Page 1


2 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8


WEEKLY

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

LAGNIAPPE

APRIL 4, 2018 - APRIL 10, 2018 | www.lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com

6 14 20

BAY BRIEFS

A shooting at a “teen party” at the Grand Hall on Halls Mill Road last Sunday left five people shot and two trampled.

COMMENTARY

April’s dancecard is pretty full for Lagniappe and our readers, so get ready.

BUSINESS

One of Mobile’s oldest locally owned grocery stores, Piggly Wiggly, has acquired two Winn-Dixie stores in Baldwin County.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

22

STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA MATTEI Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com DAVID GRAYSON Advertising Sales Executive david@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

Incoming MCPSS Superintendent Chresal Threadgill, a Mobile native and LeFlore High School graduate, prepares to take over the reins of the state’s largest public school system at a time when local schools face significant challenges.

34

CONTRIBUTORS: J. Mark Bryant, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Randy Kennedy, John Mullen, Jeff Poor, Ken Robinson, Ron Sivak ON THE COVER: BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

For Lagniappe home delivery visit

www.lagniappemobile.com/lagniappehd

28

ARTS

Noel Hanley and Lauren Woods combined their passions for dance and art to create the new hybrid space Sway Downtown, on Mobile’s Conception Street.

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com

Formerly Fly Creek Café at the Fly Creek Marina, Sunset Pointe has arguably the best sunset on the Eastern Shore — and the best food in “Panini Pete” Blohme’s portfolio.

36 44 46 48 51

Ahead of the CMT Next Women of Country Tour coming to the Saenger this Saturday night, music editor Stephen Centanni interviews singer-songwriter RaeLynn about her career and her full-length debut, “WildHorse.”

FILM

Denzel Washington plays against type in “Roman J. Israel, Esq.,” for which he won an Oscar nomination.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

St. Mary’s Bluegrass and Crawfish Extravaganza and so much more in Calendar of Events.

SPORTS

Kirk Wickizer of Huntsville won this year’s Alabama Waterfowl Stamp art contest with his painting of a male red-breasted merganser.

STYLE

There’s possum murder afoot in the Chateauguay neighborhood!

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 3


GOING POSTAL

Mobile Opera ‘gem’ of company To the editor: I attended the Mobile Opera production of La Boheme last weekend and was tremendously impressed by the quality of the performance. Any stage in the world would have been proud to have those singers. The stage direction was admirable and the orchestra was superbly led by Maestro Bernard McDonald. I am a Past President of the board of directors of Mobile Opera and have seen many opera productions both here and elsewhere including the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Our Opera ranks among the top ten regional opera companies in the nation. What a great benefit to our community to have this gem of an opera company right here in Mobile! Thank you for your support of the arts, including opera, in Mobile. Spencer C. Frost, III Mobile, AL

4 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

GO BOLD during National Public Health Week (April 2- 5) Alzheimer’s is a major public health issue we must urgently address - the burden is large, the impact is major and there are ways to intervene. This National Public Health Week, policymakers can take action to help the more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s and the nearly 14 million who may develop the disease by 2050. One important way Congress can act is by passing the Building Our Largest Dementia (BOLD) Infrastructure for Alzheimer’s Act (S. 2076/H.R. 4256). Endorsed by the Alzheimer’s Association, the Act would create an Alzheimer’s public health infrastructure across the country to implement effective Alzheimer’s interventions including increasing early detection and diagnosis, reducing risk and preventing avoidable hospitalizations. Having cared for several family members with Alzheimer’s disease, I understand firsthand the impact legislation like this can have on families and our nation. Please join me in thanking Congressman Bradley Byrne for fighting for the millions of Americans affected by Alzheimer’s by supporting the BOLD Infrastructure for Alzheimer’s Act. If we are going to end Alzheimer’s disease, then we must start treating it like the public health threat it is. Beth Reinert District 01 Alzheimer’s Association Ambassador Clarification: In a story in the March 28 issue of Lagniappe (“You’re outta here: Baldwin GOP removes school board member who endorsed Democrat”), a candidate for the house seat in District 94 was listed as Ida Mashburn-Myrick. The candidate’s name is Ida Danielle Mashburn-Myrick but she goes by Danielle Mashburn-Myrick.


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 5


BAYBRIEF | LAW ENFORCEMENT

enforcement experience and who are currently certified by the Alabama Peace Officers Standards and Training Commission (APOSTC). MCSO offered new recruits $4,500 as well as a $500 recruitment bonus to any employee who recruited a new deputy. The difference with this push for new hires is that the department also put more than $26,000 into marketing the initiative — including 14 billboards purchased DEPUTY RECRUITING PULLS FROM AREA AGENCIES through Lamar Advertising, $7,000 in local TV ads and paid advertisements on Facebook and Instagram. BY JASON JOHNSON No funds that went into recruitment came from Mobile County’s allocations to MCSO. Instead, those dollars came out of Cochran’s discretionary funding — a hodgepodge of funding sources generated by things like pistol permit fees, drug forfeitures and the sale of MCSO merchandise. According to MCSO spokeswoman Lori Myles, all 16 of those deputy positions were filled between January and March. She also said the cost of issuing bonus and marketing the initiative would be offset by what MCSO saves by not having to train and certify brand-new recruits. Based on a breakdown provided by Myles, it cost roughly $21,000 to train a new deputy based on the salary they receive during the three-month process and the cost of training itself. In an email to Lagniappe, Myles said that had MCSO hired 16 untrained deputies, it would have cost well over $300,000 in the long run. “We looked for officers with a few years of experience because they know what the job is all about and are therefore less likely to quit because they don’t like it. It saved us thousands of thousands of dollars in each case, and not only do we save money, but we know these recruits can do the job,” Myles said. While the swath of new recruits might be good for MCSO, there aren’t many places to find experienced officers with up-to-date APOSTC certification outside of other law enforcement agencies, and most of the 16 hires came from the agenIn a bid to recruit certified officers, the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office purchased billboards throughcies in the area. Lagniappe was able to confirm several transferred from the Mobile Police Deout the county including several strategically placed near city police precints. partment, though MCSO has not disclosed exactly how many of the new recruits assersby at a number of Mobile Police Department to police shootings around the country. came from area agencies. facilities have probably noticed recent billboards “You still see people lambasting police, but the dangers While Cochran acknowledged that could affect agencies who lost employees, featuring Sheriff Sam Cochran encouraging people to of policing are really highlighted when you see officers mur- he said MCSO faces similar challenges when trying to recruit and retain employjoin “Team Sheriff.” Those ads were part of a multidered or ambushed,” he said. “There’s been more pressure on ees. Before last year’s raise, Cochran had mentioned being at a disadvantage when pronged officer recruitment strategy officials say has proven existing officers to get out of the business by their families, competing with other area agencies. successful. and we’ve got a booming economy. So there are jobs avail“We put in a statement to employees that we’re not trying to pull someone Cochran has been vocal in recent years about difficulties able in the private sector where an officer might could make away from another agency unless they are already planning to make a career the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office has had keeping and more money.” change,” he said. “We don’t want to put a hardship on other agencies, but we also retaining deputies. Just last year, concerns he raised sparked In just the past few months there have been several have hardships. It’s the nature of the beast.” the county to put millions of dollars toward a 10 percent instances where local law enforcement officers have been However, the placement of the billboards mentioned above strategically tarsalary increase. involved, injured or killed during a shootout with a suspect, geted MPD precincts and its headquarters — something Myles did not deny. Maps Cochran said this helped initially, but at the beginning of and Cochran said any of those events can make new recruits and documents related to the purchase show that MPD locations were targeted at 2018 his office had 16 deputy positions to fill — a gap he hard to come by and experienced officers look for other jobs. Museum Drive, Virginia Street, Airport Boulevard and St. Stephens Road. blamed on a number of local and national factors including In response, MCSO returned to a tactic it’s used in the MPD Chief Lawrence Battiste was not immediately available to comment on the increased scrutiny placed on law enforcement in response past — offering signing bonuses to applicants with law the issue.

‘Nature of the beast’

Photo | Contributed

P

6 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8


BAYBRIEF | CRIME

Spring break violence SHOOTING AT ‘TEEN PARTY’ INJURES 7 BY JASON JOHNSON

Photo | Google

A weekend shooting at The Grand Hall on Halls Mill Road injured seven at a “teen party.”

M

obile Police Chief Lawrence Battiste has confirmed some details from a shooting that injured seven at a “teen party” at The Grand Hall on Halls Mill Road Sunday, leaving five people shot and two trampled. Reports of shots being fired started coming in from The Grand Hall a little before 11 p.m. on Sunday, April 1, in the midst of a party Battiste said was attended by hundreds of teenagers from the area who will be on spring break the rest of the week.

“This was such a large area, and there were between 300 to 400 teens at what they were calling a pre-spring break party,” he added. “There were seven individuals injured. Five were shot, two were trampled and one of the five gunshot wounds was self-inflicted. All of the individuals except one, who remains in critical condition, have been treated and released at this time.” Battiste said all of the victims were between the ages of 15 and 18, adding that most of the party’s attendees were in their teens. Several individuals were detained at the

scene, but so far none has been charged Battiste said MPD is asking for the public’s help identifying the shooter or shooters. “We’ll continue to work diligently to determine the individuals responsible for this act of violence,” he said. “This is a plea to parents to be more diligent in determining where their children are hanging out at and what protocols are in place there to ensure their children’s safety. Most of all, we ask them to hold their children accountable because the life they save might be their own child’s.” There was apparently a frantic effort to leave the Grand Hall once shots started firing and police began to show up. At least one local news station reported an uninvolved motorist’s vehicle was struck by a car fleeing police, though Battiste said he couldn’t confirm at this time whether the two incidents were connected. Battiste, who has repeatedly raised public concerns about local youths gaining access to firearms, said “Children can’t go out and buy guns, someone has to supply them.” He also urged parents to check their children’s “rooms and bookbags” for any weapons they shouldn’t have. The Grand Hall, which county land records indicate is owned by The Order of Inca Inc., is a private event space. Police say they’ve so far found no evidence alcohol was being served to minors, though reporters on the scene Sunday evening claimed to have seen some marijuana that had been discarded. Battiste said investigators would continue to evaluate how the party was organized and chaperoned and whether the number of attendees violated any local fire or safety codes. Regarding security, Battiste said he didn’t know what, if any, measures were employed for the event on Sunday but said no off-duty MPD officers were hired as security guards, which he said private venues have done for  larger events in the past. While the city of Mobile has established a 10 p.m.-to-5 a.m. curfew for teenagers in the downtown entertainment district, Battiste said that does not apply to and is not enforced in other areas of the city. He said the party itself so far appears to have been lawfully organized. “You don’t have to have a permit to have a teen party,” he added. “You can rent an establishment, but you’d hope those individuals would do everything they could to make sure they had a safe environment for children, particularly if it’s at a private venue like this was.” Lagniappe will update this story once more information is made available. Battiste asked anyone with information on the Grand Hall shooting to contact MPD at 251-208-7211.

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 7


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Full-time focus BALDWIN COMMISSION CANDIDATES QUIZZED ABOUT PAY RAISE BY DALE LIESCH

O

ne of the justifications for a pay increase passed last year for Baldwin County Commissioners is being questioned, as voters gear up to head to the polls in two months for the 2018 primary elections. When he passed the legislation last year to give commissioners in Alabama’s largest county by area a pay increase, Rep. Steve McMillan (R-Gulf Shores) said one of the reasons for the move was because it was treated like a full-time job. He stands by the rationale now, despite many of the candidates running for a commission seat this year already having full-time jobs. “I think it’s fair compensation,” McMillan said in a phone interview last week. “In Baldwin County, it’s a full-time job.” In early 2014, the Baldwin County Commission passed its own pay increase, but the state capped those raises. At the time, several commissioners favored the pay increase — more doubling salaries at the time — and used the “full-time job” as justification. McMillan’s bill increased commissioners’ pay based on a formula tied to the county’s average per-capita family income, he said. The salaries could go up to $50,000 per year or more and would take effect at the beginning of the new term. The pay is currently set at $34,000. With that in mind, Lagniappe asked several of the 11 candidates running at large for the districted seats on the Baldwin County Commission if they would quit their jobs upon election for the “full-time” pay. Not surprisingly, no candidate said they would quit their current job. One said he would take a leave of absence, one said he would retire and two more are currently retired. Daphne City Councilman John Lake, a Republican who is running for the District 2 commission seat currently held by Chris Elliott, said he would take a leave of absence from Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula if elected to the commission. “I will take a leave of absence from my employer to allow me to accomplish my task,” he said. Lake said the ability to take time off for political office is in his contract with the company. At 57, Lake is three years from being able to consider retirement, he said. Furthermore, Lake said he expects to be busy enough if elected to the commission to need to take the time off, and that he would feel the raise was unwarranted if the job isn’t one that keeps him busy. “I expect to be busy,” Lake said. “If I’m not then I’m going to be awfully mad about the pay (increase). You’re going to hear me scream about it.” Lake said it’s important to him not to take advantage of the taxpayers in Baldwin County. “In my mind, taxes are viewed as sweat,” he said. “It represents the sweat of the people who worked.” Lake will be facing Republican and former Daphne City Councilman Joe Davis for the commission seat. Davis did not respond to a request for comment for this story. He resigned from the Daphne City Council in 2015, after the board rejected by a 4-3 vote the pre-zoning and annexation of a parcel of land connected to the proposed Daphne Innovation and Science Complex. Also in the race for District 2 is Democrat Amber Smith. Smith also did not respond to a

8 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

request for comment on this story. Will McDaniel, a 68-year-old nurse running for the District 3 seat currently held by incumbent Tucker Dorsey, said he would retire from his job whether or not he’s elected to the commission. “I will be dedicated full time to this job,” McDaniel said of the commission. Dorsey, who defended the raises in 2016, had a similar take when asked last week. Between a full slate of meetings each month, working with colleagues in Mobile and trips to Montgomery and Washington, D.C., on occasion, Dorsey said he works overtime for the commission each week. “For me, I put in more than full time, about 50 hours per week,” he said. “It’s more than making sure there are no potholes. It is beyond a full-time job.” Dorsey said he spends much more time on commission issues than he does at his job in construction and real estate development. “This is a big old place and there’s a lot going on,” he said. While stopping short of saying commissioners deserved a pay increase, Dorsey did defend the raise, saying higher pay would lead to better candidates. “It incentivizes good people to run for this job,” he said. “For $10 an hour, it takes a special person to do it …. ” Republican Billie Jo Underwood, who is also running for the District 3 seat in the June 5 primary, said she would do less work as a certified public accountant if elected to the commission. As for the possibility of an added workload, Underwood is not concerned. “I’m accustomed to hard work and I’m deadline driven,” she said. “I’m a workaholic. Anybody who knows me knows that. I’m up to the task.” Democrat Heather Brown is also running for the District 3 seat. She could not be reached for comment as of press time. She will face the GOP winner in November. James E. “Jeb” Ball is one of two Republicans facing off in June. He is hoping to unseat incumbent Frank Burt for the commission’s District 1 seat. Ball told Lagniappe he plans to keep working full time as program director for Baldwin Substance Abuse Services in Bay Minette. “The pay was never a factor,” Ball said of his decision to run for County Commission. “I’m going to keep my full-time job.” Ball said he considers the commission “parttime jobs with a lot of full-time action.” “You could be called out in the middle of the night,” he said. Burt, who is a retired pharmacist, said he views the County Commission work as full time. “I’m a full-time county commissioner all the time,” he said. “It’s always been a full-time job for me.” Incumbent District 4 Commissioner Skip Gruber is retired, but views the commission as a full-time job. “It’s a bit of a sacrifice, but one I chose,” Gruber said of the commission. “Yeah, it’s a full-time job. I treat it like a full-time job.” Gruber will be facing Republican Jerry Johnson in the GOP primary in June. Johnson, who co-owns a consulting firm with his wife in Orange Beach, did not return a call seeking comment for this story.


BAYBRIEF | TRANSPORTATION

Full-steam ahead FEDERAL FUNDING BILL GIVES HOPE FOR GULF COAST RAIL SERVICE BY DALE LIESCH

Photo | Dale Liesch

An Amtrak inspection train arrived in Mobile from New Orleans in 2016, signaling an interest to bring passenger rail back to the Port City.

T

he signing of the federal FY2018 omnibus spending bill could finally bring passenger rail service back to Mobile. Signed by President Donald J. Trump in March, the bill would provide millions in possible funding for rail service, including special grant funds set aside for service that was canceled. The bill includes $592.5 mil-

lion in funding for Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements, or CRIS, including $35.5 million set aside to restore lost passenger rail service such as the Gulf Coast route, according to a statement from the Southern Rail Commission. “The money is there,” SRC Secretary and Treasurer Greg White, from Alabama, said. “It is up to us to make

an application.” The commission would apply for the grants but needs funding commitments, in the form of matches, in order to get federal attention, White said. “All the states are engaged with us,” White said. The immediate interest of the SRC is to re-establish an Amtrak route from New Orleans to Mobile and build from there, White said. It helps, he said, that Mobile has been awarded a grant for station construction. “Getting to Mobile is relatively simple,” he said. “There’s strong interest to move to a twice-daily service from Mobile to New Orleans.” The $125,000 grant for the city allows for design of a station and master plan. The grant was part of more than $2 million the SRC awarded several cities in Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana for various passenger rail station projects. With a $125,000 city match and a $25,000 in-kind match, the total budget for the project is $275,000. From Mobile, there is interest as well in connecting to Atmore and having a train terminate there. However, daily port traffic would make it slightly more complicated. “There is strong support from Atmore leadership,” White said. “The complication of getting it to Atmore would be congestion of the port yard. It would have to go through there.” The spending appropriation that averted a government shutdown represents a $68 million spending increase on passenger rail over fiscal year 2017. While the tracks between New Orleans and Mobile already have positive train control, or PTC, the funding includes $250 million for PTC. PTC is designed to automatically stop trains before certain kinds of accidents occur. Amtrak was funded to the tune of $1.2 billion, which represents a slight increase over FY2017. Wiley Blankenship, a local member of the SRC, said the money in the spending plan “strengthens the case” for passenger rail in Mobile. “This is a real, tangible indication that things are moving in the right direction,” he said. “A lot of hurdles have to be cleared yet.” For one, Blankenship said the SRC must do a better job communicating with the general public. To that end, Blankenship said he’s organizing a breakfast meeting Thursday, April 12, to brief a regional delegation on passenger rail service. Previously, the SRC championed a report by a Federal Railroad Administration working group that showed a total cost to revive service from New Orleans to Orlando would cost $5.48 million and adding a route from New Orleans to Mobile would cost $4 million.

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 9


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Crowded field

FOUR HOPEFULS, INCUMBENT DORSEY, SEEK BALDWIN SEAT BY JOHN MULLEN

T

he race for the District 3 seat on the Baldwin County Commission is one of the most crowded on the ballot for the June 5 primaries with three Republicans and one Democrat vying for the seat. It is topped only by the five-man field in the Probate Judge race. Republicans include incumbent Tucker Dorsey, Will McDaniel and Billie Jo Underwood. The only Democrat signed up is Heather Brown. Dorsey, a real estate developer and business consultant, is seeking his third term McDaniel is a retired nurse, farmer and lifelong resident of District 3 who has run before but has yet to win. Rounding out the Republican ballot is newcomer Billie Jo Underwood, a CPA who lives in Summerdale. Brown, a freelance writer, indie author and writing coach, is from Summerdale and has been a resident of Baldwin County for 29 years. This is her first run for office and since she has no Democratic opponent she will face the eventual Republican winner in the November general election. Growth and its effects on county infrastructure is near the top of each candidates’ issues. “Finding the proper balance of economic growth and opportunity while maintaining a great quality of life is key to the long-term success of the county,” Underwood said. Dorsey, who was in office when the Baldwin Beach Express was extended to I-10, would like to see the efforts for better roads continue. “We need to continue road capacity and traffic improvements, landing a tenant at the Megasite, building the Beach Express to I-65 and improving

east-west transportation in the county,” Dorsey said. Restore Act funds were recently approved for right-of-way acquisition for the extension to I-65. McDaniel says he’d like to see more improvements to a struggling sewage system strained even more by the county’s record growth. “It is a shame that we continually have overflowing sewers due to poor planning,” McDaniel said. “Now that we realize the problem, I don’t understand why our elected officials aren’t tackling this problem aggressively until a solution is found.” The environmental impact of growth needs to be addressed, Democrat Brown said. “We may not be able to eliminate everything but we can make sure we are doing the best we can with new development as well as making sure existing developments are maintaining environmental safety,” Brown said. Dorsey cited the many advances the county has made during his two terms including an aggressive road resurfacing program and helping find funding for Baldwin County schools, among others. McDaniel said his status as a lifelong resident of District 3 puts him in a unique position to know the area, the people and what problems need to be addressed. “Not only is it where I was born and raised, but it is where my wife and children have all called home,” McDaniel said. “It has been a lifelong dream of mine to be a commissioner.” Underwood said her experience as an accountant will help in “developing strategic fiscal management and maintaining economic growth while preserving the quality of life we enjoy.”

