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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

APRIL 11, 2018 - APRIL 17, 2018 | www.lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

Mobile attorney Margaret Miller pleaded guilty to assault after causing a traffic collision last year in which one motorist involved later died.

COMMENTARY

The disgusting outcome to former Gov. Robert Bentley’s grand jury investigation.

BUSINESS

Casual Greek restaurant coming to Midtown Center, Ken Styron promoted to president of CSU, Jill Chenoweth tapped to lead United Way.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

A simple roux of butter, flour and milk: Béchamel, the mother of mother sauces.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA MATTEI Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

The 2018 SouthSounds Music and Arts Festival returns to downtown Mobile this weekend, featuring of Montreal, J. Roddy Walston and The Business, Delta Rae and more.

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BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com

MUSIC

ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com DAVID GRAYSON Advertising Sales Executive david@lagniappemobile.com ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: J. Mark Bryant, Asia Frey, Gabi Garrett, Brian Holbert, Randy Kennedy, Alice Marty, John Mullen, Jeff Poor, Ron Sivak, Tom Ward ON THE COVER: SOUTHSOUNDS ARTIST J. RODDY WALSTON AND THE BUSINESS/COURTESY OF THE SYNDICATE ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING AGENCY

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

For Lagniappe home delivery visit

www.lagniappemobile.com/lagniappehd

With about six weeks until the “world’s largest beach party,” the time is now to make plans for Hangout Fest 2018.

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Chatting with director John Richards about the Mobile Theatre Guild’s production of “The Pot.”

FILM

“Wonder Wheel” may be Woody Allen’s last chance to make viewers uncomfortable with nakedly selfreferential storylines.

SPORTS

A look at the Mobile BayBears as they open their penultimate season at Hank Aaron Stadium before moving to Madison.

MEDIA

AL.com’s reboot landed in Mobile with a thud and the New Orleans weekly Gambit was recently sold to The New Orleans Advocate.

STYLE

Get up close and personal with exotic mammals and reptiles at the Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo.

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BAYBRIEF | SOUTH ALABAMA

Road work ahead MARSHALL WALTON REMEMBERED DURING WORK ZONE SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK BY DALE LIESCH

Photo | Lagniappe

John Walton talks about the death of his son Marshall in a road construction zone in 2015. The resulting Marshall James Walton Highway Safety Act signed by Gov. Kay Ivey last year created the crime of vehicular homicide in Alabama.

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ohnny Walton doesn’t want another family to go through what his went through more than three years ago. His 25-year-old son, Marshall Walton, was killed by a distracted driver at a construction site on U.S. Route 45 on Feb. 13, 2015. “I think about him every day,” the owner of John G. Walton Construction said at an Alabama Department of Transportation press conference. “He will always be missed.”

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Walton described his son and brother Taylor as the future of the family business. Marshall was a all-state soccer player at St. Paul’s Episcopal School and attended the University of Mississippi before getting into construction. At the time of Marshall’s death, a previous state law for vehicular manslaughter had been repealed and a Mobile County grand jury failed to charge the driver. Walton said the driver was not even given a speeding ticket because there was no law enforcement presence at

the time of the incident. “Outraged,” Walton said he and wife, Kathy, decided to help change the law. A bill sponsored by Republicans State Sen. Trip Pittman and State Rep. Chris Pringle was signed into law by Gov. Kay Ivey last year. The Marshall Walton Memorial Highway Safety Act makes vehicular manslaughter a Class C felony in the state, Pittman said. “On our roads, in general, way too many people … put themselves and those they interact with in danger,” Pittman said. “It’s important we have a law for vehicular manslaughter.” Pittman said he hopes the law brings better awareness of the issue and helps prevent deaths in the future. There were 652 injuries and 18 deaths reported from crashes within construction zones in 2016. There were 492 injuries and 31 deaths in construction zones in 2015, and 504 injuries and 21 deaths in 2014, according to Drive Safe Alabama’s website. In 2016, 76 percent of work zone crashes resulted in property damage, while 22 percent resulted in injuries and 1 percent resulted in deaths. Vince Calametti, ALDOT region engineer, offered drivers tips for keeping construction work zones safe for everyone. It’s a good idea, he said, to check for where work zones will be located on a planned road trip. Drivers can find that information on the ALDOT website, he said. In addition, he said it’s important not to text and drive, or eat and drive, as these activities can cause distractions. If the number of lanes is reduced because of construction, Calametti said, drivers should not try to pass other motorists and should maintain a safe distance. He added drivers should slow down when in construction zones. “Keep these tips in mind for the good of the workers and fellow motorists,” Calametti said. ALDOT Director John Cooper reminded those in attendance that the orange cones signify progress, but also signify risk. He said drivers need to try to not worry about delays when driving past work zones. “We have a tendency to think it slows down our trips,” Cooper said. “Generally, work zones don’t hinder your trip more than about five minutes.” Aggressive driving is an issue in construction zones, Capt. John Malone, district commander for the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency public safety highway patrol. He said this is especially true if lanes are condensed or eliminated due to work. “Don’t be aggressive,” Malone said. “Don’t try to be the first in line if the lane ends. Observe the signs; observe the messages … observe the lives of all those working in the zones.”


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BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Suspended sentence ATTORNEY PLEADS TO ASSAULT CHARGE AFTER CAR CRASH BY JASON JOHNSON

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nitially charged with manslaughter, a local attorney accused of causing a five-car collision while driving under the influence will only face probation after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor last week. Court records indicate Margaret McDowell Miller entered a blind plea to a third-degree assault charge April 5 — more than a year after she was charged with manslaughter, assault and DUI after police say she caused a five-vehicle collision where one of the motorists later died. The Mobile Police Department said Miller was “allegedly under the influence of alcohol” in December 2016 when her Ford Explorer rear-ended a vehicle driven by 71-year-old Jian Chen, resulting in a chain reaction that ultimately involved three other vehicles. During a field sobriety test, Miller allegedly “displayed clues and indicators of being impaired,” leading to her initial arrest. Chen was transported to a local hospital but was later airlifted to a hospital in Pensacola for more specialized care. He died on Jan. 6. Five days later, Miller’s charges were upgraded to include manslaughter, but a grand jury declined to bring that charge against her. Instead, the indictment returned in August 2017 included four lesser charges on two misdemeanor assaults, DUI and reckless driving. Miller’s attorney Josh Briskman wasn’t privy to the grand jury proceedings but told Lagniappe questions came up during the initial investigation about whether the collision that led to his client’s manslaughter charge directly contributed to Chen’s death 10 days later. “She was charged with manslaughter, but that was before the medical examiner in Florida had a chance to

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arrive at an opinion as to the cause and manner of the death,” Briskman said. “There was a thorough fact finding as well as an autopsy, and what they determined was that Mr. Chen’s very unfortunate passing could not be linked to the injuries suffered in the car accident.” Asked if he could provide a copy of Chen’s autopsy report or death certificate, Briskman said he did not pursue those documents after the grand jury rejected the manslaughter charge against Miller. A similar request to the Florida Department of Medical Examiners is pending. Initially, Miller maintained her innocence against all charges, but pleaded to a single assault charge after the other was dismissed. Briskman said Miller’s DUI is being handled through deferred prosecution and would also be dismissed if she complies with her sentencing. Third-degree assault is a Class A misdemeanor in Alabama, and Miller was sentenced to nine months in the Mobile County Metro Jail. However, that sentence was suspended by Circuit Judge Rick Stout in favor of an 18-month period of formal probation. He also gave Miller credit for time served following her arrests, which records indicate was about eight hours, collectively. “The press around this thing was a lot for her and so, to resolve the case, we entered into a best interest plea to one of the assault charges,” Briskman said. “It’s been our very strong contention from the inception of this case that Mrs. Miller was not drinking at all that night.” Briskman said his client was overcharged initially, adding that — in his opinion — prosecutors were “too quick to pull the trigger” and should have waited until all

the facts were in. While the charges against Miller originated in Mobile County, court records indicate local prosecutors recused themselves from pursuing the case, which prompted the office of Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall to take over. Most briefs in the case were submitted by Assistant Attorney General John C. Hensley III. Briskman noted the AG’s staff would have presented evidence to the local grand jury without anyone from Miller’s defense present, adding that “whatever was put on by the Attorney General, the grand jury decided this was not a manslaughter case.” At this point, it’s unclear why local prosecutors chose to step away and the turn the reins over to Marshall’s office in Montgomery. Typically, recusals occur only when there is a real or perceived conflict of interest between a prosecutor and a defendant or victim in a certain case. A request to Marshall’s office seeking information about the decision for that recusal has yet to receive a response, as have calls and emails to Mobile County District Attorney Ashley Rich. Miller has been a practicing attorney in Mobile for years, but her firm’s website makes no mention of criminal law experience, which would have put her in more frequent contact with local prosecutors. Instead, her focuses are listed as “complex litigation and business law.” It also does not appear the charges have affected Miller’s standing with the Alabama Bar Association. Briskman said the state association is aware of the situation but hasn’t made any final determination. According to Briskman, Miller has previously reached a private civil settlement with members of Chen’s family. Though he couldn’t give details, he said “there was some remuneration” involved. However, a letter submitted to Judge Stout by Chen’s son, Yu Chen, indicates the family thought Miller should have faced a harsher punishment and found the situation “unfair.” Regardless of the medical examiners’ conclusions, Chen said, “the reason cause my father passed away was accidents,” adding that if he had a prior health condition the family wouldn’t have allowed him to drive or to help with yardwork. “Mrs. Miller is an attorney. Drinking while driving is illegal she know,” Chen wrote. “She probably drive 100 miles per hours hit five cars at red light. Should be because alcohol. She should stay in the jail for those cause five cars damage and kill my father.” You can read Yu Chen’s full letter to Stout at lagniappemobile.com.


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Controversial claims STATE FACING OPPOSITION OVER SOUTH BALDWIN BRIDGE BY JOHN MULLEN

Photo | Lagniappe

American Roads struck a deal with the city of Orange Beach in 2004 that contained, among other things, an agreement to make the toll bridge (pictured) larger if traffic volume passed an agreed-upon level.

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he state’s effort to build a new northsouth corridor footed with a new bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway is facing opposition in the form of a lawsuit and a challenge from citizens including the Facebook page “Bridge to Nowhere.” American Roads, owner of the Foley Beach Express toll bridge, recently filed a lawsuit over the state’s offer to buy some of its land for right of way for the road. It also alleges the state is violating an agreement by building another span before the toll bridge traffic counts reach an agreed-upon threshold. Joe Emerson of the Bridge to Nowhere activist group claims there have not been enough, if any, studies performed or forums for the public to comment on the new project. Southwest Region Engineer Vince Calametti of the Alabama Department of Transportation disputes both of those claims. The state first announced plans for the roadway and bridge project in 2015, but entered negotiations with American Roads over the possible purchase of the Foley Beach Express bridge. In the filing, the Baldwin Bridge Co., a subsidiary of American Roads, claims ALDOT Director John Cooper’s demands, had they been met, would have meant handing over the bridge to Orange Beach “at virtually no cost.” The company says those demands essentially ended talks with the state. “I think that was the original plan and when American Roads called their bluff, then it turned it into a matter of ego, and you’ve got ALDOT and the city of Gulf Shores playing ego games with $200 million of our dollars,” Emerson said. ALDOT says the project will eventually cost between $70 million and $87 million. The bridge company struck a deal with the city of Orange Beach in 2004 that contained, among other things, an agreement to make the bridge larger if traffic volume passed an agreedupon level. The bridge company maintains in its lawsuit that those thresholds have yet to be surpassed. As for the condemnation of land owned by the bridge company and subsequent state offer of less than $10,000, the lawsuit claims it is

grossly undervalued. According to the filing “ALDOT’s offer of $9,750 is woefully inadequate because it does not take into account the difference to the fair market value of BCBC’s remaining property — which includes the BEX Bridge and tolls derived from them — before and after the taking.” The hearing on the condemnation challenge was set for April 12 in a Fairhope courtroom. Bridge company spokeswoman Donna Ritchey said ALDOT filed two motions on April 9, one to excuse Cooper from testifying and another to not allow a deposition by American Roads CEO Neal Belitsky into evidence. Emerson said at a Florida-Alabama Transportation hearing on Monday an ALDOT official was asked if there were environmental studies, traffic studies or public forums held before deciding to move forward with the project. He said the official offered no answers. “This type of stuff should be readily available and the ALDOT representative said he hadn’t seen it,” Emerson said. Calametti said on Tuesday that several public forums were conducted in Gulf Shores and Orange Beach in the form of town hall meetings and that several traffic studies have also been conducted. One concluded that 20 percent of the traffic coming south over the state Route 59 bridge in Gulf Shores headed east toward Orange Beach. A $250,000 environmental study commissioned by Gulf Shores and paid for by ALDOT is also on file, Calametti said. “They asked us if we could get the permit and go ahead and start the process,” Gulf Shores Director of Public Works Mark Acreman said. “We actually obtained the permit on their behalf but they paid for it.” That permitting process, Acreman said, was completed in October or November 2017 and signed off on by the Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Alabama Department of Environmental Management and the state historical society. Calametti said the final design for the roadway and bridge is not complete and land acquisition for rights of way is still ongoing. A p r i l 1 1 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 7


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

‘Inherently unfair’ COUNTY MOVES TO SETTLE RENT DISPUTE WITH CITY OF MOBILE BY JASON JOHNSON

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obile County is moving closer to resolving an internal dispute over rent the city of Mobile pays for office space in Government Plaza, though some are concerned the terms being considered in a possible lease amendment would be “inherently unfair” to the county. There has been friction because of how the city of Mobile pays the existing lease for at least two years, but the issue flared up last year during Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s re-election campaign. At the time, Mobile County Commission President Connie Hudson aired public grievances about the city’s decision to purposefully stop paying its rent to the county in February 2017, which city officials said was a response to losses incurred collecting the county’s sales and use taxes. Mobile has collected those county taxes for decades based on a lease agreement from 1989 that allows the city to keep 5 percent of the proceeds as payment for the service — money historically used to pay the county for rent and utilities at Government Plaza. One of the initial intents of the arrangement was to line up a stable tenant for Government Plaza once it was completed, which put the county in a better position to obtain the loans needed to construct the $73 million structure. It worked fine enough for two and a half decades, but trouble began in 2014 when the state created an online payment program for all sales and use taxes. That pulled away businesses paying taxes through the city, reducing what was generated through the 5 percent fee. Seeing declining revenues, city officials chose to stop making those payments altogether last February, which did not sit well with commissioners, who said the decision was made without consulting the county and in violation of the 1989 lease agreement. Since then, attorneys from both sides have been working to find a workable solution for the remainder of the lease, which expires Sept. 30, 2020. While nothing is finalized, the commission voted 2-1 this week to authorize attorney Jay Ross to move toward a “settlement.” “We’re now just going back and forth over the wording of the settlement agreement, but I hope to have that resolved in the next couple of days,” Ross said. “It’s anticipated that the city will accept, though we’ve been told it won’t require the City Council’s approval.” As proposed so far, Ross said the settlement agreement would require the city to pay the county all of the rent and overhead that wasn’t paid to the county in 2017 under the terms of the current lease — something Ross and another county official told Lagniappe has already occured. The terms of the amended lease would see the city paying the county $55,000 per month through September 2020. Ross said that fee would not fluctuate and the city would be obligated to pay it through the end of the lease even if its offices were moved out of Government Plaza. If approved, the city would no longer pay utilities at Government Plaza and would also end its collection of the county’s sales taxes within 90 days. In doing so, the city would also forfeit its claim to 5 percent of those proceeds. In all, the deal cited by Ross appears to be one

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that favors the city. Mobile has previously paid the county no less than $77,000 excluding utilities — an average of $100,000 per month or a little over $1 million per year. Through 2020, the new rate will total $1.9 million. However, according to Ross, the city intends to waive its claim to roughly $416,000 that’s been held by the county since 2016. Because no agreement has been finalized, representatives from the city’s legal department declined to comment. Ross said Monday’s vote gave him the authority to work toward ironing out some of the details, though any final document will require the commission’s approval. Commissioners Jerry Carl and Merceria Ludgood gave Ross the go-ahead, but Hudson withheld her support and voted against the measure earlier this week. During an April 9 meeting, she read a prepared statement voicing objections to the agreement as currently proposed. In her view, Hudson said the terms of the agreement “forgive the city” for payment of “all rent owed to the county” from 2018 to 2020, adding that the city currently occupies around “135,000 square feet of space at Government Plaza.” “That’s a total of 33 months of the city paying zero in rent,” Hudson added. “The minimum rent, per the current lease agreement, requires the city to pay no less than $77,000 per month. Using that figure, rental payments made by the

IF APPROVED, THE CITY WOULD NO LONGER PAY UTILITIES AT GOVERNMENT PLAZA AND WOULD ALSO END ITS COLLECTION OF THE COUNTY’S SALES TAXES WITHIN 90 DAYS. IN DOING SO, THE CITY WOULD ALSO FORFEIT ITS CLAIM TO 5 PERCENT OF THOSE PROCEEDS.” city for 33 months would total $2.5 million. That amount would be realized as a loss with this lease amendment.” Hudson also noted the county would have to subsidize nearly $40,000 per month of the city’s utility costs for the space it currently occupies, which she said would add up to $1.2 million between now and the end of the lease agreement in 2020. When adjusted for the money the county will keep by no longer paying the city its 5 percent commission for collecting the county’s sales taxes, Hudson said the amended lease could cause up to $2.7 million of revenue loss for the county over the next two years. “That’s $2.7 million that could go toward the cost of county operations, or raises for county employees, or toward capital maintenance and upgrades at Government Plaza,” she said. “I find it particularly egregious that after forgiving 33 months of rent, the county would also agree to subsidize city utility costs. The county does not subsidize city hall utility costs for any other Mobile County municipality.”


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Going to bat TATTOO ARTIST FILES SUIT TO SETTLE CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENCY BY DALE LIESCH

Photo | Lagniappe

Mobile City Councilman Fred Richardson received a simple majority of votes to become council president last year, but the council remains rudderless.

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constituent and friend of Mobile City Councilman Fred Richardson has filed a lawsuit in Mobile County Circuit Court seeking to force councilors into making a decision about who will be the board’s next president. The lawsuit, filed by L.A. Body Art owner Chassity Ebbole, seeks help from the court in forcing the council to stick by historical precedence and make Richardson president because he received four votes to Councilwoman Gina Gregory’s three. In a phone interview, Ebbole said a

simple majority of councilors prior to the body’s organizational meeting every four years was all that was previously needed to elect the president. In November of last year, Richardson received support from Councilman C.J. Small, Councilman Levon Manzie, Councilwoman Bess Rich and himself, giving him a simple majority. “For more than 30 years it worked,” Ebbole said. “The system was not broken. It’s a joke.” In her complaint, Ebbole seeks an injunction to prevent

the council from changing the way it has previously selected its president. Ebbole argues the council’s failure to pick a president has led to “chronic and significant problems for the effective governance of the City Council.” “The clerk is heading up the meetings,” Ebbole said. “The clerk, are you kidding me?” Ebbole is referring to a number of times CIty Clerk Lisa Lambert acted as chair of both the pre-conference meeting and regular council meeting when Vice President Levon Manzie was absent due to a knee injury. Failure to elect a president also prevents the board from having standing committees. Currently, Manzie appoints ad hoc committees to handle issues that require more study. Despite the unofficial straw polls used by previous councils to elect new presidents behind closed doors, the Zoghby Act — the law establishing Mobile’s current form of government — states that a vote to elect a new president requires a supermajority vote of five members. Ebbole called the supermajority rule an “old, dead law that had never been enforced.” In the suit she calls the council’s actions to suddenly refer to it to prevent Richardson from attaining the presidency “arbitrary and capricious.” “It’s not an issue of whether you think Fred Richardson or not,” she said. “He got four votes and Gina Gregory got three. They need to concede and do the right thing and make him president.” As a business owner, Ebbole said she wants a solution and hopes a day in court will provide one. Richardson said he hopes the suit will bring about a solution because currently there is no way to move forward. “There is no path in the city of Mobile among the council to selecting a president,” he said. “We’ve been without a president since the election; if we had a path we’d have a president by now.” Councilman John Williams, who was one of three councilors to vote against Richardson for president, said despite the suit he stands by his comments and vote during the organization meeting in November. “The law is the law,” Williams said. “It’s not difficult. It’s very simple, it takes a super majority.” Council attorney Wanda Cochran had no comment. Manzie also declined to comment on the suit. As for their relationship, Ebbole said she and Richardson are both members of Stone Street Baptist Church. She said she has known the District 1 representative more than 20 years. She added that, despite rumors to the contrary, there has never been a romantic relationship between them. She is currently Richardson’s appointment to the Citizens’ Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee. A copy of the complaint accompanies this story on lagniappemobile.com.

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BAYBRIEF | ELECTION 2018

Baldwin County Commission, District 2 DAPHNE RESIDENTS TO FACE OFF IN REPUBLICAN PRIMARY BY JOHN MULLEN

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former and a sitting Daphne councilman will square off in the June 5 Republican primary for the District 2 seat on the Baldwin County Commission being vacated by Chris Elliot. A Democratic political newcomer will face the winner in the November general election. Joe Davis is the current Daphne councilman in the District 7 seat and he’ll face John Lake in June. Amber Smith is the only Democratic qualifier for the District 2 seat on the commission. Lake says his longtime involvement in city and county politics has given him the experience necessary to serve on the commission. “I am proud to say that in 24 years as an elected official I have never used my elected position for personal gain, nor will I ever do so,” Lake said. “I have always put the citizens that I serve first, and my duty as an elected official will always be above my own personal gain.” All three candidates believe addressing growth and the infrastructure challenges it brings will be important for Baldwin County in the next four years. “I want to be part of a team that moves Baldwin County forward during our unprecedented growth and to provide opportunities for the next generations while maintaining and improving our quality of life,” Davis said. “All facets of county leadership include economic development,

infrastructure enhancements and traffic connectivity, and stormwater runoff and environmental improvements.” Daphne, Smith said, is a prime example of how much the county is growing, with several new subdivisions being proposed there during the past year. “We have a neighborhood that is about to be built in Daphne with 900 homes,” Smith said. “I am not sure where they think those kids are going to go to school. We need to be sure that we can handle the growth that we are experiencing. And if that means slowing down to be sure we do this the right way, then that is what we need to be doing.” Lake believes managing the growth will have a direct effect on quality of life in the county if it is not handled correctly. Davis says his economic background gives him the qualities and experience to play a role in managing the burgeoning growth. Smith said she was prompted to enter politics because of the divisive nature of partisan rhetoric in not only the county but nationwide. “We need new, fresh, young minds that are willing to look past our party differences and work together for the people,” Smith said. “These thoughts led me to volunteer with my local party and have since led me right here, running for office. I want to see change in America. And I am going to start with Baldwin County.”

