereinabove referred to, viz: Lot 59, Oakwood Estates, Unit Two, according to plat thereof as recorded in Map Book 16, Page 24, in the records in the Office of Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale will be made for the purpose of paying said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. THOMAS E. NELSON AND CAROLYN H. NELSON AS TRUSTEES OF THE NELSON LIVING TRUST DATED DECEMBER 11, 2006 Holders of Said Vendor’s Lien. THIS FORECLOSURE SALE HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL JUNE 12, 2018 DURING THE LEGAL HOURS OF SALE. David A. Boyett, III ANDERS, BOYETT & BRADY, P.C. 3800 Airport Boulevard, Suite 203 Mobile, Alabama  36608 (251) 3440880 ABB File No. 82797   Lagniappe HD May 16, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on September 17, 2012, by Cindi K. Lynn, as Grantee to Iras Development Company, Inc., a Alabama corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book 6942, Page 1069, and said vendor’s lien having been last assigned to The Avila Group, LLP, which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book 6956, Page 1087, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on June 13, 2018. Lot 38, as per plat of TIMBERLAND, UNIT II as recorded in Map Book 89, Page 60, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama; Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. The Avilia Group, LLP Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD May 9, 16, 23, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendor’s Lien retained in Deed from Steven Woods a/k/a Steven C. Woods to Teresa Chaffin dated November 6, 2009 and Recorded in Book 6597, Page 1354 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, notice is hereby given that the undersigned as holder of said Vendor’s Lien will under power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on June 4, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 45, RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 1-30 OF THE RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 28-55, GULF MANOR FIRST ADDITION AND LOTS 56-87, GULF MANOR, FIRST ADDITION, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 10, PAGE 90, OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA; TOGETHER WITH ALL LAND, IF ANY, LYING BETWEEN SAID LOT 45 AND THE DREDGED BOAT SLIP BOUNDED BY A SOUTHWARD PROJECTION OF THE EAST AND WEST LINES OF LOT 45. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS”  BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF THE PROBATE WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND

WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Steven Woods A/k/a Steven C. Woods Mortgagee Beth McFadden Rouse McFadden, Lyon & Rouse, L.L.C. 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL 36609 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Clement A. Conaway a single man, originally in favor of Citifinancial Corporation, LLC, on the 21st day of April, 2011, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Baldwin County, Alabama, in Instrument Number 1283836; the undersigned Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, A Delaware Limited Liability Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Bay Minette, Baldwin County, Alabama, on May 30, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Baldwin County, Alabama, to-wit: From the Northeast corner of Section 20, Township 5 South, Range 2 East run South along the Eastern boundary of such Section 990 feet to a point; run thence West 268 feet to a point as the Place of Beginning of the description of the lands hereby conveyed. From such Point of Beginning run West 500 feet to a point; run thence South 450 feet to a point; run thence East 210 feet to a point; run thence North 31 degrees 00 minutes East 550 feet, more or less, to the Place of Beginning, all being in the East one-half of the Northeast one-quarter of Section 20, Township 5 South, Range 2 East, Baldwin County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  1507 Conaway St, Daphne, AL   36526. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a nonrefundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, A Delaware Limited Liability Company, Mortgagee/ Transferee Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 434384 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Marie P. Kent, a married woman, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for SouthPoint Bank, on the 15th day of April, 2009, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6521 Page 1579; the undersigned Bayview Loan Servicing LLC, as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 31, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 9, Block 7, Suburban Gardens, as per plat of survey thereof made by Durant Engineering Company, May 10, 1950, and recorded in Map Book 6, pages 295-300, of the Probate Records of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  5591 Andrews Road, Mobile, AL  36619. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons

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avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Bayview Loan Servicing LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 432628 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE JOINT MOBILE METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION (MPO)/ TECHNICAL COORDINATING AND CITIZENS ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING The Mobile MPO Policy Board will meet on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 at 10:00 AM at the GM&O Building in the Board Room at 110 Beauregard Street. The purpose of the meeting is to approve the Transit Asset Management Performance Measures and discuss the draft 2019 Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP).  The board will review and approve the Performance Measures agreement with the Alabama Department of Transportation. The following modifications to the FY 2016-2019 Transportation Improvement Program will be reviewed and approved: Bridge Replacement New Cost Estimate 100049566 (CN) REPLACE BRIDGE, BIN 008714, SR-16 (US90) WESTBOUND OVER TENSAW-SPANISH RIVER. Old Estimate : $19,062,500.00; New Estimate : $24,595,731.22 With National Highway Funds 100068084 (UT) SR-158 EXTENSION LOTT ROAD OVERPASS AND JUG HANDLE. GRADE, DRAIN, BASE, PAVE AND BRIDGE (EB SEABURY CREEK TRIBUTARY AND PARTIAL LOTT ROAD; June 1, 2018; $30,000 With STP Attributable Funds AIRPORT BOULEVARD, ADDITIONAL LANES FROM SNOW ROAD TO 1.46 MILES WEST TO JUST PAST ELIZA JORDAN ROAD, FY 2019; $1,300,000 Physically challenged persons who need special accommodations should contact SARPC in advance so arrangements can be made to meet their needs. Transportation Planning Coordinator South Alabama Regional Planning Commission P. O. Box 1665 Mobile, AL    36633-1665 PHONE: (251)433-6541 FAX: (251)433-6009 EMAIL: transportation@sarpc.org Lagniappe HD May 16, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on June 4, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at (North side of Coca Cola Road, 2/10± mile East of U.S. Highway 90 West and extending to the South side of Wiley Orr Road.) for a Surfacing Variance to allow aggregate surfacing for a proposed RV park in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance requires all parking areas to be surfaced in asphalt, concrete, or an approved alternative paving surface in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 14th day of May, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on June 4, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 820 Challen Circle North (North side of Challen Circle North, 380’± East of Parkwood Drive East.) for a Use, Residential Buffer, Parking, Access and Manuevering, and Tree Planting Variances to allow a domiciliary care facility for elderly with no residential buffer, reduced parking, substandard access and maneuvering areas, and no tree plantings in an R-1, Single Family Residential District; the Zoning Ordinance requires a minimum B-1, Buffer Business District for a domiciliary care facility for elderly with compliant parking, adequate access and maneuvering areas, a residential buffer, and full compliance with