Delayed decision BALDWIN, GULF SHORES AWAIT SCHOOL-START RULING FROM STATE BY JOHN MULLEN

D

elay or no delay, things are moving forward for Gulf Shores City Schools, board President Kevin Corcoran said. “We are proceeding forward for a 2018 start,” Corcoran said. Gulf Shores and Baldwin County are at odds over when the coastal city will begin classes in its separation from the county. Corcoran and his board want to start this fall but Baldwin County Superintendent Eddie Tyler and his team believe a 2019 start is more feasible. The sticking point caused Tyler to announce in February he was calling off negotiations with Gulf Shores over the start date and the parties kicked the problem upstairs to State Superintendent Ed Richardson. “Gulf Shores’ demands to start in 2018 are ridiculous knowing that their reason for leaving was spurred by our decision to build new facilities in Orange Beach,” Tyler said at the time. “They knew that these facilities would be complete and ready for students in August 2019. To know this from the beginning and still demand a 2018 start date is disrespectful at best.” Richardson’s office announced last week his appointed mediator would delay making a decision on a start date for Gulf Shores schools another 1014 days. Corcoran said this will have no bearing on his board’s preparation. “Everything’s proceeding accordingly,” Corcoran said. “We’re on a schedule and it’s a practical one. We’ve seen it before and our experts have seen it time and time again, where it can be done in this timeframe.” At Monday’s City Council meeting, Mayor

10 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Robert Craft said the town’s determination to open its own school system has not been deterred and work will continue. “We continue to get pushback from the Baldwin County board,” Craft said. “They obviously don’t want this to happen and we’re determined it’s going to happen. It’s kind of a logjam with us trying to figure it out.” Among the things moving forward, Corcoran said, is hiring a permanent superintendent for the city. The application period ended March 30, with 26 hopefuls applying for the job. “We’re not going to let the delay from Dr. Richardson hamper our superintendent search at all,” Corcoran said. “The delay is not going to affect us because we expect to have a superintendent named by mid-to-late April at the latest. There’s quite a bit of vetting that needs to take place here. Our attorneys are reviewing them and making sure they meet qualifications. Just because they applied doesn’t mean they met our qualifications.” When the group is whittled down, public interviews of a handful of survivors will be conducted. “Quite frankly, they want to know if they are a finalist before they agree to an interview because they don’t want their board back home to be upset with them if they are not going to be in contention,” Corcoran said. “We’ll pare it down pretty quickly.” Other projects are moving forward as well, Corcoran said, including assessments of what will be needed to start classes and the condition of the buildings Gulf Shores will take over. The board has a work session April 5 at 1 p.m. at the Gulf Shores City Hall Annex Building.


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 11


BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Likely layoffs JUDGES’ CONCERNS WITH MINIMAL FUNDING INCREASE

E

BY JASON JOHNSON

ven with assistance from the Mobile County Commission, presiding Judge John Lockett says local courts have been struggling to get by, and he only expects things to get worse. Currently, the only thing funding more than a dozen “attendant” and “legal research assistant” positions in local circuit and district courtrooms is a 2017 county appropriation of $392,000. While the courts are local, they are funded as a function of the state of Alabama. However, all three commissioners made it clear last year the county would not continue to pick up the state’s slack, and Lockett said he has no plans to ask for assistance again. Alabama’s recently passed general fund budget will provide roughly $2 billion for state functions, and while it included a $56 million increase for state prisons, it only found $2.5 million for the judicial side of the criminal justice system. Last year, Lockett raised red flags about the effects budget constraints were having on one of Alabama’s busiest judicial circuits — telling legislators local judges were having to preside over thousands of cases a year with staffs that are being patched together with part-time employees. While it’s still possible Alabama’s Administrative Office of Courts (AOC) could set aside extra funding for Mobile County to offset its disproportionate caseload, Lockett doesn’t seem hopeful. “After the budget passed, I emailed the AOC director regarding our continued difficulties down here. I had hoped it would come back with some relief, but the

response I got from him was very discouraging,” Lockett said. “We’re doing our best, but I’m not terribly optimistic. Mobile County courts will continue to be funded at their current level through Sept. 30, but when the next fiscal year rolls around and the commission’s assistance dries up, Lockett said layoffs in the already-strained courts will most likely be inevitable. “I don’t think there’s any question about it,” he added. Lockett said that would likely have a noticeable impact on the courts moving forward. Smaller staff sizes could make it very difficult to get through to a judge’s office, and Lockett said there could be even bigger impacts on the district court system. In years past, the Circuit Clerk’s office sent someone to sit in on district judges’ dockets to take notes and issue court orders, but after last year’s cuts, the office pulled those employees and district court attendants stepped in to fill that role. However, those same court attendants are among the employees who could face layoffs in the fall. “We’re going to have to restructure how we do business, either by having fewer days open to the general public, fewer jury trials or by just doing the best we can,” Lockett said. “I hate to panic until we know whether any additional money will be provided, but zero would be an absolute disaster. If we get more, we’ll have to figure out how far we can go without shutting down.” While the courts have a constitutional obligation to remain open, Lockett said at a certain point heavy caseloads and limited staffing can have the same effect as a shutdown for citizens with business in the local judicial system.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Remembering the fallen GROUP WORKS TO CLEAN, IDENTIFY VETERANS’ GRAVES AT OAKLAWN CEMETERY BY DALE LIESCH

A

s the years passed, the overgrowth buried Cpl. Eddie Lee Hill again. Visiting the gravesite of the Vietnam soldier killed in action on Nov. 4, 1975, was “heartbreaking,” his sister Janie Ligon said. Until recently, that is. “I love it,” Ligon said, as she stood in the center of Oaklawn Cemetery serenaded by the buzz of mowers, edgers and trimmers. “It’s just, I wish I could get out here and dig in it like the rest of them, but ‘Arthur’ is my best friend right now; arthritis, you know. I come out here and do what I can. Sweep something up and put it in the bag.” Ligon was referring to an effort led by activist Eddie Irby, president and founder of the 92nd Infantry Division of Buffalo Soldiers to clean up and document the gravesites of veterans buried in Oaklawn Cemetery on the north side of the city. The work began the week before Thanksgiving in 2017, and although the group has made great progress, there’s still about two-thirds of the cemetery remaining to uncover. Irby and a group of local veterans were recently honored by the Mobile City Council and Councilman Levon Manzie for their work cleaning up a notoriously overgrown final resting place. “The ultimate goal is to clean [and] identify each veteran here and each Veterans’ Day, [or] any day that pertains to a military day, is to place flags on that particular gravesite,” Irby said, before pointing to a large American flag on a flagpole at the cemetery entrance. “[We’re] going to put six more flags up to represent Army, Navy,

12 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Marines, Coast Guard, everybody. We’re going to do it for each one of the service flags on May 8.” Last week a group of Coast Guard personnel helped Irby and others clear more brush from Oaklawn. The effort last week, Irby said, was to get the gravesites ready for Easter. “So, what we’re going to do with this part is just get it to 2 inches above the ground so they can walk up there and bring an Easter lily or flower after Easter Sunday services,” he said. “We’ve had a lot of people who’ve come out here since we’ve started — particularly seniors — who have loved ones out here. We found some people who had three or four relatives who were in the military who are buried out here and have never been able to get to them and now they can get to them.” A volunteer in Irby’s effort and a veteran himself, Neil Bruyn said the group has found roughly 600 graves belonging to servicemen and women at the cemetery already. “We came out here and walked around with grass up to our waists,” Bruyn said. “We just walked around and found 50 to 75 veterans. Then we cut the grass and found another 100. Then we weedeated [sic] and found another 100.” At last count, he and his wife, Fran Barber, have documented 570 graves, Bruyn said. He said they expect to find more with more than half the cemetery left to document. “Oh, we are [finding more],” he said. “You can drive through it and you can see the veterans’ headstones — the tops of them. Veterans’ headstones are very distinct.”

In a worst-case scenario, Lockett said there could be a judge and a single employee in each courtroom handling one of the state’s busiest dockets. Based on 2016 data, there were 2,398 cases that came before each of the 11 circuit judges, while 8,058 appeared on the dockets of the five district judges — well above state averages in both categories. The effects of a limited budget are hitting Mobile County’s juvenile court system, too. While the county owns the Strickland Youth Center, court operations and other programs are state funded. However, just last week Juvenile Court Judge Edmond Naman went before the commission to request $60,000 to fund a new position in his office that will coordinate local services for children, such as substance abuse clinics, family services, mental health providers and local schools. Commissioners said they understood the benefit a coordinating position would bring and agreed to fund the position for one year. However, Naman’s request brought up familiar concerns among commissioners about Alabama’s tendency to push state obligations onto the county. “My concern is, any time we start to pay for what the state ought to be paying for, the state is less likely to ever pay for it again,” Commissioner Merceria Ludgood said. “Detention subsidy dollars come back to us to try to offset what we already pay for out of the [county’s] general fund, and what happens is, they really don’t function like that because we have so many expenses there.” Naman said he understood Ludgood’s concern, but spoke at length about the good a experienced coordinator could do. The position, which was not created within the local merit system, will be filled by Andy Wynne, who spent 30 years as the director at St. Mary’s Home. Naman said the local juvenile court is one of the state’s busiest and has been struggling to maintain its full operation in the face of state budget cuts as well. He said 23 percent of juvenile state petitions originate in Mobile County, even though it represents only 8 percent of Alabama’s population. Since 2009, he said, the number of juvenile probation officers has been halved and there has been a $2 million reduction in state funding for programming. However, Naman said at the end of the day, children in Mobile County are the county’s responsibility, telling the commission: “We can’t wait and rely on the state to do this for us. “These are our children, and I dare say Montgomery doesn’t really care so much about them because they have to piecemeal and worry about everybody else in the state,” he added. “But we — you and I — have to worry about these individual children living in these situations.”   As they find the veterans’ gravesites, Bruyn said they are using GPS from their phones to upload the location to findagrave.com. “When we find them my wife takes pictures of them,” Bruyn said.” Her daughter uploads them to findagrave[.com] and then my wife and her grandchild comes out here with their phones and they GPS them. We haven’t done it for everybody else because there are so many veterans.” The documentation of the gravesites will be very helpful for friends and family of the deceased trying to find the gravesites, Bruyn said. For instance, he said a man from Texas comes out to visit every once in a while to see the gravesite of a soldier with whom he shared a foxhole. “He came out here looking for him and couldn’t even find the cemetery it was so grown up,” Bruyn said. “He’s in Texas and he comes out on a regular basis. We’ve found them and we’ve GPS’d them.” While Irby and Bruyn said they were happy to clean up the cemetery and find veterans’ graves, they would not being doing it on a regular basis. “We’d love for the community to get involved and start taking care of the civilians out here,” Bruyn said. “Given that we haven’t even done a third of this and we’ve got almost 600 veterans, we’re asking any military people out there or any families of military if they would like to adopt a veteran out here and just take care of his one.” In addition, Irby called on not just the community, but others as well to help out. “You don’t have to stay in the community,” Irby said. “If you stay on the Mississippi line and want to adopt a veteran, you can. Come over on Easter weekend, on the Fourth of July, on Veterans’ Day — you know, on Memorial Day, and clean that veteran’s gravesite off and put a flag there.” Bruyn said he feels a sense of duty to take care of other veterans, after 13 years in the Air Force and another six in Army Reserves, “because these guys died for our country.” “We’re talking World War I and World War II,” he said. “World War II is the greatest generation. They saved this world. They saved the United States. “We’ve got Vietnam vets out here,” Bruyn continued. “We’ve got over 600 of them. They’re veterans. They fought for this country.” For Ligon, the work is about honoring veterans buried at the cemetery. “It’s honoring my brother’s memory, it’s honoring all these veterans,” she said. “On Veterans’ Day 2017, looking at TV, they’re putting wreaths down for the veterans at Arlington. They put flags. They’re putting them over in Baldwin County at the veterans’ cemetery and I’m over here; I see veterans with no flags, no wreaths,” Ligon added. “I feel like these veterans out here need to be honored, too.”


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 13


COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

What political baggage? ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

R

emember when there used to be this thing called “political baggage”? At one point in American politics there were certain past indiscretions that would destroy just about any politician’s chances of winning office — things such as adultery, criminal convictions, huge conflicts of interest and cooking meth. Admittedly we’re in a different era. Last week “60 Minutes” had a big story about President Trump’s alleged extramarital affair with a porn star, and his approval rating is still hovering around 50 percent. Maybe sex with a porn star isn’t the political “third rail” anymore. Of course there have always been politicians who flout conventions. The Kennedys jump immediately to mind, especially as there is renewed interest in both JFK’s pervy behavior in the Oval Office, as well as in little brother Teddy’s Chappaquiddick scandal, which left a woman dead but him still a viable U.S. Senate candidate. We may not have anyone who swam away from a dead car passenger, but the 2018 elections do offer a number of local candidates who when deciding to run had a few “issues” to consider.

sion every other Joe Blow would get. ALEA apparently felt the same way and cut his suspension to 45 days for no particular reason they would explain. Making matters even more bizarre, Elliott really ended up only having a 29-day period when he couldn’t legally drive. Elliott never dealt with reports he had lied about where and how much he was drinking the night of his DUI, and despite it being Fairhope Police Department policy, none of the on-duty officers assisting in Elliott’s arrest had their body cameras on at the time. In the end it sure looks like Chris Elliott sought and received special treatment. That attitude probably makes him perfect for Goat Hill.

Engineer Joe Ruffer. The super-secretive Crawford has never spoken publicly about these issues. Making it even odder, he is running against Vivian Figures, whose late husband was a law partner of Crawford’s father.

14 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Cartoon/Laura Mattei

Chris Elliott In Baldwin County, Chris Elliott is running for State Senate District 32, to replace the retiring Trip Pittman. Elliott is currently a county commissioner, which is a natural springboard from which to launch an extended stay on Goat Hill, but Chris has one particularly big problem — his 2016 DUI. I know, getting a DUI isn’t that big a deal politically, but it’s the way Elliott handled his that turned into political Samsonite. He initially issued a press release apologizing and saying, “There are consequences for my decisions and I will face these consequences.” His story was that he’d had a couple of drinks at a charity event, ran a light and then refused the breath test, but he’d be taking his lumps and not trying to fight the consequences. But it turned out Elliott actually did petition the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency for a hearing on his license suspension for refusing a Breathalyzer, and then ended up taking the matter to court. Elliott’s lawyer even argued that Chris shouldn’t lose his license because he would suffer “irreparable harm and damage by the suspension of his driving privileges. He will be unable to work and serve in his elected capacity as a Baldwin County commissioner.” In other words, his elected position made him too important to be hammered with the usual 90-day suspen-

THEGADFLY

Willie Gray Although there’s nothing illegal about it, the ethics of Citronelle Call News publisher Willie Gray running for House seat 102 is another head-scratcher. Generally those of us in the news business avoid getting personally mixed up in politics since it makes it harder to maintain an unbiased position. But Gray is running ads in his own paper giving himself credit for schools being built in the district. Victor Crawford It’s hard to imagine how the Call News Another strange one is Victor Crawford, reporters are objectively covering their boss who is running for the District 33 Senate seat. and his two opponents. While Crawford has worked in the bowels of county government for decades, earning Troy King a fortune as an IT guy, his career ended as a And statewide, Troy King has crawled Hermie result of getting tied up in Revenue Commis- back out of the muck to try to recapture the The elephant in the living room in this category is the sioner Kim Hastie’s public corruption trial. state attorney general’s office he left after a dis-honorable Herman “Spanky” Thomas, who has thrown Crawford, a contractor for the License tenure that included obvious efforts to use his not only caution, but reason and probably just plain human Commission at the time, was used to hide power to prosecute political opponents. For decency to the wind in making a play to fill the District 99 payments from Hastie to political consultants instance, King falsely accused one of his own Alabama House seat being vacated by James Buskey. regarding her efforts to have the Revenue and investigators of perjury after that investigaIn a nutshell we know for a fact Herman moved scores License commissions combined. Crawford tor didn’t gin up a case against a judge King of cases off of other judges’ dockets, spanked young ended up wearing a recording device for the wanted to take down. The investigator beat men on their bare butts with a wooden paddle and that a FBI and ultimately was fired after Hastie beat King’s made-up charges. prisoner’s semen was found in his secret second office most of the charges against her. He filed suit Troy also has had some rather questionin Government Plaza. We also know he was disbarred, against Mobile County last year, claiming able personal behavior, not least of which with the Bar Association saying they believed he spanked his dismissal was retaliation for testifying was recording a “duet” with the already-dead prisoners for his own sexual gratification. against Hastie. Johnny Cash and sending it around for the All of those things might generally be considered negaBut during Hastie’s trial it was also public to endure. Thank God Johnny didn’t tives when running for public office, but Herman was also discovered Crawford had overbilled the have to hear it. accused of using his position to force prisoners to have sex county $82,000 and paid it back through a The year is still young, but it promises to with him, and he barely escaped conviction on several of secret agreement designed by former County be an exciting political mess in 2018. those charges. Shortly after his trial, Herman ran against Sen. Vivian Figures, the mother of one of the young men he was accused of spanking and sexually assaulting, which is a little like rubbing salt in the wound.

WILL THE INDICTED JACK WILLIAMS PLEASE STAND UP? (HINT: IT’S THE ONE ON THE LEFT!)


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 15


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Consider your April dance card full ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

S

pring is a busy time of year here at Lagniappe World Headquarters. We have our grubby little hands in a lot of stuff. So I wanted to give you all the inside scoop/more info on three of our biggest events that are already underway or coming up this month. We hope you are as excited about them as we are. Since none of us is getting any younger, let’s get to it! It’s Nappie time! Yes, it’s Nappie time. Yes, already. The voting in the Nappie Awards nomination period started a little earlier than usual this year on March 28. It will run through April 17. We just needed a little more turnaround time between the nomination period and finals so we can make sure all of the finalists are notified. Plus, tabulating it all is a pretty grueling process. The finals will begin on May 16 and run through June 10. The winners will be announced in our July 18 issue and the Nappie Awards ceremony will be on July 20 at the Saenger Theatre. We love all of the excitement the Nappies generate each year, and we are still amazed just how much our readers’ choice awards have grown over the years. In the first year, we had just a handful of categories. The ceremony was so small we handed out everything in the back room of Café 615 and the certificates awarded to the winners featured a photo of an obese Elvis impersonator (for some reason — still not sure why). There are still a few floating around town in all their kingly glory. In some ways we miss those days, because as it has grown over the years, we have definitely experienced the pains that go along with that. But we have continually tried to address those issues. For instance, this year we have cut some of the categories because both the ballot and the ceremony had just gotten way too long. It shouldn’t take half of your workday to fill it out. And we only rent the Saenger for one night, not the whole weekend. We know everyone wants a category and it’s hard for us to say no, because we feel everyone deserves recognition no matter what they do. That’s what we love about the Nappies. But it had just gotten ridiculous. So we cut some categories that didn’t get a lot of votes and/or didn’t get a lot of promotion. Also, we used to allow readers to vote as many times as their hearts desired. We figured if someone was really that fired up to vote that many times, then by all means, we should let them. But that too had gotten out of hand, so we limited it to voting once an hour the past couple of years and this year to just once per day. While we know these changes have upset some people, we hope the process overall is much better for everyone. And remember, it’s supposed to be fun. Like fat Elvis impersonator kind of fun. So in that spirit, head on over to votenappies.com and get to votin’! SouthSounds Mobile Bay and New Southern Music Showcases Lagniappe has been thrilled to partner with SouthSounds Music Festival the past three years to present what we think is one of the coolest parts of the festival, the Mobile Bay and New Southern Music Showcases. Admittedly, we are

16 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

a bit biased. But they really are the coolest. So what’s this all about, you ask? On Saturday, we have six new acts from our area each play a 20-minute set in front a panel of music industry professionals. The local acts chosen this year are: G’mar Poett, Kayla Cox, Kayland Knight & Trex, Paid to Pretend, Red Clay Strays and Summerlyn Powers. The panel will pick their favorite of those six and that band will get to play in the New Southern Music Showcase on Sunday. The New Southern Music Showcase features five of the best bands from all over the Southeast who are playing the festival, along with the winner of the Mobile Bay Music Showcase. This year’s bands are: Airpark (Nashville), Blackwater Brass (Ocean Springs), Glass Mansions (Columbia, South Carolina), I’MAGENE (Destin), and Love Moor (Birmingham). They will also each play a 20-minute set. It’s like a sampler platter of the festival! The winner of the New Southern Music Showcase will win a great prize package from the showcase sponsors, including three days of studio time at Studio H20 with the legendary Rick Hirsch (of Wet Willie fame, among others), a $500 gift card to Picker’s Paradise, a gig at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Biloxi, a $200 gift card to Callaghan’s, a $200 gas card and a feature in Lagniappe. Past winners of the New Southern Music Showcase were Motel Radio (New Orleans) and local act Yeah, Probably, who won both the Mobile Bay Showcase and New Southern Music Showcase last year. The Mobile Bay Music Showcase will be Saturday, April 14, from 12-3 p.m., and the New Southern Music Showcase will be Sunday, April 15, from 12-3 p.m. Both showcases are on the Lagunitas Stage behind The Merry Widow and admission is free. For more information, visit www.southsoundsfest.com. Mobile Bay Restaurant & Cocktail Week We barely get to catch our breath from SouthSounds before our next event begins. Lagniappe will present the 2nd annual Mobile Bay Restaurant & Cocktail Week, April 18-24. Restaurant weeks in other cities are huge, and we are so excited to replicate it here. So far, we have more than 30 restaurants throughout Mobile and Baldwin counties participating and expect more to sign up. Each restaurant chooses one of three fixedprice menus and offers dishes from their establishment: 1) $35 per person or $70 per couple; 2) $12.50 per person or $25 per couple; or 3) Special Pricing (restaurant will determine their own price). Some feature their classics, while others come up with a menu created especially for the week. To put the cocktail in cocktail week, some establishments are doing a $7 craft cocktail as well. Remember, Uber and Lyft are your friends. This is such a great way to try restaurants you have never been to before or reacquaint yourself with ones you haven’t been to in a while. And a great excuse for date night with your friends, so have your people call their people and get to planning! For more information on Mobile’s tastiest event, check out mobilebayrestaurantweek.com. Just make sure to buy some new stretchy pants!