Baldwin County District Court, Place 2 SCULLY, DASINGER TO FACE OFF FOR SEAT IN PRIMARY BY JOHN MULLEN

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two-man Republican primary race on June 5 will decide who sits in the District Court Place 2 chair in Baldwin County for the next four years. One of those, Bill Scully, is the incumbent after being appointed to replace Clark Stankoski in February 2017. Stankoski was also an appointee filling in for Floyd Lang, who retired in 2016. He has lived in Baldwin County for 27 years. Facing Scully will be attorney Brian Dasinger, who is running for public office for the first time. He has been a resident of Baldwin County for 18 years. Scully brings a long career of working in the law while serving in the military, the military reserves, as an assistant district attorney in Mobile County and in private practice as well as his recent stint on the District Court bench. “Primarily, I was an attorney with a general practice in Daphne,” Scully said. “I tried cases and handled appeals in all of our federal, state and local courts. I was also an Army officer, having recently retired as a colonel in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps of the U.S. Army Reserve.” Dasinger has also served as an assistant district attorney in Baldwin County but opened his own firm in Fairhope after five years in that office. “I have been a practicing attorney in Baldwin County for the last 18 years, first as a prosecutor with the Baldwin County DA’s office, and for the last 13 years I have been the owner and operator of Brian A. Dasinger PC, a rapidly growing firm in Fairhope specializing in criminal defense, domestic relations and personal injury,” Dasinger said.

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Scully says several factors qualify him for the bench, citing his variety of experiences in the legal field and his time actually running the district court. “I am uniquely qualified to make the informed but fast decisions that a judge must make,” Scully said. “I like the job. I’ve been serving as district court judge for over a year now. I have found the position to be enjoyable and fulfilling.” A judge must have experience, proper motives and courage to serve, Dasinger says. And he believes he can bring all three while serving on the bench. “You don’t want someone taking the bench that isn’t well versed in the areas that he or she is going to preside over, which happens quite often when appointments are made,” Dasinger said. “A judge should have the courage to make the proper decision in the face of any opposition or external pressure.” Whichever candidate prevails will face a crowded docket in a notoriously busy Baldwin County court system. “As one can imagine, overcrowded dockets and understaffed offices can cause a multitude of problems,” Scully said. “As judge, I cannot control the budget. But I can focus on hard work and diligence in performing my responsibilities.” Dasinger says the key will be to keep the process flowing. “The judge of this docket must know the law and be able to make a concise and just decision in order to keep the docket moving and get people back to their busy lives,” he said.


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BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Frenemies SPENCER COLLIER PURSUES BENTLEY SUIT AMID OWN LEGAL CHALLENGES BY JASON JOHNSON

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hile the criminal investigation into former Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley has ended, a lawsuit filed by former law enforcement secretary Spencer Collier is moving forward as Collier faces his own legal challenges. Announcing the conclusion of the criminal investigation last week, Supernumerary District Attorney Ellen Brooks said prosecutors were frustrated with limitations in Alabama’s ethics and campaign laws preventing further charges against Bentley. Brooks was appointed to oversee the investigation into whether Bentley misused state resources to cover up an affair with his then-chief political strategist Rebekah Mason after Attorney General Steve Marshall — a Bentley appointee — recused himself in early 2017. The investigation, which was led by the AG’s special prosecutions unit, covered a lot of areas and relied on information from Collier, who went to the media with allegations of Bentley’s affair after he was terminated as the head of the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency in 2016. Bentley said Collier was terminated after an internal investigation found a number of issues within ALEA, including the “possible misuse of state funds.” The same year, Collier filed a civil lawsuit against Bentley, Mason and his replacement at ALEA, Stan Stabler. His attorneys have maintained the claims against Collier and the subsequent ALEA investigation were part of a conspiracy to defame his character and remove him from office because of what he knew about Bentley’s relationship with Mason at the time. All defendants have made efforts to be dismissed from the suit but with little success.

Bentley has tried to claim he is entitled to immunity from civil liability in Collier’s claims because he was a state constitutional officer at the time, but a judge ruled last November state immunity wouldn’t protect Bentley from “conduct outside the course and scope” of his job. The ruling allowed Collier’s claims of defamation, invasion of privacy and conspiracy to move forward. Bentley’s attorneys asked the Alabama Supreme Court to intervene in hopes of seeing the decision overturned, but the high court declined his request last week. In recent court filings, Bentley’s attorneys have tried to get Collier to discuss conversations he had with the AG’s office about the special grand jury that investigated Bentley. Collier’s attorneys argued those communications would be protected under the Grand Jury Secrecy Act and noted that, at the time of that request, Bentley’s attorneys were seeking information related to an active criminal investigation into the former governor’s actions. It’s unclear if the conclusion of the criminal investigation last week will effect Collier’s willingness to discuss any involvement he had with the grand jury. In previous depositions, though, Collier has also declined to discuss conversations he admitted to having with members of former Attorney General Luther Strange’s office in 2016 while they were impaneling a separate grand jury as part of the investigation into his tenure over ALEA. An ALEA integrity unit investigated the “possible misuse of state funds” Bentley used to justify Collier’s termination, but later that year a grand jury declined to indict Collier on any charges after reviewing the allega-

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tions laid out in ALEA’s report. “No credible basis” for any criminal inquiry was found, which appears to support Collier’s claim that the allegations were merely an attempt to discredit him and get him out of Bentley’s Cabinet. However, in a deposition from February, Collier said he had “at least 10” conversations with members of the attorney general’s office about the grand jury reviewing that ALEA investigation — conversations he said occurred outside of the grand jury’s presence throughout 2016. Immediately after those statements were made, a transcript shows Collier asked to confer with his attorney. The deposition proceeded “off the record.” A copy of that portion of the deposition transcript and other court documents can be viewed at lagniappemobile.com. Another interesting development in Collier’s lawsuit against Bentley has been the former governor’s attempts to subpoena toxicology reports from the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences taken after an unrelated car accident Collier was involved in last summer. Collier, who is currently the chief of police in the city of Selma, is accused of causing an accident on Aug. 14, 2017, injuring himself and another motorist. At the time of the crash, he was driving an unmarked police SUV issued to him by the city of Selma. State troopers, who serve under the ALEA umbrella, responded to the scene. An accident report indicates Collier’s vehicle left the roadway on U.S. Route 80, overcorrected and then crossed the median before striking another vehicle. Collier stated he doesn’t remember anything about the crash or the events leading to it. Investigators took a blood sample from Collier that was submitted to ADFS for analysis. The results of that test are the subject of the toxicology report Bentley’s attorneys have attempted to subpoena as part of Collier’s civil lawsuit. Lagniappe requested the same toxicology report from ADFS in March, but was denied after Montgomery County District Attorney Daryl Bailey notified ADFS the case “remains under criminal investigation.” No details were given about the nature of the investigation. Additionally, Collier faces a civil suit stemming from the 2017 collision, filed by Carl Mickle — the driver of the other vehicle — in February. Collier, the city of Selma and Alfa Mutual Insurance Co. are named as defendants in that suit. Emails sent to Collier seeking comments for this report did not receive a response.


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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

A new chapter RETIRING STATE REPRESENTATIVE HONORED BY CITY COUNCIL BY DALE LIESCH

Photo | Lagniappe

Retiring State Rep. James Buskey was honored by the Mobile City Council for his four decades in state politics this week.

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t was a very happy birthday for State Rep. James Buskey (D-Mobile) on Tuesday, April 10. To honor his 42 years of service as a member of the Alabama House of Representatives, councilors and Mayor Sandy Stimpson honored him with a proclamation naming Tuesday “State Representative James Buskey Day.” They and several members of the local legislative delegation sang “Happy Birthday” to him. “Thank you,” Buskey said. “This is probably the most

surprising thing … that has ever happened to me.” Councilman Fred Richardson, who represents the district in which Buskey resides, gave the 10-term politician the key to the city, but acknowledged it was just for show. “This key will not let you open any doors in the city,” he said. “This key is to the heart of every citizen … We want you to know we love you.” Stimpson gave Buskey a mayoral pin in case the 81-year-old ever decides to run for mayor.

In addition to being co-chair of the delegation for many years, Buskey recently helped set up the downtown entertainment district and legalized 10 a.m. Sunday alcohol sales, among many other things. “I have a tearing problem … ,” Buskey said to those in attendance, as he dabbed at his eyes with a napkin. “I’m overwhelmed with emotion as well.” Councilman John Williams said he and Buskey keep tabs on each other. He joked that he knew there was good food at a local or statewide event if the District 99 representative was in attendance. Buskey is serving his final term in the House. There are currently eight Democrats who have qualified to run for his seat in the June 3 primary. Former Mayor Sam Jones, former Circuit Court Judge Herman Thomas, local attorney Greg Harris II, Henry Haseeb, Burton LeFlore, Franklin McMillion, Gregory Parker and Rico Washington have all qualified for the race. The winner of the Democratic primary will face the lone Republican, Charles W. Talbert, in November. In other business, the council voted unanimously to enter into a $314,000 contract with S.C. Stagner Contracting for the first phase of structural improvements at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. According to the project’s scope of work, the repair will include new guardrails, repair of existing guardrails, painting, and repairs to existing railing and concrete areas. The project also includes temporary erosion and sediment controls. Levon Manzie, who represents the area including the stadium, said this further proves the city’s commitment to the 70-year-old stadium. “We’re committed to the upkeep of the stadium,” he said. “It’s an old facility. It will always need improvements.” As for what to do when the University of South Alabama opens an on-campus stadium and no longer uses the city-owned facility, Manzie said they would have to find other uses for it. Ladd-Peebles is also used as the home stadium for some high school football teams as well. While the council approved the funding for the Ladd-Peebles improvements, the future of another city-owned stadium remains unclear. City spokesman George Talbot said the city had gotten offers from at least two independent minor league baseball teams to use Hank Aaron Stadium once the Southern League’s Mobile BayBears are finished with it when the team moves to Madison in 2020. Talbot also said there could be interest in using it for something other than baseball in the future, but didn’t elaborate. A professional softball league, the American Softball Association, is coming to Mobile this summer. The league’s four teams will play at the city’s Texas Street park, Talbot said.

BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Battle of the brands MOBTOWN MERCH SUES MOH-BEEL USA FOR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT BY GABRIEL TYNES

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ocal clothing and lifestyle brand Mobtown Merch, whose “Mobtown,” “Defend the Delta” and “We started it” (Mardi Gras) memorabilia is available at Urban Emporium, G Harvell and Red Beard’s Outfitters, among other places, has filed a federal lawsuit against local startup company Moh-BEEL USA for infringing on its use of the phonetic spelling of the city’s name. According to an 11-page complaint filed March 19, Mobtown Merch has used its “moh-BEEL” mark on clothing and koozies since at least September 2016. On October 25, 2017, it applied to register the mark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. On Feb. 27 of this year, the trademark was registered by the Alabama Secretary of State. Allegedly, the defendant, Frederick F.B. Sims, doing business as Moh-BEEL USA, “hoped to trade on plaintiff’s efforts and expense by promoting a confusingly similar brand,” according to the complaint, which admits Moh-BEEL USA actually beat Mobtown Merch to the federal trademark office, providing an exhibit of the defendant’s application dated Sept. 28, 2017 — four weeks before Mobtown Merch made the same move. But the plaintiffs contend “as competitors and Mobile, Alabama, neighbors, [the defendants] have been familiar with the plaintiff and its [Moh-BEEL] mark for at least one year,” yet “began deliberately, willfully and maliciously offering goods under the nearly identical MOHBEEL mark.”

Mobtown Merch has listed five causes of action against Moh-BEEL USA including violations of the Lanham Act, Alabama State Trademark Infringement, Common Law Trademark/Service Mark Infringement, violations of the Alabama Deceptive Trade Practices Act and Unjust Enrichment Under Common Law. Rebecca Maisel, a principal of Mobtown Merch and signatory on the trademark application, said she preferred to let the court sort it out, but the spelling belongs to them. “We’re going to take this complaint seriously and we take our creative license seriously,” she said. “At the end of the day, he’s out there selling his products trying to make money off something we created.” Sims referred questions about the lawsuit to Joseph Donaldson, who called himself “part of the Moh-BEEL USA organization.” According to Donaldson, there is no ill will, and Moh-BEEL USA is less of a clothing brand than it is a community organization and the sponsor of team in the recently established women’s softball league American Softball Association. “This organization is one for recognizing everything positive coming from Mobile,” Donaldson said. “We go around and try to empower the community around us as we promote positivity.” Donaldson said the lawsuit was the latest in a series of communication with Mobtown Merch “trying to scare us off,” but claimed geographical representations cannot be trademarked, and further said the addition of “USA” on the end differentiates one mark from another.

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“It’s a free world and a big market — you look at any other city and there are tons of companies using the city’s name,” he said. “The city of Mobile owns ‘Moh-BEEL’ and its geographic representation — we cannot rightfully say this is ours. Nobody can claim it because it’s the city of Mobile’s.” Meanwhile, Corrina Murray, owner of Optera Creative, was tickled Mobtown Merch filed the complaint. As early as 2013, Optera sold a T-shirt with a USS Alabama battleship logo proclaiming “It’s Pronounced Moh-Beel.” In addition to using the phonetic spelling of Mobile, Mobtown Merch has since created its own USS Alabama logo proclaiming “Defend the Delta.” “This is a subject that is close to my heart,” Murray said. “We originally did our products with a logo of our own design with that spelling beginning in 2013 … then at TenSixtyFive, I saw the Mobtown Merch stuff emerge and they took that spelling and had an illustration very similar to our battleship illustration.” Murray said rather than litigate over the logo or spelling, Optera simply phased out their products, believing Mobtown Merch was contributing proceeds to the nonprofit Jake Peavy Foundation. “Traditionally you are trademarking the visual representation of the word,” she said. “The logo and the treatment of it … I thought maybe it was foolish on our part not to protect it more heavily at the time, essentially defending it by the frequency of its usage, but we sold it and promoted it with our mark on it, but we didn’t invest in an attorney … we even won an ADDY award for that campaign,” she concluded.


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Disgusting outcome to Bentley grand jury ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

IT’S A PERFECT RUSE. BLAME THE SYSTEM AND THROW IT ON THE BACKS OF LEGISLATORS WE ALL KNOW ARE NEVER GOING TO WILLINGLY MAKE STRONGER ETHICS LAWS THAT MIGHT CURTAIL THEIR OWN GRAFT AND CORRUPTION.”

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“How is THAT not illegal?!” Let’s just focus on one particular passage in that report talking about ALEA Secretary Spencer Collier and the head of Bentley’s security detail, Ray Lewis, riding with the governor on a trip to Greenville. “Collier dismissed Gov, Bentley’s security detail so that he and Lewis could personally drive Gov. Bentley to Greenville. Collier and Lewis discussed whether they should read Gov. Bentley his Miranda rights, but they decided against it,” the report reads. Collier and Lewis, according to the report, went on to serve the governor as if they were all involved in some kind of high school drama. They had meetings to discuss Bentley’s affair and Lewis even served as a surrogate to try to “break up” with Rebekah Mason for the governor. Of course Collier went so far as to jump in a car and go harass Director of Scheduling Linda Adams at her home one night. But I suppose that’s not a misuse of government resources, right? Somehow throughout all of this insanity, we’re told no crimes were committed other than two campaign finance misdemeanors. We’re expected to buy the concept that Robert Bentley did some bad things, but — darn it! — they just weren’t covered by state law. We’re expected to swallow the notion Spencer Collier was a noble whistleblower and not a political crony willing to do nearly anything Bentley asked, who only spoke up once Bentley fired him. At the end of the day, it looks like Alabamians have been played like a fiddle and there’s not going to be a drop of blood spilled for this outlandish scandal. At least next time we’ll know going in to expect nothing more than the status quo.

THEGADFLY

being able to go after Bentley for his criminal behavior. The grand jury, she said, pleaded with lawmakers to create stronger ethics laws so this kind of thing can never happen again. It’s a perfect ruse. Blame the system and throw it on the backs of legislators we all know are never going to willingly make stronger ethics laws that might curtail their own graft and corruption. So, in the end, Brooks essentially told us there just aren’t any laws against what Bentley did. I think what we have here is the antithesis of the adage about a prosecutor being able to get a jury to indict a ham sandwich. The converse must also hold true. If that prosecutor wants that ham sandwich to go free and return to a medical career of CoolSculpting fat off of the citizens of Tuscaloosa, then she could probably make that happen, too. Let’s briefly note here that in 2012, Brooks also found the law lacking to prosecute ex-Speaker of the House Mike Hubbard and former Gov. Bob Riley for numerous PAC-to-PAC transfers. In that instance as well she called on politicians to strengthen the ethics laws governing them, so this isn’t her first rodeo. Even if you don’t believe Bentley foresaw all of this — getting Big Luther Strange off his case by dangling that sweet-sweet fruit of a U.S. Senate seat — then appointing Steve Marshall to fill the AG’s position, knowing Marshall would then recuse himself from any investigation and appoint Brooks to let him walk free — there are a number of other things we are now supposed to believe. And they are some doozies. By Brooks’ estimation, the following activities are perfectly legal in Alabama: • The governor can have an affair with his top adviser and use an outside source to pay her hundreds of thousands of dollars to do government work. • The governor can hire his lover’s husband to run an agency for which he has no background or experience

and pay him a six-figure salary. • The governor can charter a private jet to carry him and his lover on government trips, thus avoiding public manifests detailing who is aboard his plane. • The governor can threaten to fire his employees because he suspects they are talking about his affair. • The governor can have a state helicopter fly his wallet from Montgomery to Fort Morgan because he forgot it while storming out of the house after a fight with his wife about his girlfriend. • The governor can order the state’s top law enforcement official to go to his scheduler’s house after hours to interrogate her as to her knowledge of a tape of him talking to his lover. • The state’s top law enforcement officials can serve as the governor’s henchmen, interrogating state employees, offering the governor strategies as to how he can either end or hide his affair and spending hours meeting with one another about how to keep the governor’s secret under wraps. • The governor can attempt to have state officers investigate political opponents, and the heads of ALEA can participate in those discussions. • The Alabama attorney general can meet with a governor under investigation by his office and solicit an appointment to the U.S. Senate. Those are just a few of the things we now know are totally legal in this state because of the absence of law, according to DA Brooks. Anyone who takes the time to read the mind-blowing 120-plus page House investigation report into Bentley’s impeachment would have to come away saying,

Cartoon/Laura Mattei

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as anyone truly surprised when the special grand jury charged with looking into the Luv Guv and his cohorts came back with nothing more than whining complaints our laws aren’t right for keeping a horny, power-mad governor from engaging in behavior almost any one of us might consider patently illegal? I doubt it. This is, after all, Alabama, land where political corruption is as much a part of the landscape as dogwood trees and barbecue joints. When special District Attorney Ellen Brooks released the results of the grand jury’s findings last week, it felt once again like the fix was in. Robert Bentley may have been in over his head when it came to actually running the Alabama government, but the man was a genius when it came to orchestrating his escape from a jail cell. The Luv Guv just wasn’t going to the slammer, no matter how many conjugal visits from his beloved Rebekah they might promise. Brooks, the special DA appointed by the attorney general appointed by our corrupt ex-governor, did her job well. She came back and blamed the system for not

A LOCAL TATTOO ARTIST IS TAKING COUNCILMAN FRED RICHARDSON’S QUEST TO BE COUNCIL PRESIDENT INTO HER OWN HANDS.


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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Tattoo artist inks out suit against City Council ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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zaleas. Mardi Gras. Oak trees. Leprechauns in Crichton. These things are all #somobile. But the latest news in the ongoing Mobile City Council president saga may be the most Mobile thing to happen since we started counting down the New Year by watching a giant electronic MoonPie slide down the side of one of our downtown buildings. Coincidence? Maybe not. Since the man behind both the MoonPie and the latest lunacy from sweet lunacy’s county seat is the same person, Councilman Fred Richardson. What is this new craziness, you ask? Well, apparently Mobile’s most infamous tattoo artist and longtime Richardson pal, Chassity Ebbole, has filed suit against the City Council because her buddy did not get elected president of the council. The suit filed in Mobile Circuit Court on April 3 by the former “Tattoo Chat” host says the council failed “to follow its historical voting procedure for the election of a council president. Specifically, the council has historically elected a council president by a simple majority vote. The City Council is now seeking to arbitrarily and capriciously deviate from the past custom and practice of election procedures used to elect past council presidents.” Ebbole, the plaintiff, has brought this case as a “concerned citizen.” The heavily inked citizen gained local fame on her cable access show, as well as being a fixture on local billboards around the area for many years. She was also involved in a rather high-profile lawsuit with another tattoo shop downtown years ago, where all kinds of wild accusations were made between the two parties. The council president drama has been going on since just after the election last November, when none of the councilors was able to obtain the five “supermajority” votes to become council president in their open meeting, which District Four Councilman John “Mr. Rules” Williams pointed out. Richardson contended though, that in previous election years the council held a “straw vote” to elect their president behind closed doors. They would then all vote unanimously for the person who won the straw vote. Councilwoman Gina Gregory won 4-3 behind closed doors last term, Richardson said, but they voted to elect her president 7-0 in the open meeting. He felt the same courtesy should be extended to him. I would have to say it’s hard to argue against that, EXCEPT the way they had been conducting this “straw poll” in the past was totally unethical, if not illegal. When this first came up after the election, Williams asked then-City Council Attorney Jim Rossler for his opinion on the matter. Rossler said under the Zoghby Act he thought it did take five votes to be elected council president. Mary Zoghby who co-wrote the act, also concurred. But this did not matter to the councilors, who quickly axed Rossler (ironically with a simple majority vote) for issuing this

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opinion. They then voted in Wanda Cochran as their new council attorney, who about a month later issued the same legal opinion as Rossler. Her head has remained off of the chopping block somehow. In the meantime, Levon Manzie who was elected as vice president, has served as acting president. And Fred has been sulking. I mean, you can get why he is upset. Folks get upset when the rules change, even if the rules you were operating under were totally wrong and go against one of the pillars of our democracy — an open, transparent government. Those secret “straw polls” they were ALL participating in for God knows how many years behind closed doors should make our collective skin as American citizens and Mobile taxpayers crawl. They claim they were able to do this legally because their terms ended at midnight the night before they were officially sworn into their next/first terms, giving them a few hours where they could meet behind closed doors as people who weren’t technically council people yet. Yeah, OK. So you are allowed to violate open meetings requirements on a technicality? What a load of crap! It is no surprise this has ended up in court. The council is at an impasse on this, and this is the only play Richardson has left, and he just can’t let his dream of holding that gavel go. The only thing remotely surprising in this whole situation is that Fred recruited, or at the very least, let Ms. Ebbole do this for him. Their “friendship” has always been a hot topic. There is even a Facebook page where people posted photos of the two out and about together. When he traveled to Farnborough, England, for an airshow on behalf of the city, she happened to be in England at the same time, sparking rumors she had accompanied him. Lagniappe examined all of Richardson’s travel expenses and only his were paid for by the city. Multiple sources confirmed off the record, though, she was seen with him during the show. There is nothing wrong with this. Neither is married and our leaders can take spouses, kids or friends with them as long as they travel on their own dime. But it generated a lot of interest because, let’s just say, they are a rather odd pair — friends or whatever their relationship is. Richardson had to know it would generate the same kind of interest if she were the “concerned citizen” who filed this suit. It would be like Kim Kardashian filing a suit on behalf of Mike Pence. Maybe he wanted the extra attention and there is a method to his madness. Or maybe it’s just their collective, um, madness. Either way, it will be an even bigger spectacle now than it already is, which is #somobile. It is disgraceful the ENTIRE council operated in such a shady way, making these backroom “presidential” deals for all those years. Now, guess who is going to have to foot the bill to clean up their mess? Yup, that would be all of us. Which, sadly, is also #somobile.