tree planting requirements. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 14th day of May, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on June 4, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 3200 Spring Hill Avenue (Northwest corner of Spring Hill Avenue and Western Drive.) for a Sign Variance to allow a total of four (4) wall signs and a single freestanding sign on a single tenant site in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance allows a total of three signs for a single business site in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 14th day of May, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on June 4, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 70 Midtown Park East (Northwest corner of Midtown Park East and Midtown Park South.) for a Sign Variance to allow a second freestanding sign for a multitenant site with less than 601’ of linear street frontage in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance allows one freestanding sign on a multi-tenant site with less than 601’ of linear street frontage in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 14th day of May, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on June 4, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 5424 U.S. Highway 90 West (West Side of U.S. Highway 90 West, 235’+ South of Wiley Orr Road.) for a Sign Variance to allow two (2) menu board signs and two (2) pre-browse signs on a site with two (2) drive thru lanes in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance allows one menu board per drive thru lane in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 14th day of May, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on June 4, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 3116 Dauphin Island Parkway (West side of Dauphin Island Parkway, extending to Club House Road.) for a Sign Variance to allow two (2) digital menu board signs and two (2) pre-browse signs on a site with two (2) drive-thru lanes within 300’ of residentially-zoned property in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District; the Zoning Ordinance requires all digital signs to be a minimum of 300’ from all residentially zoned properties and allows only one (1) menu board per drive-thru lane in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 14th day of May, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended,

the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on June 4, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 1252 Government Street (North side of Government Street, 55’± West of South Georgia Avenue.) for a Use, Tree Planting and Landscape Variances to amend a previously approved variances to allow a retail and wholesale bakery with light distribution with no tree plantings or landscaping in a B-1, Buffer Business District; The Zoning Ordinance requires a minimum B-3, Community Business District for a retail and wholesale bakery with light distribution, and full compliance with tree planting and landscape area requirements. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 14th day of May, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

NOTICE OF COMPLETION STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE NOTICE OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1978, notice is hereby given that J. Hunt Enterprises General Contractors, LLC has completed the contract for Fire Station #9 Parking Lot Paving and Drainage – FD/104/16 at 1000 Houston Street, Mobile, Alabama, 36608. All persons having any claim for labor, material or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify the Architectural Engineering Department, City of Mobile, P.O. Box 1827, Mobile, Al. 36633-1827 J Hunt Enterprises General Contractors, LLC Gold Mine Road East, Mobile, AL  36619 Lagniappe HD May 16, 2018

STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE NOTICE OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, notice is hereby given that Marathon Electrical Contractors, Inc. has completed the contract for Alteration of University of South Alabama Primary Feeder Relocation New Simulation Lab Building at the University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL for the State of Alabama and the County/City of Mobile, Owner(s), and have made request for final settlement of said Contract. All persons having any claim for labor, materials, or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify Hayes Cheatwood Consulting, Inc. (Architect). Marathon Electrical Contractor, Inc. (Contractor) 2830 Commerce Blvd. Irondale, AL 35210 Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: INTRAMURAL FIELDHOUSE MASONRY University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 15-60B1 USA BID NO. 8041801 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, May 24, 2018, in Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal.Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office.  Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama.edu). Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above.  A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 1:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, May 10, 2018, in Room AD23 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 rcorrigan@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: HVAC FOR GROUNDS MAINTENANCE BUILDING University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 18-01 USA BID NO. 8042401 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Tuesday, May 22, 2018, in Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office.  Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama.edu). Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above.  A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 9:00 a.m. local time on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, in Room AD23 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below.  307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 bkelley@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: HVAC UPGRADES FOR TRPIII University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB #18-14 USA BID #8050302 Bids will be received and clocked in at 3:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, June 7, 2018, in Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office.   Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama.edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above.  A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 10:00 a.m. local time on Thursday, May 24, 2018, in Room AD80 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below.   307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 bkelley@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 30, 2018