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 17


COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Stop pretending Shelby is beyond reproach BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

R

ichard Shelby has held public office in Alabama since 1971. Yet, as someone who personifies the term “seasoned veteran politician,” sometimes Shelby doesn’t act like it. During last year’s infamous United States Senate special election, Alabama’s senior member of Congress upset a lot of Republicans by not supporting Roy Moore in his bid against Democrat Doug Jones. He publicly stated that instead of voting for Moore, he was going to write in “a distinguished Republican.” As expected, that didn’t go over well for many. At a Roy Moore event in the Wiregrass on the eve of that special election, the mention of Shelby resulted in boos and jeers from rally goers. That ill will is still present. At the ALGOP Winter Meeting earlier this year in Montgomery, usually a mundane event, pro-Shelby and anti-Shelby factions clashed over a proposal to censure him. The motion was tabled indefinitely in a 58-42 percent margin, which is symbolic of where we are now — a Republican Party united on everything else, but still with unresolved issues about Sen. Richard Shelby. Over the last month, some of the wizards of thought that populate editorial pages and political websites in Alabama politics have told Republicans they need to move on from the Roy Moore debacle and they should be damn proud of having a conservative statesman like Shelby on the team. All of this happy talk showcased in the media from pro-Shelby forces in Alabama politics is essentially wallpapering over a problem. Deep down, this unresolved dispute involving “a few right-wing fringe members,” as the self-important Alabama political columnist Steve Flowers describes them, that make 42 percent of the ALGOP’s executive committee, will linger. Here’s how to move on from Roy Moore: An acknowledgment from Shelby that he could have handled things better. It would go a long way for Shelby to directly address disgruntled Republicans instead of having his surrogates lecture them about his underappreciated greatness. Let’s keep in mind a few things here. Yes, Shelby has done a lot for the state of Alabama, but these celebrated achievements were made possible with tax dollars. It’s not as if Shelby is a lethal combination of Thomas Jefferson, Winston Churchill and Patrick Henry delivering statesman-like oratory extolling the virtues of sending American tax dollars to Alabama. He is the master of navigating the cesspool of Washington, D.C., and reaping its rewards in the name of bringing home the bacon. That’s not exactly a textbook definition of honor. Let us also not forget that before Moore won the GOP nomination last September, Shelby was working behind the scenes for Moore’s eventual primary runoff opponent, Luther Strange. Shelby and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell sought to clear a path for Strange. After Strange’s appointment by disgraced Gov. Robert Bentley, he took on the moniker of “incumbent.” Other potential challengers for

18 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

the Republican nomination were discouraged from running. Strange allies threatened political consultants with being blackballed if they considered taking a client that sought to challenge “Big Luther.” Luther Strange was their guy, and he was going to be installed as Alabama’s U.S. Senator, even if it required brute force. It isn’t clear why Strange was the U.S. Senator Alabamians had to have. Traditionally, elected Republicans in these high-profile primary battles remain on the sidelines and then go all-in for the eventual nominee. Shelby did the exact opposite. It would be foolish to assume that wasn’t going to upset anyone. Shelby could at least demonstrate contrition for that phase of last year’s debacle. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, let’s not pretend Shelby has always been this Reaganlike figure on the American political scene. Shelby was a member of the Democratic Party until 1994. Yes, he was one of the more conservative Democrats. However, during Shelby’s time in the Democratic Party, he aligned himself with Tip O’Neill, Jim Wright, Robert Byrd and George Mitchell. To get to the Senate in the first place, Shelby had to unseat Jeremiah Denton, who was certainly a bona fide conservative, in the 1986 midterms. As late as 1993, Shelby insisted he was a loyal Democrat. “I’m a Democrat,” Shelby said at the time, according to the March 28, 1993, edition of The Anniston Star. “I’ve stayed with the Democrats, grew up as a Democrat all my life. The Democratic Party has been big enough and diverse enough to hold a lot of us, including a lot of us from the South that are more conservative than the Eastern liberal wing of the party. But I’d like to work within the Democratic Party as far as I can, and when I can’t, I vote on the other side. I always have.” Shelby switched to the Republican Party on Nov. 9, 1994. What spurred his change? Did National Review start offering delivery in Tuscaloosa in the early 1990s? Was he listening to Rush Limbaugh? Was there a Milton Friedman lecture series going on at The University of Alabama? On Nov. 8, 1994, the day before Shelby switched parties, the GOP won control of Congress, which most likely had something to do with it. With this history, why should any critics of Richard Shelby be shunned? It’s not only so-called establishment Republicans, but the usual cast of left-of-center, pseudo-intellectual elitists featured on AL(dot) com acting as if it is absurd to find any fault with Shelby. It wasn’t as if Shelby’s detractors were seeking an excommunication from the Republican Party. And given he probably won’t seek reelection when his term is up in 2022, all of this is nothing more than symbolic. However, if Republicans want a unified effort in this year’s midterms, recognizing the legitimate complaints about Alabama’s senior elected Republican instead of dismissing them as kooky and conspiratorial would go a long way toward making it happen.


COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

Resurrecting a relevant faith BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

was one of those parents. Yes, this past Easter Sunday I was one among many with my phone held high and a broad smile as my child participated in the annual Easter Day Program. From delivering the program’s “welcome,” to saying his Easter speech, to performing a part in a play, watching him brought me great joy and pride. Church involvement and religious education was a big part of my life growing up. Just like me, my parents weren’t perfect, but they recognized the importance of nurturing the spiritual side of a child’s life. Thus, for most of my K-12 schooling I went to a religious school, attended Sunday services consistently and was active in our church’s youth program. They were not trying to make me a religious zealot, but were just firm in their belief that, when approached properly, religious instruction can have value for an individual and by extension the community at large. They believed those values the founder of Christianity spoke of so highly — mercy, compassion, forgiveness, empathy, charity and others — can be positively impactful in a person’s life and also create positive ripple effects. I believe this as well. Such belief is fading, though. According to the latest research, a belief in the value and efficacy of religion and religious faith is waning in the United States. This belief has been on a decades-long decline and shows no signs of stopping. It’s projected that by 2035, around 35 percent of the U.S. population will most likely have no religious affiliation whatsoever. This will constitute a number forecast to be bigger than those who will identify as Protestant,

and making those with no religious affiliation the largest religious-affiliation category in the country. It appears that the “religious life cycle” has broken down in America. This is the concept that as one grows older, finds a spouse and has children, official or institutional religious involvement takes place also. According to researchers, this is no longer the case. Church affiliation and attendance has suffered as a result. As a consequence, church closures and consolidations have become the new normal. This decline in church attendance and affiliation is particularly acute among millennials — those born between 1981 and 1996. Around 35 percent of this demographic group identify as nonreligious. They are, according to demographers, “the largest cohort of secular men and women in the nation’s history.” Various factors are contributing to this growing decline in religious affiliation and faith in America, but one that particularly stands out is the political weaponization of Christianity. In the last several decades, as it has been on the march, belief and church attendance has been in decline. This political weaponizing of Christianity is quite ironic when one considers the fact that the founder of Christianity had no political ambitions during his sojourn on earth. The Gospels speak of when Jesus was lured into the desert to be tempted by Satan; the last of three temptations he resisted was the offer of “all the kingdoms of the world.” He refused. He often had to remind his followers that he was not there to establish an earthly political rule, something many of them longed and hoped for. Standing before the Judean governor, Pontius Pilate, hours before his crucifixion, he stated, “My kingdom is not of this

world; if it were, My servants would fight to prevent My arrest …” Yet, according to theologians and Christian writers it is the lure of temporal, earthly power that has been so irresistible, seductive and damaging to the Christian faith throughout its history. Jesus may have stated he wants to establish a reign in the hearts of men and women through an act of their free will, but some Christian leaders have often attempted to gain obedience to Christian tenets and faith by governmental fiat or declaration. It was the late Christian evangelical leader Charles “Chuck” Colson who noted rather succinctly, “Nothing distinguishes the kingdoms of man from the Kingdom of God more than their diametrically opposed views of the exercise of power.” Colson also observed, “Christians should never have a political party. It is a huge mistake to become married to an ideology, because the greatest enemy of the gospel is ideology. Ideology is a manmade format of how the world ought to work, Christians instead believe in the revealing truth of Scripture.” Colson’s point was not that Christians shouldn’t participate in the political process, but be wary of marrying the Christian message with a political party’s message. Nothing but harm, particularly to the efficacy and relevance of the Christian message, can come of it. Such a marriage can often cause religious leaders and believers to have to contort and compromise their beliefs to the point that their faith becomes unrecognizable and of little transformative value. As President Richard Nixon’s “hatchet man,” Colson knew and understood this firsthand. According to Colson, the Nixon White House made a “concerted effort to get religious people into the White House” and utilize their influence for Nixon’s own political purposes. Colson noted the key was using the trappings of the White House and the immense power it communicated, along with speaking the language religious leaders wanted to hear to get their support. It worked phenomenally well. But as Nixon’s dramatic and spectacular fall showed, religious leaders, their followers and the message of the faith paid a price as well. As I sat this past Easter weekend listening to my son and the other kids, I was reminded of what a hopeful and positive message the Christian faith contains. Its leader was one who associated with strangers, outcasts and societal rejects. As a child he and his young parents experienced life as refugees fleeing persecution. Greatness, he stated, was associated with service and humility, not arrogance and coldness. He berated the religious leaders of his day for forgetting the heart of the law is “justice, mercy and faithfulness.” If Christians desire to resurrect the relevance of the Christian faith and save it from a dying influence in society, they should return to its core message and purpose.

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 19


BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Piggly Wiggly acquires Baldwin Winn-Dixie stores BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

O

ne of Mobile’s oldest locally owned grocery stores recently announced the acquisition of two additional stores in Baldwin County. Piggly Wiggly will be moving into what were previously Winn-Dixie stores in Robertsdale and Gulf Shores, as ripples from the Jacksonville-based grocer’s recently announced bankruptcy and 94-store closure are still being felt along the central Gulf Coast. “It’s hard to see a local titan like Winn-Dixie shut its doors, but we are excited to be able to allow the people of Gulf Shores and Robertsdale to continue to shop local,” general manager Kamal Constantine said. Founded in 1916 in Memphis, Piggly Wiggly reportedly was the first true self-service grocery store chain in the country. The Manning family opened their first store in Mobile County in 1972, then purchased the existing Baldwin County Piggly Wiggly stores in 2016. With the addition of these two stores, there will be 14 locations along the central Gulf Coast. Piggly Wiggly plans to retain most of the associates from the Winn-Dixie stores and is accepting applications at all of the Baldwin County stores.

Cracker Barrel soft opening in Saraland

The newest local-area Cracker Barrel in Saraland held a soft opening last Friday to a standing-room-only crowd of local area officials and public service workers, including police officers, firefighters and their families. An estimated 800 visitors attended the heavily heralded new eatery. According to Saraland Cracker Barrel general manager John Link, Friday was a warm-up for the official grand

opening the following Monday. “We want to make sure our employees get plenty of practice Friday before officially serving our first official customers next Monday,” Link said. Patrons in Saraland will have their orders taken on iPads as part of a new technology rollout being tested among at a handful of new locations opening this year by the Lebanon, Tennessee-based chain. Upward of 200 new jobs have been added to the area thanks to Cracker Barrel’s arrival, with expectations to possibly hire more during the year as seasonal demand dictates.        

Knollwood Pointe grand opening

Knollwood Pointe Assisted Living & Memory Care Center, located at 5601 Girby Road in West Mobile, recently held a grand opening. The 30,000-square-foot facility was acquired in 2017 by an Atlanta-based property management company that has invested more than $1 million in renovations prior to reopening the senior care center’s doors to the local community. The site currently employs around 25, but expectations are to ramp up to 60 workers when fully staffed over the next 90 days. RNs, LPNs and those with a work history in assisted living are encouraged to apply. For more information visit Knollwood Pointe’s website and/or contact Debbie Nicholl, facility manager.   

Real estate moves

• Filters-NOW.com, the Creola-based air filter company, has leased some 86,250 square feet of warehouse space

20 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

at 248 Jacintoport Blvd. in the Mobile River Industrial Park in Saraland. David Dexter of NAI Mobile brokered the transaction. • According to Carrie Mackey with Jason Will Real Estate, local area speculators paid $370,000 for a 7,000-square-foot former Old Barn Antiques property located at 1803 S. Greeno Road in Point Clear. Jeremy Friedman with Catapult Properties worked for the sellers. Mackey represented the buyers. • Fresenius Medical Care is leasing the 12,843-square-foot former Rite Aid building located at 2011 Springhill Ave. in Mobile. The company is planning an extensive renovation of the property, with plans in place to open in late fall 2018. Nathan Handmacher, leasing executive with Stirling Properties, represented the landlord in the transaction. David Plummer with Retail Specialists worked for the tenant. • The Athens, Georgia-based Zaxby’s restaurant franchise is developing a new eatery in Orange Beach, according to city records. Rezoning property sites targeted are the 4171 and 4161 sections located near Orange Beach Boulevard. Zaxby’s currently has several sites in Mobile and Baldwin counties. • Per Stacey Ryals with Hosteeva Realty, out-of-state investors recently acquired Little Rock Mobile Home Park as well as 15 acres located near the corner of Baldwin County Road 65 on Little Rock Road for $185,000. Randy Dodd with Landstar represented the seller. Hosteeva Realty worked for the buyer. • Lithia Springs, Georgia-based Nations Roof is leasing 7,860 square feet of office space inside Bel Air Tower located at 851 E. Interstate 65 Service Road South in Mobile. Justin Toomey, broker associate with Stirling Properties, represented the tenant. Jason Scott, leasing executive with Stirling Properties, worked for the property owner. Per a news release, Nations Roof is expanding its corporate footprint into the Southeast with the addition of this location.

Merrill Lynch names Noel local manager

Merrill Lynch Wealth Management recently named Tyrone Noel as market development manager for its Southern Gulf states market. In this newly created role, Noel will work closely with local Merrill Lynch leadership to execute the firm’s community markets growth initiative along the central Gulf Coast. Areas in Alabama include Mobile, Fairhope, Dothan, Birmingham, Gadsden, Montgomery and Tuscaloosa. According to Census data, this area of Alabama has a population of more than 1.2 million, comprising approximately 470,000 households. Noel’s responsibilities will include helping to recruit and retain advisers in this area, supporting advisers in driving growth and identifying opportunities to create efficiency and improve client retention through new tools and technology. In partnership with local Merrill Lynch resident directors, Noel will also help pursue business opportunities through active participation in area communities, with a local focus on both Mobile and Baldwin counties.


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 21


CUISINE THE REVIEW

Sunset Pointe, the jewel in ‘Panini’ Pete’s crown

SUNSET POINTE 831 N. SECTION ST. FAIRHOPE 36532 251-990-7766

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

SOMETIMES YOU NEED A LITTLE SOMETHING SPECIAL. NOT NECESSARILY A CELEBRATION DESTINATION OR A PARTY SPOT, BUT RATHER A LUNCH OR DINNER THAT IS A TAD MORE THAN WHAT YOUR USUAL MAY BE. ” for Sunday lunch/brunch. No matter. One of the area’s best is open and inviting, in the form of Sunset Pointe. Formerly Fly Creek Café at the Fly Creek Marina, Sunset Pointe is arguably the best sunset on the Eastern Shore. This vision-brought-to-life by our own “Panini Pete” Blohme is really his way of opening up the throttle and showing us what he has under the hood. The celeb we call our own has been on more Food Network shows than anyone I know, traveled with the Mess Lords feeding our servicemen and women, and is generally a larger-than-life personality on our local food scene, with restaurants in Fairhope, Mobile and on the Causeway. Of all these places, for my money, it’s at Sunset Pointe where he shines brightest. I don’t want to label this as a “something for everyone” restaurant, but for Katie, Lucas, Graham and myself it has everything we need. On a beautiful afternoon dining al fresco, surrounded by sailboats and a few umbrellas to shade us from the pesky sunshine, the only thing I needed was a drink and some really good food. They delivered. Often thought of as offering a tapas menu, there are plenty of big plates to fill you up, but we wanted to start small with

22 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Photo | sunsetpointefairhope.com

S

ometimes you need a little something special. Not necessarily a celebration destination or a party spot, but rather a lunch or dinner that is a tad more than what your usual may be. You’ll know it when you feel it. It’s an internal pull that steers the vehicle away from the same old Chinese buffet or Mexican order-bynumber you had last week. Last Sunday found me conducting some business in the Colony of Fairhope with the family in tow when “the pull” tightened its grip. Fairhope has all the charm of a Southern novel, with its downtown shopping and vibrant waterfront stretching all the way to Point Clear. There’s no shortage of restaurants in this little town, but you won’t find all of your options available

Sunset Pointe in Fairhope is perfect for when you want that special meal — and a perfect sunset to go along with it. Gulf Coast BBQ Shrimp ($15), as Graham ordered an awesome and I ate (why he ordered his burger specifically without tomato lemonade, Lucas his first Arnold Palmer, Katie an unsweet tea is a mystery) and we finished off the fried grouper offerings of an and a rosé for dear old dad. otherwise diverse menu. The shrimp were well executed, of good size, butterflied with Snapper Throats ($19) were definitely a Sunday lunch must. a tomato broth. A hint of lemon brightened the dish, which was I ordered mine fried after waffling back and forth between that served similar to New Orleans style with crusty bread for dipor grilled, but didn’t regret a thing. For the uninitiated, you must ping. With a half dozen or so shrimp, this didn’t come across as know that the snapper throat is an incredible piece of meat. I a small plate and could easily serve as an entrée for one. rarely order filet of anything, always believing bonier is better. Lucas chimed in and ordered an appetizer for the table — Snapper throats are the perfect amount of meat versus the labor like the big brother he is — with Grouper of removing the bone. Two whopping “Bights” ($9). A play on words for a shallow triangular pieces were tender yet crunchy. I bay, these “bights” were fried chunks of barely finished one and the rest of the famgrouper presented with a drizzle of rémouily helped me finish the other. lade. I was a big fan of the shrimp and hated With the same grilled slaw I mentioned to admit the grouper was giving them a run earlier, fresh and loaded with red and yelSUNSET POINTE IS DEFIfor the money. low bell pepper, red onion and, if I recall Since Lucas was kind enough to share his correctly, a little cilantro, the dish was for NITELY A STEP UP. WE appetizer, he was correct in assuming it was the most part light. Then I made my way HAD GREAT, PROMPT OK to order another. He doubled down on to the skillet potatoes and couldn’t keep the grouper with Gulf Fish Wraps ($8). This from dipping them into the sauce from the SERVICE AND THE FOOD time the fried grouper and rémoulade came barbecue shrimp. on flour tortillas with lemon aioli and grilled I will say we had a wonderful afternoon WAS STELLAR. I CAN slaw for a fresh fish taco feel. soaking in a little vitamin D, taking in the IMAGINE DINNER WOULD Graham isn’t really a burger guy, but today serenity the water affords and enjoying each the 8-year-old showed his wolf fangs and other’s company rather than burying our BE EVEN BETTER. ordered the Kid’s Burger ($7). A man who noses in multiple plates from some buffet or knows what he wants, the smallest at the table any place with a cartoon on the sign. boldly altered the order by adding cheese and Sunset Pointe is definitely a step up. We striking the tomatoes. When the brioche bun had great, prompt service and the food was came, he powered through it like I’ve never seen. It’s laughable stellar. I can imagine dinner would be even better. to call it a kid plate knowing it would’ve been big enough for Next time you get that internal pull, put this one on your short me. Supplemented with sweet potato chips, my little fella was list of across-the-bay hotspots. It’s not the cheapest lunch out destined for a food nap on the ride home. there, but it’s worth it. We treat it as a special day, but our special Katie ordered the Rick Bragg’s Ode to Grouper Sandwich days are about to get more expensive. Poor Katie must feel so ($15.75) and I was beginning to think I was stuck in Grouperoutnumbered, but we just found out she’s going to be a little more ville. Now we had it in sandwich form with lettuce and tomato outnumbered by the end of September. Here’s where I hint about on brioche. She promptly removed her tomato, which Graham a raise ….