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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Sorry, millennial voters aren’t special BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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very political cycle, the pundit class argues politicians must kowtow to the whims of the coveted under-30 demographic. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, it was the baby boomers. In the 1980s and 1990s, it was the Gen-Xers. Now in 2018 we have millennials. And just like each of those age groups, there was an older generation that scoffed at the idea these easily manipulated know-nothings determine the course of the nation. History is repeating itself as we speak. All the smart money is saying a message that focuses on the sensibilities and desires of millennials is the prime ingredient needed for success. And by extension, since younger voters tend to be left of center, this message must reflect that. One of the numerous reasons Doug Jones, 63, was able to defeat Roy Moore, 71, last November (aside from that whole underage-girl thing) was that Jones resonated with the millennial voter. According to exit polling data, Jones won Alabama voters aged 18-29 by a massive 60 percent to 38 percent margin. The numbers don’t lie. If you can’t come any closer than 22 points with a significant age group, then your chances of winning are going to diminish significantly. OK, problem solved — if political hopefuls all mimic Doug Jones, they will own the millennial vote and, therefore, win their respective races, right? Obviously, that is an over-simplification but don’t expect some talking head not to try to impart that wisdom to us. The problem with this fashionable wisdom is that getting millennials, or any of the other youth movements of the past 50 years, motivated to get out and vote proves to be very difficult. It takes something genuinely historic such as Barack Obama at the top of the ticket, or something regrettable such as Roy Moore, to get turnout numbers for voters 18-29 years old even in the same orbit as any other voting-age group. This has always been the case. Even with the rise of the counterculture that gave us Woodstock, Richard Nixon still walloped George McGovern in the next presidential election in 1972. Yet this is the end-all, be-all. You must get those younger voters on your side. Let’s give the purveyors of this theory the benefit of the doubt and assume it isn’t advice with ideological motivations. The prize demographic in television rating is the 29-54 age group. It isn’t the biggest audience, but who gets the biggest audience within that age range.

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The idea is that those in this age group are in their formative years as consumers, and advertisers seek out this age group in ads thinking they can influence their purchasing behavior at an early age and that will continue through adulthood. Think of it as the long game. Perhaps the thinking is that every few decades the youth, be it the baby boomers, Generation X or millennials, are the most crucial group to which a politician can cater. Except that isn’t true. Voters tend to evolve as they get older. Baby boomers were once those magic voters politicians had to bow to to win. Now it is as if the modern Democratic Party is waiting for them all to die off and be replaced by the younger voters and an influx of immigrants. Then it will be Democratic majorities for the next century. It never works out that way. Everyone gets older. They learn that personal responsibility is a virtue and that the laws of basic math dictate that a society can’t offer a grab bag of freebies for some without some cost to others. Then in 2035, the next big group politicians and their supporters must learn to understand will be the post-millennials or Generation Z. At that point, this current group of 18-to-30-yearolds will likely have stopped snorting condoms and eating Tide pods and realize utopia isn’t something one can engineer through government policy. Human behavior is better influenced by things like economics and morality and not laws created by a government body. In the meantime, realize that putting young voters on a pedestal is not only a fool’s errand, but it’s also insane. Even more insane is putting high school kids that can’t even vote on a pedestal, as we’ve seen with the group of teens that survived the Parkland, Florida, mass shooting tragedy. It’s not that they don’t have honorable goals like equality, fairness, ending violence, etc. It is that many in this group often think solving problems is as simple as passing a law. It is also a way of thinking that discounts older voters. If we’re all equal, then why such an emphasis on millennials over any other age group? Are they like the three-point shot of politics? No, it is all a ruse. Much of it is probably because this age group is much easier to manipulate than older voters. “If you want to be cool, you support all liberal policies. If you don’t, you’re a hateful racist, bigoted homophobe and nobody like those guys.” At least that is what they’re told to think.


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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

The Simple Greek opening in midtown Publix development BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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he Simple Greek, a Pittsburgh-based “fast casual” Greek food franchise chain, has signed a lease for a new location inside the new Publix-anchored Midtown Center near the corner of Old Shell Road and North Florida Street. This is the concept’s first Mobile location. Amber Hightower Dedeaux with Vallas Realty represented the landlord. Charlie Sutherland of Capital Growth Real Estate worked for the tenant. • Comprehensive Pain & Rehabilitation (CPR) recently announced its move to a newly built office space located in Fairhope from its former site in Daphne. This new office will offer a procedure and recovery suite for interventional spine procedures, labs and exam rooms as well as expanded onsite patient parking. The total facility footprint encompasses nearly 5,500 square feet.   CPR is a multidisciplinary medical practice that offers diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain using an integrated program of interventional pain medicine, behavioral medicine and functional rehabilitation. The practice includes a team of physicians who are board certified and fellowship trained in anesthesiology, pain medicine, physical medicine and rehabilitation. CPR has clinic locations in Fairhope, Mobile, Pascagoula and Biloxi.   • According to Lee Dale Younce with JLL, national cell phone retailer Verizon Wireless recently leased some 1,200 square feet of store space situated within the University Square shopping center, at 5821 Old Shell Road in Mobile. Plans are in place to open doors in late summer according to Younce, who managed both sides of the transaction. • A 28,000-square-foot shopping center site is currently under construction in Baldwin County and will reportedly be called Daphne Commons, according to Buff Teague with JLL, who is handling leasing work alongside Chip Lavigne,

project owner and developer. Lavigne will announce incoming tenants in the near future. The site — designed to accommodate both restaurants and retail — will be built near The Infirmary Health Eastern Shore Center at 7101 U.S. Highway 90 in Daphne. • Per Stacy Ryals with Hosteeva Realty, a new, nearly 100-unit apartment complex will be built on roughly five acres of property near East 20th Avenue in Gulf Shores. The site was acquired for $775,000 by local area speculators who will be developing the property. Timelines for initial construction and/or completion were unknown as of press time.

CSU selects new president

Orange Beach-based Columbia Southern University (CSU) has promoted COO Ken Styron into the role of university president effective May 1. The university’s board of trustees nominating committee voted the appointment to replace CSU’s current president, Robert Mayes Jr. In his new role, Styron will focus on policies, procedures, execution of strategy and day-to-day operations. The ceremony for Styron’s inauguration will take place in conjunction with CSU’s 2018 commencement ceremony on Friday, Oct. 19, an event that will also honor the university’s 25th anniversary. During his tenure with CSU, Styron has worked at levels of increasing responsibility including his current role of COO, chief of staff, chief information officer, vice president of instructional design and technology, and director of information technology. He holds a bachelor’s degree in information science from the University of South Alabama and a master’s from CSU. “During my time at CSU, I have seen this university

22 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 1 1 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

grow from a small, public safety college in Orange Beach … to an international university that’s helped thousands of adult learners. I am committed to continuing this mission,” Styron said. Styron will be CSU’s third president following the university’s co-founder Robert G. Mayes (1993-2005) and the university’s current president and co-founder Robert Mayes Jr., who took office in September 2005. Upon Styron’s transition, Mayes will continue in his role of CEO of Columbia Southern Education Group, CSU’s parent company.    Recognized and accredited by the Distance Education Accrediting Commission, CSU currently offers online associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in business administration, criminal justice, fire administration and occupational safety and health. More information about programs can be found on the school’s website. 

UWSWA taps Chenoweth

United Way of Southwest Alabama (UWSWA) recently announced Jill Chenoweth as the new president and CEO of the local nonprofit headquartered in downtown Mobile at 218 St. Francis St. Chenoweth has served as UWSWA vice president of resource development since October 2017. “I am excited and honored to be starting this new chapter as president and CEO of United Way of Southwest Alabama,” Chenoweth said. “I look forward to continuing my work with the southwest Alabama community to raise much-needed funds for UWSWA partner agencies, which provide programs and services to the citizens of Southwest Alabama.” Chenoweth has held several leadership positions in local nonprofit organizations and academic institutions in the area, per a news release. Prior to her work for UWSWA, she was director of development for St. Mary’s Home, a residential treatment program for abused, abandoned and neglected children. “After a rigorous process, we believe Ms. Chenoweth has the experience and skills necessary to lead United Way of Southwest Alabama,” Charles Hyland, director of Mobile Area Water & Sewer System and 2017 chairman of the UWSWA board, said. “Her ability to lead a team, work effectively with our partners and supporters, drive measurable impact and build strategically are some of the skills that will serve her well in her new position.” Chenoweth graduated from Spring Hill College with a bachelor’s degree in English. She has also participated in and provided leadership to numerous board committees locally. Currently, she serves as a member of Mobile United, the Junior League of Mobile and The South Alabama Coalition of Nonprofits. Created in 1926 as a Community Chest, UWSWA serves Choctaw, Clarke, Mobile, and Washington counties. Goals of the nonprofit include strengthening communities by focusing on uniting and mobilizing resources that support education, financial stability, health and access to basic life essentials. UWSWA has raised and invested over $256 million in local area communities to help to facilitate positive community progress.


CUISINE | THE DISH

Béchamel, the mother of mother sauces BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

Photo | depositphotos.com

IT’S EASY TO THINK OF BÉCHAMEL AS A FRENCH THING, WITH ITS POPULARITY ASSOCIATED WITH THE FRENCH STYLE OF COOKING, BUT WE LARGELY ASSOCIATE IT WITH ONE OF CATHERINE DE MEDICI’S CHEFS WHOSE LAST NAME WAS BÉCHAMEL, THUS EXPOSING IT AS A FLORENCE-BORN SAUCE THAT BECAME FRENCH BY WAY OF MARRIAGE.”

Try making a Mornay sauce by adding Gruyere to béchamel. For the best mac & cheese you’ve ever eaten, experiment by mixing cheeses with a particular one in the sauce and another on top.

T

he temps dropped into the 40s only hours after a sweaty performance at the Stapleton Bluegrass Festival. I awoke to chilly kitchen tiles and hardwood floors as I started the kettle for a morning pour over, prior to a 5K hike through midtown. I thought spring had sprung, but this was an indication we were outlasting the groundhog’s prediction. The fast-paced walk got the blood flowing and my conversation with Katie turned to lunch and dinner plans. I’m a “soup all year” kind of guy, but I knew this may be the last chance to get in a colder-weather classic such as ham and potato. We still had leftover ham from Easter and a sack of potatoes that had lingered long enough. It was agreed dinner for four would be on the cheap with some of our favorites. As I cooked the ham, potatoes, celery, onions and carrots in chicken stock, I started making a béchamel sauce to thicken my already reducing pot. It hit me that we certainly use béchamel for a lot of things. It’s one of the greatest of the five mother sauces (see my article on lagniappemobile.com “The mother lode: a deeper look at the Five Mother Sauces,” September 3, 2014), if not the greatest. You find béchamel everywhere you look. Here I was simply thickening potato soup when my gears began to turn

next time try the original. Experiment by mixing cheeses with a particular one in the sauce and another on top. In this sauce you may need to thin it down more than I did in the potato soup. A good base would be to plan on one tablespoon of flour and one tablespoon of butter to thicken one cup of milk. Compared to my previous recipe, you’d need to double the milk. White gravy is basically béchamel. You could go simpler and just use milk and flour, but to me gravy isn’t gravy until the flour hits some sort of fat before liquid is added. In a white gravy (or sawmill gravy), keep the mixture pretty thick and add black pepper and ingredients of your choosing. This is for things like chicken fried steak or biscuits and gravy. You may be breaking some kind of béchamel law if you use the grease from your sausage instead of butter, but I won’t tell. If it makes you feel a little less criminal, add the ground sausage after the fact. You could also use crumbled bacon, chopped Tasso or country ham.

and I knew there was a story in this one sauce. Let’s first understand what it is. Béchamel is simply a butter and flour roux with milk. For example, in my soup I was using half a stick of melted butter, ¼ cup of flour and 2 cups of milk. In a small saucepan, I cooked the flour for only a minute or two, making sure the roux stayed blonde. After that I slowly added the milk, stirring constantly over medium heat until the sauce began to thicken around the four-minute mark. This was plenty thick for my soup and perhaps too thick for other applications. For a thinner sauce, add more milk. The soup was my second encounter with this simply wonderful sauce in three days. I’d just had it on an incredible version of moussaka prepared by the lovely Carol Davis. Carol was visiting Mobile with her son and felt I shouldn’t have to cook one night. Far better than the one I’ve made from a Mediterranean cookbook I got from Cliff Fulkerson almost 20 years ago, her moussaka was eggplant with ground beef (there were no leftovers from her Easter lamb), tomatoes and, you guessed it, béchamel on top. By adding a mild cheddar she created basically a Mornay sauce. It was great the night she made it, but better the day after. True Mornay is a béchamel with Gruyere, a fantastic cheese. Many of you have made macaroni and cheese with cheddar, but

Anything gratin has to start with our favorite sauce. I grew up with potatoes au gratin but now will do just about anything seasonal. It doesn’t even have to be veggies. Ever heard of crabmeat au gratin? Boom! I’ll give you a guess as to how the sauce is made. The Croque Monsieur is covered in béchamel. This classic ham sandwich is underrated, with its cheese melted on the inside with the sauce on top. Make it a Croque Madame with a runny-yolk fried egg on top of the sauce. Without the béchamel this sandwich would be far less sophisticated and nowhere near as good. It’s easy to think of béchamel as a French thing, with its popularity associated with the French style of cooking, but we largely associate it with one of Catherine de Medici’s chefs whose last name was Béchamel, thus exposing it as a Florence-born sauce that became French by way of marriage. You’ll notice that ordering anything Florentine will come with spinach and is almost always accompanied by béchamel or Mornay sauce. Eggs Florentine differ from Benedict by replacing the ham with spinach and the hollandaise with Mornay. Think of all the uses. Any “cream of …” soup must start with a béchamel. That was my first exposure to it in college. It’s considered the “glue” sauce that can hold everything together, from casseroles and lasagna to the previously mentioned moussaka. Try melting straight cheese onto anything and it likely won’t work. If you want a cheese sauce, it has to start with béchamel. There is no question that all of the mother sauces have their importance, but if I had to give them up one at a time, béchamel or velouté (like béchamel but with stock instead of milk) would likely be the last to go. Keep your eyes peeled and you’ll see it all around. If you’ve never made one, start practicing now.

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E WING HOUSE ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) 15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

FATHOMS LOUNGE

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000 $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 525-9177

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$) CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 622-0869

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 29660 AL-181 • DAPHNE • 626-3161 3151 Daupin St• 525-9917 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($)

NOURISH CAFE ($)

HEALTHY WHOLE FOODS & MORE 101 N Water St. (Moorer YMCA)• 458-8572

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($) 562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

PANINI PETE’S ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

ROLY POLY ($)

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

THE CHEESE COTTAGE

650 St Louis St. • (251) 308-8488

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS 7 SPICE ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$)

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

FIVE ($$)

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • Daphne • 621-2271

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$) LAUNCH ($-$$)

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($)

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$) MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

FAR EASTERN FARE

NOJA ($$-$$$)

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98•Daphne • 273-3337

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$) 4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 829-9227

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

THE TASTE OF MOBILE 59 N Florida St. • 408-9997

SOUTHERN NATIONAL ($$-$$$)

BENJAS ($)

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

MAMA’S ($)

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

THE BLIND MULE ($)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

DEW DROP INN ($)

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

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WILD WING STATION ($)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

SOUTHERN NAPA

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

LODA BIER GARTEN ($)

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 312 Schillinger Rd • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

‘CUE

THE GALLEY ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

3915 Gov’t Blvd. • 219-7922

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

A VARIETY COMFORT F00D. BREAKFAST ALL DAY. 6682 US-90 • Daphne • (251) 621-3749

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($)

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 Eastern Shore Center • Spanish Fort • 625-6544

BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

JUBILEE DINER ($-$$)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($)

INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$) BAY BARBECUE ($) BRICK PIT ($)

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

360 Dauphin St • 308-2387

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

CHARM ($-$$)

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

CHINA DOLL ($)

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$) LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

FUJI SAN ($)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

A LITTLE VINO

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

DREAMLAND BBQ ($) MEAT BOSS ($)

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($) BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($) 3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

DROP DEAD GOURMET BAY GOURMET ($$)

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

DOMKE MARKET FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

GOLDEN BOWL ($) HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$) QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

LIQUID ($$)

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367


STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($) 30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366

RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$) 751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($)

LULU’S ($$)

SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858 CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

OFF THE HOOK MARINA & GRILL ($)

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 1108 Shelton Beach Rd •Saraland • 473-0757 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GRIMALDI’S ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

GUIDO’S ($$)

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Gov’t St. • 301-7556

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MARCO’S PIZZA ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 2409 Schillinger Rd S • 525-8431 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

MIRKO ($$)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

THE BLIND TIGER ($-$$)

quality food and simple unique cocktails

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

LOS ARCOS ($)

THIRTY-TWO ($$$)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

ISLAND VIEW:

RAVENITE ($)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535 PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

LA COCINA ($)

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$)

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

MANCIS ($)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

TAKE ‘N’ BAKE PIZZA 2370 Hillcrest Rd.• 251-661-4003 3764 Airport Blvd • 251-338-9903 3992 Government • 251-287-2345 7820 Moffett Rd. • Semmes • 251-586-8473 705 Highway 43 • Saraland • 251-308-2929 27955 US 98 • Daphne • 251-621-8666 2062 S. McKenzie • Foley • 251-970-7272

PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

CAJUN INSPIRED/FRESH SEAFOOD & MORE 621 N Craft Hwy • Chickasaw • 422-3412

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

PAPA MURPHY’S

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

OLÉ MI AMIGO! AZTECAS ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

DON CARLOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT($) 29669 Alabama 181 • Spanish Fort • (251) 625-3300

EL CAMINO TACO SHACK ($) 212 Fairhope Ave. • 928-8108

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

EL PAPI ($-$$)

615 Dauphin St • (251) 308-2655

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

FUZZY’S TACO SHOP ($) 5713 Old Shell Rd.• 338-9697

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$) POOR MEXICAN ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439 SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

ROOSTER’S ($)

C&G GRILLE ($)

TAQUERIA CANCUN ($)

PALACE CASINO:

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

MIGNON’S ($$$)

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

3172 International Dr. • 476-9967

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TREASURE BAY:

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

THE DEN ($-$$)

AMAZING ARRAY OF MOUTH-WATERING FOOD.

CQ ($$-$$$)

LOCAL SEAFOOD AND 40+ BEERS

BLU ($)

THE BUFFET ($-$$)

COAST SEAFOOD & BREW ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

STALLA ($$)

WIND CREEK CASINO:

TERRACE CAFE ($)

FIRE ($$-$$$)

ITALIAN COOKING

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

HARD ROCK CASINO:

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($) AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SCARLET PEARL:

9380 Central Avenue D’Iberville • 800266-5772

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

CHEF WENDY’S BAKING ($-$$)

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

UNDER THE OAK CAFE ($-$$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

MADE-TO-ORDER FESTIVE TREATS AND SPECIALTY CAKES. CLASSIC ALL-AMERICAN CASUAL CUISINE WITH OVER 100 OPTIONS.

WATERFRONT BUFFET ($$-$$$) SOUPS, SALADS, FRESH SEAFOOD, AND MORE

CHOPSTX NOODLE BAR ($-$$)

VIETNAMESE SANDWICHES, PHO, AND APPETIZERS.

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

SCARLET’S STEAKS & SEAFOOD ($$$)

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$)

BUTLER’S BAR & LOUNGE ($$)

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

SAVORY STEAKS AND SEAFOOD

EXTRAORDINARY DRINK MENU, COCKTAILS

A p r i l 1 1 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 25


CUISINE | THE BEER PROFESSOR

Birmingham’s hidden jewels BY TOM WARD/THE BEER PROFESSOR

Photo | Facebook

Birmingham’s Cahaba Brewing Co. features a microbrewery and tasting room in the historic Continental Gin in East Avondale.

B

irmingham has emerged as a bit of a craft beer mecca, not only for Alabama but for much of the region. While brands such as Good People and Avondale often tend to dominate discussions of Birmingham beers — in part because they are more widely distributed than some of the city’s other brewers (and also because they are pretty good) —

WORD OF MOUTH

Chaleur Coffee moving to new location BY ANDY MACDONALD A year or so into providing midtown with great coffee, Chaleur Method Brew and Espresso has announced they are moving from the corner of Airport and Glenwood to the corner of Dauphin and Semmes, in the former Mobile Popcorn building. Being in one of the area’s most coveted structures, the bigger news is they will be also opening a bakery. Courtney and Christian Hilley are taking their coffee shop to the next level with a full bakery to go along with their already popular brews. It sounds like the perfect match. Celebrate their opening May 1 at 1714 Dauphin St.

Cuppa Go taking it to the streets

We reported it was coming months ago, but Cuppa Go Coffee Co. is pedaling its brew on the streets of Mobile with our first

one shouldn’t overlook some of the other selections the Magic City has to offer. Cahaba Brewing Co. was founded in 2011 in Birmingham’s Lakeview District and operates a modern industrial taproom on 5th Street. Cahaba puts out a half-dozen year-round styles, plus occasional seasonals and specialty beers, but are currently avail-

(and only) coffee bike! The brightly colored brew bike (trike) is a coffee shop on three wheels with kegs and a double-tap system for serving cold brew and nitro coffee. Owned and operated by local entrepreneurs Erin and Thomas Smith, Cuppa Go will debut Friday, April 13, at the Back Lot food truck court during Art Walk and appearances downtown during SouthSounds Music Festival. Cold brew and nitro are great ways to up the caffeine in your life without the pesky sweats of Mobile’s warmer spring. For more information on Cuppa Go visit www.cuppagocoffee.com.

New Char-Broil cookbook for grilling season

Every now and then a great cookbook comes across my desk. Char-Broil has collaborated with Fox Chapel Publishing

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able only in Central Alabama. I picked up a six-pack of its flagship American Blond Ale while passing through Birmingham. It was good, although very light — more like a lager than an ale. Another smaller Birmingham brewery that, as of right now, does not have a footprint in South Alabama is the Ghost Train Brewing Co. Also situated downtown, on 3rd Avenue, it puts out five styles — a lager, a golden ale, a brown ale, an “IPL” (India pale lager) and a kettle sour. I tried both its Craft Lager and Kaleidoscope Kettle Sour, and came away impressed. Both were relatively light, but flavorful. The lager had some good hop notes, while the Kaleidoscope was tart with some berry flavors, but neither too sweet nor too sour. If you’ve been wary about trying a sour beer, this would be a good one to dip your toes into, if you can find one. Trim Tab Brewing Co., on the other hand, has moved into the Mobile market, with some styles readily available in cans in our area, including its IPA, which I found at my local Publix. It was not bad, but was very bitter, even for an IPA. Another Trim Tab style available here is the awkwardly named Paradise Now Raspberry Berliner Weisse, a light wheat ale, with — you guessed it — raspberry flavors. It was very nice, acidic and the notes of fruit were subtle; I almost wished there was a bit more of the raspberry flavor. It will be a great beach beer once the spring breakers leave and we can enjoy the shore. The Trim Tab brewery and taproom is located in in the Southside section of Birmingham, not far from UAB, on 5th Avenue. It’s in a very cool space — an industrial warehouse, with the actual brewery in the front and the taproom in the rear. The taproom had a DJ and disco lights, with “The Wiz” playing on the big screen the Friday night I was there and food trucks in the courtyard outside. There were seven beers on tap, most of which are only available in the taproom, plus some more styles available in bottles and cans. It’s a neat spot to either stop by for a beer or spend an evening. If you’re in Birmingham this weekend, Trim Tab will be celebrating its fourth anniversary April 13-14, with music and a number of small-batch beers, the release of a special anniversary beer in cans and a pig roast. It sounds like a good time!

to release “Great Book of Grilling: 300 Tasty Recipes for Every Meal,” available this month. This softcover cookbook can pilot the grill novice through many intimidating recipes or inspire the well-seasoned grill man to up his game. The name “CharBroil” alone conjures images of red meat in the summer heat. If that paints the picture you’re looking for, then this book won’t disappoint. Multiple prime rib and ribeye recipes had my wheels turning. Salted Margarita Flank Steak and Bloody Mary London Broil are playful titles that show creativity, but many of you will appreciate the tips and tricks for smoking brisket. This isn’t just about grilling a steak over a gas flame. This book is about cooking outdoors in general. Helpful hints, guides to different products and gadgets will have

you running to the nearest retailer to make your experience easier. There is a nice table of cooking temperatures and times that can keep your smartphone in your pocket. Of course you expect some marinades, seafood, vegetables, sides and snacks. This book delivers with things like Livefire’s Potato Torte, Charred Shishito Peppers and North African-style Grilled Salmon. What is really impressive is the number of desserts. I counted 23 things I had never thought of grilling. Bacon Chocolate Chip Cookies were one. This is a handy guide with a heavy international influence and a “think outside the smoker box” attitude that already has it in regular rotation at my house. Less predictable than most, its value far exceeds the $24.99 price tag. Recycle!