PROBATE ESTATE ADMINISTRATION NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: CHARLES H. CALDWELL, Deceased Case No. 2018-0852 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of April, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. CHARLOTTE M. WINTZ AKA CHARLOTTE CALDWELL WINTZ as Executor under the last will and testament of CHARLES H. CALDWELL, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PATRICK B. COLLINS Lagniappe HD May 2, 9, 16, 2018

ABANDONED VEHICLES NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicles have been Unclaimed/abandoned at Wilson’s Service Center 10393 Old Highway 31, Spanish Fort, AL 36527 and will be sold on June 22, 2018 at 10:00 am at the same address.  2017 Jeep 1C4PJMBS5HW618974 2007 Cadillac 1GYFK668X7R348781 Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 330 Birmingham St., Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Pontiac G6 1G2ZG558664173378 Lagniappe HD May 9, 16, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 162 9th Ave., Chickasaw, AL 36611. 1997 Toyota Camry 4T1BG22K4VU140336

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 49100 Rabun Rd., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 1996 Ford Ranger 1FTCR10A9TPB21364

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3025 Hwy 90 W., Mobile, AL 36606. 2007 BMW X3 WBXPC93407WF03369

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3091 Western Hills Dr W., Mobile, AL 36618. 2009 14› Enclosed Utility Trailer 00122

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3604 Dauphin Island Parkway, Mobile, AL 36605. 1997 Ford Taurus 1FALP52U1VA109662

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  559 Dexter Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 2002 Mercury Marquis 2MEFM75W22X667336

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 351 Fall Ave., Mobile, AL 36612. 1996 VW Jetta 3VWRA81H7TM056507

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  1180 Sledge Dr., Mobile, AL 36606. 2009 Ford Focus 1FAHP35N39W261238

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1037 St Stephens Rd., Prichard, AL 36610. 2002 Honda Accord 1HGCG56752A113743 2012 Chrysler 200 1C3CCBBB3CN267790 2003 GMC Yukon 1GKEC13V83J125082 2000 Honda Accord 1HGCG5658YA031996 2016 Chrysler 200 1C3CCCBB5GN175964

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2000 Honda Civic 1HGEJ6677YL035544 2004 Nissan Murano JN8AZ08T44W228227 1990 Nissan Sentra JN1GB22B7LU504676 2009 Hyundai Accent KMHCM46C19U303557 1998 Mitsubishi Mirage JA3AY26A9WU029800 2004 Ford Escape 1FMYU02144KB40846 1989 Toyota Corolla 1NXAE92E7KZ061596

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The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3755 Government Blvd., Mobile, AL 36693. 2001 Kawasaki VN1500 JKBVNAE171A101990 Lagniappe HD May 9, 16, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3252 Orleans St., Mobile, AL 36606. 1999 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNEC13RXXJ341270 Lagniappe HD May 9, 16, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6401 Rester Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 2006 Coachman Chapparal RV 1TC2B400863103284 Lagniappe HD May 9, 16, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 11426 County Rd 65 Unit 2, Foley, AL 36535. 2007 Dodge Charger 2B3KA43H47H708340 Lagniappe HD May 9, 16, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  558 S Wilson Ave., Mobile, AL 36610. 2015 Toyota Camry 4T1BF1FK3FU092028 Lagniappe HD May 9, 16, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 15, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1989 Mercury Grand Marquis 2MEBM74F2KX646468 Lagniappe HD May 9, 16, 2018

This abandoned vehicle will be sold on 06/14/2018 at 5260 Hwy 90 W  Mobile Al. 36619 9am if not redeemed before then JEEP    1J4BA3H11AL208855 Lagniappe HD May 9, 16, 2018

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 06/21/2018 at 5781 Three Notch Road Mobile Al. 36619 at 9am if not redeemed. CHEV    3GCPCPEH9EG287452 HOND    JHMCP26768C25728 Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1820 Clinton Ave., Mobile, AL 36617. 1992 Ford F250 1FTHX25H1NKB65236 Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

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The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at   1015 E I-65 Service Rd S., Mobile, AL 36606. 2007 Nissan Quest 5N1BV28U37N100292 2004 Nissan Maxima 1N4BA41E54C907280 2013 Infiniti JX35 5N1AL0MN6DC315368 2004 Nissan Maxima 1N4BA41E04C815767 Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2003 Chevrolet K1500 3GNFK16Z73G176907 Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  8400 Lebaron Ave., Citronelle, AL 36522. 2007 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WU58RX79407668 Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  242 Garrison Ave.,Prichard, AL 36610. 2000 Buick Century 2G4WY55J4Y1282544 Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 22, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  2115 Whip Poor Will Ct., Semmes, AL 36575. 2005 VW New Beetle 3VWCM31Y75M317637 Lagniappe HD May 16, 23, 2018

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 5 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday. Lagniappe HD offices are located at 702 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604 For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 8 - M a y 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 63


Lagniappe: May 16-23, 2018  
Lagniappe: May 16-23, 2018