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 23


E WING HOUSE ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) 15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

FATHOMS LOUNGE

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000 $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 525-9177

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($)

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

CARPE DIEM ($)

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$) CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 622-0869

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973 AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 29660 AL-181 • DAPHNE • 626-3161 3151 Daupin St• 525-9917 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($)

NOURISH CAFE ($)

HEALTHY WHOLE FOODS & MORE 101 N Water St. (Moorer YMCA)• 458-8572

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($) 562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

PANINI PETE’S ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

ROLY POLY ($)

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

THE CHEESE COTTAGE

650 St Louis St. • (251) 308-8488

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS 7 SPICE ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$)

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

FIVE ($$)

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • Daphne • 621-2271

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$) LAUNCH ($-$$)

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$)

GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($)

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$) MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

FAR EASTERN FARE

NOJA ($$-$$$)

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98•Daphne • 273-3337

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$) 4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 829-9227

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

THE TASTE OF MOBILE 59 N Florida St. • 408-9997

SOUTHERN NATIONAL ($$-$$$)

BENJAS ($)

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

MAMA’S ($)

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

THE BLIND MULE ($)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

DEW DROP INN ($)

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

24 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

WILD WING STATION ($)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

SOUTHERN NAPA

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

LODA BIER GARTEN ($)

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 312 Schillinger Rd • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

‘CUE

THE GALLEY ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

3915 Gov’t Blvd. • 219-7922

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

A VARIETY COMFORT F00D. BREAKFAST ALL DAY. 6682 US-90 • Daphne • (251) 621-3749

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($)

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 Eastern Shore Center • Spanish Fort • 625-6544

BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

JUBILEE DINER ($-$$)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($)

INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$) BAY BARBECUE ($) BRICK PIT ($)

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

360 Dauphin St • 308-2387

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

CHARM ($-$$)

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

CHINA DOLL ($)

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$) LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

FUJI SAN ($)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

A LITTLE VINO

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

DREAMLAND BBQ ($) MEAT BOSS ($)

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($) BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($) 3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

DROP DEAD GOURMET BAY GOURMET ($$)

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

DOMKE MARKET FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

GOLDEN BOWL ($) HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$) QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

LIQUID ($$)

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367


STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$)

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($) 30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318. LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$) 751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($)

LULU’S ($$)

SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858 CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

OFF THE HOOK MARINA & GRILL ($)

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 1108 Shelton Beach Rd •Saraland • 473-0757 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GRIMALDI’S ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

GUIDO’S ($$)

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Gov’t St. • 301-7556

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MARCO’S PIZZA ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 2409 Schillinger Rd S • 525-8431 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

MIRKO ($$)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

THE BLIND TIGER ($-$$)

quality food and simple unique cocktails

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

LOS ARCOS ($)

THIRTY-TWO ($$$)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

ISLAND VIEW:

RAVENITE ($)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535 PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

LA COCINA ($)

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$)

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

MANCIS ($)

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

TAKE ‘N’ BAKE PIZZA 2370 Hillcrest Rd.• 251-661-4003 3764 Airport Blvd • 251-338-9903 3992 Government • 251-287-2345 7820 Moffett Rd. • Semmes • 251-586-8473 705 Highway 43 • Saraland • 251-308-2929 27955 US 98 • Daphne • 251-621-8666 2062 S. McKenzie • Foley • 251-970-7272

PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

CAJUN INSPIRED/FRESH SEAFOOD & MORE 621 N Craft Hwy • Chickasaw • 422-3412

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

PAPA MURPHY’S

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

OLÉ MI AMIGO! AZTECAS ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

DON CARLOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT($) 29669 Alabama 181 • Spanish Fort • (251) 625-3300

EL CAMINO TACO SHACK ($) 212 Fairhope Ave. • 928-8108

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

EL PAPI ($-$$)

615 Dauphin St • (251) 308-2655

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

FUZZY’S TACO SHOP ($) 5713 Old Shell Rd.• 338-9697

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$) POOR MEXICAN ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439 SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

ROOSTER’S ($)

C&G GRILLE ($)

TAQUERIA CANCUN ($)

PALACE CASINO:

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

MIGNON’S ($$$)

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

3172 International Dr. • 476-9967

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TREASURE BAY:

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

THE DEN ($-$$)

AMAZING ARRAY OF MOUTH-WATERING FOOD.

CQ ($$-$$$)

LOCAL SEAFOOD AND 40+ BEERS

BLU ($)

THE BUFFET ($-$$)

COAST SEAFOOD & BREW ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

STALLA ($$)

WIND CREEK CASINO:

TERRACE CAFE ($)

FIRE ($$-$$$)

ITALIAN COOKING

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

HARD ROCK CASINO:

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($) AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SCARLET PEARL:

9380 Central Avenue D’Iberville • 800266-5772

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

CHEF WENDY’S BAKING ($-$$)

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

UNDER THE OAK CAFE ($-$$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

MADE-TO-ORDER FESTIVE TREATS AND SPECIALTY CAKES. CLASSIC ALL-AMERICAN CASUAL CUISINE WITH OVER 100 OPTIONS.

WATERFRONT BUFFET ($$-$$$) SOUPS, SALADS, FRESH SEAFOOD, AND MORE

CHOPSTX NOODLE BAR ($-$$)

VIETNAMESE SANDWICHES, PHO, AND APPETIZERS.

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

SCARLET’S STEAKS & SEAFOOD ($$$)

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$)

BUTLER’S BAR & LOUNGE ($$)

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

SAVORY STEAKS AND SEAFOOD

EXTRAORDINARY DRINK MENU, COCKTAILS

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 25


CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

St. Mary’s Crawfish and Bluegrass extravaganza returns BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

Photos | www.southernnational.com | Green Olive Media

Southern National now features brunch on Saturday as well as Sunday.

S

aturday, April 14, is my favorite event of the year! It’s time for the 16th annual St. Mary’s Knights of Columbus Crawfish and Bluegrass Extravaganza at St. Mary Catholic School grounds, 1450 Old Shell Road. Ready yourselves for thousands of pounds of bluegrass and hours of crawfish (or is it the other way around?), with gumbo and hot dogs for those not into pinching tails and sucking heads. This year’s event features Fat Man Squeeze, returning for its 15th year at the festival. Tickets cost $30 in advance for adults, $35 at the gate. Teenagers ages 13-18 get in for $15 while kids 12 and under are admitted free. This is Lucas’ last year avoiding admission fees, as I have watched my boys grow with this festival. My, how time flies. Get your advance tickets at St. Mary Catholic Church and School offices, Mobile Popcorn or through www.brownpapertickets.com. Don’t miss this event, and prepare for the ever-popular Casino Night coming up Saturday, May 5!

26 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Cream & Sugar closing, new restaurant coming

I can’t believe it’s been with us since 2009, but Cream & Sugar Café at the corner of George and Savannah will be serving its last breakfast, lunch and coffee Friday, April 13, as they approach a decade of service. Owner Susan Carley and crew have fed the OGD their famous cake balls, gumbo and grits, and breakfast burritos with gusto and C&S is a fixture that will be missed by many. But the void won’t tarry. New owners are waiting in the wings and, as Cream & Sugar “regulars,” plan to continue breakfast and lunch service, keeping some of the more popular dishes as well as adding their own ideas. “I love what we have built here and will miss it very much, but plan to spend more time with my family before Cameron and Ross go off to college,” Carley wrote last Friday. “There are many, many special friends and families I’ve come to know and love. I wanted to tell each of you in person and thank you for your patronage and

friendship, so hopefully I will see you in the next two weeks.” Kitchen on George is still going strong as the yin to its yang in that neighborhood. More on the new restaurant as it unfolds.

Southern National expands to Saturday brunch

Fans of Southern National will be eager to hear the James Beard-nominated restaurant at 360 Dauphin St. is expanding brunch to Saturdays. You now have your choice of weekend days from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. with an aggressively Southern menu of chicken and waffles, collard green scramble or pork belly fried rice bowl, but I’ll be having the Kung Pao duck confit hash! See what the fuss is all about. Easter is over, spring has sprung and we have a busy April! Stay tuned for more events as the month unfolds. Recycle!


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 27


COVER STORY

Threadgill talks past, future with MCPSS BY JASON JOHNSON/REPORTER

I

28 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

the first. “It is definitely an honor to be a role model for our young, African-American males, but as I have said before, I do not and will not accept being average or status quo,” he said. “My goal is not to be the first African-American superintendent, though it is truly an honor. My goal is to be the best superintendent MCPSS has had — male, female, black or white.”

Big system, big challenges

How do you take a recipe for success that worked for a 1A system and apply it to the largest school district in Alabama? According to Threadgill, “you don’t.” He said education in general needs to “get away from a one-size-fits-all mentality,” and said if the success Elba saw during his tenure is to be repeated locally, it would be the result of a tailor-made approach targeting the specific issues that exist in Mobile County. According to the state of Alabama, there are more than 53,000 students currently enrolled in more than 80 MCPSS schools, whereas Elba has two schools and roughly 700 students. It’s a big jump, but Threadgill said the same knowledge base is needed to lead large and small systems. Not only that, he believes his experience in smaller school systems will serve him well at MCPSS. “If I’m in a district that has half the students, do I need half the knowledge?” he asked. “No. I still have to know and understand the same functions, and to be quite honest with you, I think it’s to my advantage that I came from a small school district because I had to wear a lot of hats.” Threadgill said his previous positions have required him to oversee everything from federal programs to special education and curriculum to student discipline. Given the size of MCPSS, he’ll have to delegate some of those functions to others, but Threadgill said he has a better understanding of how they should be performed because of his previous jobs. Threadgill said there are many bright spots for MCPSS, but he has acknowledged the system faces challenges. Nine of its schools were deemed “failing” under the Alabama Accountability Act this year and 23 received Ds or Fs on state school report cards. Add to that the possibility of a city school system in Mobile, which is something city councilors and Mayor Sandy Stimpson have openly discussed studying further in recent weeks. Like Peek, Threadgill said he doesn’t believe splintering the system would be in students’ best interest. However, he said he would welcome any opportunity to start a two-way dialog with city officials. “I want to bring those people to the table and educate

Photo | Daniel Anderson

ncoming Mobile County Public School System Superintendent Chresal Threadgill’s career in public education has brought him back to the community he grew up in at a time when local schools are facing significant challenges both in and out of the classroom. A Mobile native and LeFlore High School graduate, Threadgill has deep roots in the area and a family history in MCPSS. Last month, he was selected from a slate of candidates to replace outgoing Superintendent Martha Peek, who will officially retire at the end of June. For Threadgill, it’s a big deal. However, he told Lagniappe he pursued the job in Mobile not for a title or a higher salary, but to have a positive impact on a community that helped raise him. “My hope is that I can bring my experiences and what I’ve learned — my failures and my successes — back to where I was born and raised, and for my hometown to benefit from that knowledge,” he said. “It’s huge for me. Hopefully, this will be where I retire.” Throughout his career, Threadgill has served at most every level of public education. He was a teacher and a principal in Greenville City Schools before becoming an administrator and assistant superintendent with Troy City Schools.   Since last August, he’s been working as Peek’s chief of staff, but before that he spent four years as the superintendent of Elba City Schools, where he oversaw an improvement in system finances and student performance. He took over the reins in Elba during a critical time for the 1A system, which was losing students and struggling with academics and finances. Mobile County School Board President Bill Foster said the turnaround at Elba was a big factor in why he saw Threadgill as the person for the job. “The board [in Elba] was offering him a five-year contract when he took the job down here, and for somebody to have served — particularly in the superintendent’s seat — for four years and be offered a five-year contract said a lot about the way people up there felt about him,” Foster said. Elba’s graduation rate was at 63 percent when Threadgill was hired and currently sits at 96 percent. Its overall system rating has also gone from a D to a B. While there, Threadgill was named District 3 superintendent of the year and was in the running for the statewide award. In education circles, Foster said Threadgill is one of the “up-and-coming people” you hear about. He will also be the first African-American superintendent in MCPSS’ 182-year history. While the significance of leading the state’s oldest school system isn’t lost on him, Threadgill has broken color barriers before. When asked, he said he’s more interested in being the best than

Chresal Threadgill will be the superintendent of the Mobile County Public School System begining July 1. them on the challenges and obstacles we face, but I also want to hear from them and hear the perception of what they see the problems are,” he said. “We’ve got to sit down, communicate and work these things out because the only ones who are hurt when we don’t communicate are the students.” However, Foster said Peek has already met with “every City Council member who will meet with her,” adding that he and other board members have extended a similar offer. He said he’d like city officials to discuss “exactly what it is they feel needs to be done that hasn’t been done already.” If the city of Mobile were to break away to form its own school district, it would virtually halve MCPSS’ student population and state funding. While smaller cities such as Saraland, Chickasaw and Satsuma have previously left MCPSS, there are nearly 25,000 students in Mobile. Threadgill said creating a new district that size would be a “massive task” for anyone and would likely affect taxpayers inside and outside the city. Foster agreed, and said creating a school system for that many students would require a substantial administrative staff from the start.  “All of sudden you wind up with two superintendents and lord knows how many assistant superintendents. Then you have to have directors for transportation, facilities and all of these others areas,” Foster said. “All that comes from local funding. That’s not state money.” While there has been much talk about a city system, there’s been no official step toward creating one or even studying how feasible it would be. No matter what the city decides to do, though, Threadgill said his focus would remain on the schools that fall under his leadership. “I’m still going to attempt to make Mobile County schools the best I possibly can, whether there are 500 students or 55,000,” he said.

State testing, “failing” schools

In general, Threadgill said he believes students are tested too much — not just in Mobile, but throughout public education. However, he said getting a true picture of where students are in the learning process is critical, and tests are still the most effective way to do that.


COVER STORY Aside from the standardized exams required by the state, MCPSS has previously used in-house tests — many created, administered and analyzed by classroom teachers — as an indicator of how well students are mastering curriculum. Last year, several teachers complained of being overburdened by those paperwork requirements on top of their classroom duties. Speaking to those concerns, Threadgill said teachers are already asked to do a lot, adding he would try to avoid unnecessary paperwork when possible. “State and federal requirements already put a lot of additional work on our teachers. Instead of getting good instruction time, they’re doing that extra stuff,” he said. “Now there are some things that we’re just going to have to do workwise, but as far as unnecessary paperwork, that’s something I want to try to stay away from.” That said, the driving factor behind Mobile’s interest in a city school system has been a perception that schools in the city are performing poorly, and that perception is based almost entirely on how those schools perform on state standardized tests. City officials have suggested school performance is adversely impacting business and industrial recruitment, and within MCPSS, ridding schools of that “failing” designation has been a priority for some time. In 2017, nearly $5.6 million of additional funding was put into those efforts. In recent years, state test scores have come from the ACT Aspire, which the Department of Education stopped using last year after federal officials found it failed to properly align with the standards being taught in classrooms. No matter what test the state ultimately selects to replace the Aspire, Threadgill said getting schools off the failing list is a priority for him as well. Asked how he plans to accomplish that, Threadgill said it would require a proactive mindset and creating the right team at each school. “We have to focus on getting and keeping the right personnel — people who understand the environment and have the knowledge base to hold these kids to very high expectations,” he said. “There are teachers out there who want to be in those challenging schools. We just have to recognize those teachers, put them in place and support them.” He also emphasized a team-based approach when it comes to allocating funds in the best interest of students, saying it “should not be a single person’s decision, rather a group of people who thoroughly understand the needs of a particular school.” Though the board doesn’t control day-to-day operations, Foster said he, too, wants to make sure money going to struggling schools is being spent where it yields the greatest result. Specifically, Foster said he’d like to focus on smaller class sizes in some schools. In recent years, Peek has been critical of the “failing” label created by the Alabama Accountability Act, which is applied to all schools in the bottom 6 percent of statewide reading and math scores. Threadgill shares those concerns and said a single test score “does not paint an accurate picture of our schools.” He also said he doesn’t think lawmakers are “experienced enough in all areas to be able to determine what a holistic assessment measure” should be. However, he said standardized testing is important and, regardless of how educators feel about state requirements, they should still strive to meet them. “Though we may question an assessment piece or even the entire accountability puzzle, we’re still obligated to be transparent,” he said. “We must take ownership of the data we receive from the state-mandated assessments and

continue doing what needs to be done to move forward.”

Moving forward

Threadgill said he has the utmost respect for the 46 years Peek put into MCPSS and said he wants to build on some of her successes as superintendent. Specifically, he mentioned the First Class Pre-K program and Signature Academies, both of which Peek strongly supported. Signature Academies allow students to transfer to any of the district’s 12 high schools to enroll in courses dedicated to a particular educational path or occupational interest. Built around community and industry partners, they provide hands-on experience tailored to what employers are looking for. There are academies dedicated to health care, aerospace and aviation, manufacturing, engineering and more, but Threadgill said he’s entertained the idea of a full-fledged education academy as well as one focusing on sports management and athletic training. He said such programs help students become “a contender for jobs in the field,” instead of just exposing them to basic skills associated with a trade while they’re in school. Alabama legislators just approved an $18.5 million expansion for pre-K programming, and Threadgill said he’s glad to see the state continuing to expand it to other families. There are currently 59 First Class Pre-K units in MCPSS. Threadgill said those are tomorrow’s students. “It’s very important, but I think we need to take it a step further and start at the day care level because those are going to be our students, and we need to prepare day care teachers as well as students and parents,” he said. “We have to have a mindset to look 13 years down the road, see what they’re going to need when they graduate and start giving them those skills in pre-K.” However, Threadgill has his own ideas to bring to the table, and in fact has already seen some implemented as Peek’s chief of staff. In February, the school board approved its first retirement incentive for high-earning administrative employees. Threadgill said he pitched that behind the scenes. The plan offered a $20,000 retirement bonus to administrators making more than $75,000 a year. The application period is still active, but if enough employees accept it, it could save MCPSS hundreds of thousands of dollars in annual salary expenses. “I think we need to align our personnel to the number of students that we have,” Threadgill said. “That’s what I’m trying to get back to, so this may not be the last retirement initiative.” Before he assumes his new position in July, Threadgill said he wants to focus on building relationships with teachers, students and parents. Throughout April, he said he’ll be attempting to visit every school he will be overseeing starting in July. “I’ll have to do five or six per day, but I plan to have a lunch with a student every day,” he said. “That’s very important for me. I need to build relationships and a rapport with them, because that’s who I’m getting up every morning to be an advocate for.” He can’t speak for all members, but Foster is excited about the school board’s pick. He said Threadgill is, first and foremost, “a good person” and the type he wants to be visible to students and teachers in the schools and in the community representing MCPSS. “I want us to be successful, and I believe if we get behind this young man and promote and push the kinds of things that he wants to do, we’re going to have success,” he said. “I truly believe we will.” A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 29


30 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

NIGHTLIFE

BEST SALON - MOBILE

BEST REALTOR

BEST SUMMER CAMP

BEST SALON- BALDWIN

BEST INSURANCE AGENT OR AGENCY

BEST DAYCARE/MOTHER’S DAY OUT

BEST ALL AROUND BAR

BEST OVERALL STYLIST - MOBILE

BEST MORTGAGE BROKER/FIRM

BEST PRESCHOOL

BEST BARTENDER

BEST OVERALL STYLIST - BALDWIN BEST COLORIST

BEST INVESTMENT BANKER/ FINANCIAL PLANNER

BEST BIRTHDAY PARTY PLACE

BEST BARTENDERESS

BEST CAR DEALERSHIP

BEST KID-FRIENDLY LOCAL ATTRACTION

HOTTEST BARTENDER HOTTEST BARTENDERESS BEST NEW BAR BEST DIVE BAR BEST E-SHO BAR BEST WEMO BAR BEST MIMO BAR BEST LODA BAR BEST SOMO BAR

SCISSOR WIZARD (BEST HAIRCUT-TER) BEST BARBER BEST MAKEUP ARTIST BEST HOOHA WAXER BEST PLACE TO GET MANI/PEDI BEST ESTHETICIAN BEST DAY SPA BEST MASSAGE THERAPIST MOBILE BAY’S BEST DOCTOR

BEST WINE BAR

MOBILE BAY’S BEST SPECIALIST (MD)

BEST FANCY DRINK BAR

BEST HOOHA DOCTOR

BEST HAPPY HOUR BAR

BEST BOOB DOC

BEST E-SHO HAPPY HOUR

BEST FACELIFT DOC

BEST SPORTS BAR

BEST DERMATOLOGIST

BEST WATERFRONT BAR

BEST WEIGHT LOSS DOC

BAR WHERE YOU ARE MOST LIKELY TO BEST “DOC IN THE BOX” CLINIC GET LUCKY BEST BACK CRACKER (CHIROPRACTOR) BEST PLACE TO SHAKE YOUR BOOTY BEST DENTIST BEST GAY BAR BEST FITNESS FACILITY FAVORITE CRAFT BEER BEST PERSONAL TRAINER FAVORITE IMPORT BEER BEST VETERINARIAN FAVORITE DOMESTIC BEER BEST PET GROOMER BEST LOCALLY BREWED BEER BEST FLORIST BAR WITH BEST TAP BEER SELECTION BEST PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO FAVORITE CASINO BEST YOGA STUDIO BEST MARGARITA BEST CARWASH/DETAIL BEST BLOODY MARY BEST LAWYER IF YOUR SPOUSE IS A BEST SPECIALTY COCKTAIL HO (DIVORCE) BEST BAR TRIVIA BEST LAWYER TO KEEP YOU OUT OF BEST GENTLEMAN’S CLUB

SHOPPING & SERVICES

PRISON (CRIMINAL)