Photo Courtesy of PolyVinyl Records/Ebru Yildiz


of Montreal’s sonic collage BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: OF MONTREAL DATE: FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 10:30 P.M. VENUE: LAGUNITAS STAGE AT THE MERRY WIDOW, 51 S. CONCEPTION ST., WWW.THEMERRYWIDOW.NET

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Photo/ Courtesy Polyvinyl Records

T

he band of Montreal’s regular visits to the Azalea City bring a grand spectacle for the ears and eyes. Kevin Barnes is the avant-garde brain behind this worthy addition to Athens, Georgia’s legacy. of Montreal’s formula incorporates ‘80s dance pop with intellectual lyrics and a colorful, unforgettable live show. Barnes has been celebrating of Montreal’s latest release, “White Is Relic/Irrealis Mood,” a title describing the album’s concept. Barnes composed double-titled tracks such as “Paranoiac Intervals/Body Dysmorphia” and “If You Talk to Symbol/Hostility Voyeur” with ‘80s-style “extended dance mixes” in mind. Because of the extended length of these songs, the lyrical content sometimes shifts into new areas. “The songs are longer than the typical pop song,” Barnes explains. “They sort of venture into different kinds of lyrical territory. The song might start dealing with one subject and then meander into another subject and evolve into something else before it’s finished. I want the titles to reflect the more complex aspect of the subject matter of the songs.” “White Is Relic/Irrealis Mood” mixes Barnes love affair with early new-wave dance pop together with unconventional lyrics. His muses included Malcolm X, Noam Chomsky and Angela Davis. Barnes also admits he’s a fan of “catchy melodies” and “vivid and buoyant” arrangements and harmonies and even though he is a Beatles fan with an appreciation for “that ‘60s pop approach,” he also wants to break some of the pop archetypes. “I want to venture off and become more original,” Barnes says. “So, I tend to blend a bunch of influences that are all over the map. It’s not always something that would make sense together, but I

of Montreal will offer a stripped down performance at SouthSounds to allow for more dancers and stage antics. like to think of myself as a collage artist in that sense.” One example of breaking pop traditions can be found in the song “Plateau Phase/No Careerism No Corruption.” The seed of this track was planted during a collaborative effort between Barnes and Janelle Monae called “F*cked in Your Driveway,” which is the opening line to the song. Eventually, the Barnes/Monae collaboration fizzled, but the song remained embedded in Barnes’ brain. The composer took a song “meant for the dance floor” and transformed it into a minimalist work of art filled with synths and ambient tones. “It didn’t have that layer of intellectualism to the lyrics,” Barnes says. “It was more visceral. When I realized that it wasn’t going to happen as a collaboration, I decided to take it more in the same direction of the other songs on the record.” For “White Is Relic/Irrealis Mood,” Barnes spent a significant amount of time alone in the studio, creating a meditative, immersive experience that allowed him to “lose track of space and time.”

When working with a full band for the entirety of an album, Barnes admits, he can instinctively worry about involving everyone. His supression of this instinct harbored an optimum creative environment. “When I’m working by myself, it feels more therapeutic,” he says. “I get into this hibernated state of mind. I go to sleep thinking about the song and wake up thinking about the song. Then, I work all day on the song. It’s a more immersive process.” Barnes has something new planned for of Montreal’s SouthSounds performance. Instead of a full band, of Montreal will feature only Barnes and longtime band member JoJo Glidewell onstage. In return, Barnes says, there will be double the number of performance artists accenting The Merry Widow’s stage. While he notes this will be challenging, he also admits it will be a fun attempt at a new delivery style and should not prevent him from exploring the far reaches of the group’s extensive catalog or providing the memorable, psychedelic live experience for which the band is known.


From ‘Glee’ to beyond BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: NOAH GUTHRIE DATE: FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 9 P.M. VENUE: SOUL KITCHEN, 219 DAUPHIN ST., WWW.SOULKITCHENMOBILE.COM

Photo/ noahguthrie.com

Noah Guthrie’s career has skyrocketed since his rendition of LMFAO’s “Sexy and I Know It” went viral on YouTube.

W

hen Noah Guthrie makes his SouthSounds debut, the crowd will no doubt be taken by his passion. Before entering his teens, the death of his grandfather led him to pen his first song. Guthrie says the experience was natural, serving as a curative form of expression instilled further in ensuing years. “You start working through your hormones and all that fun stuff and trying to figure out how to get your own voice out there, and I found that in songwriting,” Guthrie said. “I fell in love with songwriting when I got to high school, and it just blossomed from there.” Guthrie’s first career boost came from his take on LMFAO’s high-energy dance anthem, “Sexy and I Know It.” Armed with his acoustic, Guthrie reshaped the song into a slow-groove, blue-eyed soul ballad that could melt the coldest heart. He admits it was an act of spontaneous desperation. Attempting to create a viral video, Guthrie kept a strict release schedule, though he was “a few weeks” behind on its release. As he experimented with blues riffs, Guthrie began to jokingly insert hooks from “Sexy and I Know It” and decided to move forward. “I did it, and it was a one-take video,” Guthrie says. “I posted it and went to sleep. The next day, it was blowing up. You never know what it’s gonna be, but it was that one. It did a lot of awesome things for me.” As he began touring and releasing original material, Guthrie’s career got a second boost

through another unexpected source. Casting agents for the FOX television show “Glee” were among the thousands who had viewed Guthrie’s online videos, offering him the role of a “shy, chubby guy who sounds like Otis Redding” named Roderick. Guthrie submitted a self-taped audition that led to an in-person audition with writer/producer Ryan Murphy. Afterward, the singer-songwriter found himself living in Los Angeles with an acting role on a prime-time show. “[‘Glee’] came about very much out of the blue,” Guthrie said. “I’d been touring and doing my own thing. I didn’t wanna act or anything. It wasn’t on my radar.” Guthrie comes to the Azalea City with music from his sophomore full-length, “The Valley,” which he produced with his brother, Ian. Since Ian had been by his side throughout his musical endeavors, he felt his brother would be the best adviser for this album. “The Valley” demonstrates Guthrie’s growth as a both a musician and a songwriter. His debut album “Among the Wildest Things” featured more of an indie rock sound. “The Valley” is Guthrie’s first journey into the world of alt. country but maintains his trademark soul vocals throughout these rocking ballads. “I’ve always had a tendency to write more sad or moody songs,” Guthrie said. “I started listening to that kind of music and found myself in it and wanted to explore it. I love it. I think it’s a fun mix of genres to be in.” A p r i l 1 1 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 29


Delta Rae bringing new tunes BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: DELTA RAE DATE: SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 9:30 P.M. VENUE: HARGROVE STAGE AT O’DALY’S IRISH PUB, 564 DAUPHIN ST., WWW.ODALYSIRISHPUB.COM

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Photo/ David McClister

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elta Rae’s addition to SouthSounds has created a buzz of anticipation. According to vocalist Elizabeth Hopkins, during a recent run of performances in the United Kingdom, the group discovered its fan base extends internationally. Hopkins said the “love and enthusiasm” they experienced overseas was overwhelming. She was especially taken by fans who were willing to stand in the cold and sing along with the band. She says the meet-and-greets were some of the best parts of touring in the U.K. “[The U.K. fans] were really sweet and the fact that there was any kind of line of people waiting to meet us really blew our minds,” Hopkins said. “We were one of the up-and-coming acts at the festival and had only been to the U.K. once. So we were very grateful that people had been over there listening to our music over the past few years and were excited to meet us.” Delta Rae’s success overseas should not come as a surprise. This talented group from North Carolina has crafted a style appealing to a wide array of tastes, landing listings on the lineups of festivals from Lollapalooza to the upcoming Outlaw Music Festival. Delta Rae has built its unique sounds on a smooth, beautiful bed of impeccable harmonies. From there the group knows no limits, expertly blending a heavy serving of traditional country with indie, folk, blues or whatever sound fits their fancy. “At the end of the day, it’s about making music that makes you feel something,” Hopkins explains. “As a music listener myself, I usually don’t scroll through my music and say, ‘OK, today, I want to listen to folk music. Now, I want to listen to jazz music.’ It’s just a feeling thing with music that makes you feel good or

Delta Rae fans can expect cuts from the band’s latest album, “The Blackbird Sessions,” along with select covers and audience favorites. emotionally moved in some way. We’ve been really grateful to see the diversity of fans that we’ve collected over the years.” Delta Rae’s most recent offering is “The Blackbird Sessions,” released at the end of 2017. Hopkins says an acoustic holiday music tour has become a yearly tradition for the group, one they were unable to celebrate last year. With this in mind, the group reserved time at Blackbird Studios in Nashville to record its rendition of “Silent Night.” Delta Rae made fast work of it and had studio time remaining. They used it to “re-approach” its new single, “No Peace in Quiet,” as well as a take on The Beatles’ classic “Blackbird” and a version of The Eagles’ “Seven Bridges Road.” “[‘Seven Bridges Road’] was the next natural fit, because it was another song that we really know and love,” Tompkins says. “In our opinion, it’s one of the best harmony songs that were ever recorded. We, as a harmony band, wanted to pay homage to The Eagles as one of the groups who has most influenced us. We integrate four-part

harmony into everything we do. It’s part of our sound.” Delta Rae’s SouthSounds audience will experience new music from the group - visions of the South and its complex history as well as socially conscious tracks that demand attention. “Hands Dirty” deals with the need for equal pay regardless of gender. “Only in America” is a tribute to the nation they love. The band also will perform “I Move South,” which is a biographical tale of their relocation to North Carolina. Not matter where the setlist meanders, Delta Rae will still maintain its mesmerizing vocal harmonies as well as its fondness for the locals. “We love Alabama,” Hopkins says. “We have always had such a great time there. We’ve played in Mobile at Soul Kitchen and in Birmingham. We’ve also played in Gulf Shores. We’re really looking forward to coming back. I’m always really excited to get back there. There’s so much soul and history bubbling up through the cracks in Alabama.”


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Boyfriend’s ‘rap cabaret’ BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: BOYFRIEND DATE: SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 11 P.M. VENUE: THE MERRY WIDOW, 51 S. CONCEPTION ST., WWW.THEMERRYWIDOW.NET

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hree years ago, Crescent City hip-hop diva Boyfriend introduced Mobile to her album “Love Your Boyfriend,” leaving the crowd taken by not only her verbal prowess but also her dramatic live show, which featured the artist wearing curlers and bedroom garb. Since then, Boyfriend’s live show has evolved into a “rap cabaret” featuring the accompaniment of numerous onstage performers. Her latest release, “Next,” features tracks that prove her skills go beyond hip-hop. While visiting her mother in Nashville, Boyfriend graced Lagniappe with details behind her new album and her ever-growing phenomenon. Stephen Centanni: We first spoke three years ago. I’ve been watching you since then, and Boyfriend has really blown up on so many different levels. How would you compare life now to then? Boyfriend: It does feel like a world ago, and when you put it in terms of three years, it doesn’t sound bad at all. For one thing, it’s grown as far as how many people are participating. For the “Love Your Boyfriend” tour, it was me and [a producer]. Now, the Rap Cabaret family includes at any given point 35 to 40 people. I have this collective of different performers who are involved in the show. It’s more of an ensemble, which has sort of changed my roles. Now, things like costuming, props and choreography take up as much of my time as studio sessions and editing. I’d say that’s one of the biggest changes, for the better. I’m a Broadway nerd. It’s more like putting on a musical than a concert, and I love that. Centanni: On “Love Your Boyfriend,” the complex concept of love flowed through the album. Where do you find your inspiration these days? Boyfriend: I’ve been writing for other artists a good bit. I really love the variety of that. On one day, I might need to write a country song. Three days later, I might need to write an R&B song. I think the variety component has really influenced my writing. With the next EP, I wanted to show that I can write in these different styles. “Love Your Boyfriend” was more focused sonically. I’m trying to cast a bit of a wider net, as far as styles of music and appeal. I might write a song that may be a fun-sounding pop song. It doesn’t necessarily have the art niche message attached to it. I’ve got a song called “Beauty Is Pain,” and it has guitar and singing and no cuss words, which my managers are excited about. I can write those different styles and listen to those different styles. I think we’re in a post-genre society where everybody has a Spotify playlist that could go all over the place. More and more, my own Spotify page is starting to reflect some of that variety. Centanni: I think “Next” is a perfect title for your album because I see the experimentation with “Beauty Is Pain” and “Sleeping On.” What’s it been like experimenting with new musical styles? Boyfriend: I think it ends up feeling the same. Sometimes, I sit down with a sonic goal in mind like, “I want to write a song that sounds like this.” Then, I want to write a song that feels like it’s

NOLA’s Boyfriend returns to Mobile with new tracks to perform during her trademark boudoir set. getting an emotion out. Once the actual writing part starts, it feels the same. It might be a different motivation. “Sleeping On” was a cathartic eruption of “Rah!” “Beauty Is Pain” is more intentional. I want to write a song about my aesthetic that talks about the curlers and the boudoir setting and the shaving that I do onstage. I’ve been silently talking about it with visuals, but I wanted to make a song that talks about it. Centanni: Cindy Wilson from The B-52s appeared on “Fun as Shit.” How did she get involved with that track? Boyfriend: (The B-52s) actually reached out about doing a show together. She’s been promoting her solo project and was coming through New Orleans. I was going to be out of town, but we were like, “I’d still love to work with you. Do you want to get on this song?” We knew that we wanted a vocalist, because that beat is based on a looping vocal sample. We thought it would be a really cool type of feature for a vocalist to have where their voice is creating the bed of the track itself. She also sings the track with me. We thought she would be perfect. The B-52s in general speak a lot to what I’m trying to go for anyway. It’s the curated aesthetic and collective. Plus, Cindy is “Tin roof, rusted,” so she’s legendary. She’s also one of the nicest people that I’ve ever met in my life. She’s like a kindergarten teacher when I’m talking to her. I wanted her to give me a homework assignment and a gold star.

Centanni: How will you be spending the rest of 2018? Boyfriend: I just released a new song called “Toast.” If you haven’t heard it, check it out. It’s also a different departure from “Next” as well. I’m going to keep dropping singles instead of putting all this energy and focus for another four-song EP or album. I just want to drop little Easter eggs throughout the year. That’s how people consume music. If somebody releases an album, I’m like, “I’ve got to get around to listening to that.” If somebody releases a single, then I can be like, “Oh yeah! I can listen to that right now!” Also, I think it takes some of the pressure off for a project to have this cohesive through line, sonically and narratively. The way I am with the storytelling and Broadway background, I want to do a concept album. If it’s going to be an album, then I want to tell a story. If I do singles, then I can keep the variety thing going. Centanni: What’s the best thing about playing SouthSounds? Boyfriend: I think I just like Mobile as a whole. I like Alabama, but I don’t consider Mobile part of Alabama. All my family is from Birmingham and north of Birmingham. Mobile is like this little pocket. It has a different vibration and a different frequency. I like that. It feels sort of hidden, like the rest of the country doesn’t know it’s there, in a good way. There’s this old energy, and people are partying and having a good time. There’s Spanish moss and a great energy there that reminds me a little of New Orleans but in a smaller, knowing way, like, “Don’t let our secret out.”


BEST IN TWO SHOWCASES STANDS TO WIN BIG Lagniappe’s Mobile Bay Music Showcase and New Southern Music Showcase will once again bring an impressive lineup of regional talent to SouthSounds. These showcases will be a chance for music fans to witness these bands giving their best before a panel of industry judges. On Saturday, locals will compete against each other for a chance to compete against regional bands at Sunday’s New Southern Music Showcase. In advance of this heated competition, Lagniappe would like to introduce its readers to the participants. Lagniappe’s Mobile Bay Showcase will feature many newcomers to the competition, including G’Marr Poett. Poett describes himself as a “part-time dreamer, full-time optimist.” This singer-songwriter has been establishing his listening audience through tracks such as “Don’t Take.” This soulful rhythm and blues (R&B) groove is highlighted by vocal work thriving on smooth complexity. Madison Grace began penning songs when she was barely into her teen years. Grace will thrill the judges with a performance featuring tracks from her debut album, “Equilibrium of Contradiction.” This album is filled with mature pop hits featuring vocals that are pristine and sugary. Kayland Knight & Trex’s sound is based in R&B and hip-hop. This duo has been infiltrating the local scene with tracks such as “Dial Tone.” For “Dial Tone,” Knight’s hypnotic vocal work mingles well with Trex’s new-school verbal flow. Red Clay Strays will be representing Mobile Bay Area label Skate Mountain Records. This ragtag group of young local musicians will use their mix of classic country and Southern rock to win over the judges. Red Clay Strays have used both their eclectic musical style and spirited live show to gather a dedicated local following. Paid to Pretend will add a touch of Azalea City rock to the showcase. This five-piece has spent the past year spreading its sound at such venues as The Merry Widow and The Blind Mule. Paid to Pretend will provide the judges with a dose of dreamy, homegrown indie rock. Summerlyn Powers will represent the Mobile Bay Area’s country scene. This young singersongwriter specializes in a unique mix of mainstream and alt. country. Powers’ unique style can be witnessed through tracks such as “Alabama Kind of Girl” and “Blue Satin Lace.” The winner of the Mobile Bay Area Showcase will advance to the New Southern Music

Showcase, which will include Glass Mansions from Columbia, SC. This duo will provide tracks from its debut EP, “Ritual.” Glass Mansions specializes in electronic heavy indie rock mixed with seductive vocal work. Nashville is sending Airpark to compete in this showcase. Airpark has been promoting “Early Works, Volume 2.” Its catchy, mesmerizing indie rock is sure to gain the group some new fans. From the swampy depths of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, Blackwater Brass returns to the New Southern Music Showcase for a second year. This collective of horn players ignites its crowd with a mix of jazz, funk and hip-hop. Its live shows in the Azalea City tend to keep the crowd on its feet for the set’s entirety. Destin’s I’MAGENE specializes in “Retro Electro Soul Music” crafted in the Florida Panhandle. This group combines synth pop with deep R&B vocals filled with soul. Overall, I’MAGENE hopes its music “envelopes you in memories of the past or perhaps a situation that may still be unfolding.” Birmingham’s Love Moor is bringing her beautiful neo-soul sounds to the showcase. This singer-songwriter mixes soul, R&B and hip-hop with island influences to create memorable tracks such as “Bam Bam.” The judges will be treated to cuts from her sophomore effort, “Simp Girl.” The ultimate winner of the two showcases can look forward to an impressive prize package. The winner will spend three days at Studio H2O with producer Rick Hirsch of Wet Willie fame. They will also receive a $500 gift certificate to Pickers Paradise and a $200 gift card to Callaghan’s. The winner will also be able to log some tour miles with a $200 gas card provided by Lagniappe. Finally, Lagniappe will feature the artist in an upcoming issue. This year’s panel of judges includes: Matt Wilson: Artist Manager, Greater Thinking Music Group, Andrew Goodwin: Head of Festival Partnerships, Everfest, JD Connell: Vice President, New Media, SESAC, Rick Hirsch: Recording Artist (Wet Willie, etc.) / Composer / Producer / H2O Studio, Jared “Jay B” Boyd: Mobile based journalist and artist, Steve Centanni: music editor, Lagniappe, and the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Biloxi’s Sabrina Nastrini: Entertainment Manager & Talent Buyer, as well as Corey Cochran, Production Manager and Vicki Tilton, Vice President of Marketing.

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Hip-hop in flames BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: MOB*ILL DATE: SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 9:30 P.M. VENUE: LAGNUNITAS STAGE, THE MERRY WIDOW, 51 S. CONCEPTION ST., WWW.THEMERRYWIDOW.NET

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Mob*Ill features the talents of (from left) Charod, Mika Nicole and Elijah McCreary Jr. with production by DJ Rodski.

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ach month, the Elements Hip-Hop Showcase features some of the best and brightest from the Azalea City hip-hop scene. This special SouthSounds installment of Elements will be a chance to catch Mobile’s first hip-hop supergroup, Mob*Ill. Mob*III unites four of the scene’s most promising notables with legendary local producer DJ Rodski. This group features the verbal expertise of Mika Nicole, Elijah McCreary Jr. and Charod. New meets old on the production side, with Rogest “Rosco” Carstarphen (Hippo Meat Productions) combining his talents with DJ Rodski. Charod called Rodski the “architect,” which began as a conversation between the vocalist and the producer. Eventually, McCreary joined the duo’s efforts and brought Mika Nicole into the mix. From there, Charod says, Mob*Ill began to form like “magic.” McCreary says Rodski’s experience and guidance in the studio helped create a style that went “against the grain for what’s going on in the mainstream” while staying true to the hip-hop culture. “It was just that experience alone of going through and trying to keep it culturally based, which is keeping it strictly hip-hop but at the same time giving it that edge to make it more digestible to the hip-hop head,” McCreary said. “It was a great experience to keep it to the original roots of hip-hop but bringing our own little thing to it.” “If you know Rodski, he has a passion for hip-hop,” Charod added. “It just bleeds onto us, and we feed off of it. We love hip-hop too, but the way he expresses his love for it made it a fun experience.”