BEST LAWYER TO SUE THE PANTS OFF SOMEONE (TRIAL) BEST REAL ESTATE FIRM

MOST KID FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD

BEST CPA

BEST DANCE STUDIO

BEST LANDSCAPER BEST CONTRACTOR/HOMEBUILDER BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER

BEST PEDIATRIC DENTIST BEST ORTHODONTIST BEST PEDIATRICIAN

BEST HARDWARE STORE

BEST KID PHOTOGRAPHER

BEST PEST CONTROL

BEST PUBLIC SCHOOL

BEST PET STORE

BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL

BEST ANTIQUE STORE BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE

COOLEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER

BEST LINGERIE/NAUGHTY SHOP

COOLEST MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER

BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE

COOLEST HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER

BEST CLOTHING CONSIGNMENT STORE BEST DEPARTMENT STORE

CITY LIFE

BEST PLACE TO GET MARDI GRAS ATTIRE

BEST MOBILIAN EVER

BEST FINE JEWELRY

QUINTESSENTIAL MOBILIAN

BEST DRY CLEANERS BEST HOME CLEANING SERVICE BEST OUTDOORS STORE

BEST MOBILE FIREFIGHTER BEST ANNUAL FUNDRAISING EVENT

BEST SHOE STORE

BEST HOTEL

BEST GIFT SHOP BEST HOME FURNISHINGS STORE BEST FURNITURE CONSIGNMENT SHOP BEST BANK OR CREDIT UNION

BEST MOBILE POLICE OFFICER COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD

BEST LOCAL PHARMACY

BEST VAPE SHOP

BEST MOBILIAN RIGHT NOW

BEST HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND BEST MARDI GRAS PARADING SOCIETY BEST MARDI GRAS MARCHING SOCIETY BEST MARDI GRAS BALL COOLEST CHURCH OR HOUSE OF WORSHIP

KIDS

BEST CLERGYMAN/PASTOR/SPIRITUAL LEADER

BEST KIDS’ CLOTHING STORE

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (ATTRACTION)

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 31


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (RESTAURANT)

BEST MUSEUM

BEST PO BOY

COOLEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY

BEST THEATRE GROUP

BEST SUSHI

BEST LOCAL COMPANY TO WORK FOR

BEST PLAY OR PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR

BEST BAKERY

NAPPIE CATEGORY FOR 2019

BEST LOCAL ACTOR

BEST BURGER

BEST DANCER

MUSIC

BEST THEATRICAL SINGER BEST ARTS EVENT

BEST LOCAL BAND BEST NEW LOCAL BAND

BEST CATERER BEST STEAK BEST SEAFOOD BEST BRUNCH BEST ETHNIC RESTAURANT

BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HER NAKED BEST TALK RADIO HOST/SHOW BEST SPORTS RADIO HOST/SHOW BEST LOCAL EVENING TV NEWSCAST BEST LOCAL MORNING TV NEWSCAST BEST ANCHOR BEST METEOROLOGIST BEST TV INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER BEST SPORTS COVERAGE

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT

BEST COUNTRY BAND/PERFORMER

EATS & DRINKS

BEST METAL/UNDERGROUND BAND

BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT

BEST PIZZA

BEST BLUES BAND/ARTIST

BEST NEW RESTAURANT

BEST COFFEEHOUSE

BEST CLUB TO SEE LIVE MUSIC

BEST EASTERN SHORE RESTAURANT

BEST EASTERN SHORE COFFEEHOUSE

BEST OUTDOOR BAR TO SEE LIVE MUSIC

BEST BEACH RESTAURANT

BEST LOCAL GROCERY STORE

BEST CHEF

BEST GROCERY CHAIN

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER IMAGE

BEST VENUE TO SEE LIVE MUSIC (NON-BAR)

BEST ATMOSPHERE

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS- MOBILE

FAVORITE AL.COM CONTENT CREATOR FAVORITE GLOSSY MAGAZINE

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS - BALDWIN

FAVORITE LOCAL WEBSITE OR BLOG

BEST BARBECUE RESTAURANT

BEST WEBSITE DEVELOPER

BEST SOLO MUSICIAN BEST JAZZ MUSICIAN BEST HIP HOP ARTIST BEST MUSIC/RECORD STORE BEST LOCAL RECORDING STUDIO BEST GUITAR PLAYER BEST AREA SINGER/VOICE BEST AREA DRUMMER BEST AREA BASSIST BEST PIANO PLAYER/KEYBOARDIST BEST DRAG QUEEN PERFORMER

MOST INNOVATIVE MENU BEST OUTDOOR DINING BEST APPETIZER BEST ENTRÉE IN MOBILE

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

BEST HOME COOKIN’/SOUL FOOD

BEST BARBECUE SAUCE

BEST SERVER (SERVER NAME AND RESTAURANT)

BEST RIBS BEST RAW OYSTERS

BEST SERVICE OVERALL (RESTAUARANT)

BEST CUPCAKE

BEST DESSERT

BEST SEAFOOD MARKET

BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST

BEST HANGOVER FOOD

BEST WINGS BEST CHICKEN FINGERS

BEST WEEKEND TV NEWS TEAM HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSMAN HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSWOMAN FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE WRITER FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER STORY

BEST LOCAL TV AD BEST MARKETING/EVENTS COMPANY

POLITICOS

HARDEST WORKING OFFICIAL - CITY OF MOBILE (ELECTED OR APPOINTED) HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL - MOBILE COUNTY

BEST ICE CREAM/YOGURT/GELATO

MEDIA

BEST LUNCH SPOT

FAVORITE RADIO STATION FM

BEST EASTERN SHORE LUNCH SPOT

FAVORITE RADIO STATION AM

ARTS

BEST WINE/GOURMET SHOP OR GROCERY

BEST LOCAL DJ

BEST WINE SELECTION - RETAIL

BEST DJ TEAM

BEST LOCAL PAINTER

BEST BEER SELECTION - RETAIL

BEST MORNING SHOW/DJ

BEST LOCAL SCULPTOR

HARDEST WORKING LOCAL STATE LEGISLATOR

BEST LOCAL GRAPHIC DESIGN ARTIST

BEST ANNUAL FOOD EVENT OR COOK-OFF

BEST MIXED MEDIA ARTIST

BEST FOOD TRUCK

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HIM NAKED

WHO WILL BE THE NEXT GOVERNOR OF ALABAMA?

BEST ART GALLERY

BEST GUMBO

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO

BIGGEST SCANDAL OF THE YEAR

BEST DJ (MIXIN’, MASHIN’UP KIND) BEST AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL

32 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL- EASTERN SHORE HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL - BALDWIN COUNTY


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 33


ART ARTIFICE

Visual, physical arts meet at Sway Downtown BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

M

arrying mind and soul, the visual and the physical was as simple as signing a lease. Then came the elbow grease. “My husband and I always wanted something downtown, an art gallery, but weren’t quite sure how,” Noel Hanley said. A principal dancer with Mobile Ballet for six years, Hanley also taught yoga, an avocation with the potential for greater cash flow. She mixed dream with pastime to form the hybrid space Sway Downtown. Finding the spot was crucial since Hanley knew rents and price tags were rising steadily amidst rejuvenation. They found a Conception Street location last summer, then tackled most of the cosmetic renovation themselves. “Someone did these floors. They’re called luxury vinyl plank, just on top of existing concrete. It has a cork back which takes a lot of impact,” Hanley explained. After graduating from The University of Alabama as a dance major, the Mississippi native danced with Southern Danceworks, Sanspointe Dance Company and Birmingham’s Alabama Ballet for two years. She also was on the faculty of Samford University and Birmingham Dance Theater. Then she came to Mobile via a traditional route: she married a native. “My husband is from here and I wasn’t ready to quit dancing so I joined Mobile Ballet as one of their paid professionals,” Hanley said. It prompted her connection with Lauren Woods, a Mobilian whose talent in tights and on canvas is equally lauded.

Bienville Books may be on the block

Bienville Books going. In 2008, Adams opened the Haunted Book Loft on his second floor, the name a nod to a storied Mobile institution that closed in 1991 after a 50-year run. Though they’ve ditched the moniker, the loft’s feature remains horror and science fiction/fantasy. Adams said his first surgery would prevent him from answering inquiries until April 15.

“Art After Hours” at new locale

This year sees the rebirth of the Mobile Arts Council’s “Art After Hours” events every other month. What is it? Think “happy hour” with an artistic flavor. The next unfolds Monday, April 9, 5:30-7 p.m. at the new spot for Gallery 450 (300 St. Michael St.). Appropriately enough for Na-

34 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

A PRINCIPAL DANCER WITH MOBILE BALLET FOR SIX YEARS, HANLEY ALSO TAUGHT YOGA, AN AVOCATION WITH THE POTENTIAL FOR GREATER CASH FLOW. SHE MIXED DREAM WITH PASTIME TO FORM THE HYBRID SPACE SWAY DOWNTOWN.” “A lot of [adult students] danced growing up and they know it, but they’re just nervous to come to a class. I tell them not to be, I don’t have mirrors. It makes us feel good about ourselves,” Hanley said. She said there’s no requirement on numbers of sessions per week. The curious are welcome to drop in and start class, regardless of previous skill levels. “I have people who have never taken a ballet class before come. A lot of the ladies that come haven’t danced in 30, 40 years and always talk about how fun it was, that it makes them feel like they’re 12 again,” Hanley said. No pink tights, no leotards. No ballet shoes even, if students don’t want. “It’s just doing a ballet class. You’re getting a workout for your body and brain,” Hanley said.

tional Jazz Appreciation Month, the gallery is joined in hosting “Art After Hours” by the Gulf Coast Ethnic and Heritage Jazz Festival, the Jazz Studio and the Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed. There will be complimentary wine, light appetizers and live entertainment from Jazz Studio students. Door prizes will be awarded. Admission is free. For more information, call 251-459-2298 or visit mobilearts.org.

Exploreum merges cultural concentrations

The Gulf Coast Exploreum (65 Government St.) has a superb summer camp program ready for youth to grow their smarts while having fun. Kids ages 4-14 can learn about topics ranging from astronomy to chemistry to avionics. They’re also unveiling new Culture Camp

2018, a collaborative effort between Mobile’s hallmark institutions. Campers 9-11 years old will interact with, observe and explore various disciplines. Session One: June 25 will feature the Mobile Carnival Museum; June 26 the Bragg Mitchell Mansion; June 27, the Alabama Contemporary Art Center; June 28, the Joe Jefferson Players (at the Exploreum); and June 29, the Exploreum Science Center. Session Two: Aug. 6 will feature the Exploreum Science Center; Aug. 7, the Bragg Mitchell Mansion; Aug. 8, Mobile Opera; Aug. 9, Mobile Museum of Art; and Aug. 10, GulfQuest National Maritime Museum. Parents are responsible for dropping children at the correct location each day. For more information, call 251-208-6818 or visit exploreum.com.

ARTSGALLERY

A downtown Mobile cultural cornerstone might be up for grabs as Bienville Books (109 Dauphin St.) owner Russell Adams contemplates selling his business. He opened the independent store near Bienville Square in 2002. Adams has battled health issues “for a year and nine months” and recuperation from a pair of imminent procedures will make his presence at the business tenuous. “I may not be able to move around a lot. I’ve told employees I might not be there after late June,” Adams said. Since he also owns the building, Adams has mulled selling both but would prefer to sell the bookstore first. Independent booksellers have been decimated by online sales recently but Adams’ diligence with specialty finds has kept

The friendship cultivated what would become Sway. “Lauren and I are real close. We actually sat down and did the logo for the new studio. She’s the gallery manager so she puts all the shows together. It’s kind of a collaborative-type thing for us,” Hanley said. Woods’ connections with the area’s visual artists has worked. She lined up April’s appearance by noted local painter Stephanie Morris. Her singer-songwriter son Eliot shows the arts run deep in Morris’ family. The native Mobilian picked it up as legacy. “My grandmother and mother were portrait artists, so my mother taught me quite young. She had a little studio in the backyard where she taught the neighborhood children art and so I learned the basics from her,” Morris said. Morris also has vivid memories of her father’s love for classical music, its strains echoing through the house. She found it natural for the body to move to it and ballet lessons came naturally. A summer in New York as teens meant she and her sister took dance at Carnegie Hall. “It was such a thrill. Our teacher looked like a ballet teacher in a Degas painting. He had a cane and a jacket even,” Morris said. Morris stayed with visual arts while enrolled at Spring Hill College. A year in the University of Georgia’s graduate school brought her comfort zone into full view. “We had this fabulous teacher whose name was Yancey Robinson. He was head of the department. After a month

or two of seeing our work, he said to me, ‘Oh gosh, you’re a portrait artist,’” Morris recalled. Once back in Mobile her penchant for likenesses grew. Morris estimates she’s been best known as a commissioned portrait artist for more than four decades. When Woods inquired about a Morris show at Sway, the portrait artist wanted to expand her catalog of work featuring dancers. She held Woods at bay while she went to work, visiting Mobile Ballet and capturing bodies in motion with paint and charcoal. Sway studio has had success reconnecting other adults with dance in a more physical way. Hanley was inspired by adult ballet classes she witnessed while attending a yoga event in Denver.


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 35


MUSIC

FEATURE

CMT NEXT WOMEN OF COUNTRY TOUR SATURDAY, APRIL 7, WITH DOORS AT 6:30 P.M. Photo | Mobilesaenger..com

SAENGER THEATRE, 6 S. JOACHIM ST., WWW.MOBILESAENGER.COM TICKETS: $32.50-$69.50, AVAILABLE THROUGH TICKETMASTER

Next Women of Country Tour comes to Saenger

T

Sara Evans (right) headlines the “Next Women of Country Tour” at the Saenger this Saturday night, featuring RaeLynn (center, profiled below) and Kalie Shorr (left).

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

he “Jewel on Joachim” will thrill country music fans when the fourth installment of the CMT Next Women of Country Tour comes to Mobile this Saturday. Country superstar Sara Evans will headline in support of her new album, “Words.” The evening will also include the fresh talent of country up-and-comer Kalie Shorr. Singer-songwriter RaeLynn will complete the lineup. No stranger to the tour, RaeLynn built an extensive following through her 2012 run on the NBC talent competition “The Voice.” Even though she was eliminated, RaeLynn used an EP and a number of singles, including “Boyfriend” and “God Made Girls,” to maintain her career’s positive momentum. Last year, she finally released her full-length debut, “WildHorse,” which she considers a very personal album. Even though it has been less than a year since her debut, this singer-songwriter is already

giving her fans a preview of her sophomore effort through the new single “Queens Don’t.” RaeLynn took a break from cleaning her house to chat with Lagniappe about her steady rise to country stardom. Stephen Centanni: You’re coming to Mobile on the CMT Next Women of Country Tour. How does it feel to be involved with something like that? RaeLynn: I have been a part of the CMT Next Women of Country Tour for a couple of years now. I think that I was the Class of 2016 or 2015. It’s just an incredible community to be a part of and changing the conversation of what’s happening with women right now. I’ve been wanting to do this tour for a while, so I’m very excited to be a part of it and be on it with such a class act like Sara Evans and a newcomer like Kalie Shorr. It’s really awesome to see. Centanni: You knew you wanted a career in music before you were out of high school. What led you to that decision at such an early age? RaeLynn: Honestly, I couldn’t imagine myself doing anything else. I started playing guitar and singing when I was 16. It’s kinda like one of those things where you’re like, “Okay, well, this is what I’m good at.” There was never a Plan B. It was always music or doing something in this field. I think when you have nothing but one goal, then you make it happen. That’s what I did. Centanni: You got your music out there by using internet outlets such as YouTube, but one of your biggest boosts came from your appearance on “The Voice.” When you were first on the show, your performances focused on covers. Then you came back and got to perform one of your own songs, which was “Boyfriend.” What was it like going back on “The Voice” and performing your own song? RaeLynn: It was such a surreal moment for me because I had only done covers on the show. It was a dream come true to be able to sing a song that I had written and perform it on the show that got everything started for me. It was definitely a full-circle moment. To be able to have a standing ovation from the judges, it was pretty amazing. Centanni: After six years and singles and an EP,

36 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

you finally released your first full-length, “WildHorse.” How did it feel to finally have a full collection of songs out there? RaeLynn: It was a dream come true. Finally, everybody can see the collection of music that I’ve been wanting to put out, and they can hear my story and see where I’m coming from. This record really laid the foundation for the artist that I really want to be. I am just so thankful for every person that wrote on it with me and helped me tell a story. I’ve been in this industry for six, almost seven years. Being a woman, you change so much, and the older you get, you learn more. So, I’ve just learned a lot with all that comes through in my songwriting. I’m just

ary. Keeping that in mind, what do you want people to know about you through the album’s music? RaeLynn: I just want people to see my heart and really see where my life has been over the past five years. I went from being an 18-year-old on a hit television show to getting into a van and traveling all over the country and going to radio stations and getting ready in gas stations, to going on major tours and being married and all these life changes that I’ve gone through. You can see that and feel that in this record. Centanni: Speaking of being married, “Lonely Call” is about your husband. What was his reaction when you first played that song to him? RaeLynn: He just laughed and said, “Classic!”

My favorite thing about collaborating is that it’s all a group effort. If I’m writing a song with you, something you say might not be in the song but might trigger something for me to think of to say.

thankful that now that people can see it. Centanni: Speaking of learning, you co-wrote this album with a great list of songwriters, and that’s one thing that I really like about the new generation of young country artists. Everybody has a hand in writing their own songs. For you, what’s the best part of collaborating with songwriters? RaeLynn: My favorite thing about collaborating is that it’s all a group effort. If I’m writing a song with you, something you say might not be in the song but might trigger something for me to think of to say. That’s what it’s all about. A little bit of the pressure is off to think super hard. You have somebody helping you and guiding you. Also, having somebody to be creative with is an awesome thing. Centanni: You’ve likened “WildHorse” to a di-

That’s my husband, though. He was just like, “Of course, you had to write a song about this.” Centanni: What’s your next project? RaeLynn: Well, my new single, “Queens Don’t,” is out, and I’m very excited about that. I’m just working on another beautiful piece of work. I’ve found out a lot about myself over the past couple of years and what I’ll stand for and what I won’t. I’m being more honest and wearing my heart on my sleeve even more than I did on “WildHorse” and not being afraid to say what I want to say. A lot of that is coming through with this next record, which I’m really excited about. Centanni: When can we expect that one? RaeLynn: Pretty soon! I can’t say anything yet, but soon.


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 37


MUSIC BRIEFS

Photos | (Left) Moon Taxi | Facebook, (Right) Flow Tribe | www.flowtribe.com

Let Moon Taxi play

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Moon Taxi, Flow Tribe Date: Saturday, April 7, with doors at 7:30 p.m. Venue: Soul Kitchen, 219 Dauphin St., www.soulkitchemobile.com Tickets: $25 in advance/$30 day of show; available at venue website, Mellow Mushroom (Mobile locations) or by calling 866-777-8932

38 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

This Saturday, Soul Kitchen will feature two bands that have made quite an impression locally. First, Flow Tribe will energize the crowd with its versatile style of New Orleans funk. Afterward, the crowd will celebrate the return of Moon Taxi to the Mobile Bay area. From Hangout Fest to TenSixtyFive, Moon Taxi has used its jam-minded indie rock to steadily add to its ever-growing fan base. Moon Taxi will fill its set list with tracks from its latest album, “Let the Record Play.” Long before the album’s release, the lead single, “Two High,” was an instant hit that generated excitement for the completed album. Vocalist/guitarist Trevor Terndrup admits the single’s success came as a surprise. Terndrup says the success of this track legitimized the band’s songwriting and production decisions and provided a “giant shot of confidence to complete the album,” with lead guitarist Spencer Thomson in the production chair. “We just really enjoy having Spencer as the producer because we can take more sonic risks,” Terndrup said. “He’s able to collect those ideas and put them in an order that makes sense. It was a little bit of a riskier album, but it paid off.” Terndrup says the new tracks have thrived in concert, and the band’s new lighting production provides “a new sensory experience” for audiences.


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 39


MUSIC BRIEFS

Sir Mix-a-Lot’s back

Photo | Robert Cline Jr. | www.robertclinejr.com

Band: Sir Mix-a-Lot Date: Saturday, April 7, with doors at 8 p.m. Venue: Midnight Rodeo, 7790 Tanner Road, www.midnighrodeomob.com Tickets: $17.50-$30, available through Ticketfly

Midnight Rodeo is shaking off its honky-tonk sensibilities for a night of rump shaking on the dance floor, courtesy of Sir Mix-a-Lot. Thirty years ago, this hip-hop legend used his debut album “Swass” to jump into the national spotlight, demonstrating his versatility and hip-hop innovation. Offbeat songs such as “Buttermilk Biscuits” and “Square Dance Rap” were instant hits. As hip-hop and heavy metal began to join forces, Sir Mix-a-Lot collaborated with Metal Church on “Iron Man.” The 1992 album “Mack Daddy” included the single for which Sir Mix-a-Lot is most famous: “Baby Got Back.” This anthem to the posterior spent weeks at No. 1 and earned him a Grammy for “Best Rap Solo Performance.” From radio to television, the shelf life of “Baby Got Back” has never expired, continuing to introduce new generations to the world of Sir Mix-a-Lot.

Cline brings ‘American Mojo’ to Dority’s Photo | Sir Mix-a-Lot | http://sirmixalot.com

40 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Band: Robert Cline Jr. Date: Saturday, April 7, 7 p.m. Venue: Dority’s Bar & Grill, 1010 Bienville Blvd. (Dauphin Island), 251-861-4853 Tickets: Call for info From Austin to Muscle Shoals, singer-songwriter Robert Cline Jr. tends to make a good impression with everyone he meets. He made such a good impression on New Orleans groove rockers The Subdudes that the band helped nurture his musical ambitions. In fact, John Magnie of The Subdudes acted as producer for Cline’s debut album, “All the Right Reasons.” This collection of countrified folk demonstrated Cline’s knack for crafting poignant songs highlighted by lyrical and instrumental purity. After meeting Muscle Shoals session legends The Swampers at SXSW, Cline relocated to Muscle Shoals and began penning the tracks that would become his latest release, “American Mojo.” With this album, Cline has ventured more into the modern honky-tonk world. “American Mojo” is filled with wailing pedal steel, warm electric piano and smooth vocal work. The most attractive aspect of this album, however, is Cline’s poetic musical translations of life his lyrics bring to the mix.


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 41


AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | April 4 - April 10 Please send upcoming music to listings@ lagniappemobile.com by MONDAY before Wednesday’s paper.

WED. APR 4 Bluegill— Matt Neese Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Brickyard— Chad Davidson Band Callaghan’s— Phil & Foster with Brooks Hubbert Felix’s— Light Travelers Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p // Johnny Barbato, 5:30p /// Rhonda Hart Duo 6p //// Ja Rhythm 10p ///// Bruce Smelley Duo 10p IP Casino— Brennan Roybal Duo Lulu’s— Adam Holt, 5p

THURS. APR 5 Bluegill— Stephen & Symone Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Brickyard— Yellowhammer Callaghan’s— Cooper Trent Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Flora Bama— Dave McCormick 2p // Kevin Swanson 5p /// Club Dueling Pianos 5p //// Mark Sherrill, Chris Newbury, James Daniel & Jose Santiago 6p ///// Hung Jury 10p ////// Mario Mena Duo 10:15p IP Casino— Brennan Roybal Duo Lulu’s— Jimmy Lumpkin & The Revival, 5p Manci’s— Rondale & the Kit Katz, 7p McSharry’s— String Slingers, 7p The Merry Widow— Thelma & The Sleaze // Craig Brown Band /// Sister Sister Veets— Sherry Neese, 8p

FRI. APR 6 Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12pm // Adam Holt Duo, 6p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Zydeco, 6p Brickyard— Josh Ewing Felix’s— Bust Trio Flora Bama— J. Hawkins Duo 1p // Lea Anne Creswell Duo 2p /// Dave Chastang 4p //// Jack Robertson Show a.k.a. Big Earl 5:30p ///// Beachbillys 6p ////// Greg Lyons 6p /////// Nick & The Ovorols 6p //////// Smokey Otis Duo 8p ///////// Lee Yankie & the Hellz Yeah 10p ////////// Bruce Smelley Duo 10:15p /////////// Josh Buckley Band 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar)

42 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

— Joel Cooper Rock Show, 9:30p IP Casino— Brennan Roybal Duo Listening Room— Michael McDermott, 8p Lulu’s— Brandon White Duo, 5p Manci’s— Rock Bottom Duo McSharry’s— DJ Tiger, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — The Spotswood Brothers Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Zachary Hudson Off The Hook— Kim Carson, 6p Wind Creek Casino— The City, 10p

SAT. APR 7 Bluegill— Jamie Adamson, 12p // Jeff Johnson Duo, 6p Blues Tavern— Disciples of the Crow, 9p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese Brickyard— Ryan Dyer Band Callaghan’s— Jimmy Lumpkin & The Revival Dority’s Bar and Grill— Eric Erdman, 6p Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Flora Bama— Kim Carson and the Real Deal 1p // Tony Ray Thompson 1p /// J. Hawkins Trio 2p //// Rebecca Barry and Bust 2p ///// Al & Cathy 4p ////// Stephen Sylvester 5p /////// Jack Robertson Show a.k.a. Big Earl 5:30p //////// Big Muddy 6p ///////// Johnny B Trio 6p ////////// Kevin Swanson & Jon Puzan 8p /////////// Red Clay Strays 10p //////////// Jo Jo Pres 10:15p ///////////// Ja Rhythm 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Joel Cooper Rock Show, 9:30p Hard Rock (Live) — 38 Special, 8p IP Casino— Brennan Roybal Duo Listening Room— Abe Partridge Lulu’s— Adam Holt Band, 5p McSharry’s— DJ Chi, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Lefty Collins Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Rock Bottom Duo Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Ashley Feller Off The Hook— Elaine Petty, 6p Saenger— Sara Evans, 7:30p Soul Kitchen— Moon Taxi, Flow Tribe, 8:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jason Justice, 11a Tarpon Lounge— Funkhouse Fever Trio, 8p Traders— Small Zoo, 8:30p

Wind Creek Casino— The City, 10p

SUN. APR 8 Bluegill— Quintin Berry, 12p // Sugarcane Jane, 6p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Kyle Brady, 6p Brickyard— Jack Burford Felix’s— Jimmy Lumpkin Flora Bama— Smokey Otis Trio 12p // Al & Cathy 1p /// Songs of Rusty McCugh w/ Jason Justice 1:30p //// Chad Parker Duo 2p ///// Zach Diedrick 2p ////// Lee Yankie 5p /////// Kim Carson & the Real Deal 5:30p //////// Jo Jo Pres 6p ///////// Perdido Brothers 6p ////////// The Springs 10p /////////// Tony Ray Thompson Duo 10:15p Frog Pond— Shawn Mullins, Will Kimbrough, Grayson Capps, Cary Morin, Corky Hughes, Tom Ryan & Radoslav Lorkovic IP Casino— Brennan Roybal Duo Listening Room— Eric Erdman w/Robert Cline, Jr. Lulu’s— Cadillac Attack, 5p Off The Hook— Neil Dover, 5p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jessie Howell, 11a

MON. APR 9 Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Adam Holt, 6p Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor 2p // Cathy Pace 6p /// Kevin Swanson 8p Petty & Pace 10:15p IP Casino— Brennan Roybal Duo Listening Room— The Tainted Cabaret. 8p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUES. APR 10 Bluegill— Matt Neese Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— Chris Powell Felix’s— Matt Neese Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery 2p // Perdido Brothers 6p /// Bat 8p //// Bruce Smelley Duo IP Casino— Brennan Roybal Duo Lulu’s— Lefty Collins, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Deaver Hawsey


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


FILMTHE REEL WORLD ‘Roman J. Israel, Esq.’ serves up a steaming muddle

D

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Road South Mobile, AL (251)639-1748 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin St Mobile, AL (251) 438-2005 REGAL MOBILE STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Drive Mobile, AL (844) 462-7342 AMC JUBILEE Square 12 6898 Highway 90 Daphne, AL (251) 626-5766

enzel Washington, in his inexplicably Oscar-nominated titular role of “Roman J. Israel, Esq.,” serves up a steaming bowl of plot soup as a lawyer committed to social justice, even while he is himself socially inept. The film starts off as an interesting story with a procedural kind of plot about reform of the justice system, and also asks what a misfit like Roman will do with himself after a sudden change in his professional circumstances. The answer to that question ends up being utterly preposterous.   Evoking the revolutionary spirit of the past in both his clothing and his outlook, Roman wants to keep on truckin’ after the sudden death of his partner, a renowned criminal defense lawyer who was the public face of their partnership. Roman, meanwhile, worked tirelessly, effectively and very cheaply back at the office, writing briefs and generally trudging along with the help of a Rain Manlike recall of facts — and what I think is meant to be a quirky reliance on Post-it notes and other luddite office supplies.   Initially, Roman Israel has some provocative character contradictions. You

expect that once this weirdo is suddenly out in the open, his lawyerly prowess will stun you. Instead, he is indeed as inept in the courtroom as his partner thought. Consigned to his proper place as a foot soldier in a new law firm headed by hotshot Colin Farrell, we prepare ourselves as viewers for things to gel. Instead, the characters double down on making no sense whatsoever. Farrell is sometimes a money-grubbing shark, and then randomly displays a noble spirit. When he first shows up, Roman wonders how a person like Farrell could possibly fit into the story, and I am here to tell you that this never makes sense. In movies, there are plot twists, and then there is total nonsense. “Roman J. Israel, Esq.” is the latter. The total lack of narrative consistency is infuriating, especially because the first part of the film is actually intriguing. I don’t think I could spoil this film if I tried, because it made so little sense, but I’ll just say that Roman, after establishing himself as an annoying but upstanding person, does something illegal for money that makes the whole film jump every rail/shark it has bothered to set up.

Meanwhile, a beautiful younger activist continues to appear in the film and swear tearfully that he is a profound inspiration to her and her work. Surely she is watching a different film. What makes “Roman J Israel, Esq.” more than merely bad is that it’s so astonishingly erratic and so long and complicated. It seems like someone worked really hard to siphon out any logic in the storylines, to take any characterization that the actors might have brought to the screen and subvert it. We could have had a pulpy drama with Denzel Washington doing a simplistic Asperger’s kind of character that gets sucked into a violent crime, or we could have had a talky drama with Denzel Washington doing a simplistic Asperger’s kind of character who gets sucked into an uplifting courtroom story. Instead, the filmmakers blended these two concepts, pulverizing any dramatic coherence, and leaving us with a talented actor in a bad suit, letting a slightly messy afro stand in for character development, and leading to this actor getting an Oscar nomination.      “Roman J Israel, Esq.” is currently available to rent.

NEXUS CINEMA DINING 7070 Bruns Dr. Mobile, AL (251) 555-5555 AMC CLASSIC WHARF 23151 Wharf Lane Orange Beach, AL (251) 981-4444 COBB PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 923-0785 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 State Hwy 181 Spanish Fort, AL (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

44 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Photos | Sony Pictures Entertainment / Entertainment Studios Motion Pictures

From left: Denzel Washington stars as “Roman J. Israel, Esq.,” for which he won an Oscar nomination. The dramatic thriller also stars Colin Farrell. Right: Ted Kennedy’s life and political career become derailed in the aftermath of a fatal car accident in 1969 that claims the life of young campaign strategist Mary Jo Kopechne. NEW THIS WEEK CHAPPAQUIDDICK

Ted Kennedy’s life and political career become derailed in the aftermath of a fatal car accident in 1969 that claims the life of a young campaign strategist, Mary Jo Kopechne. Sounds intriguing, plus the sandwiches are delicious. Nexus Cinema Dining

A QUIET PLACE

A family of four must navigate their lives in silence after mysteri-

ous creatures that hunt by sound threaten their survival. Starring Emily Blunt and John Krasinski, who also directed this nerve-wracking horror film. All listed multiplex theaters.

BLOCKERS

When three parents stumble upon their daughters’ pact to lose their virginity at prom, they launch a covert one-night operation to stop the teens from sealing the deal. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING THE LEISURE SEEKER Crescent Theater READY PLAYER ONE All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining. TYLER PERRY’S ACRIMONY All listed multiplex theaters. GOD’S NOT DEAD: A LIGHT IN THE DARKNESS All listed multiplex theaters. PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining. UNSANE All listed multiplex theaters. 7 DAYS IN ENTEBBE AMC Classic Wharf 15

SHERLOCK GNOMES All listed multiplex theaters. PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST AMC Mobile 16 MIDNIGHT SUN All listed multiplex theaters. LOVE, SIMON All listed multiplex theaters. TOMB RAIDER All listed multiplex theaters. I CAN ONLY IMAGINE All listed multiplex theaters. A WRINKLE IN TIME All listed multiplex theaters. STRANGERS: PRAY AT NIGHT

All listed multiplex theaters. DEATH WISH All listed multiplex theaters. RED SPARROW All listed multiplex theaters. ANNIHILATION All listed multiplex theaters. GAME NIGHT All listed multiplex theaters. BLACK PANTHER All listed multiplex theaters. PETER RABBIT All listed multiplex theaters. INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY Regal Mobile Stadium 18 THE GREATEST SHOWMAN Regal Mobile Stadium 18, Cobb Pinnacle 14


A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 45


CALENDAR OF EVENTS APRIL 4, 2018 - APRIL 10, 2018

NIGHT MARKET AT MMOA BUY LOCAL, SUPPORT LOCAL! NIGHT MARKET IS AN EVENT HOSTED BY MMOA SHOWCASING MAKERS, ARTISTS, ARTISANS AND CRAFTSMEN WHO MAKE LOCALLY SOURCED, HANDMADE GOODS. GREAT FOOD AND DRINK FROM LOCAL FOOD TRUCKS AND LIVE MUSIC THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 5-9 P.M. Photo | www.mobilemuseumofart.com

GENERAL INTEREST April Brown Bag in Bienville Lineup: April 4 – Grayson Capps, April 11 – Lisa Mills, April 18 – Jamell Richardson, April 25 – Bohni Trio. Wednesday 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. For more information, please call (251) 208-1550 5th Annual Firkin Festival Presented by Moe’s Original Bar B Que and Budweiser Busch Distributing, the Firkin Festival will be held on Saturday, April 7, at 701 Spring Hill Ave. Benefiting the American Cancer Society, the festival indulges craft beer lovers, novices and aficionados alike. Visit www. moesoriginalbbq.com.

Southeastern Indian Festival Come immerse yourself in the rich and vast culture of the various Southeastern tribes who originally inhabited this area. Open to the public on Thursday, April 5, and Friday, April 6, at the Poarch Band of Creek Indians in Atmore. Call 251-3689136, ext. 2052.

Plant Swap Free and open to the public so bring your potted plants and trade for others! Join us at Central Presbyterian at the corner of Dauphin and Ann streets on Saturday, April 7, from 10 a.m. to noon. Last swap there were 500 plants to trade! Email joanhon13j@gmail.com for more details. “Girl Talk Over Tea” The Daphne Public Library offers “Girl Talk Over Tea” on Saturday, April 7, from 10:30 a.m. to noon in the Daphne library community room. Free event sponsored by the Friends of the Daphne Library. Call Daphne Public Library at 251-621-2818, ext. 211. USA Campus Cleanup Please join us for our annual campus cleanup on April 7 at 9 a.m. Every year we remove hundreds of pounds of trash on our campus and would really appreciate your help in creating a cleaner, greener campus. Meet at the entrance of the Glen Sebastian Nature Trails. Kayaks and canoes are available for waterway cleanup.

Discover the Dinosaurs

Trek back to a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth. Come to the Mobile Convention Center on Saturday, April 7, or Sunday, April 8, for a roaring, stomping, roam-through experience like no other. Visit www.discoverthedinosaurs.com for details. Stapleton Bluegrass Festival Please join us on April 7 as we bring back the Stapleton Bluegrass Festival. The event will include great music, food and your opportunity to support the Stapleton School! Call 251-937-2038 for more information. Camellia Classic Open Car Show 
Enjoy a display of hundreds of vintage and classic automobiles on the Great Lawn at Bellingrath Gardens on Saturday, April 7, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Proceeds from car registrations will go to Feeding the Gulf Coast (formerly Bay Area Food Bank) and the Autism Society of Alabama. For details visit bellingrath.org or call 251973-2217.

Saving for your Future Learn how to build a budget and manage your finances. Join us at the downtown Ben May Library on Wednesday, April 4, from 6-7:30 p.m. Facilitator is Paula Webb, government documents librarian, at the University of South Alabama. Registration is strongly encouraged. Call 251-208-7078 or email jsigler@mplonline.org. Market at The Pillars Join us Sunday, April 8, at noon for a fun afternoon of local makers, bakers, crafters and artists! Live music and local eats! This event is free and open to the public. Family fun and pet friendly! Wedding Resale Brides, we need you! Gather all your leftover wedding goodies and come sell them to future brides this Sunday, April 8, at The Venue at Dawes (3349 Dawes Road) from 1-5 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Visit www. thevenueatdawes.com or call 251-2899646.

46 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Republican Women’s Club Knollwood Republican Women’s meeting will be held Wednesday, April 11, at  2 p.m. at Gordon Oaks Retirement Community.  Speakers will be candidates competing in the June 2018 Republican primary.

Mobile Claims Association 2018 Golf Tournament Grab your golf clubs and come and join us at the MCA’s Spring Golf Tournament at Heron Lakes Country Club on Friday, April 6. Proceeds from this tournament will benefit St. Mary’s Home. Visit www. MobileClaimsAssociation.com. First Friday Art Walk Begins at Eastern Shore Art Center on Friday, April 6, at 6 p.m. Stroll through downtown Fairhope visiting art galleries and listening to music. Call 251-928-2228. Men4Christ Beginning at 5 p.m. on Friday, April 6, through Saturday, April 7, the Lighthouse Baptist Church in Theodore will be hosting a special retreat for men and young men from junior age and up. Contact 251-6536542.  

FUNDRAISERS Ann’s Fans Bayside Academy invites the community to show support and rally behind Hall of Fame Coach Ann Schilling at the “Ann›s Fans Strikeout Cancer Benefit” Thursday, April 5, at 4 p.m. Concession profits will go to help with her medical needs. Check us out on Facebook for more information. Erin Go Paw Bring your family and your faithful hounds and join us at Callaghan’s, Saturday, April 7, for a run through the garden district, followed by a street party with music, food and a silent auction. Proceeds benefit Friends of the Mobile Animal Shelter.

Barc & Brews Fairhope Brewing is partnering with the Baldwin County Humane Society to host its 6th annual Barc & Brews fundraiser on

Sunday, April 8, 2-7 p.m. Live music, food and family friendly. Pet adoptions will be held from 2-4 p.m. For more information visit www.fairhopebrewing.com. Alabama Goes Teal The Rape Crisis Center is taking part in Sexual Assault Awareness Month with a “Take Back the Night” walk on April 5 at the USA Campus at 6 p.m. Wear a teal ribbon throughout the month of April in solidarity. Croquet and Cocktails The American Cancer Society is pleased to announce a brand-new fund-raising event in Baldwin County. Join us on April 8 at Steelwood Country Club in Loxley at noon for a game of croquet on the lawn. Go to www.facebook.com/ ACScroquetandcocktails/ to win a free ticket and for more information. Family Fun Day Join us at Liberty Church in Foley this Saturday, April 7, for a day of fun including a bake sale, kid’s area, food trucks and live music. Free admission. All proceeds go to the backpack program to feed hungry kids in our area. Contact Darlene at 251-752-5445. Pancake Breakfast Join the St. Mary Knights of Columbus for a monthly pancake breakfast Sunday, April 8, 9:30-11 a.m. in the St. Mary Gymnasium. Contact Sean Dudley, sdudley@burr.com or the St. Mary Parish Office, 251-432-8678.

Yoga and Meditation Come support us at our fundraising event at Chipotle on Monday, April 9, 4-8 p.m. Just show our flyer for 50 percent of the proceeds to be donated to our year-long peace events. Check us out at thevanguardusa.com/3495/life/spotlighton-meditation-and-mindfulness-club.
 Rebellion Pre-Season Party 
Join us Tuesday, April 10, at 6:30 p.m. at Lucky’s Irish Pub for the inaugural Causeway Rebellion Pre-Season Party as we rally together to support AFC Mobile. Raffles, food and drink specials. Visit


www.facebook.com/causewayrebellion/ for details.

Night Market at MMoA Buy local, support local! Night Market is an event hosted by MMoA showcasing makers, artists, artisans and craftsmen who make locally sourced, handmade goods. Great food and drink from local food trucks and live music Thursday, April 5, 5-9 p.m.

ARTS

Pulitzer-Winning Author to Speak 
Elizabeth Kolbert, winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for her best-selling book about mass extinction, will speak in the Student Center Ballroom at the University of South Alabama on Wednesday, April 4, at 7 p.m. Recognized as one of America’s best science writers, Kolbert will speak on how mass extinction relates to the Gulf Coast region.

Catt’s Brown Bag Concert Series Free shows by Grayson Capps on Thursday, April 5, 11:30 a.m. at May Day Park in Daphne and Friday, April 6, at 11:30 a.m. at Windmill Market in Fairhope. Music in the Park Enjoy free concerts in the Pavilion at Town Center Park every Friday evening beginning April 6, with the Unfazed Show and Band, through August 31. Visit spanishforttowncenter.com for the summer lineup. Mobile Pops Disney Concert Join us in this family-friendly concert as we explore the world of Disney. Saturday, April 7, 6-7:30 p.m. at the Dauphin Island Water Tower. Free and open to the public. Auditions for “1984”
 Chickasaw Civic Theatre will host auditions for its production of George Orwell’s “1984” this Friday at 6 p.m. and Saturday at noon. Look us up on Facebook at Theatre Explorer Post 149. Are You Woke Yet? Get woke with student artists and wellknown artists at this Poetry Slam at the Student Center Ballroom on the USA Campus. Tuesday, April 10, at 7 p.m. Contact jptalks@southalabama.edu. Brown Bag by the Bay A free show by Lisa Mills will be performed at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, April 11, at Mayday Park in Daphne.

MUSEUMS “Titanic: Honour & Glory” “Titanic Honour & Glory” will run through April 15 at the History Museum of Mobile. Call 251-301-0273 or gavin.snyder@ historymuseumofmobile.com. «Alabama Main Streets» Traveling Postcard exhibit will be on display until Saturday, April 28, at the Spanish Fort Public Library. Visit spanishfortpubliclibrary.org. “Windows to the Sea”

“Windows to the Sea” is the latest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Savage Ancient Seas” “Savage Ancient Seas” will transport GulfQuest guests to a time when the last of the great dinosaurs roamed Earth and swam the seas. Visit www.gulfquest.org. Fairhope’s Founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday), 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all Mobile County residents. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200. “Permian Monsters: Life Before Dinosaurs” Take an adventure back in time 290 million years when bizarre-looking animals dominated life on land and sea. The Exploreum will display this traveling exhibition through June 3. Visit exploreum. com. “Galapagos: Nature’s Wonderland” In the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, there is a paradise unlike any other: the Galapagos Archipelago. Immerse yourself in this spectacular film at the Exploreum, until May 26. Visit exploreum.com.