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Mob*Ill will be performing cuts from their debut, “N.S.A.” (“No Slaves Allowed”). Mika Nicole likened the group to a “friendly competition” between the artists, adding that each artist brings a different style and perception to each track. “Everybody brings something different to the table, and we challenge each other,” she explained. “Something that might not be a strong point for me, might be strong for Charod or Elijah or vice-versa. It’s challenging as a person to try something new with their artistry. Working together was very seamless, but it was friendly competition. We pushed each other to be the best on this project.” “Rosa Parks” was the first single to drop. Accented by dark samples filled with soul, this aggressive revolutionary anthem for change conjures up the spirit of the Civil Rights icon and brings her to the streets of Mobile. Conceptually, this song began with McCreary. After some discussion, the trio began working on lyrics. Ultimately, “Rosa Parks” provides three unique versions of the song’s subject matter. “The number-one thing [McCreary] wanted to drive home was the aggression and getting his point across,” Charod said. “We all three had different aspects that we were talking about, but it was potent in its own fashion. Everybody did their own thing and had their own message, too.” Mob*Ill was not afraid to get rowdy on “N.S.A,” perhaps best witnessed on the track “Flame,” a mix of bounce and street philosophy making one of the album’s catchiest tracks. Nicole said it was pure spontaneity. “As far as ‘Flame’ is concerned, we decided to go ham on that, because the beat was so crazy,” she says. “We didn’t have a concept for


Years in the making BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: THE NEW RESPECTS DATE: SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 3:30 P.M. VENUE: LAGUNITAS STAGE, THE MERRY WIDOW, 51 S. CONCEPTION ST., WWW.THEMERRYWIDOW.NET

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ver the past decade, the nation has watched as Nashville has incubated the Southeast’s home for indie music. All the while, longtime Music City natives The New Respects have been crafting their sound and monitoring the nature of both the scene and the city. Drummer Darius Fitzgerald recognizes the changes in the Nashville skyline and traffic. But with the growth, Fitzgerald and his bandmates also witnessed the various benefits to the Nashville indie music craze. “It’s drawing more attention to a city that we think is awesome,” Fitzgerald explained. “It’s become more than just a country town. People are realizing that there is a lot of diversity here, and it’s awesome.” The abundance of new talent is forcing bands to become more innovative to stand out. Fortunately, The New Respects’ eclectic, unclassified sound has made them a highlight in Nashville and beyond. The group of talented young musicians has taken indie pop rock and given it a warm, fresh infusion of soul courtesy of vocalist/guitarist Jasmine Mullen. While their style has brought new listeners to the band’s fold, The New Respects’ trademark “pop, soul and rock ’n’ roll” sound was not its original focus. In its early years, the group focused more on indie folks endeavors. “We’ve always played what we loved,” explained bassist Lexi Fitzgerald (Darius’ sister). “Most of us were homeschooled in Nashville, and [indie folk] was the music that was around us. Mumford & Sons was more popular. Then, we got to a phase where we were getting into more music like pop and rock ‘n’ roll. Then we started playing what we liked and what we heard.

Nashville standouts The New Respects are touring in support of their debut album “Here Comes Trouble.” That’s how we ended up musically where we are.” Tracks from The New Respects’ debut album will comprise the group’s SouthSounds performance. The band’s “Here Comes Trouble” EP is a release seven years in the making. Darius says the band has spent years playing some of these tracks in the live setting, adding that receiving more widespread positive feedback from an audience has given the group a new breath of inspiration. “When you’re living with songs and projects for a long time, you know it in and out,” Darius says. “So, it can get boring. To see other people respond to the music and get what you’re trying to say and add their influence to what was said just excites me. It’s a breath of fresh air into the songs and the music.” “Here Comes Trouble” opens with “Money,” which perfectly fills each measure with a warm wave of soul mixed with modern alt. rock vibes. The end result establishes a trendsetting Southern

indie rock masterpiece. Lexi credits guitarist Zandy Fitzgerald as the controlling songwriter for “Money,” which takes listeners back to the days when The New Respects were struggling musicians trying to find joy and happiness without a price tag. “There were things that we were able to do that didn’t cost anything,” Lexi says. “We would laugh with each other and go hang out with friends and really have true joy. So, we would also see people struggling with things, and they had way more money than we did. Life is so much more than we can buy … It’s about community and God and joy, and we were celebrating that with a song.” In addition to songs from “Here Comes Trouble,” The New Respects will also entertain SouthSounds with new singles “Future” and “Something to Believe In,” two harbingers for a future studio effort Darius says is “on the horizon.”

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Anything but a soft life BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: J. RODDY WALSTON AND THE BUSINESS DATE: SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 9 P.M. VENUE: SOUL KITCHEN, 219 DAUPHIN ST., WWW.SOULKITCHENMOBILE.COM

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J. Roddy Walston and The Business headline SouthSounds Sunday night at Soul Kitchen.

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outhSounds’ strong finale Sunday will begin at Soul Kitchen courtesy of J. Roddy Walston and The Business. For more than a decade, this group has conjured the spirits of rock and soul bands Faces, T. Rex and The Rolling Stones to establish a dedicated following. Throughout a set frontman J. Roddy Walston describes as “hairy and chaotic,” he takes center stage armed with unblemished rock ‘n’ roll and a “slightly mutated and modified” upright piano that has spent years on the road. Recently, Walston has opted to travel with a spare piano, in case of emergencies. “It woke me up in the middle of the night one night that we’re really banking on this old piano not crapping the bed in the middle of the show,” Walston says. “If it did, I’d be like, ‘Alright! I’m just a guy running around the whole time.’ Now, we have two pianos and the old synthesizer thing running as well.” Before hitting the road with The Business, gospel and country music served as the foundation for Walston’s musical interests. With rock ‘n’ roll’s roots coursing through gospel, country and blues, Walston describes his transition into the rock ‘n’ roll world as a natural movement. He adds many of rock ‘n’ roll’s forefathers shared backgrounds in gospel, country and blues. Walston also recognizes the power of a charismatic live delivery, which he witnessed each Sunday in his church-centric hometown of Cleveland, Tennessee. With this in mind, Walston makes sure each performance is filled with an energetic delivery that is passed on to the audience. “If you’re from the South, you can understand why the songs are that way or why the shows are so passionate,” explained Walston. “My friends grew up more in the North, where the Catholic Church is more subdued. They’re like, ‘I don’t understand the jump from church music to this.’ If you’ve been to a Pentecostal service, you understand that there’s a bunch of jumping and wailing. It’s not much different from a rock show.” J. Roddy Walston & The Business is touring in support of its latest release, “Destroyers of the Soft Life.” The group has managed to fill another album with classic arena-rock swagger, poignant emotion and infectiously unforgettable hooks. The album takes its name from the final track

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“Burn Black,” which covers the trials and tribulations of living a “soft life.” Walston describes the “soft life” as a “current state of being” that leads someone down the “path of least resistance.” “It’s like saying, ‘Of course I’m going to go to school. Of course I’m going to take this job. Of course I’m going to stay here and do the safest thing over and over. My parents did it, so I am too,’” explained Walston. “The current is flowing this way and taking me, and I’m going to land there. It’s easy in that you’re not directing your own life. At the same time, it’s kind of miserable.” J. Roddy Walston & The Business took responsibility for tracking this album. The members decided to build their own studio in a defunct grenade factory in the band’s home base of Richmond, Virginia. The group based this decision on its past studio experience, situations where, Walston noted, the band’s self-recorded “demo” version of a song sometimes lost its magic in transition from the rehearsal space to the formal studio. He likens these incidents to trying to “catch lightning in a bottle for the second time.” Walston sees a personal studio as a way to completely fulfill each preconceived musical vision for the band’s releases. “We wondered what would happen if a band retreated into their own studio and made a giant hi-fi sounding record and didn’t go to Ocean Way or one of these other major studios and still get the same slick Foo Fighters/Fall Out Boy sound,” Walston says. “We still wanted there to be grit, but we also wanted it to sound gigantic. We kinda just thought that if we said to people, ‘OK, we have this great idea for the record’ and they sent us into a major studio, we would land at a place that would be sonically boring or flaccid.” If it’s anything like their typical live performance, J. Roddy Walston & The Business’ SouthSounds debut should be one of the weekend’s most memorable. In addition to an adrenalized live delivery of jam-minded roots rock, Walston jokes that the crowd can expect “a little bit of spit and a little bit of B.O., and then a lot of people touching body parts in a consensual way.” He adds that if it is a good night, the audience will transcend into a “communal, cathartic” scene. Overall, the crowd should realize Walston and his crew have led anything but a “soft life.”


Human imperfections BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: LEE BAINS III & THE GLORY FIRES DATE: SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 10:30 P.M. VENUE: THE MERRY WIDOW, 51 S. CONCEPTION ST., WWW.THEMERRYWIDOW.NET

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ee Bains III established his Alabama rock legacy in The Dexateens. These days, he’s rocking his days away with The Glory Fires. Bains and his crew have created a raucous form of raw, Southern-fried garage rock he admits is not for “the faint of heart or the sensitive of hearing.” Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires’ blend of Southern rock, blues and punk is one without rules or standards. “We’re just loud, and I feel like we really try to have a real cathartic, wide-open experience and just go for it,” Bains explains. “We always end a show feeling exercised and tappedout, in a great way.” This carefree, artistic disregard for the rules has transitioned into the band’s latest effort, “Youth Detention,” a double-album release. For him, music is a form of art, and the album is a palette. He says albums have a way of telling a story or establishing an elaborate concept for the listener that can’t be achieved with a single song. “We were talking about that with somebody recently with this run of shows that we were on, and we were having the conversation of singles and 7-inch [45s] and albums,” Bains said. “To me, there’s something really magic about eight to 20 songs that go from being, at best, a moment or a glimpse into somebody or a place to being like a whole story or a whole set of ideas that are bouncing off one another.” The concept for “Youth Detention” begins with the Michael Brown tragedy in Ferguson, Missouri. The incident found a place in Bains’ heart. He began comparing his checkered youth with Brown’s criminal portrayal based on what Bains considers “petty crimes.” Bains realized he had done much worse in

Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires turn it up to 11 with “real Alabama rock ‘n’ roll.” his youth and received lighter consequences, which he says was based on race and class. He admits that if he had been black or living in Ferguson, he might not be alive today. “I guess all of that got me thinking about how we’re socialized in our place and time in a way that these very large systems that people talk about, like the criminal system or class/racial structure, can have very real personal effects on folks,” Bains says. “That’s why I decided to take a moment and spurred writing this record. I went back to that time over those several years and look at my life and the city of Birmingham and neighborhoods and the way I saw it. One song is definitely not going to do it justice.” Throughout the creation of “Youth Detention,” Lee Bains III

& The Glory Fires decided to break a few studio rules as well. Under the guidance of longtime producer Tim Kerr, the band decided to lay down tracks on tape while performing live in-studio without headphones. This method was an attempt to catch the musical spontaneity and rawness of the group while minding the beauty of sonic imperfections. According to Bains, these imperfections add a human element of individuality to the mix. “Your imperfections can be your strength as a musician,” Bains explained. “I think we have a rawness and a way of kind of pushing and pulling the beat. Things might be a little bit out of tune, but it works in this way that sounds like us and not anybody else. I think that’s what we were aspiring to, and I feel really good about that with the record.”

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

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BAR WHERE YOU ARE MOST LIKELY TO BEST “DOC IN THE BOX” CLINIC GET LUCKY BEST BACK CRACKER (CHIROPRACTOR) BEST PLACE TO SHAKE YOUR BOOTY BEST DENTIST BEST GAY BAR BEST FITNESS FACILITY FAVORITE CRAFT BEER BEST PERSONAL TRAINER FAVORITE IMPORT BEER BEST VETERINARIAN FAVORITE DOMESTIC BEER BEST PET GROOMER BEST LOCALLY BREWED BEER BEST FLORIST BAR WITH BEST TAP BEER SELECTION BEST PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO FAVORITE CASINO BEST YOGA STUDIO BEST MARGARITA BEST CARWASH/DETAIL BEST BLOODY MARY BEST LAWYER IF YOUR SPOUSE IS A BEST SPECIALTY COCKTAIL HO (DIVORCE) BEST BAR TRIVIA BEST LAWYER TO KEEP YOU OUT OF BEST GENTLEMAN’S CLUB

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KIDS

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BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (ATTRACTION)

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

COOLEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY

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MUSIC BEST LOCAL BAND

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FAVORITE AL.COM CONTENT CREATOR FAVORITE GLOSSY MAGAZINE

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS - BALDWIN

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WHO WILL BE THE NEXT GOVERNOR OF ALABAMA?

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BIGGEST SCANDAL OF THE YEAR

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HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL- EASTERN SHORE HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL - BALDWIN COUNTY


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Photo | Hangout Music Festival

n May 18-20, The Hangout Music adding a lot of new things that you’ve never seen beFestival will bring a multitude of fore. We’ve made a lot of changes to the layout. It’ll music enthusiasts to Gulf Shores feel more wide open. It’ll be easier to walk places, for a three-day event that could and (have) more food choices and more stages and be considered the world’s largest a lot of new experiences, featuring everything from beach party. The ninth installment psychedelic art projects and a roller disco and these of this annual event will include beach club pop-up DJ experiences. We’ve got a new scores of bright, up-and-coming musical acts such reggae stage called the Sunset Stage. We’re really as The Glorious Sons, Dena Amy and Etana, along excited to learn from each year, listen to our fans and with big-name headliners, including Kendrick Lamar, make it better. SZA and The Killers. Centanni: When do you start planning for the While the masses prepare to take in surf, sun next festival? and music over the weekend, a team of organizers, O’Connell: In many ways, we’ve already started including festival director Sean O’Connell, have planning for 2019. We started that process, but it is a spent months preparing a glorious experience for atyear-round process. Pretty quickly, we look at what tendees. Lagniappe hooked up with O’Connell to get worked and what we want to improve on for next a behind-the-scenes look into Hangout Fest, as well year. We’re always talking to partners who want to as a preview of what this year’s festival will bring to create new experiences. We’re always dreaming up Gulf Shores. things. A lot of that is inspired Stephen Centanni: How by the fans. There’s a constant would you describe the Hangdialogue with the fans throughout Music Festival to someone out the year. The talent starts who has never been? getting booked while we’re at Sean O’Connell: For me, the festival. WHEN YOU WALK THROUGH the exciting thing about HangCentanni: What goes into THOSE GATES, YOU’RE ON A out is that we curate an amazselecting the artists? ing lineup of talent that comes O’Connell: This is my fifth BEACH VACATION. EVERYin from all over the world. We year choosing the talent. I don’t have so many stages of music. have a formula, to be honest. I THING ELSE HAPPENING IN The other part is that the want to program music that’s THE WORLD WILL COMPLETE- incredibly meaningful and in focus for my whole team is always about the experience. the moment and incredible live. LY DISAPPEAR. YOU’RE SO When you walk through those You look at an artist like Tash gates, you’re on a beach vacaSultana, who is coming from HAPPY TO BE WITH PEOPLE tion. Everything else happenAustralia, one of the best perFROM ALL OVER THE WORLD. formers out there. The fact that ing in the world will completely disappear. You’re so happy she will be on one of our stages to be with people from all over is so exciting. Then, we look the world. At every turn, you’re back last summer and look far going to find surprises and activities that you didn’t out and say, “We believe that acts like NF and AJR know exist. You’re going to discover great bands and and Greta Van Fleet are really going to be bands that make new friends, all on this incredible beach site have really big moments.” That certainly goes into it. that has so much to offer. That’s Hangout. Obviously, we face a lot of challenges as far as where If you’ve gone to any other festivals, the thing our artists are in the country during Hangout Festival that makes Hangout so special is that it’s really an or whether they’re touring at the time. Sometimes, easy festival. It’s not easy to do that as a producer, artists aren’t available because they’re not on an but that’s what we’re focused on. You don’t have album cycle or on tour. to worry about anything. It’s three days of nonstop We always have a wish list that starts with what I smiles, music and fun. want on it. Then it evolves and become very exciting Centanni: How does it feel to be entering the as it comes together. Then you’ll hear a record like ninth year? St. Vincent put out. It just felt important that she be O’Connell: It’s great. We’ve accomplished a on this time. With other things like our Sunset Stage, lot. We focus on always reinventing this event and we felt that reggae should be represented. That’s been refreshing it and making it better. People are going in the works for a long time. to see a lot of changes for the good this year. We’re There is a balance to it. We do take great effort to

MUSIC

O

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Plan your Hangout Fest fun now

THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE ARE EXPECTED TO HEAD TO GULF SHORES NEXT MONTH FOR THE HANGOUT MUSIC FESTIVAL, FEATURING KENDRICK LAMAR, THE KILLERS, THE CHAINSMOKERS AND MORE. make sure that at any one time, if you’re not a hip-hop fan, then there’s great rock acts playing. If you’re not an electronic fan, then you have alternative. There’s always three flows, if you will, of music that’s going on at any one time. Your day is full. If you don’t know every band, that’s okay. What we hear from our fans is that people get really turned on to a lot of new stuff that they didn’t know. That’ll be true this year. I think this is the deepest lineup that we’ve ever had. Centanni: What’s your advice for first-timers? O’Connell: You’ve gotta get a shuttle ticket. Shuttle passes sell out every year, and they’ll sell out soon. There’s not a lot of parking down there. The shuttles work, and they’re amazing. We spend a lot of money and resources to bring in hundreds of buses. They come from area buses and condos. If you’re coming from Mobile, there’s a parking lot on (Highway) 59. You depart almost right at the gate. That’s important. If you get there early, the lines are easy to get through. We’ll be publishing the schedule shortly so people can start plotting out their times. We have free water stations all through the festivals. You can bring a water bottle in and keep hydrated. We want to make sure that everybody takes care of that. Bring some sunscreen. Probably more than anything else, find out what’s happening on the beach. I think that’s what people have been discovering. Out on the beach, we have incredible art projects. We have a wedding chapel where you can get married, for real or for pretend. The marriage license is only good for three days or until something better comes along. With that said, I think we average 15 to 20 real marriages a year. There are two beach clubs where you can hear DJs and get in the water. We have a Camp Hangout which is bringing summer camp back to life with Slip ‘N Slides and dodgeball and squirt gun wars. It’s so much fun, and we end the night with a big bonfire where we’re cooking up s’mores. The Malibu Beach House has an amazing roster of DJs in this beautiful circus tent. So, there’s a lot happening there, and that stuff has gotten more popular. What makes Hangout unique is what’s happening near the water.


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Classic rock trifecta

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Styx, REO Speedwagon, Don Felder Date: Saturday, April 14, 7 p.m. Venue: The Amphitheater at The Wharf, 23101 Canal Road (Orange Beach), www.alwharf.com Tickets: $20-$92, available through Ticketmaster

Photo | Transmission Media | Styx

T

he Amphitheater at The Wharf is hosting a three-headed classic beachside blast from rock ‘n’ roll’s past. Singer-songwriter Don Felder will set the tone for the evening. Felder first gained notice through his work with the Eagles. In addition to memorable guitar work on such songs as “Already Gone,” Felder was also co-writer on the Eagles’ hits “Hotel California” and “Victim of Love.” Since then, he’s maintained a busy career that has included two solo albums. REO Speedwagon will add its epic arena rock to the evening. After establishing its reputation with such songs as “Ridin’ the Storm Out” and “Time for Me to Fly,” REO Speedwagon’s anthems “Keep on Lovin’ You” and “Can’t Fight This Feeling” established the band’s permanent place in rock history. Styx completes this versatile classic rock mix. This band used hits such as “Lady” and “Suite Madame Blue” to bring prog rock to the mainstream. With tracks such as “Come Sail Away” and “Fooling Yourself,” “The Grand Illusion” is considered Styx’s finest work. Even after this album’s release, Styx managed to grow its audience with memorable songs such as “Mr. Roboto” and “Renegade.” Styx’s audience can expect a jammed-out live delivery of memorable songs from the band’s extensive catalog.

A man and his guitar

Band: Travis Tritt Date: Sunday, April 15, with doors at 6 p.m. Venue: Saenger Theatre, 6 S. Joachim St., www.mobilesaenger.com Tickets: $42-$87, available through Ticketmaster

Throughout his career, country legend Travis Tritt has made the Azalea City a regular stop on his tours. Tritt’s rise to stardom began in 1989 with the hit “Country Club.” Shortly after, a debut album by the same name resulted in the singles “Help Me Hold On,” “I’m Gonna Be Somebody” and “Drift Off to Dream” becoming No. 1 hits. Since then, Tritt has released an overabundance of top 10 hits from multiple gold and platinum albums. He has also won numerous CMA and Grammy Awards. “A Man and His Guitar: Live from the Franklin Theatre” is Tritt’s most recent gift to his loyal fan base. This album provides an intimate, acoustic treat, featuring “stripped-down, pure form” versions of such memorable songs as “Help Me Hold On,” “Anymore” and “Best of Intentions.” Tritt also gives his listeners a special treat with previously unheard versions of “Come and Go Blues” and “Pickin’ At It.”

Crawfish squeeze

Band: St. Mary’s Crawfish & Bluegrass Extravaganza Date: Saturday, April 14, 4 p.m. Venue: St. Mary’s Catholic School, 1450 Old Shell Road, www.stmarymobile.org Tickets: $30 in advance/$35 day of show/$20 ages 13-18, free for children under 12; available at St. Mary’s, Mobile Popcorn and www.brownpapertickets.com

For Azalea City denizens seeking a musical alternative to the hustle and bustle of SouthSounds, St. Mary’s Catholic School will be celebrating its 16th annual Crawfish & Bluegrass Extravaganza in the heart of midtown. Each year, St. Mary’s Knights of Columbus transform the school’s playground into an epicenter of bayou food and bluegrass music. Attendees will be able to fill up on delicious crawfish with all the traditional sides. This event will also provide hot dogs for those who don’t indulge in the tasty crustaceans. In the past, St. Mary’s has brought a lineup of bands to provide the event’s soundtrack. This year, however, the Crawfish & Bluegrass Extravaganza will feature the sounds of Azalea City bluegrass/”bargrass” masters Fat Man Squeeze. Highlighted by guitarist Andy McDonald’s precision flatpicking, Fat Man Squeeze is sure to get feet stomping with a vast setlist of traditional bluegrass and offbeat originals. No one who experiences Fat Man Squeeze in a live setting can leave without a smile on their face and a tune in their heart.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | April 11 - April 17 Please send upcoming music to listings@lagniappemobile.com by MONDAY before Wednesday’s paper.