WORKSHOPS Soft Pastel Workshop Join us April 7 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Marnee’s Studio for a unique soft pastel workshop with Victoria Udovikina. No prior experience required, just bring lunch and a friend. Visit https://www.facebook.com/ marnees.studio/. ASL Class Come learn how to communicate in American Sign Language (ASL). Beginner classes start Tuesday, April 10, and run eight weeks at the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind. You will be taught the manual alphabet, numbers and approximately 250 signs. Call Beverly at 251-432-7777 or email her at bownds. beverly@aidb.org. Cyber Seniors Terrified of technology? Join us at Spanish Fort High School on April 10 at 4 p.m. for this class, open to all adults who need assistance with technology. Call 251-4107323. Open Studio at Cathedral Square Gallery
Come see artists at work and enjoy complimentary beverages and works by

more than 60 area artists. Sunday, April 8, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Contact 251-694-0278.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Mobile Bay Bears vs. Pensacola Opening night at the Hank on April 5, the BayBears host the Pensacola Blue Wahoos for a five-game homestand. Starting at 6:30 p.m., this week’s “Thirsty Thursday” is sponsored by Lagniappe! More info at www.mobilebaybears.com. Ladies’ Night at Crossfit
 If you’ve ever wondered what CrossFit is all about and how it can help you reach even the loftiest health and fitness goals, then don’t miss the next Ladies Night, Friday, April 6, at 5:30 p.m. Free to members and non-members; bring a friend. Contact Courtney@crossfitsaraland for more information. Yoga Series Soul Shine Yoga is offering a six-week series beginning Sunday, April 8, at Kudzu Aerial Fitness in Fairhope. Contact Gabi Garrett at 256-348-7249. Free Yoga at Alabama Contemporary Art Recharge and refresh with Yoga at Alabama Contemporary Art Museum. This free, one-hour class is led by certified yoga instructors and open to participants at all levels of experience. Saturday, April 7. Beekeeping School Be part of one of the best beekeeping series around. Led by Becca of Little Green Bees and Becka of B’s Bees. PZK Hall in Robertsdale, April 11-13. Visit www. littlegreenbees.com. Group Rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@rideSAMBA.com. Free Yoga Whether you’ve never tried yoga before or you’re an expert, swing by for a fun and free session at Red Beard’s Outfitter. Class starts at 8:30 a.m. and is open to all skill levels. Call 251-217-7466. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale; www.baldwincountyal.gov Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre. com. Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450. Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m.; www.daphneal.com. Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesday at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in town hall. Workshop meeting on second Tuesday; townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m.; www.cofairhope.com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St.; www.cofairhope.com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m.; www.cityoffoley. org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov. Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m.; www.cityofmobile.org.

Fitness and Athletics Classes Try something new! Classes are offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Tai Chi, bellydance, candlelit yoga, Piyo Tone and piano. Call 251-463-7980 or visit mobilecap.org

Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St., www.urban.cityofmobile.org.

Pickleball for Adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School on Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. thecityofprichard.org.

Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach.com.

Satsuma City Council: First and third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m., City Hall, 5464 Old Highway 43, 251-675-1440.

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 47


SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

First-time entry wins Waterfowl Stamp Art Contest BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

Photo |Alabama Dept. of Conservation & National Resources

Kirk Wickizer of Huntsville won this year’s Alabama Waterfowl Stamp Art Contest with his painting of a male red-breasted merganser. The artwork will be used as the design of the 2019-20 Alabama Waterfowl Stamp, required for licensed waterfowl hunters.

K

irk Wickizer of Huntsville is the winner of this year’s Alabama Waterfowl Stamp Art Contest. His painting featured a male red-breasted merganser. Seven other artists entered the 2018 contest. Eric Greene of Mobile took second place with his painting of a pair of wood ducks. Third place went to Barbara Keel Lunsford of Auburn, who also painted wood ducks. The winning artwork will be used as the design of the 2019-20 Alabama Waterfowl Stamp, which is required for licensed hunters when pursuing waterfowl in Alabama. This was Wickizer’s first time entering the state contest. “I was a little nervous and didn’t think I would win,” Wickizer said. “I was having lunch [in Huntsville] with my wife during the judging. When I got the call a few hours later, I was extremely pleased. I’m very happy about it.” In addition to his career designing airplane structures for Boeing, Wickizer runs a YouTube channel that showcases his passion of painting. The channel, Kirk Wickizer Art, features several videos on subjects ranging from how to paint landscapes to how to make your own canvas panels. “I’ve been painting for a long time, but after my experience in this year’s contest I’m going to focus more on wildlife,” Wickizer said. He said it was the visual flair of the duck’s breeding plumage that drew him to the red-breasted merganser.

48 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

In Alabama, the bird is usually found on estuaries, bays, shallow coastal waters, lakes and deep, slow-moving rivers during its seasonal migration. The 2018 contest was judged by a panel of experts in the fields of art, ornithology and conservation during the Fins, Feathers and Flowers event at Lakepoint State Park in Eufaula. Entries were judged on suitability for reproduction as a stamp, originality, artistic composition, anatomical accuracy and general rendering. The designs were limited to living species of North American migratory ducks or geese. Winning species from the past three years — American wigeon, mallard and green-winged teal — were not eligible subjects for this year’s contest.

BayBears back in action

The Mobile BayBears open their season at home on Thursday, hosting the Pensacola Blue Wahoos at Hank Aaron Stadium at 6:35 p.m. As in the past several seasons, all Thursday games will be “Thirsty Thursday.” This week’s game is presented by Lagniappe. Here is a listing of this season’s daily specials: Sunday Fun Day and Bark in the Park — Children can play catch on the field before the game and run the bases after the game. Fans can bring dogs to the game. With a

free Kids Club membership in 2018, all children will receive a free ticket to every Sunday game. Every Monday Matters — Free ticket with donation of two nonperishable food items, two books or two gently used clothing items. Among those benefiting from the drives are Feeding the Gulf Coast, Goodwill Easter Seals and the Mobile Public Library. Two-For-Tuesday — Buy one, get one free ticket to every Tuesday game. Weenie Wednesday — $1 hot dogs throughout the game. Thirsty Thursday — $1 12-ounce Rolling Rock and Natural Light (from 6 p.m. until end of seventh inning). Wind Creek Friday Night at The Hank and Fireworks Friday — Fireworks show following every Friday game. AutoNation RAM Truck Saturday Night — special $1 concession nights on the first Saturday of every month and other special promotions (such as Cook’s Pest Control T-shirt giveaway and Star Wars Night). The roster for this season was not available by deadline. A full report on the BayBears will appear in next week’s Lagniappe.

SHC beach volleyball in nationals

The Spring Hill College beach volleyball “Sandy Badgers” have accepted an invitation to participate in the inaugural America Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA) Small College Beach Championships. The event is set for Saturday and Sunday at Hickory Point Beach in Tavares, Florida. “As one of the original small schools to add beach volleyball, we couldn’t be more thrilled with the opportunity to compete in the inaugural AVCA Small College Championship,” said SHC head coach Shawn Taylor. “The AVCA was not only instrumental in establishing the first beach volleyball championship, but crucial to the NCAA recognizing beach volleyball as a collegiate sport. Without their support, research and behind-the-scenes work, it’s fair to say that beach volleyball would probably not exist as an NCAA sport.” The tournament will feature pool play on Saturday and bracket play on Sunday with teams from seven NCAA Division II schools. The teams will be divided into one three- and one four-team pools. Pool groupings will be determined by the results of February and March competitions and specific pools and match times will be announced April 2. “As the field begins to grow in the college ranks, there has developed a large disparity among universities in terms of how they choose to support a program with various resources,” Taylor said. “As beach volleyball continues to be the fastest growing of all NCAA sports, the AVCA has recognized that it is a good time to implement a season-culminating event for smaller programs. Our hope is that history repeats itself and we are able to take it from the AVCA Small College Championships to the NCAA Division II and Division III Championships.” Because Spring Hill is in its final year of transition into joining the NCAA ranks, this tournament marks a major event for the Badgers. “When we received the invitation from the AVCA, I was excited,” Taylor said. “The most difficult part was keeping it from the team as the details were worked out. What better way to showcase what we have been working on? What better way to celebrate our first class of beach players who have competed for four years? It also means that we will be the first program from SHC to compete in a postseason event since the school started the process of NCAA Division II membership.” The AVCA Small College Beach Championships were created in response to the explosive growth of college beach volleyball across the country. Just 15 institutions sponsored teams in 2012, but today 120 colleges field varsity teams. There are 65 in the NCAA at Division I level, 11 at Division II and three at Division III. Six compete in the NAIA, and 35 are in the California Community College Athletic Association. Another 12 institutions have announced their intention to add a squad next season.


SPORTS FROM BEHIND THE MIC

Who’s most responsible for using child prodigy athletes? BY RANDY KENNEDY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

T

he family of Marvin Bagley III went from relative poverty to living the life of luxury as soon as it became clear the 6-foot-11 teenage basketball prodigy was headed for stardom and the riches that accompany the highest level of athletic success, according to a report on oregonlive.com. The way this works is that the unscrupulous sports agent or money manager or shoe company representative provides what the athlete and his family view as a huge amount of money in order to curry favor that will eventually lead to a long and lucrative relationship for the vultures. Of course, the cash and cars and high-dollar rent are pennies compared to what the representatives will get in return if the young player turns pro and they get their cut of his multimillion-dollar contract and/or enjoy the benefit of him endorsing their products. If you followed college basketball this season then you know Bagley lived up to the hype. After skipping his senior year of high school in a newly popularized maneuver known as reclassifying, Bagley arrived at Duke ready to dominate college basketball. He did just that in leading the Blue Devils to the Elite 8 while becoming a finalist for the

national player of the year award. Just last week he declared for the NBA Draft, right about the time the story broke alleging his family received benefits that would jeopardize his status as an amateur athlete — meaning it’s almost time for the vultures to capitalize on their investments. If you’re outraged by this narrative, it’s only because you’re one of the millions of college basketball and football fans who have been brainwashed by the NCAA into thinking there is a victim in any of this. Let’s take a look at the players. The family goes from barely being able to provide a proper upbringing for their child to raising him in an upscale neighborhood and sending him to a quality private high school. If the parents also happen to be driving in style, that’s just a bonus. Winner. The player gets the benefit of that upbringing and doesn’t have to suffer in poverty until the NBA decides he’s eligible to be drafted. Winner. The agents, money managers and shoe companies are simply making calculated decisions about how to invest their money. The smart ones will get a huge return on their investments. The less smart ones will invest in players who don’t make it,

THE NBA GETS THE BENEFIT OF SOMEONE ELSE SUBSIDIZING ITS FUTURE STARS UNTIL THEY’RE MORE PREPARED TO SUCCEED IN THE LEAGUE. WINNER.

and thus lose money. Winner. The NBA gets the benefit of someone else subsidizing its future stars until they’re more prepared to succeed in the league. Winner. The NCAA? Well, the officials who are responsible for distributing millions of dollars based on TV contracts for the college basketball tournament have to try to convince the public that they are the losers in this whole charade. After all, players and their families receiving money threatens the sanctity of college athletes and the rules of amateurism upon which those sports are based. But I ask: Who was hurt by the Bagley family receiving money? You can’t make a case that it’s Duke’s opponents, because almost every team competing for championships has at least one Marvin Bagley on their roster. In fact, they probably have a roster full of players who could not pass the amateurism test if all the facts were known. This may sound like a plea for paying college athletes. Nothing could be further from the truth. The solution for having NCAA officials and college coaches and presidents having to answer for why their teams are cheating is to return college sports to college students. First, a player like Bagley should be allowed to enter the NBA or one of its developmental leagues at any age. Use a model like professional soccer, where a 12-year-old can sign a pro contract if he shows enough promise. Second, the NCAA should get serious about college athletes being college students. My proposal would be for every player to be signed to a four-year scholarship. If he left before his four years were up — for any reason — he would still count as one of the scholarship players on the team for all four years. So, if you wanted to sign a player like Bagley — who never had any interest in being a college student or being on campus for more than seven months — then Duke would have one less scholarship player for the three years of eligibility he left on the table. This would require college coaches to recruit only players who they knew were serious about succeeding as students and athletes. Of course, that would mean great players such as Bagley would not be there to help bring in millions of dollars to the NCAA. Now, I ask: Who’s most guilty of using these kids? Randy Kennedy writes a weekly column for Lagniappe and is co-host of “Sports Drive” every weekday from 3-6 p.m. on WNSP 105.5 FM, the country’s first all-sports FM station.

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 49


STYLE HOROSCOPES SAGITTARIUS GETS THE WRONG IDEA ARIES (3/21-4/19) — While trying to find a restroom during SouthSounds, you’ll mistakenly stumble into a dressing area and become a stand-in bassist for a local punk band. Though you don’t play bass, opportunities to break out your 1988 black denim collection are rare these days. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — A 20-year-old plan to horde the Toys”R”Us Geoffrey dollars you won on a late ‘90s game show will seem foolish as you rush to spend them in the company’s last days. You’ll be unable to get the cash value but will never need another Nerf product in your life. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — Excited about Mobile’s new citywide bike-sharing program, you’ll bust out an old Huffy to make sure your skills are intact. While you’re able to mount, ride and steer, stopping will prove tricky and you’ll forcefully share a bike with around five pedestrians. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll finally head out to try the new midtown Publix, where you’ll be very impressed by the customer service, varied selection and cleanliness. On a sad note, you and another frequent customer of the “Crack Dixie” will pass each other in shameful silence. LEO (7/23-8/23) — Hilarity will ensure as you host a few guests from “Across the Pond” later this month. While you’ve always enjoyed exploring cultural differences, you’ll be flat-out taken aback when one of your British friends asks if you’d care for any chocolate chip biscuits. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — In a bit of a faux pas, you’ll mistake local Rep. Jack W. Williams for Rep. Jack D. Williams, who was recently indicted on federal bribery charges. You would probably feel worse about the mix-up if you weren’t joined in the error by several prominent statewide publications. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — You’ll make the mistake of planning a romantic night out with your significant other while the little ones are on spring break. Upon returning home that night, you’ll find the babysitter in tears, a cracked television on the floor and the dog completely hairless and shivering on the couch. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — With the success of “Roseanne” and other rebooted television shows, you’ll get the greenlight to bring “Mr. Ed” back from the television trash heap. The low cost of production will prevent you from using a real horse as the star. Instead, you’ll use one of those stickhorse toys. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — In 2020, you’ll be one of the first fans to discover the newest sport to come to Mobile, professional cricket. Played at a recently abandoned Hank Aaron Stadium, the game will look like nothing you’ve seen before. You’ll be completely lost, except for laughing at the terminology and uniforms. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — In an attempt to better yourself, you’ll pick up the trombone. You’ll practice hard and get better with it, right before the Mobile Police Department takes it away from you for violating the city’s noise ordinance. After that less-than-stellar experience, you’ll take up the spoons. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — Taking some admittedly bad advice, you’ll start a company called “Icarus” to take advantage of the ride-hailing service market. As the name suggests, “Icarus” allows a user to fly themselves from place to place. Also, as the same suggests, there will be some problems at first. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — You will take part in a failed public transportation experiment. You’ll be one of the first residents of Mobile to use a service called “Surf the Bay” to get from Mobile to the Eastern Shore. It’ll launch as an alternative to bridge tolls, but will result in injuries due to gator attacks.

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE FOLLOW THE SUN BY FINN VIGELAND / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Government policy chief 5 Assented 12 Not empirical 19 Not natural-looking 21 Sometimes hard-to-find shirt opening 22 Drunkard 23 Onetime co-host of “The View,” informally 24 Contest once hosted by Bob Barker 25 Makes reference (to) 26 Catastrophic event that can be caused by a gigantic earthquake 28 “Fer sher” 29 Folds, as a business 30 Headed for 34 Abbr. on mil. mail 36 French painter of ballerinas 40 Injunction 42 How Hercule Poirot likes to address Hastings 43 Money in Malmö 45 Headstone inits. 46 Stag 48 Ones in rocking chairs, stereotypically 50 Smartphone feature 53 Cherry variety 54 Start to many bumper stickers 55 Response to pointing out a resemblance between two people 56 Hollywood labor groups 59 See 71-Down 60 Plant stalk 62 Crank (up) 63 Chipotle choice 65 Nitwit 66 180s 67 2015 hit spinoff of “Despicable Me” 68 How someone in awe might describe himself 70 Pretty cool, in slang 73 One of the Big Four accounting firms 74 Deft touch 75 Place-holder letters 78 Better now 80 Trivia fodder 81 All ____ 83 Rough shelter 84 Hannah who coined the phrase “the banality of evil” 86 Largest city in the Baltics 87 Planets like ours, in sci-fi 88 Hue lighter than lime 91 Per ____ (yearly) 92 Vintage-film channel 93 Goody 95 Like St. Augustine, among all U.S. cities 97 College, to a Brit 98 Amérique 101 Immigrants’ class, for short 102 Only words on the front

17 Riddle-me-____ 18 Qtrly. check recipient, maybe 20 “Stars above!” 27 “____ soon?” 31 Smear 32 Writing in a window? 33 Paranoid sorts, in slang 35 Pushes back 37 “Mamma Mia!” setting 38 In a light manner 39 Outbreaks 40 Anthropomorphic king of Celesteville 41 “Still ____” (Julianne Moore film) 43 Rios, e.g. 44 Decisive assessment 47 Intl. Rescue Committee, e.g. DOWN 49 R.&B. singer with the hits 1 E.M.T.’s training “So Sick” and “Mad” 2 Speed along 51 Tempe sch. 3 Print ad come-on 52 Things in restaurant 4 Sit on the throne windows 5 International conglomerate 57 Sac-fly result whose name means “three 58 Outlay that cannot be stars” recovered 6 Cable-news host Melber 59 Some corsage wearers 7 Gchats, e.g. 61 Grand Lodge group 8 Some A.L. players 64 Ready … or red, maybe 9 Response to a surprising claim 65 “Let’s keep this between us” 10 “That’s something ____!” 67 Wasn’t kidding about 11 Voyager 68 Stunt at the end of a power12 Medieval Spanish kingdom ful performance 13 Sport last played in the 69 Informal assent Olympics in 1936 70 Go back on one’s word? 14 Was awesome 71 With 59-Across, some works 15 Occupied of Tennessee Williams 16 Funny 72 Big ____ (the drug of the Great Seal of the United States 10 4Really fresh 106 Its hub at J.F.K. was designed by Eero Saarinen 108 Hubbub 110 Artistic, chatty sorts, it’s said 113 Draft 117 Testify 119 “I got the check” 120 Ancient, undeciphered writing system 121 Towel fabric 122 Relatives of asters 123 Tony who won a Tony for “Angels in America” 124 “It’s a deal!”

industry) 74 Biter 75 Moment of liftoff 76 Dangerous toy 77 “Same here” 79 Legal vowelless Scrabble play 80 Herculean act 82 Bit of art pottery 85 Preface to a heart-to-heart conversation 89 End of a George Washington address? 90 Safer alternative to paintball 91 If you’re lucky 94 Candy brand owned by Hershey 96 Word before and after “no” 99 Salt-N-Pepa and Ben Folds Five 100 Branch of Islam 102 Rakes in 103 Not taken seriously? 105 Tiniest change 107 Popular gaming console that sounds like two pronouns 109 It’s a long story 110 “Keep movin’!” 111 Info for a chauffeur, perhaps 112 Yahoo alternative 114 “Yuck!” 115 Grp. of connected computers 116 1/100 of a 43-Across 118 Manhattan part … or a suburb near Manhattan

ANSWERS ON PAGE 51

50 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8


STYLE BOOZIE

A tisket, a tasket, a basket and a casket BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

G

Thank you, Easter bunny, whoever you are

First, a leprechaun in Crichton. Now, a mysterious Easter bunny in midtown and Oakleigh. What is it about Mobile and mythical creatures? Sources have confirmed an unidentified bunny “egged” yards throughout the OGD and midtown sometime in the wee hours of Easter morning. Residents woke up to find eggs in their yards. I’m sure many were hoping to find money, booze or even the leprechaun’s gold, but instead they found a note with a winking Easter Bunny that read, “April Fool’s.”

I’m glad this bunny pulled a good April Fool’s Day joke. With the first day of April falling on Easter Sunday, I feel like the level of pranks was sadly at record lows. So kudos, mysterious MiMo Easter bunny, for bringing a little April foolery to town!

A tisket, a tasket, a motorcycle pulling a casket

Over the last couple of weeks I have had several reports from around the Gulf Coast of a motorcycle pulling a casket. The first sightings started a couple of weeks ago. A man wearing a black leather motorcycle jacket and matching black helmet was spotted pulling a full-sized casket behind him. We heard he was spotted in Dauphin Island, Bayou La Batre and Saraland. No word on whether he is really hauling folks to their final resting place or just what is going on here, but that would be a pretty cool ride to Playing possum? Um, maybe not. It looks like “Dateline” may be your final resting place. Just sayin’.

Possum murderer on the loose?