WED. APR 11 Bluegill— Matt Neese Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Brickyard— Delta Smoke Cockeyed Charlie’s— Karaoke with JJ Felix’s— Sugar Cane Jane Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p // Rhonda Hart Duo, 6p /// Tony Ray Thompson, 8p //// Rusty Tabor, 10:15p Lulu’s— Adam Holt, 5p

THURS. APR 12 Bluegill— Sergio Rangel Duo Blues Tavern— McNab Bros Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Brickyard— Yellowhammer Callaghan’s— Bobby Butchka Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ JJa Felix’s— Lee Yankie Duo Flora Bama— Jim Newton & Jonathan Newton, 2p // Rusty Tabor, 5p /// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p //// Mark Sherrill, Chris Newbury, James Daniel & Jose Santiago, 6p ///// Red Clay Strays, 10p ////// Kyle Wilson Duo, 10:15p Lulu’s— Bat, 5p Manci’s— Ross Newell McSharry’s— Southern Star, 7p The Merry Widow— Airpark, 8p Off The Hook— Sugar Babies Karaoke Veets— Dale Drinkard, Jr. 8p

FRI. APR 13 Alchemy— The Handsome Scoundrels Belle Fontaine Sand Bar— Texarkana, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Andrew Ellis Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12p // DOTC 6p Blues Tavern— Doobious Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese Duo, 6p Brickyard— Magnolia Bayou & The Cordovas Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill Cortland’s Pizza Pub— OverTime’s American Built Tour, 9p Fairhope Brewing— Flow Tribe Felix’s— Soulshine Flora Bama— Bat, 2p // Rusty Tabor, 4p /// Jack Robertson Show a.k.a. Big Earl 5:30p //// Johnny B Trio, 6p Mason Henderson, 6p ///// Rebecca Barry & Bust, 6p ////// Gregory Lyons, 8p /////// Foxy Iguanas, 10p //////// Hung Jury, 10p ///////// Tony Ray Thompson, 10:15p ////////// Oliver’s Twist, 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — DJ Avelon 11p // DJ D-Funk, 9:30p Hard Rock (Live) — Radio, Inc 9:30p IP Casino— The Temptations

and the Four Tops, 8p Listening Room— Lisa Mills, Frankie Boots, Brenda Bledsoe Lulu’s— Jeri, 5p Manci’s— Modern Eldoradoes McSharry’s— DJ Embezzle, 10p The Merry Widow— Of Montreal, 9p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — C Dub and the Money Monies Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Phil & Foster O’Daly’s— Dumpstaphunk, 10p Off The Hook— Keith “The Mailman” Burns Sahara Club— Funkhouse Fever Trio, 8p Soul Kitchen— Corey Smith, Noah Guthrie, 8:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Hippy Jim, 6p

SAT. APR 14 Alchemy— Glass War, The Hallers, South Carlen, and Strange Her Saturday Belle Fontaine Sand Bar— Hunter Landry, 6p // Texarkana, 8p Big Beach Brewing— T-Bone Montgomery & Mac Walter, 3p // Grayson Capps, 6:30p Bluegill— Robert Lee, 12p // Matt Neese Trio, 6p Blues Tavern— Soul River Levee Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Adam Holt, 6p Brickyard— Yeah Probably & New Respects Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ E. Bezzle Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Flora Bama— Dave McCormick, 1p // Jo Jo Pres, 1p /// Cat Rhodes & the Truth, 2p //// Rusty Tabo, 2p ///// Robert Sully, 4p ////// Dave Chastang, 5p /////// Jack Robertson Show a.k.a. Big Earl, 5:30p //////// Al & Cathy, 6p ///////// Kyle Wilson, 6p ///////// Smokey Otis Duo, 8p ////////// Ryan Balthrop & Friends, 10p /////////// Bruce Smelley Duo, 10:15p /////////// Jared Ashley, 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — DJ Avelon 11p // DJ D-Funk, 9:30p Hard Rock (Live) — Queensryche, 8p IP Casino— Bush, 8p Listening Room— Eric Erdman, Abe Partridge, Jamell Richardson Lulu’s— Kyle Brady, 5p Manci’s— Jimmy Lumpkin & The Revival McSharry’s— DJ Shadow, 10p The Merry Widow— Boyfriend, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Phil & Foster Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Robert Lee Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Charlie Wilson Duo O’Daly’s— Delta Rae Off The Hook— Melissa

Robertson Saenger— The Black Jacket Symphony: Guns N’ Roses Appetite for Destruction Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Strickly Isbell, 5:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Mack Walters, 12p Top of the Bay— Philo, 10p Veets— Sucker Punch, 9p The Wharf— Styx and REO Speedwagon w/Don Felder

SUN. APR 15 Bluegill— Jimmy Lumpkin, 12p // Yeah Probably, 6p Brickyard— The Prescriptions & Delta Smoke Callaghan’s— Forest Fire Gospel Choir, Charley Crockett Felix’s— Jamie Adamson Flora Bama— Smokey Otis Trio, 12p // Rusty Tabor, 1p /// Songs of Rusty McCugh, 1:30p //// Al & Cathy, 2p ///// Dave McCormick, 5p ////// Ja Rhythm, 5:30p /////// Perdido Brother, 6p //////// Lee Yankie & The Hellz Yeah ///////// Mario Mena Duo, 10:15p Frog Pond— Grayson Capps, Nikki Talley, Abe Partridge, Adam Faucett Listening Room— Molly Thoma,s Jimmy Lumpkin, Laurie Anne Armour Lulu’s— Light Travelers 5p Manci’s— Molly Thomas & The Rare Birds The Merry Widow— Lee Bains III & the Glory Fires, 8p Off The Hook— Open Mic with Nori Hendrix Saenger— Travis Tritt Soul Kitchen— J. Roddy Walston & The Business, Great Peacock, Johnny No, 7p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p

MON. APR 16 Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese, 6p Felix’s— Ryan Balthrop Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 2p // Open Mic w/ Cathy Pace, 6p /// Mario Mena, 8p //// Petty & Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUES. APR 17 Bluegill— Mobile Big Band Society Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— Jerry Powell Cockeyed Charlie’s— Karaoke with Jordan Bramblett Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p // Al & Cathy, 5:30p /// Perdido Brother, 6p //// Hung Jury, 10p ///// Kyle Wilson Duo, 10:15p Lulu’s— Lefty Collins, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Chad Parker A p r i l 1 1 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 45


ART ARTIFICE

Identity, immigration center stage at Mobile Theatre Guild BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

W

ho are you really? How much perspective is generated internally and how much is shaped by those around you? How much is from your community? Nathan’s professor, Dr. Pearson, poses this short question with deep implications, and what follows is a dive into identity that swims through the psychological and into the topical. Welcome to “The Pot.” Glenn Hutchinson’s timely 2015 stage play comes to Mobile through personal acquaintance. Director John Richards was in Miami for a training conference and occupied his free Sunday with community theater. “It’s only been performed about three or four times. I really enjoyed it and said we need to bring this to Mobile,” Richard recalled. He was the guy to do it. A self-professed theater “hobbyist,” Richards has been involved with local productions for about 15 years. Richards directed last year’s “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” and 2016’s “The Woman in Black,” both at Mobile Theatre Guild (14 N. Lafayette St.). He’s followed suit with “The Pot.” Nathan’s class assignment is complex. He’s AfricanAmerican — technically racially mixed, but this is “onedrop” America — and adopted. A Thanksgiving sojourn enlivens the mix when his sister brings home her boyfriend, an undocumented Mexican immigrant. Throw in Nathan’s father, a newly elected state senator, and an uncle who’s a

Festival seeks visual artists

Submissions will be returned at artist’s request. For more information, email Raoul Richardson at drraoulrichardson@outlook.com.

Exploreum gets national love

The current exhibit at the Gulf Coast Exploreum (65 Government St.) is so impressive it was honored as one of the best exhibits in the nation, according to USA Today. In an April 3 article titled “Best museum exhibits in the U.S. this spring,” the current show on the creatures of the Permian period was highlighted and profiled. Only 12 other exhibits made the cut. Among them were three in New York City, Cezanne portraits at Washington, D.C.’s National Gallery of Art, China’s Terracotta Army exhibit in Cincinnati and a Henriette Wyeth and Peter Hurd art retrospective in

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GLENN HUTCHINSON’S TIMELY 2015 STAGE PLAY COMES TO MOBILE THROUGH PERSONAL ACQUAINTANCE. DIRECTOR JOHN RICHARDS WAS IN MIAMI FOR A TRAINING CONFERENCE AND OCCUPIED HIS FREE SUNDAY WITH COMMUNITY THEATER.” it needs to be,’” Richards laughed. Richards noted the advantage of being the only live theatrical production in town for two weeks. He’s hoping it aids attendance. He also praised Hutchinson’s style. The playwright was no doubt helped by his educational job and an ear for public interaction. “One thing that really drew me to it was how natural the conversation was. This isn’t Tennessee Williams; this is a professor who decided to write a play. None of the dialogue’s forced to advance the plot so nothing sounds like it’s out of left field just to make a point,” Richards said. With the Azalea City’s rich history of immigration — think Chastang, Perez, Zoghby, Nguyen — it’s a resonant subject. “It’s not a preachy play that’s trying to get you to side with one side. It’s more just something that could easily happen here in Mobile,” Richards said.

Doylestown, Pennsylvania. The prehistoric display will be at the Exploreum until June 3. For hours and pricing, call 251-208-6893 or visit exploreum.com.

Baldwin Pops Band stages free shows

The Baldwin Pops will present two free John Allen Memorial Scholarship concerts this month. Dr. Jason Rinehart will conduct the Baldwin Pops as they play Henry Mancini, Johannes Brahms and a selection of patriotic and show tunes. The first show is April 15, 3 p.m., at Baldwin County Coliseum in Robertsdale. The second is April 22, 7 p.m., at Henry George Park in Fairhope. Guests in Fairhope should bring chairs or blankets. The Pops sponsors an annual scholarship contest for Baldwin County high school

seniors who plan to continue their musical involvement in college. Ten students from Daphne, Fairhope, Foley, Robertsdale and Spanish Fort High Schools will perform with the band. The scholarship winner will be announced at the April 22 concert. The honored students are Avrionna Erlandson, Blake Odom, Catherine Power, Houston Hughes and Rhian Pactor (Robertsdale High School), Ben Brunson and Sam Butler (Fairhope High School), Erika Horne (Daphne High School), Imani Williams (Foley High School) and Mason Pitre (Spanish Fort High School). Donations for the John Allen Memorial Scholarship will be gratefully accepted at both concerts or by mail to Baldwin Pops Band, P.O. Box 38, Fairhope, AL 36533. For more information, call 251-987-5757, search Facebook or go to baldwinpops.com.

ARTSGALLERY

The Gulf Coast Ethnic and Heritage Jazz Festival is seeking a design for its 20th annual event in early August. Alabama artists living in Mobile or Baldwin counties are invited to participate. The winner will receive $300 cash. The guidelines are as follows: • Original, unpublished, two-dimensional work featuring a jazz theme in any medium. One entry per artist. • Entry must include the words “Gulf Coast Ethnic & Heritage Jazz Festival,” “Mobile, Alabama” and “20 Years of Jazz: 1998–2018”. • Entry should be 24 inches by 18 inches, in a vertical format and mounted on white foam core. • Include application with submission. • Mail or hand-deliver entries to Mobile Arts Council, 318 Dauphin St., Mobile, AL 36602 no later than May 21, 2018.

conservative blogger and their melting pot starts to steam. “I’m one of these people, the immigration issue is about Texas and Los Angeles and California and Florida. I didn’t really look at it as something that affects the local community much,” Richards said. Varied experiences riddle the eight-member cast. Boyfriend Rick’s sister is a DACA kid, though Rick was a year too old to qualify. “There’s a character who is their housekeeper and she is saying, ‘Do you like it when people cut in line? Well, we didn’t. We did all the paperwork. We followed all the rules. We came here legally,’” Richards said. The director will borrow an extra element from the Miami production when they feature a panel discussion following the Sunday matinee. Friday and Saturday curtain is 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinee is 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday attendees are invited to return free on Sunday for the discussion around 4 p.m. “I have the playwright flying in from Miami the first Sunday, April 15. I also have some other advocates like Frank Barragan from the Alabama Coalition for Immigrant Justice and Juan Torres,” Richards noted. Torres is with BELONG, an organization providing “essential opportunities to immigrants” through “a network of one-stop-shop community center platforms.” “I also have Grace Resendez McCaffrey, who runs the only Spanish-language newspaper on the Gulf Coast out of

Pensacola. La Costa Latina is the name of it. She’s going to try and be here the second Sunday,” Richards said. He’s attempting to round out the panel by inviting conservative writer and pundit Brendan Kirby, who hasn’t yet responded to Richard’s invitation. “I don’t want it to be one-sided. That’s what’s good about this show, it has all viewpoints covered, from Uncle John, who is more the ‘build the wall, send them back type,’ to the housekeeper and then the boyfriend and his sister being DACA kids more or less with no control over what’s happened to them,” Richards said. For Richards, the director’s role is endless. He spent his last free Saturday aiming lights, programming light boards and addressing the fires that consistently spark. “It’s definitely challenging. Every show you’re involved with you’re like, ‘Gosh, if we had one more week then we could really get this show down to what


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Woody Allen plays out real life … again

T

FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Road South Mobile, AL (251)639-1748 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin St Mobile, AL (251) 438-2005 REGAL MOBILE STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Drive Mobile, AL (844) 462-7342 AMC JUBILEE Square 12 6898 Highway 90 Daphne, AL (251) 626-5766

he wordy Woody Allen has produced a weirdly theatrical series of monologues and strung them together into “Wonder Wheel,” which revisits the concept of living at Coney Island literally under a roller coaster that he introduced to much more memorable effect in his masterwork, “Annie Hall.” In that film, Alvy Singer, played by Allen, harkens back to his childhood and, admitting he’s probably exaggerating, claims in a whimsical flashback that he grew up under the Cyclone roller coaster at Coney Island. Allen is certainly exaggerating in this latest film, too, which marries an interesting visual style with melodramatic but still affecting performances. Justin Timberlake stands in for Allen as Mickey, the intellectual, fourth wall-breaking narrator who is also a central character. In “Wonder Wheel,” Kate Winslet plays a miserable woman living with her husband and son on Coney Island in the 1950s. A former actress obsessed with regret over her first marriage to the father of her son, she is now hanging by a thread with the help of somewhat decent but brutish “Humpty” (Jim Belushi),

whose job is to run the carousel. Coney Island itself is seedy and on the skids, and so are they. Belushi’s performance and his character are surprisingly compelling, and the story cuts him a lot more slack than it does Winslet. Both actors commit fully to their roles, and Winslet’s efforts never falter, even when she must act out the most hackneyed versions of the fury of a woman scorned. When Belushi’s grown daughter from his first marriage comes to live with them — an attractive woman named Carolina whose marriage to a gangster caused her father to disown her — Winslet is none too happy to welcome another set of problems into their home. She has to keep Humpty, the recovering alcoholic, on the wagon, and her red-haired little son, shoehorned into a blatantly allegorical role in the film, is an unrepentant firebug. Given far too little attention by his mom, he has no choice but to further the film’s plot by setting a fire every time someone in the movie gives way to the fires of passion, accompanied by a recurring song about that exact same thing. Timberlake actually fits into his role as Mickey, a fit younger lifeguard

bringing sexy back to Winslet’s grim existence when they launch a beautifully lit summertime love affair. Despite his fame as a singer, Timberlake works well in period films somehow, and I thought his folk singer in the Coen Brothers’ period film “Inside Llewyn Davis” was surprisingly perfect. You’ll never guess who Mickey starts to become attracted to instead of the desperate Kate Winslet character, but I’ll give you a hint: the parallels between Allen’s own forbidden love for the step-daughter of his girlfriend and the plot of this story are awfully blatant. Given that Allen has finally seemed to catch a reckoning for the scandals of his personal life, and that actors seem to be required to disavow him now, “Wonder Wheel” might be his last chance to make viewers uncomfortable with nakedly self-referential storylines. For years he cast himself in May-December romances on screen while married to the daughter of his former girlfriend, but this may finally be the year people have lost their taste, or their tolerance, for the trope of the dirty old man. “Wonder Wheel” is currently available to rent.

NEXUS CINEMA DINING 7070 Bruns Dr. Mobile, AL (251) 555-5555 AMC CLASSIC WHARF 23151 Wharf Lane Orange Beach, AL (251) 981-4444 COBB PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 923-0785 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 State Hwy 181 Spanish Fort, AL (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Photos | Amazon Studios

“Wonder Wheel” takes you to 1950s Coney Island, where a lifeguard tells the story of a middle-aged carousel operator, his beleaguered wife and the visitor who turns their lives upside-down. Wes Anderson’s stop-motion animation film “Isle of Dogs,” set in Japan, follows a boy’s odyssey in search of his lost dog. NEW THIS WEEK ISLE OF DOGS

Quirky Auteur Wes Anderson’s latest film is a stop-motion animation film about an outbreak of canine flu in Japan that leads all dogs to be quarantined on an island. A boy (voice of Koyu Rankin) journeys there to rescue his dog Spots (Liev Schreiber), and gets help from a pack of misfit canines who have also been exiled. His quest inspires a group of dog lovers to expose a government conspiracy. The voice cast also includes Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton, Bob Balaban, Greta Gerwig and Yoko Ono. Crescent Theater

BLUMHOUSE’S TRUTH OR DARE

A harmless game of “Truth or Dare” among friends turns deadly

when someone — or something — begins to punish those who tell a lie — or refuse the dare. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING

CHAPPAQUIDDICK Nexus Cinema Dining, all listed multiplex theaters. RAMPAGE THE MIRACLE SEASON A silverback gorilla, a wolf and a All listed multiplex theaters. reptile grow to a monstrous size CHAL MOHAN RANGA after a rogue genetic experiment Regal Mobile Stadium 18 goes wrong. Primatologist Davis A QUIET PLACE Okoye (The Rock, obviously) soon All listed multiplex theaters. joins forces with the military to BLOCKERS prevent the mutated beasts from All listed multiplex theaters. destroying everything in their READY PLAYER ONE All listed multiplex thepath. All listed multiplex theaters. aters, Nexus Cinema Dining. SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO TYLER PERRY’S ACRIIt causes me personal grief to MONY report that both Helena Bonham All listed multiplex theaters. Carter and Gerard Depardieu GOD’S NOT DEAD: provide voices for the animated A LIGHT IN THE film about a stray dog that is DARKNESS All listed multiplex theaters. rescued off the streets by a PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING soldier and goes on to become All listed multiplex thea hero of World War I. All listed aters, Nexus Cinema Dining. multiplex theaters.

SHERLOCK GNOMES All listed multiplex theaters. PAUL, APOSTLE OF CHRIST AMC Mobile 16 TOMB RAIDER All listed multiplex theaters. I CAN ONLY IMAGINE All listed multiplex theaters. A WRINKLE IN TIME All listed multiplex theaters. STRANGERS: PRAY AT NIGHT All listed multiplex theaters. DEATH WISH All listed multiplex theaters. BLACK PANTHER All listed multiplex theaters. PETER RABBIT All listed multiplex theaters.


STYLE GARDENING

Pot-pourri for butterflies BY ALICE MARTY, MOBILE COUNTY MASTER GARDENER | COASTALALABAMAGARDENING@GMAIL.COM

Step 1: Preparing the pots

Glazed clay pots were chosen because the glaze makes them nonporous. If you are using nonglazed clay pots, it’s a good idea to soak them overnight to help them absorb water. Plastic pots can also be used and retain moisture better than plain clay pots. If you are purchasing glazed clay pots, make sure they already have drainage holes in the bottom. Adding holes later can easily cause the pot to crack. I like to place a used fabric softener sheet over the large hole in the bottom. Secure it with a few pebbles to

Mark Dwyer/Janesville Rotary Gardens

W

hile researching for the Mobile County Master Gardeners inaugural Lunch and Learn in May 2013, I came upon an article that has been the high point of the butterfly garden presentations I have given since. It is entitled “Potpourri to Attract Pretty Butterflies” by garden writer Naomi Mathews. The article explains that anyone can attract butterflies to a garden consisting of only three pots and a little patience. Someday I need to contact Naomi to share with her how people perk up and listen intently when I show them how to make their own butterfly pot-pourri. A myriad of butterflies has already begun the migration north from their wintering grounds as far south as Mexico. Representing the new and future generations, they will be seeking life-giving nectar from any source on their journey. After mating, the females will also be scouting for host plants on which to lay their eggs. This is serious business for them, as they won’t settle for just any old plant as a home for their baby caterpillars. Only specific plants will do, especially for monarchs. This makes it essential to greet them with both nectar sources and host plants ready for their arrival. Ingredients for a butterfly pot-pourri • Three glazed/decorated clay planters of different sizes; • Two bags of commercial potting mix (do not use garden soil); • Slow-release fertilizer granules; • Nectar-rich plants for butterflies (3 lantana camara); • Host plants for caterpillars (2 asclepias, 3-4 fennel seedlings); and • One bag of “no float” mulch.

help keep the potting soil from running out and critters from crawling in.

Step 2: Adding soil and fertilizer granules

Garden soil should never be used in containers. It contains both weed seeds and detrimental micro-organisms. Fill each pot about one-half full with potting soil and then add the recommended amount of fertilizer granules, mixing thoroughly with the soil. The slow-release fertilizer will provide nutrients to last for several months. When using fertilizer, “less is more”! Too much will give you lots of pretty leaves and not many flowers. Before adding more soil, water each pot thoroughly several times, letting the water drain all the way through. This eliminates any dry pockets in the bottoms of the pots. Add additional soil to within about 6 inches of the top rim of each pot and again water thoroughly.

Step 3: It’s planting time! Nectar plants

Butterflies flock to lantana (L. camara), which bloom profusely through the summer and into the fall. Lantana can easily be found at most nurseries in the early spring and is considered a lowmaintenance plant. Some butterflies that are attracted are spicebush swallowtail, monarchs, fritillaries, whites and skippers. Three lantanas will adequately fill the largest container. First,

position them in the container while they are still in their pots. This way you can easily adjust the soil level. Remove from their pots, settle them in the large container and fill in soil around the plants to within about one inch from the top of the container. This leaves room for watering and mulch. A no-float mulch will stay in containers when there is a heavy rain. Wood chips tend to float out. Water lightly.

Step 4: Caterpillar host plants

For the middle-sized pot, asclepias, commonly called butterfly weed or milkweed, will do the trick. Female monarchs will be looking for it to lay their eggs, but the flowers also provide a nectar site for many other butterflies and hummingbirds. After hatching, the caterpillars will devour the milkweed. Hopefully, this will give you a chance to view this portion of the monarch’s life cycle. Planting the four fennel plants in the smallest pot will complete the butterfly pot-pourri. Fennel and other members of the carrot family, which includes parsley and dill, will attract female black swallowtails. These plants also attract other beneficial insects to your garden. The last rule for your butterfly garden is absolutely no pesticides in or around butterfly habitat. Butterflies are insects, too, and will be affected adversely. Check the plants often for pests and remove them by hand.

Step 5: Enjoy

Take the time to observe your pot-pourri and enjoy the variety of butterflies, hummingbirds and other beneficial visitors it attracts. YOU ARE INVITED TO THESE UPCOMING GARDENING EVENTS What: Mobile Master Gardeners Lunch & Learn (free) When: Monday, April 16, noon to 1 p.m. Where: Jon Archer Ag Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: Nutrition — Samantha Chirichella, DC Master Gardener Helpline: 1-877-252-4769, or send gardening questions to coastalalabamagardening@gmail.com.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS APRIL 11, 2018 - APRIL 17, 2018

GENERAL INTEREST Bay Awakening Luncheon Join Mobile Baykeeper for an annual luncheon supporting its work toward clean water, clean air and healthy communities. Featuring a panel of well-known authors and artists Watt Key, John Sledge and Nall the Artist discussing stories of Mobile Bay. Battle House Hotel, Friday, April 13, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Visit mobilebaykeeper.org/ bay-awakening for more details. “Engaging the Next Generation” Mobile United invites young professionals to “Engaging the Next Generation,” a volunteer fair on Dauphin Street between Joachim and Conception streets on Friday, April 13, 6-8 p.m. Free and open to the public. Visit facebook.com/ engagingthenextgeneration. LoDa Artwalk Visit downtown Mobile this Friday, April 13, for art exhibitions with receptions and entertainment in a variety of galleries and venues, beginning at 6 p.m. Check out mobilearts.org/announcement/loda-artwalk for additional information or contact 251208-1550. Movie in the Park Join us for a family movie night at Semmes Municipal Park on Friday, April 13. “Beauty and the Beast” will be showing from 7-9 p.m. Visit cityofsemmesal.gov for more information. “Titanic” in the Park History Museum of Mobile will host a viewing of “Titanic” in Mardi Gras Park beginning at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 13. Bring a lawn chair/blanket. Visit www. historymuseumofmobile.com for more information. A Day for Science Hosted by March for Science Mobile on Saturday, April 14, 9 a.m. to noon in Bienville Square. An open-air science fair for all ages with speakers and booths from local organizations. Call 251-680-0084 for more information. Military Vehicle Show The Dixie Division will hold its annual vintage military vehicle show and swap meet on Saturday, April 14, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park. Find us on Facebook for more information. Strawberry Festival Loxley Municipal Park will host the 31st annual Baldwin County Strawberry Festival on Saturday, April 14 and Sunday, April 15. Visit baldwincountystrawberryfestival.org. Disney Concert

Join us in this family-friendly concert as the Mobile Pops Band explores the world of Disney! Saturday, April 14, 6 p.m. at Medal of Honor Park. Visit themobilepops. com for details.

non-crawfish eaters. Tickets are available at St. Mary Catholic Church and school offices, at Mobile Popcorn and online at brownpapertickets.com. Proceeds benefit Veterans Recovery Resources. 

3rd annual Zydeco & Crawfish Festival Saturday, April 14, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Waterway Village in Gulf Shores. Free to the public. Find us on Facebook for more information.

Fairhope High School IB Come celebrate our second-ever “Jamboree for IB” at The Warehouse Bakery on Saturday, April 14. Sneak preview from Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre’s upcoming “Newsies,” the FHS Jazz Band, “This is Now” and more, all benefiting this academic program. Visit us on Facebook @ morganthompsonfoundation for more information.

Confederate Memorial Day Join us Sunday, April 15, 2 p.m. at the Confederate Rest, Magnolia Cemetery for observance of Memorial Day featuring period re-enactors and weaponry. Contact J.A. DePree, 251-421-0491. 22nd annual motorcycle show Join us Sunday, April 15, on Dauphin Island for the Mobile Bay Vintage Motorcycle Club’s annual spring show at Waves (formerly Fins). Free admission, food available. Proceeds support Dauphin Island PTO. Call 251-509-5451 or 251635-8520 for more information. “Chill Out” Day There will be no taxation without relaxation this tax season. Kona Ice of Coastal Alabama will be offering free shaved ice on Tuesday, April 17, to help local residents chill out. The truck will be making a stop at Bienville Square, 150 Dauphin St. in Mobile from noon to 1 p.m. Police/Citizens Council Meet The Police Citizens Community Relations Advisory Council will meet Tuesday, April 17, at 6 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church. Visit cityofmobile.org/pccrac for more information. Brown Bag in Bienville On Wednesday, April 18, Jamell Richardson will perform a free concert in Bienville Square, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The following Wednesday, April 25, the Bodhi Trio will perform. Call 251-208-1550. Blueberry Picking at Weeks Bay Come out and pick fresh, organic blueberries beginning at 7 a.m. on Wednesday, April 18. Visit weeksbayplantation.com for more information.

FUNDRAISERS St. Mary Crawfish & Bluegrass Extravaganza Enjoy crawfish and gumbo and listen to foot-stomping music on Saturday, April 14, 4-8 p.m. Music by bluegrass band Fat Man Squeeze. Hot dogs will be on hand for

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Bowling for Autism Eastern Shore Lanes and the American Autism and Rehabilitation Center in Daphne are hosting this event from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Eastern Shore Lanes on Sunday, April 15. All profits will enhance the outdoor play area and sponsor local families for the summer camp program. Visit www.eslanes.com. Mutts and Mimosas Join us Sunday, April 15 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Off the Hook Marina & Grill for brunch and $5 pitchers of mimosas. Bring the family and fur kids and help us support the Saraland Animal Shelter. Find us on Facebook for more information. Spring into Wine + Art The inaugural Spring into Wine + Art will be held Sunday, April 15, at 2 p.m. at the American Legion Post 199 in Fairhope. All proceeds go toward the South Alabama Volunteer Lawyers Program. Point Clear Rotary Club The musical duo Roman Street will join the Point Clear Rotary Club Tuesday, April 17, 6 p.m. at Fairhope Civic Center for this year’s Taste of Rotary “Taste and Tunes” event to benefit the Point Clear/Fairhope Rotary Youth Club, scholarships and other local nonprofits. Call 601-917-5182. Bark and Bingo Join us at Serda Brewing on Wednesday, April 18, as we partner with ARF (Animal Rescue Foundation) for a special fundraiser for dogs, benefiting ARF. Win prizes from local vendors Walks & Wags, Dog Days Bakery and Happy Dog 123. Find us on Facebook for more info.

ARTS The Pact Open House The Facility for Performing Arts Creative Training will hold its open house Saturday, April 14. Hors d’oeuvres and drinks

provided, as well as entertainment throughout. Please email thepactmobile@ gmail.com. “The Marriage of Figaro” Set in the early 19th century, this is the story of two young servants longing to the tie knot while striving to elude the clutches of the count and countess who are conspiring to loosen it. Saraland High School on Friday April 13, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 15, at 2 p.m. SouthSounds Arts & Crafts Market In conjunction with all the great music during the SouthSounds Music Festival, there will also be an art market featuring one-of-a-kind arts and crafts produced by local artisans. Cathedral Square on Saturday, April 14, and Sunday, April 15, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Theatre USA presents “Pericles” April 13-15 and 19-21, Theatre USA will host one of Shakespeare’s final plays. “Pericles” follows the adventures of the title character as he sets out to woo a princess, only to be pursued by an evil king across the vast seas. All performances at the Laidlaw Performing Arts Center. Call Theatre USA Box Office, 251-460-6306 for tickets. “Meme” in Art Susan Fitzsimmons will display her art exhibit focusing on the “Meme” idea of conveying cultural ideas, symbols or practices that can be transmitted through writing, speech, gestures, rituals or other imitable phenomena at the University of South Alabama Visual Arts Gallery, through April 20. A reception will take place Thursday, April 19, at 6 p.m. Call 251-461-1438 or email sgfitzsimmons@ southalabama.edu. Medicine in Art Dr. Charles B. Rodning, professor of surgery, will discuss the validity of integrating the scientific, humanistic and artistic domains of intellectual endeavor into the patient-physician relationship to achieve healing. Friday, April 13, USA Health Strada Center. Lunch served at 11:30 a.m., presentation begins at noon. A free community event but reservations are required. Call Kim Partridge at 251460-7770 or email kepartridge@health. southalabama.edu. Ellen Jones Art and Life Join us at Innova Arts on St. Louis Street on Friday, April 13, 6-9 p.m. as we celebrate the life and art of Ellen Jones. Proceeds from the silent auction of her artwork and the donated items of other local artists will benefit The Ellen Jones Art Fund supporting Legacy 166, an organization dedicated to art education for


underprivileged children. Visit innovaarts. com for more information. Music in the Park Enjoy free concerts in the Pavilion at Town Center Park every Friday evening through August 31. April 13 will feature Eric Erdman. Visit spanishforttowncenter.com for the summer lineup.

MUSEUMS

Fairhope’s Founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday), 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@exploreum.com.

Last chance for “Titanic: Honour & Glory” “Titanic Honour & Glory” exhibition ends Sunday, April 15 at the History Museum of Mobile. Call 251-301-0273 or gavin.snyder@ “Permian Monsters: Life Before Dinosaurs” historymuseumofmobile.com. Take an adventure back in time 290 million years when bizarre-looking “Alabama Main Streets” animals dominated life on land and sea. Traveling Post Card exhibit will be on The Exploreum will display this traveling display from now through Saturday, April exhibition through June 3. Visit exploreum. 28, at the Spanish Fort Public Library. com. Visit spanishfortpubliclibrary.org for more information. “Galapagos: Nature’s Wonderland” In the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, Thursdays at MMoA there is a paradise unlike any other: the Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Galapagos Archipelago. Immerse yourself in the Mobile Museum of Art offers free this spectacular film at the Exploreum, until May 26. Visit exploreum.com. admission to all Mobile County residents. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200. “Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is the latest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Savage Ancient Seas” Ending April 21. Don’t’ miss “Savage Ancient Seas” at GulfQuest and be transported to a time when the last of the great dinosaurs roamed Earth and swam the seas. Visit www.gulfquest.org.

WORKSHOPS

Art as a Business Free workshop Wednesday, April 18, at 10 a.m. in Bellingrath Hall at Central Presbyterian Church (corner of Ann and Dauphin) with Yolanda Johnson. Optional $5 lunch available afterward to benefit the CPC Food Pantry. Call 251-432-0591 for more information. Metaphysics of “The Wizard of Oz” Join us for this four-part series beginning

Sunday, April 15, at 10:30 a.m. at the Center for Spiritual Living. Rev. Kandace is sure to shed new light on this classic film by presenting it through a “Science of Mind” lens. Come dressed as your favorite character. Visit centerforspirituallivingmobile.org for more information. “History of the FBI, Creative Writing & Forensics” Miniature conference hosted by the Honors College for those interested in criminal justice, creative writing, psychology, journalism, forensics, publishing or fascinating ideas in general. At the Honors College in the Seaman’s Bethel, University of South Alabama, on Friday, April 13, 5-7 p.m. and Saturday, April 14, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Contact honors@southalabama.edu. Violence in the Workplace John Conrad, assistant director at Bayview Professional Associates, will discuss the current statistics regarding the prevalence of workplace violence. Tuesday, April 17, 4-5 p.m. at the Ben May Main Library, 701 Government St. For more information, email jsigler@ mplonline.org or call 208-7085 or 208-7078.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES DOGA Flow Class Benefit Grab your best furry friend and join Mobile’s first DOGA Flow class on Saturday, April 14, at 10 a.m. Hosted by Personal Edge Fitness to benefit Save a Stray. Email saveastraydoga@gmail.com or erikacturner@gmail.com. Special Olympic Track Meet Join us at St. Paul’s Episcopal track on Friday, April 13, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. to cheer on 400-plus athletes from 52 Mobile-area schools. Contact

mobilecospecialolympics@gmail.com for more information. Mobile BayBears vs. Biloxi The Mobile BayBears will host the Biloxi Shuckers at Hank Aaron Stadium Monday, April 16, through Friday, April 20. Call 251479-BEAR. Via! Bingo Bingo every Tuesday and Thursday, 1:303:30 p.m. Open to the public.Via! Health, Fitness, Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Visit viamobile.org. Group Rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@ rideSAMBA.com. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Fitness and Athletics Classes Classes are being offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School in Tai Chi, bellydance, candlelit yoga, Piyo Tone and piano. Call 251-463-7980 or visit mobilecap.org Pickleball for adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School on Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or visit communityactivitiesprogram.com.

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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Mobile BayBears ‘open for business’ despite future move BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

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Photo | Lagniappe

t has been a rough off-season for fans of the Mobile Several faces should look familiar to BayBear fans, BayBears. Rumors of the team’s sale and relocation as 18 players who saw some action at The Hank last year finally became reality in November. have returned. These include outfielder Zach Gibbons, who A fixture at Hank Aaron Stadium since 1997, the played in 79 games; right-handed pitcher Justin Anderson, BayBears have captured four Class AA Southern League who led the staff with 42 appearances; and catcher Wade championships during their run in Mobile. Despite their Wass, who was a Southern League Mid-Season All-Star. future move to North Alabama, the players and manageThe remaining pitchers include right-handers Nathan ment have a message to share: “We are open for business.” Bates, Cortland Cox, Samil De Los Santos, Ivan Pineyro, “As many of you probably know by now, the BayBears Jeremy Rhoades, Jose Rodriguez and Dylan Unsworth. have two more seasons remaining in the Port City and I Left-handers are Conor Lillis-White, Greg Mahle and want to guarantee that we will work hard to make sure Jonah Wesely. that everyone who chooses to support the BayBears in Joining Wass behind the plate will be Francisco Arcia 2018 and 2019 has a great experience in a fun, clean and and Michael Barash. In the outfield with Lund and Gibsafe environment at Hank Aaron bons are Brendon Sanger and Bo Stadium,” said Chris Morgan, the Way. Completing the infield with BayBears’ general manager. Thaiss, Ward and Justus are Hutton The Los Angeles Angels of AnaMoyer, Jose Rojas, Riley Unroe and heim continue to be the parent club Jake Yacinich. of the Mobile BayBears. Serving The BayBears are hosting 70 A FIXTURE AT HANK as the new manager is Lou Marson, games through Labor Day. Singlewho broke into coaching last season tickets and special ticket AARON STADIUM SINCE game as the hitting coach for the Salt Lake packages are available by calling Bees, a Class AAA affiliate of the 251-479-BEAR (2327). 1997, THE BAYBEARS Angels. Marson spent six seasons “Our staff and players are comHAVE CAPTURED FOUR mitted to put the best product out with the Philadelphia Phillies and Cleveland Indians as a catcher before there that we can,” Morgan said. CLASS AA SOUTHERN signing a free-agent contract with the “These young players really deserve Angels in 2016, where he would then our support.” LEAGUE CHAMPIONretire and enter into coaching. “With this being my first year as Special Olympics this week SHIPS DURING THEIR a manager, I can honestly say this Approximately 400 special-needs RUN IN MOBILE. is the most talented team I’ve ever athletes representing 52 local schools had,” joked Marson, who is just 31. will be competing in track events “I always wanted to be a manager, this Friday at the annual Mobile Area but I am surprised it happened so Special Olympics. Track events such soon. In fact, one of the guys on the as relays, runs, walks and wheelchair races will take place team [Hutton Moyer] is the son of one of my former team- at the complex at St. Paul’s Episcopal School. Field events mates [Jamie Moyer].” will include the running and standing long jumps, shot put, Completing the coaching roster are hitting coach Lee javelin, softball and tennis ball throw. Tinsley, pitching coach Pat Rice, strength coach Dylan The opening ceremonies will begin at 8:30 a.m. The Cintula and defensive coach Travis Adair. Athletic trainer arrival of the torch will be handled by the Mobile Police Matt Morrell will be returning after serving in the same Department led by Chief Lawrence Battiste. On the final role for the BayBears in 2017. leg of the run, they will be joined by several Special OlymSeven players on this year’s roster are Top 30 prospects pians. The competition is set to last until 1 p.m. in the Angels organization, according to MLB Pipeline. The Expected to be present are Mayor Sandy Stimpson, list includes infielder Matt Thaiss (9th), right-handed pitcher City Council members John Williams and Bess Rich and Jesus Castillo (11th), infielder Taylor Ward (14th), outfielder County Commissioner Jerry Carl. From the Mobile County Brennon Lund (20th), right-handed pitchers Luis Pena Public School System will be Superintendent Martha Peek, (25th) and Jake Jewell (27th), plus infielder Connor Justus area athletic director Brad Lowell and Sharon Magee, (30th). Thaiss and Ward were both first-round draft picks. executive director of special services Sharon Magee.

Former Major League catcher Lou Marson joined the Mobile BayBears as general manager for the 2018 season. Team Focus to honor Saban

Mobile-based Team Focus will mark its 11th anniversary of hosting its annual fundraiser event — “A Night Honoring Nick Saban” — on Tuesday, April 17, at the Mobile Convention Center. It will begin with a silent auction at 5:45 p.m.; dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. The silent auction features numerous signed sports memorabilia items. Team Focus founder Mike Gottfried will speak and introduce the keynote speaker, Alabama Crimson Tide head coach Nick Saban. “The focus of this banquet will be honoring Coach Nick Saban and his sixth national title,” Gottfried said. “He is truly a remarkable coach and man, and we are very grateful for the years of support he has given Team Focus.” Lee Corso will also participate in this special event. The sports broadcaster, ESPN football analyst and former coach has been a featured analyst on ESPN’s “College GameDay” program since its inception in 1987. Team Focus is rooted in utilizing leadership skills, Christian values, guidance and continual relationships to reach young men aged 10-18 who lack a father figure in their lives. This community-centered program focuses on positive influences and role models — including high-profile, nationally recognized collegiate and professional athletes and coaches — to reach these young men through individual mentoring, tutoring, monthly social activities, leadership camps and scholarship opportunities. Gottfried and his wife, Mickey, founded Team Focus in 2000. From its headquarters in Mobile, the nonprofit group now has six chapter locations across the United States. Since its inception, the organization has impacted the lives of more than 4,000 young men. Individual tickets cost $100. A table for 10 is $950. Sponsorships are available starting at $6,000. For more information, contact the Team Focus office at 251-635-1515 or visit teamfocususa.org.


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SPORTS FROM BEHIND THE MIC

Saban’s Team Focus visit one of Mobile’s best sports events BY RANDY KENNEDY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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t may seem like Nick Saban’s annual schedule includes a trip to the national championship game and the championship parade in Tuscaloosa that follows. But that’s happened only five times in the last nine years. I know, five titles in nine years doesn’t deserve an “only” as a modifier. The point is it’s not a given that Saban’s year will include a national championship celebration. But since the coach arrived in Tuscaloosa in 2007, two non-football events have been on his schedule every year. One is the annual golf tournament to benefit his Nick’s Kid Foundation. The other is the Team Focus event in Mobile to benefit the organization founded by Mike and Micky Gottfried. This year, the coach will be back for an 11th straight year to headline the fundraiser at the Mobile Convention Center on Tuesday, April 17. Tickets for the event cost $100 each, with a table for 10 available for $950. Sponsorships are available starting at $6,000. The evening will include a silent auction that begins at 5:45 p.m., with dinner at 6:30 p.m. This year’s event will also feature ESPN personality Lee Corso. If you’ve come into contact with Team Focus or the teens the organization benefits, then you know what a worthwhile organization it is. Mike Gottfried has devoted his post-coaching life to making sure thousands of teens who don’t have a positive father figure in their lives get the guidance they desperately need. Gottfried said this year’s event should be the most

special yet. “We’re changing it a little bit to honor Nick and Terry Saban for the work they do helping kids,” Gottfried said. “We’re going to give everybody in attendance a small ball recognizing the national championships Nick has won.” This year the Team Focus event will take place four days before Alabama’s spring A-Day game. That makes scheduling tricky and demonstrates Saban’s commitment to Team Focus. “When he comes from Tuscaloosa after practice it’s a tight schedule, and you know he has practice on his mind,” said Gottfried, who has known Saban through coaching connections more than 25 years. “He has to fly in after practice, does a great job at our event, then has to get back to be at work early the next day. But he has always done a great job communicating with us and making sure we can make it work. He doesn’t just want to put his name on something. He wants to see the results. I appreciate so much what he does.” While Saban is the clear headliner, Corso usually steals the show any time he walks on a stage or in front of a television camera. As coach at Indiana in 1976, Corso famously called a second-quarter timeout while leading Ohio State 7-6 so his entire team could take a photo in front of the scoreboard. It was the first time in 25 years Indiana had led Ohio State. The Buckeyes then scored the next 41 points to win 47-7. Of course, Corso is more famous for his broadcasting career at ESPN, where he still stars on the weekly “Col-

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lege GameDay” show. Corso was already working at ESPN when Gottfried began his successful run at the network. “When I got the job at ESPN I went to a meeting in early August,” Gottfried said. “I was really apprehensive because I had no previous experience and didn’t know what I was doing. The night before I called Corso and he said ‘meet me at 5 o’clock in the morning and I’ll tell you everything you need to know about ESPN.’ “I get there at 4:45 in the morning and he’s already there. We start walking in the dark and he says, ‘There are only two things you need to know for this job. Number one is when you do a telecast there are going to be people in the truck who are managing the telecast. They’re going to come up to you and say what a marvelous job you did. Don’t believe them. The second thing you need to know is that you need to be on the lookout for coaches getting fired. Because as soon as a coach with more notoriety than you gets fired from coaching,

THIS YEAR, THE COACH WILL BE BACK FOR AN 11TH STRAIGHT YEAR TO HEADLINE THE FUNDRAISER AT THE MOBILE CONVENTION CENTER ON TUESDAY, APRIL 17. TICKETS FOR THE EVENT COST $100 EACH, WITH A TABLE FOR 10 AVAILABLE FOR $950.” you’re gone at ESPN.’ That has turned out to be true for a lot of guys.” This event is the lone fundraiser for Team Focus every year. Saban offered this assessment of Team Focus in a previous visit. “If you’re going to be a good leader, you’ve got to have vision, you’ve got to have a plan, you’ve got to set a really good example for other people, you’ve got to hold people accountable, and you have to have some very defined principles in your organization so everybody can be accountable to them,” Saban said. “The last thing you have got to do to be a good leader is, you have to serve other people. This guy over here [Gottfried] is a great leader in your community. He’s doing great things. Please support him.” Randy Kennedy writes a weekly column for Lagniappe and is co-host of “Sports Drive” every weekday from 3-6 p.m. on WNSP 105.5 FM, the country’s first all-sports FM station.


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MEDIA MEDIA FRENZY

Al.com reboot lands in Mobile with a thud BY ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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he early returns are in on al.com’s anticipated restructuring of its statewide website, and so far I’ve gotten a collective head scratch from every Mobilian I’ve spoken with about it. It’s not so much the reorganization of the site that has locals rolling their eyes; it’s the fact the state’s second-largest metropolitan area appears to have almost no representation on the state’s largest news website. As I write this, selecting “Mobile” at the top of the page results in just one story being listed as “news from Mobile,” and that is about gubernatorial candidate Bill Hightower. Mobile’s news page is peppered with multiple stories from Birmingham and other areas of the state, but almost nothing from the Port City. Even Mobile’s high school sports page is dominated by stories from the other end of the state. As al.com has moved local advertising operations north and prepared another round of buyouts, it appears Southwest Alabama may not play much of a role in its future plans. One can’t help wondering with dwindling print circulation, and now dwindling online coverage as well, what Advance’s plans are overall for our area.

Gambit sold

Mobilians are fond of visiting our sister city New Orleans, and as that is the case, many of us are fond of, or at least familiar with, the Big Easy’s alternative weekly newspaper, Gambit.