Photo | Boozie Spy

reetings, my gossip-loving fiends! I hope you all had a wonderful Easter and didn’t get too out of hand at your various adult egg hunts. Yes, the booze may come in small bottles but it is just as powerful. Trust me, I can attest. Never mix vodka and gin. Someone needs to needlepoint that on a pillow for me! Anyway, aside from those shenanigans, it was an absolutely glorious weekend, celebrating with friends and family. How much ham and how many deviled eggs can one person eat? I can tell you, it’s an obscene amount. Obscene! But you aren’t here for that. Nope, you want to know all the craziness that’s been going on. Luckily, I collected it all for you and put it in a big, yellow Easter basket. Because I know you’d rather have the scoop than a bunch of Peeps any day of the week and twice on Easter Sunday, so I obliged! You’re welcome! Now enjoy!

making a trip to Mobile’s Chateauguay neighborhood to get to the bottom of the murder of a beloved possum.

I got a report from one of my spies in the midtown neighborhood of Chateauguay that a possum had possibly been murdered in their ‘hood. It seems the freaky-looking mammal was spotted dead on the side of the road. I know what you are thinking. He probably just got hit by a car, as is the cause of death for most possums. But what made this so intriguing is that the possum seemed to have a sharp metal object sticking out of his side, leading this neighbors to ask, “Could this be MURDER?” Was it Colonel Mustard with a dagger in the cellar?

Before an autopsy could be performed, the body mysteriously disappeared. (Or maybe animal control just picked it up.) Either way, this mystery will remain unsolved. But possums should stay on high alert in case a serial killer is on the prowl. Well, kids, that’s all I got this week. With reports coming in from spring break and SouthSounds, Mobile Bay Restaurant Week and some of my fave charity events coming up, there is certain be a ton of gossip to satiate our insatiable appetites. But until then, just remember — whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or just plain ol’ possum murder, I will be there. Ciao!

F U T U R E S H O C K

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 50 A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 51


52 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by J. Ashley Sharer aka Jefferson A. Sharer, an unmarried man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Citibank, N.A., on the 25th day of November, 2013, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7101 Pg: 86; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 10, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot Number 95, having a front of 49 feet on Dauphin Street, and the West Half of Lot 96, having a front of 24 1/2 feet on Dauphin Street, in Dauphin Place, as per plat of same duly recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, mobile County, Alabama, in Deed Book 102, at Page 27, of the Probate Records of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  1721 Dauphin St, Mobile, AL  36604. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, Mortgagee/ Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 431877 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 18, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Joseph G. Chinchar, an unmarried man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc., on the 30th day of August, 2013, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7075 Pg: 1412; the undersigned Ditech Financial LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 3, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 28, Crystal Lakes Estates, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 28, Page 27 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  2305 Cedar Ky, Mobile, AL  36695. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The

balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Ditech Financial LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 431117 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 18, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Joan E. Price-Williams, an unmarried woman, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for United Security Financial Corp., on the 19th day of October, 2012, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6955 Page 1849; the undersigned Mid America Mortgage, Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 3, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 56, Ponderosa, Unit Two, as recorded in Map Book 28, Page 37 in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  2033 Campfire Dr, Semmes, AL  36575 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure.  The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Mid America Mortgage, Inc., Mortgagee/Transferee Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 425806 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 18, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Willis J Holland and Brittany N Hallford, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for AMCAP Mortgage, LTD., on the 30th day of December, 2014, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book LR7222 Page 1192; the undersigned American Financial Resources, Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 31, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 189 as per plat of Ramsey Estates, Unit 10, as recorded in Map Book 87, Page 83, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama and together with a 1/32nd roadway interest in Elizabeth Road and Ann Lane, as the same depicted on said Map Book. Property street address for informational purposes:  10680 Ann Lane, Grand Bay, AL  36541. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED

THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances. Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. American Financial Resources, Inc., Mortgagee/Transferee. Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 411311 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Rachel E. Gray, an unmarried woman, originally in favor of Generation Mortgage Company, on the 8th day of December, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6478 Page 929; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Champion Mortgage Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 3, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 20, in Harbor Hills Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Map Book 8, Page 241, of the records in the Office of the Judge of the Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  4113 Beacon Lane, Mobile, AL  36693. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Champion Mortgage Company, Mortgagee/ Transferee Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 432498 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain mortgage executed by Gregory B.Hunter and Earline A. Hunter, husband and wife to Whitney National Bank dated March 6, 1998, and Recorded in RPLY Book 4558, Page 1064 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, notice is hereby given that the undersigned as mortgagee will under power of sale contained in said mortgage, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on April 24, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street Mobile, Alabama 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same

property described in the above referred to mortgage: THAT LOT A LAND BOUNDED BY A LINE DESCRIBED AS BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST SIDE OF KENNEDY STREET 108 FEET SOUTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF KENNEDY AND CONGRESS STREETS; RUNNING THENCE WESTWARDLY AND PARALLEL WITH CONGRESS STREET 90 FEET 2 INCHES TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTHWARDLY AND PARALLEL WITH KENNEDY STREET 17 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT; THENCE RUNNING WESTWARDLY AND PARALLEL WITH CONGRESS STREET 45 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUNNING SOUTHWARDLY AND PARALLEL WITH KENNEDY STREET 50 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTH LINE OF PROPERTY NOW OR FORMERLY OF AMANDA FRIEND; THENCE RUNNING EASTWARDLY AND PARALLEL OR NEARLY SO, WITH CONGRESS ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID AMANDA FRIEND’S PROPERTY 135 FEET 2 INCHES TO THE WEST SIDE OF KENNEDY STREET; THENCE NORTHWARDLY ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF KENNEDY STREET 67 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; BEING LOT 9 AND A PART OF LOTS 7 AND 8 IN SQUARE 17 OF THE KENNEDY TRACT, ACCORDING TO MAP THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 11 N.S., PAGE 77 OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES. PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. This property will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis, subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions reflected in the mortgage and those contained in the records of the office of the judge of the probate where the above-described property is situated. This property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title, use and/or enjoyment and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Whitney National Bank d/b/a Hancock Bank Mortgagee William McFadden McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain mortgage executed by American Estate & Trust FBO Frances Watson Clark IRA to Insiders Cash, LLC dated October 14, 2014, and Recorded in Book LR 7213, Page 1177 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, which said mortgage was subsequently assigned to Soyhon Kwon by instrument recorded in Book LR7590, Page 1318 of said Probate Court records; notice is hereby given that the undersigned as mortgagee will under power of sale contained in said mortgage, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on April 18, 2018, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street Mobile, Alabama 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 2, BELLE ROSE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO TH EPLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 9, PAGE 296, OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. This property will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis, subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions reflected in the mortgage and those contained in the records of the office of the judge of the probate where the abovedescribed property is situated. This property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title, use and/or enjoyment and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Sohyon Kwon Mortgagee William McFadden McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on May 10, 2013, by Clarence M. Harbison Jr., as Grantee to Fieldview LLC., an Alabama Limited Liability Company, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book 7037, Page 302, and said vendor’s lien having been last assigned to McAleer Properties II, L.P., which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book LR7169, Page 862, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on April 25, 2018. Lot 13 as per plat of SOUTH BAY ESTATES as recorded in Map Book 111, Page 34, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. McAleer Properties II, LP Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama  36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Josetta Haggard, a single woman, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for PrimeLending, a PlainsCapital Company, on the 20th day of January, 2010, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6619 Page 621; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 24, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 3, Resubdivision of Lots 10-141 and 58, El Monte Subdivision as recorded in Map Book 12, Page 7 in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  3857 San Juan Dr, Mobile, AL  36609. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ Transferee  Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 418869 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Willie Lott and Anita Lott, husband and wife, originally in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., on the 25th day of June, 2012, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6909 Page 172; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 53


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 24, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 14, Del Barco Drive Subdivision, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 5 Page 166, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  264 Del Barco Dr, Mobile, AL  36607 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 432354 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendor’s Lien retained in Deed from Triple R. Properties, LLC to Sonia N. Purl and Thomas D. Purl, dated February 23, 2011, and Recorded in Book 6754, Page 1257 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama; notice is hereby given that the undersigned as holder of said Vendor’s Lien will under power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on April 18, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 12, FONTAINE WOODS NORTH, PHASE III, ACCORIDNG TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 94, PAGE 117, OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA.   ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF THE PROBATE WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney›s fee.  The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Triple R. Properties, LLC Holder of the Vendors’ Lien William S. McFadden McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by George Allen Mothershead, II, an unmarried man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Magnolia Mortgage Company LLC, on the 16th day of November, 2016, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7451 Pg: 478; the undersigned Freedom Mortgage Corporation, as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 19, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Commencing at the Southwest corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 4, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Mobile County, Alabama; thence North 1,320 feet to a point; thence East 1,680 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence North 11 degrees 09 minutes 42 seconds West 393.74 feet along the East Right of Way of Dogwood Trail to a point; thence North 60 degrees 21 minutes East 209.55 feet along the South Right of Way of Kushla-McLeod Road to a point; thence South 00 degrees 38 minutes 33 seconds West 490 feet to a point, thence West 100.4 feet to the Point of Beginning. Property street address for informational purposes:  5825 Kushla Mcleod Road, Eight Mile, AL  36613. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Freedom Mortgage Corporation, Mortgagee/Transferee Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 431890

THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances. Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. PennyMac Loan Services, LLC, Mortgagee/ Transferee Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 431667 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Daniel R. Goldman and Teresa Goldman, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for GTC Mortgage Company Inc., on the 24th day of January, 2014, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book LR7117 Page 153 and modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded in Book LR7302 Page 786; the undersigned Guaranty Trust Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 17, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Commencing at the Southwest corner of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Mobile County, Alabama, run North along the West line of said Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, a distance of 390.6 feet to a point on the East Right of Way line of Dogwood Trail, thence along said East right of way line of Dogwood Trail, run South 43 degrees 54 minutes East 697.5 feet to a point; thence run North 46 degrees 06 minutes East 343.84 feet to a point; thence run South 44 degrees 09 minutes East 163.97 feet to the Point of Beginning of the property herein described; thence along an existing fence line run North 46 degrees 06 minutes 31 seconds East 305.29 feet to a point; thence run South 43 degrees 54 minutes East 395.64 feet to a point, thence run South 71 degrees 50 minutes 32 seconds West 337.71 feet to a point; thence run North 44 degrees 09 minutes West 249.01 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 2.2540 acres. Together with a 20 foot non-exclusive reciprocal easement for ingress and Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018 egress, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Southwest Corner of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Mobile County, Alabama, MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE run North along the West line of said Section 3, TownDefault having been made in the payment of the in- ship 3 South, Range 2 West, a distance of 390.6 feet to debtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed a point on the East right of way line of Dogwood Trail; by Tonia Daniels, a single person, originally in favor of thence along said East right of way line of Dogwood Trail Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nomi- run South 43 degrees 54 minutes East 677.5 feet to the nee for Franklin American Mortgage Company, on the Point of Beginning of the property herein described; 4th day of September, 2015, said mortgage recorded thence run North 46 degrees 06 minutes East 379 feet to in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, a point; thence run South 43 degrees 54 minutes East 20 Alabama, in Bk: LR7301 Pg: 756; the undersigned Pen- feet to a point; thence run South 46 degrees 06 minutes nyMac Loan Services, LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, West 379 feet to a point on said East right of way line under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in of Dogwood Trail; thence along said East right of way said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest line of Dogwood Trail run North 43 degrees 54 minutes bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the West 20 feet to the Point of Beginning of said easement. Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May Together with a 20 foot non-exclusive reciprocal ease10, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, ment for ingress and egress, being more particularly detitle, and interest in and to the following described real scribed as follows: Commencing at the Southwest corner estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot of Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Mobile Number Thirteen (13) in Block Number Five (5) of Forest County, Alabama, run North along the West line of said Heights Subdivision, as per map thereof recorded in the Section 3, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, a distance Office of the Judge of Probate Court of Mobile County, of 390.6 feet to a point on the East right of way line of Alabama in Map Book 4, pages 599-600. Property street Dogwood Trail; thence along said East right of way line address for informational purposes:  4804 Leruth Road, of Dogwood Trail run South 43 degrees 54 minutes East Mobile, AL  36618. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN 697.5 feet to a point; thence run North 46 degrees 06 “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, minutes East 343.84 feet to the Point of Beginning of ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE property herein described; thence continuing North 46 MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF degrees 06 minutes East run a distance of 20 feet to THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY a point; thence run South 44 degrees 09 minutes East WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  163.98 feet to a point in an existing fence line; thence THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR along said existing fence line run South 46 degrees 06 RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE minutes 31 seconds West 20 feet to a point; thence run AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO North 44 degrees 09 minutes West 163.97 feet to the

54 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8

Point of Beginning of said easement. Property street address for informational purposes: 1480 Dogwood Trail, Eight Mile, AL  36613. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Guaranty Trust Company, Mortgagee/ Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 348058 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Shelby F. Hill and Mickey L. Hill, wife and husband, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Hometown Lenders LLC, on the 22nd day of June, 2015, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7278 Pg: 565; re-recorded in Bk: LR7294 Pg: 145; the undersigned LakeView Loan Servicing, LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 17, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 04, Bakerfield, Unit 3, Revised according to plat recorded in Map Book 87, Page 42, in the Probate Office of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  9770 Oak Forrest Dr, Mobile, AL  36695 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. LakeView Loan Servicing, LLC, Mortgagee/ Transferee Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 429161 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Todd C. Ewbank and Sherry Ewbank, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc., on the 25th day of September, 2009, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6590 Page 908; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC dba Mr. Cooper, as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 17, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Commencing at the Southeast corner of Section 9, Township 6 South, Range 3 West; thence North 00 degrees 32 minutes East along the East line of the said Section 9 and along the West line of Helen Glaze Drive, 450.0 feet to the point of beginning; thence continue North 00 degrees 32 minutes East and along said West right of way line of Helen Glaze Drive, 210.30 feet; thence run North 89 degrees 34 minutes 50 seconds West, 420.06 feet; thence run South 00 degrees 41 minutes 52 seconds West 209.91 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 31 minutes 36 seconds East, 420.67 feet to a point on the West right of way line of Helen Glaze Drive and the point of beginning. Property street address for informational purposes:  7620 Helen Glaze Dr, Theodore, AL  36582. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC dba Mr. Cooper, Mortgagee/ Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 413747 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Juan A. Mejia, married man , originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Hamilton Mortgage Corporation, on the 12th day of July, 2013, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book LR7053 Page 1572; the undersigned Caliber Home Loans, Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 17, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 12, Ynestra Subdivision, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 11, Page 171, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  671 Ynestra Dr, Mobile, AL  36609. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances. Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Caliber Home Loans, Inc., Mortgagee/ Transferee. Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 387829 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Willie C. Lucas, unmarried, originally in favor of Wachovia Bank, National Association, on the 17th day of July, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6023 Page 752; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., successor by merger to Wachovia Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 19, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot(s) 7, Block 12, Ivanhoe Manor Subdivision according to the map or plat thereof recorded in Map Book 8 Page 294, in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  1660 Hurtel St, Mobile, AL  36605. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., successor by merger to Wachovia Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ Transferee  Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 408651 Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE POSTPONEMENT Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain mortgage executed by Katherine Eva Tucker and spouse

Thomas Ray Tucker, to Compass Bank, dated August 19, 2005, and Recorded in Book 5846, Page 1501 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, which said mortgage was subsequently assigned to Michael Alexander Bk: LR7609 Pg: 1197 of said Probate Court records; notice is hereby given that the undersigned as mortgagee will under power of sale contained in said mortgage, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on April 2, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street Mobile, Alabama 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 2A OF THE RESUBDIVISION OF LOT 2, ALVAREZ’S FIRST ADDITION TO SARALAND, ACCORDING TO PLAT OF SUCH RESUBDIVISION RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 87, PAGE 14, OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES. PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. This property will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis, subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions reflected in the mortgage and those contained in the records of the office of the judge of the probate where the above-described property is situated. This property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title, use and/or enjoyment and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney›s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Michael Alexander Mortgagee William McFadden McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609. The sale provided for hereinabove which was originally scheduled for April 2, 2018 was further postponed by public announcement being made at the public entrance of the Mobile County Court House, 205 Government Street Mobile, Alabama 36602, during the legal hours of sale.  Said foreclosure sale shall be held on April 17, 2018 at the public entrance of the Mobile County Court House, 205 Government Street Mobile, Alabama 36602, during the legal hours of sale. Lagniappe HD April 4, 2018

PROBATE NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of BARBARA Q. MATHIS Case No. 2017-1409 Take notice that Letters of Administration on the Annexed Will have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of March, 2018 by the HONORABLE DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. EARON SERRA, as Administratrix CTA under the last will and testament of BARBARA Q. MATHIS, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JOHN R. PARKER Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 18, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ALMA L. DRIVER, Deceased Case No. 2018-0560 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 19th day of March, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. EDWARD E. DRIVER as Executor under the last will and testament of ALMA L. DRIVER, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DEENA R. TYLER Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MABEL WEAVER, Deceased Case No. 2018-0354 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 21st day of March, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all

parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. PATRICIA SNOW as Executrix under the last will and testament of MABEL WEAVER, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: CORNELIUS JOHN GRIFFIN JR, Deceased Case No. 2018-0561 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 19th day of March, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. JULIE S. GRIFFIN as Executrix under the last will and testament of CORNELIUS JOHN GRIFFIN JR, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DEENA R. TYLER Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: HARLAND F. RENTSCHLER, DEC. Case No. 2017-1082 Take notice that Letters of Administration on the Annexed Will have been granted to the below named party on the 15th day of March, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. Cyrina Lynn Rentschler and Richard Lindsey, as Co-Personal Representatives CTA under the last will and testament of HARLAND F. RENTSCHLER. Attorney of Record: Michael S. McNair, Esq. Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

ADVERTISMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: New Primary Feeder to New Alumni Building University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB #17-57 USA BID #8031201 Provide new 15kV feeder from existing loop-feed transformer to new padmounted transformer; utilize existing and new ductbank to new underground manhole. Bids will be received from prequalified contractors only, and clocked in at 2:00 PM local time on Thursday, April 12, 2018, at Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# 251- 460-6151 FX# 251- 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama.edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 9:00 AM local time on Thursday, April 5, 2018, in Room AD023 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager, at the address listed below.  307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 rcorrigan@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD March 21, 28, April 4, 2018

NOTICE OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, notice is hereby given that Dobson Sheet Metal & Roofing Specialties, Inc. has completed the contract for construction of Re-Roofing of Facilities at Matthews Park, 3700 Michael Blvd. Mobile, Alabama 36609, Project #PR-265-17 for the City of Mobile, P.O. Box 1827, Mobile, AL 36633 and have made request for final settlement of said contract. All persons having any claim for labor, materials, or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify Dobson Sheet Metal & Roofing Specialties, Inc. 2911 Mill Street, Mobile, Alabama 36607. Lagniappe HD April 4, 2018

ABANDONED VEHICLES NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle will be sold on May 4, 2018 at 12 pm if not claimed at 555 Myrtlewood Blvd. Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Chrysler 300 4S 2C3KA43RX6H363664 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 04, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  2016 O’Connor St., Mobile, AL 36617. 2005 Chrysler Pacifica 2C4GM68405R373792 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 04, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1037 St Stephens Rd., Prichard, AL 36610. 2002 GMC Denali 1GKEK63U52J248070 2002 GMC Yukon 1GKEC13Z52R316025

Hill Dr., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 1990 Chevrolet Camaro 1G1FP23E2LL127577

Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 47161 Rayburn Rd., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 1991 Chevrolet GMT-400 1GCDC14Z9MZ184511 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5713 Three Notch Rd., Mobile, AL 36619. 1994 Ford LGT Convt 1FTEX15Y6RKA18736 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 457 Charles St., Mobile, AL 36604. 2004 Mercedes E320 WDBUF65J94A449177

Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 2018

Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 04, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1997 Mercedes C230 WDBHA23E5VA503820 2001 Nissan Quest 4N2ZN16T71D802794 1997 Mercury Marquis 2MELM75W9VX690846

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2185 Snow Rd. N., Semmes, AL 36575. 1988 Chevrolet Monte Carlo 1G1GZ11G2JP113827

Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 04, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 24399 State Hwy. 59, Robertsdale, AL 36567.legals 1996 Kawasaki ZX100 JKAZXBD15TB507173

Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 05/09/2018 at 9 AM at 5781 Three Notch Rd  Mobile Al. 36619 if not redeemed. NISS     1N4AL11D25C201476 FORD    3FAHP08166R157333 NISS     JN1CA21D0XT218426 TOYO   1NXBR12E1XZ247779 MERC   2MEHM75W66X600429 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 04, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 509 Dismukes Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 1992 GMC Sonoma 1GTCS14Z5N8517857 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3151 Moffett Rd., Mobile, AL 36617. 2005 Mercury Grand Marquis 2MEFM75W45X661428 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3055 Springhill Ave., Mobile, AL 36607. 2014 Toyota Corolla 2T1BURHE9EC198527 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 310 Oak Dr., Mobile, AL 36617. 2006 Ford Crown Vic 2FAFP71W36X152386 2003 Lincoln Town Car 1LNHM82W83Y638084 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 9612 State Hwy 104, Fairhope, AL 36572. 2004 Yamaha FZ6-S JYARJ08EX4A001544 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1999 Buick Century 2G4WS52M6X1522434 2009 Chevrolet Cobalt 1G1AS58HX97148689

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 5 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday.

Lagniappe HD offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604.

For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5952 Brook

A p r i l 4 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 0 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 55


Lagniappe: April 4 - April 10, 2018  
Lagniappe: April 4 - April 10, 2018