It was announced Monday that the newspaper, which has been independently owned for decades, has been purchased by the owners of The New Orleans Advocate, the city’s daily newspaper. The Advocate, a sister paper to The Baton Rouge Advocate, is owned by John and Dathel Georges, who purchased the Baton Rouge paper in 2013. They started The New Orleans Advocate in direct response to Advance Media’s decision to reduce production of the Times-Picayune to just three days a week. Gambit has been owned and run by Margo and Clancy DuBos since 1991, and the paper has been a staple of New Orleans life for decades. The newspaper battle that erupted between The Advocate and the Times-Picayune in 2013 did seem to affect Gambit some, as its coverage made a noticeable shift toward more arts and entertainment and away from news and commentary. Still, the paper has remained a vibrant part of the New Orleans media scene. The Georges family says they bought the paper as part of their ongoing effort to preserve iconic Louisiana brands, and that it fits in with their current media holdings, which also include three other weekly newspapers. The DuBoses plan to remain with Gambit, with Clancy continuing his column and Margo as business manager. Gambit was formed in 1981 and currently publishes 35,000 papers a week.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE 1+1=5 BY SAM EZERSKY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Hardly 8 Chemicals proscribed by ’70s legislation 12 Like some legal damages 20 2018 N.C.A.A. football champs 21 “I know the answer!” 22 Final song in “Fantasia” 23 Excited sort 25 Chinese-restaurant chain 26 Actress Green of 2006’s “Casino Royale” 27 Tasteless 28 7 1/2-hour exam, for short 29 Component of a summer cloud 30 One doing the lord’s work 32 Something you hope people have when they leave? 34 Bee ____ 35 Business bigwigs 39 Caught morays 40 What a spoiler spoils 42 Crush 44 Heroic figure in “Star Wars” films 49 “I need everyone’s help!” 54 “Geez, that was tiring!” 55 Rumpus 56 Many a cereal-box toy 57 Speckled horse 59 Big name in nail polish 60 Bathtub accessory 61 Rating for “Game of Thrones” and “House of Cards” 62 Area for filming in Hollywood 65 ____ favor 66 Org. that oversaw F.D.R.’s Federal Project Number One 67 Haw’s go-with 68 Patriotic song lyric before “Mind the music and the step” 71 Regulation followers, in brief 72 Shorn animal 73 An ace has a low one 74 Relatives of channels 75 Gallic gal pal 76 Dumbbell curls build them, for short 77 Aides: Abbr. 80 ____ Rios, Jamaica 81 Cry to a prima donna 82 Had 83 Hero 85 Natural disaster of 2012 88 Magician known for debunking paranormal claims 91 IV-bag contents 92 Big ____, nickname of baseball’s David Ortiz 93 Fetch 96 Photo-editing option 98 4-Down personnel, informally

100 Item in a sink 102 Lasting, unpleasant memory 105 Match (with) 106 Move to solid food 108 Something used in a pinch? 112 Social ____ 113 Stretchable wrappers 115 1988 crime comedy rated 93% positive on Rotten Tomatoes 117 Spanish 101 question 118 They may be loaded in a casino 119 Device many use in bed 120 Massé, e.g. 121 On the double 122 Go down

14 Call from behind a counter 15 The “Home Alone” boy, e.g. 16 Things to shoot for … or shoot at 17 Ryan of “The Beverly Hillbillies” 18 Embassy issuances 19 Big ____ Conference 24 Sermon topic 28 Señora, across the Pyrenees 31 Reddish-purple 33 Prefix with liter 34 Have an exclusive relationship 36 Nutrient in lentils and liver 37 X 38 Pathetic 40 Make easier to plow, in a way 41 Makes a connection DOWN 43 Pfizer competitor 1 Deceptive moves 45 Dieting units: Abbr. 2 Partner of well 46 Helen Reddy’s signature hit 3 Cockpit devices 47 Malleable 4 “Enemies: A History of the 48 Tougher ____” (2012 best seller) 49 Like a fictional Casey 5 Delhi dignitary 50 Have as a housemate 6 Country whose total land 51 “I wanna look!” area is less than .01% forested 52 ____ Zero 7 Retailer with a star in its logo 53 Leafy vegetables 8 Flaky entree 58 Acknowledge without words 9 A, B, C or D 62 Irish Spring, e.g. 10 Brothel 63 Pueblo ancestors 11 ____-crab soup 64 It’s lit 12 Vatican jurisdiction 68 “Totally, bro” 13 Eye part 69 Four-letter island name

with three syllables 70 Some expensive gowns 75 Associate of Athos and Porthos 78 ____ Fridays 79 “____ in the Rain” 81 Certain bra spec 84 Big heads 86 ____ ipsa loquitur 87 Hot state 89 Each 90 Goal for a tailor 94 Beethoven’s Third 95 Typewriter formatting aid 97 Consent (to) 98 Ballroom dance in duple time 99 City near Biscayne National Park 100 Touches, as with a tissue 101 “This is SO frustrating!” 103 Poet who wrote “For the Time Being” and “Another Time” 104 Figure on a poster 105 Bench presses build them, for short 106 Well thought? 107 Prefix with -derm 109 Kept in the loop, in a way 110 Prudence 111 Whoops? 114 French possessive 115 Billboards, e.g. 116 France’s ____ du Bourget

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STYLE FEATURE

Close encounters of the zoo kind BY GABI GARRETT/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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The cost of each animal encounter helps fund the animal wildlife sanctuary, which regulates the guidelines for how the rare animals, such as sloths, are kept. These regulations cover the way the animals are fed, their living conditions and more. The individuals working the encounters are mindful to keep these animals safe by explaining the animals’ tendencies before each person enters into their zoo homes. “I loved seeing the sloths up close. They’re so unique and cool. My favorite thing about the sloth encounter was feeding them and watching them eat,” Sarah Timmons Sommerville said. Sommerville, daughter of two local business owners in the Eastern Shore area, recently became infatuated with sloths and was overjoyed at the opportunity to meet her friends in person. This preteen even adopted her own sloth online and is excited to help contribute to the dwindling population of these unique animals, even if her certificate did not secure her “her own, actual sloth.” The kangaroo encounters prove to be fun. Upon entering the circular area, one can join other animal encounter goers in petting three toddler-age kangaroos. One kangaroo is blind and loves to give hugs to visitors. The trio are very friendly and will pause their hopping for a little rub on the back of their unusually soft fur. Whether you’re in the mood to get up close and personal with a lizard or snake in the reptile exhibit, go more “out there” with a lemur or a tamandua, or stick with the always photo-worthy kangaroo and sloth, the Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo is sure to delight. Make a day of your adventure and head to the beach to grab a cocktail, lunch or just get your toes in the sand. If you decide to take the leisurely trip down Route 59, may we suggest the farmers markets and authentic Mexican

Photo | Gabi Garrett

hat do you want to do today?” is a question that might come up on the rare Saturdays you don’t have a soccer game, a planned grocery store run or a full day of cleaning ahead. When you’re contemplating what’s fun for you and your friends, your significant other or the entire family, here’s a fun solution: Go play with a kangaroo. “Play with a kangaroo?” you ask. Yes, and don’t stop there — you can also have exploration time with sloths, lemurs, reptiles and tamanduas at the Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo, which is in Gulf Shores. Gulf Shores is a simple drive down state Route 59 from the Spanish Fort and Daphne area, or a quick jaunt on the beach expressway from Fairhope and Mobile. In under an hour, traffic pending, you can be all set and ready for your next adventure, starting with animal explorations at the zoo. “If we can change one person’s life by bringing them closer to animals, then we’ve done our job,” says the zoo, which opened in June 1989 as Zooland Animal Park. In 1991, the Ward family created the Zoo Foundation Inc., a nonprofit, and donated 17 acres that make up the zoo today, housing more than 500 animals, including lions, tigers and bears. (Oh my!) The zoo is proud to offer unusual opportunities to get up close and personal in a safe space with some of their favorite, or soon to be favorite, animals. The encounters cost a fee per person in addition to your entry to the zoo but the time promises to be well worth it. Prices for each animal range from $5-$10. Keep in mind that only the family member with the pass will have the opportunity to get one-on-one with their animal of choice. The zoo entry cost is affordable: $11 for adults and $8 for children 3 years old to 12 years old.

The Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo offers unique opportunities for guests to get up close and personal with kangaroos, sloths, lemurs, reptiles and other animals. food in Robertsdale and Loxley. As the saying goes, “time spent in nature is never wasted,” so get out there and explore what Alabama has to offer.

Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo Address: 1204 Gulf Shores Parkway, Gulf Shores 36542 Phone: 251-968-5732 Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily

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STYLE HOROSCOPES TUNE INTO SOUTHSOUNDS ARIES (3/21-4/19) — You’ll turn the monthly LoDa ArtWalk into ArtPrance as you Prancercize through the downtown entertainment district. Your lucky SouthSounds song is Dumstaphunk’s “Dancin to the Truth.” TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — You’ll be stuck in the Wallace Tunnel for hours after a slaughterhouse truck overturns and litters the road with injured swine. Your lucky SouthSounds song is The Red Clay Strays’ “Show Me A Sign.” GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — You’ll be the last one in your theater seat days after a performance of “The Pot,” when you suddenly exclaim, “Oh, I get it,” and then go about your life. Your lucky SouthSounds song is Corey Smith’s “Twenty One.” CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll help yourself to the buffet at an upcoming open house, but will ask your date to fetch you seconds and thirds. Your lucky SouthSounds song is of Montreal’s “It’s Different for Girls.” LEO (7/23-8/23) — Your first attempt at making béchamel sauce may be a failure but you inavertently invent a new denture cleanser. Your lucky SouthSounds song is Delta Rae’s “Dance in the Graveyards.” VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — As the result of a sporadic sleep schedule, you’ll snore your way through Mobile Baykeeper’s Bay Awakening Luncheon. Your lucky SouthSounds song is Boyfriend’s “Toast.” LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — You’ll try to break your personal eating record at St. Mary’s Crawfish & Bluegrass Extravaganza. Your lucky SouthSounds song is Glass Mansions’ “Nightswimming.” SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You’ll observe Confederate Memorial Day by volunteering in the African-American community. Your lucky SouthSounds song is The New Respects’ “Money.” SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — You’ll remove April 17 from your calendar so you’ll have an alibi for not filing your taxes. Your lucky SouthSounds song is J. Roddy Walston’s “Same Days.” CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — You’ll chain yourself to Hank Aaron Stadium in a two-year effort to keep the Mobile BayBears from moving to Madison. Your lucky SouthSounds song is Stoop Kids’ “Stoop Life.” AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — You’ll get a tattoo from LA Body Art proclaiming support of “FRED RICHARDSON: MY COUNCIL PRESIDENT.” Your lucky SouthSounds song is Great Peacock’s “Take Me To The Mountain.” PISCES (2/19-3/20) — You’ll join a protest against another bridge across the Intracoastal Canal. You’ll block barge traffic until you’re given a free Little Ceasar’s Hot & Ready. Your lucky SouthSounds song is Johnny No’s “Gimme Some.” 58 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 1 1 , 2 0 1 8 - A p r i l 1 7 , 2 0 1 8


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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Jonathan W. Lockett, Jr. married man and Tawanda Lockett, his wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Capstone Mortgage Inc. DBA Baker Group, on the 25th day of February, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6341, Page 595; re-recorded in Book 6341, Page 595; modified in Bk: LR7284, Pg: 1986; the undersigned U.S. Bank Trust National Association, as Trustee of The Igloo Series III Trust, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 17, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 12, Block 2, Top Mobile as recorded in Deed Book 156, Pages 66-67 of the records in the office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  2413 Osage Street, Mobile, AL  36617. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. U.S. Bank Trust National Association, as Trustee of The Igloo Series III Trust, Mortgagee/Transferee Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 422811 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 25, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by James W. Demarco Jr. and Kimberly J. Demarco, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for AllSource Mortgage    , on the 25th day of January, 2010, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6622, Page 513; the undersigned Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on June 14, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 48, Richmond, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 88, page 44, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  9839 Tuckahoe Court, Mobile, AL  36695 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure

process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee. Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 405806 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 25, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Holly M. Biscardi, a single woman, originally in favor of Magnolia Mortgage Company LLC, on the 10th day of April, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5951 Page 236; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on June 7, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 90, Churchill Downs, 2nd Unit as recorded in Map Book 24, Page 84 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:   3581 Dover Street, Semmes, AL   36575 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 86003 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 25, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Jean D. Griffin, a married woman and Melissa W Ivory, a married woman, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for First Fedral Bank, on the 16th day of June, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5993 Page 318; modification recorded in Book LR7220 Page 1119; the undersigned MidFirst Bank, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at

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public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on June 7, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 38, Belvedere Park, Unit 2, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 10, Page 257 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  2735 Belvedere Court, Mobile, AL  36606 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure.The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. MidFirst Bank, Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 433053 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 25, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Christopher Joseph Rouse, unmarried man, originally in favor of AmSouth Bank, on the 3rd day of March, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5931 Page 561; the undersigned Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 10, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 8, Ashley Estates, Second Addition, Part B, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 26, Page 37, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:   7512 N Tara Drive, Mobile, AL  36619 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 432290 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 25, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Demetris Henderson and Monica Henderson, originally in favor of CitiFinancial Corporation, on the 18th day of April, 2002, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5148 Page 1792; the undersigned Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, a Delaware Limited Liability Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on March 29, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, towit: Lot 12, according to a map of Washington Place, recorded in Deed Book 156 N.S., Page 450 of the Records in the Office of the Judge of Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  25 Washington Pl., Mobile, AL  36603. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, a Delaware Limited Liability Company, Mortgagee/Transferee Pam King SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures. The above mortgage foreclosure sale has been postponed until  05/24/2018  during the legal hours of sale in front of the main entrance of the courthouse in the City of Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama. 429601 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, April 11, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Tommy Body, a single person, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., acting solely as a nominee for Loan City.Com, on the 25th day of February, 2005, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5756, Page 1528, modified by Loan Modification Agreement in Book 6847, Page 223 and in Book LR7381 Page 352; the undersigned MidFirst Bank, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on June 7, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 16, Block 1, Arlington Terrace, and the East Half of Lot Seventeen in Block One of Arlington Terrace, a subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Deed Book 156 N.S. Page 256 of the records in the Office of the Judge of the Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  924 Nellie Street, Mobile, AL  36605 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE

AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances. Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. MidFirst Bank, Mortgagee/ Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 380422 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 25, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by J. Ashley Sharer aka Jefferson A. Sharer, an unmarried man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Citibank, N.A., on the 25th day of November, 2013, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7101 Pg: 86; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 10, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot Number 95, having a front of 49 feet on Dauphin Street, and the West Half of Lot 96, having a front of 24 1/2 feet on Dauphin Street, in Dauphin Place, as per plat of same duly recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, mobile County, Alabama, in Deed Book 102, at Page 27, of the Probate Records of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  1721 Dauphin St, Mobile, AL  36604. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, Mortgagee/Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 431877 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 18, 2018


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Joseph G. Chinchar, an unmarried man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc., on the 30th day of August, 2013, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7075 Pg: 1412; the undersigned Ditech Financial LLC, as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 3, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 28, Crystal Lakes Estates, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 28, Page 27 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  2305 Cedar Ky, Mobile, AL  36695. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Ditech Financial LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 431117 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 18, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Joan E. Price-Williams, an unmarried woman, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for United Security Financial Corp., on the 19th day of October, 2012, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6955 Page 1849; the undersigned Mid America Mortgage, Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 3, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 56, Ponderosa, Unit Two, as recorded in Map Book 28, Page 37 in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  2033 Campfire Dr, Semmes, AL   36575 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure.  The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to

Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Mid America Mortgage, Inc., Mortgagee/Transferee  Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 425806 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 18, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Willis J Holland and Brittany N Hallford, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for AMCAP Mortgage, LTD., on the 30th day of December, 2014, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book LR7222 Page 1192; the undersigned American Financial Resources, Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 31, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, towit: Lot 189 as per plat of Ramsey Estates, Unit 10, as recorded in Map Book 87, Page 83, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama and together with a 1/32nd roadway interest in Elizabeth Road and Ann Lane, as the same depicted on said Map Book. Property street address for informational purposes:   10680 Ann Lane, Grand Bay, AL  36541. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. American Financial Resources, Inc., Mortgagee/ Transferee. Jahan Berns SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 411311 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Rachel E. Gray, an unmarried woman, originally in favor of Generation Mortgage Company, on the 8th day of December, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6478 Page 929; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Champion Mortgage Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 3, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 20, in Harbor Hills Subdivision,

according to the plat thereof recorded in Map Book 8, Page 241, of the records in the Office of the Judge of the Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  4113 Beacon Lane, Mobile, AL  36693. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Champion Mortgage Company, Mortgagee/Transferee Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 432498 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain mortgage executed by Gregory B.Hunter and Earline A. Hunter, husband and wife to Whitney National Bank dated March 6, 1998, and Recorded in RPLY Book 4558, Page 1064 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, notice is hereby given that the undersigned as mortgagee will under power of sale contained in said mortgage, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on April 24, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street Mobile, Alabama 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: THAT LOT A LAND BOUNDED BY A LINE DESCRIBED AS BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST SIDE OF KENNEDY STREET 108 FEET SOUTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF KENNEDY AND CONGRESS STREETS; RUNNING THENCE WESTWARDLY AND PARALLEL WITH CONGRESS STREET 90 FEET 2 INCHES TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTHWARDLY AND PARALLEL WITH KENNEDY STREET 17 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT; THENCE RUNNING WESTWARDLY AND PARALLEL WITH CONGRESS STREET 45 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUNNING SOUTHWARDLY AND PARALLEL WITH KENNEDY STREET 50 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTH LINE OF PROPERTY NOW OR FORMERLY OF AMANDA FRIEND; THENCE RUNNING EASTWARDLY AND PARALLEL OR NEARLY SO, WITH CONGRESS ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID AMANDA FRIEND’S PROPERTY 135 FEET 2 INCHES TO THE WEST SIDE OF KENNEDY STREET; THENCE NORTHWARDLY ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF KENNEDY STREET 67 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING; BEING LOT 9 AND A PART OF LOTS 7 AND 8 IN SQUARE 17 OF THE KENNEDY TRACT, ACCORDING TO MAP THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 11 N.S., PAGE 77 OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES. PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. This property will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis, subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions reflected in the mortgage and those contained in the records of the office of the judge of the probate where the above-described property is situated. This property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title,

use and/or enjoyment and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Whitney National Bank d/b/a Hancock Bank Mortgagee William McFadden McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL 36609 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain mortgage executed by American Estate & Trust FBO Frances Watson Clark IRA to Insiders Cash, LLC dated October 14, 2014, and Recorded in Book LR 7213, Page 1177 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, which said mortgage was subsequently assigned to Soyhon Kwon by instrument recorded in Book LR7590, Page 1318 of said Probate Court records; notice is hereby given that the undersigned as mortgagee will under power of sale contained in said mortgage, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on April 18, 2018, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street Mobile, Alabama 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 2, BELLE ROSE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO TH EPLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 9, PAGE 296, OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. This property will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis, subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions reflected in the mortgage and those contained in the records of the office of the judge of the probate where the above-described property is situated. This property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title, use and/or enjoyment and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Sohyon Kwon Mortgagee William McFadden McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: Administration Building Fire Alarm Upgrades University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB #18-04 USA BID #8040402 Provide and install a new and complete functional fire alarm system. Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00PM local time on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, at Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 4606151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama. edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 9:00AM local time on Thursday, April 19, 2018, in Room AD080 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer,

and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 dstrain@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 25, 2018

LEGAL NOTICE – INVITATION TO BID CONTRACT LABOR –VARIOUS MECHANICAL TRADES Sealed Proposals will be received by the Board of School Commissioners of Mobile County, AL at its offices located in the Purchasing Department, 1 Magnum Pass, Mobile, AL 36618 until the day of Monday, April 23, 2018 at 2:00 P.M., then publicly opened and read aloud. Bid forms and specifications can be found on theMobile County School System’s website: purchasing.mcpss.com or a copy can be picked up in the Purchasing Office, 1 Magnum Pass Mobile, AL 36618 from the hours of 8:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. Mon.-Fri. Should you have any questions, please call Melody Roh at (251) 221-4473. BID ON: CONTRACT LABOR – VARIOUS MECHANICAL TRADES BID #18-38. BID DATE:  MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018 @ 2:00 P.M. Lagniappe HD April 11, 2018

PROBATE NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of BARBARA Q. MATHIS Case No. 2017-1409 Take notice that Letters of Administration on the Annexed Will have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of March, 2018 by the HONORABLE DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. EARON SERRA, as Administratrix CTA under the last will and testament of BARBARA Q. MATHIS, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JOHN R. PARKER Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 18, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ALMA L. DRIVER, Deceased Case No. 2018-0560 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 19th day of March, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. EDWARD E. DRIVER as Executor under the last will and testament of ALMA L. DRIVER, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DEENA R. TYLER Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MABEL WEAVER, Deceased Case No. 2018-0354 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 21st day of March, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. PATRICIA SNOW as Executrix under the last will and testament of MABEL WEAVER, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: CORNELIUS JOHN GRIFFIN JR, Deceased Case No. 2018-0561 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 19th day of March, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. JULIE S. GRIFFIN as Executrix under the last will and testament of CORNELIUS JOHN GRIFFIN JR, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DEENA R. TYLER Lagniappe HD March 28, April 4, 11, 2018

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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 ABANDONED VEHICLES – NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle will be sold on May 4, 2018 at 12 pm if not claimed at 555 Myrtlewood Blvd. Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Chrysler 300 4S 2C3KA43RX6H363664 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 3151 Moffett Rd., Mobile, AL 36617. 2005 Mercury Grand Marquis 2MEFM75W45X661428 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 3055 Springhill Ave., Mobile, AL 36607. 2014 Toyota Corolla 2T1BURHE9EC198527 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 310 Oak Dr., Mobile, AL 36617. 2006 Ford Crown Vic 2FAFP71W36X152386 2003 Lincoln Town Car 1LNHM82W83Y638084 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 9612 State Hwy 104, Fairhope, AL 36572. 2004 Yamaha FZ6-S JYARJ08EX4A001544 The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1999 Buick Century 2G4WS52M6X1522434 2009 Chevrolet Cobalt 1G1AS58HX97148689 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 5952 Brook Hill Dr., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 1990 Chevrolet Camaro 1G1FP23E2LL127577 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 47161 Rayburn Rd., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 1991 Chevrolet GMT-400 1GCDC14Z9MZ184511 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 5713 Three Notch Rd., Mobile, AL 36619. 1994 Ford LGT Convt 1FTEX15Y6RKA18736 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 457 Charles St., Mobile, AL 36604. 2004 Mercedes E320 WDBUF65J94A449177 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 11, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 2185 Snow Rd. N., Semmes, AL 36575. 1988 Chevrolet Monte Carlo 1G1GZ11G2JP113827 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 05/09/2018 at 9 AM at 5781 Three Notch Rd  Mobile Al. 36619 if not redeemed. NISS     1N4AL11D25C201476 FORD    3FAHP08166R157333 NISS     JN1CA21D0XT218426 TOYO   1NXBR12E1XZ247779 MERC   2MEHM75W66X600429 Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 409 Montgomery St., Prichard, AL 36610. 2003 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNEC13Z33R244701

All hail, the Crawfish King

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 1015 N Craft Hwy., Prichard, AL 36610. 2016 Kia Soul KNDJN2A26G7830257 2013 Dodge Challenger 2C3CDYAG3DH632587

BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2002 Toyota Prius JT2BK12U920064199 2014 Nissan Altima 1N4AL3AP9EC423311 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 651 Canton Ave., Mobile, AL 36607. 1996 Saturn SL2 1G8ZK527XTZ163208 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 4607 Eastland Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2007 Jeep Commander 1J8HH48P97C613997 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 1431 E I-65 Service Rd S., Mobile, AL 36606. 2010 Mitsubishi Galant 4A32B3FF5AE005308 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 5448 Bellefield Dr N., Theodore, AL 36582. 2003 Buick Park Ave 1G4CU541034159451 2006 Chrysler 300 2C3KA63H06H535820 1996 Chevrolet Caprice 1G1BL52W5TR148166 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at  3661 Airport Blvd. Apt 180, Mobile, AL 36608. 2012 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WG5E32C1207559 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at  807 Gorgas St., Mobile, AL 36603. 1984 Chevrolet P30 1GCFP32J7E3347120 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 18, 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 3356 Springhill Ave., Mobile, AL 36607. 2008 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNFC13C18J193091 1992 Oldsmobile 88 1G3HY53L4NH323099 2011 Dodge Challenge 2B3CJ4DG1BH549909 Lagniappe HD April 11, 18, 2018

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 5 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday. Lagniappe HD offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604. For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-4504466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

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Photo | Boozie Spy

Lagniappe HD April 4, 11, 2018

STYLE BOOZIE

2007 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNFK13067J336947 2005 Dodge Ram Truck 1D7HA18N15J595163

S

pring Break 2018 has come and gone. Woot! Woot! So now we have those last few weeks of reasonably good Mobile weather before it just gets ass hot. So that means tons of events will be jammed into the next six weeks. Good for me, even better for the gossip and for you my little addicts. With SouthSounds, Little Black Dress, a Night with Nick Saban, Bald Eagle Bash and St. Mary’s Crawfish Extravaganza coming up, just to name a few, the spies are going to be busy, busy, busy. And probably a little drunk. But don’t worry, they still can do their jobs. But before we get to all that, we have to get our business from last week taken care of first. So let’s get to it.

Sullivan reigns supreme as Crawfish King

Crawfish at the Courtyard took place last Tuesday night, April 3 at the Gulf Coast Exploreum. Put on by the Exploreum’s Junior Advisory Board, the event raises money for Discover Science, the Exploreum’s program with the Mobile Housing Board, which provides underserved children engaging educational science experiences including IMAX films, lab demonstrations and science camps. Not only do locals get to enjoy tasty crawdads as they raise money this great cause, local media folks get to battle it out in a crawfish eating contest. Lauren Murphy provided music for the all-you-caneat gathering, but the crawfish eating contest provided at least three minutes of less refined entertainment. Several members of local media institutions gathered around a table piled high with freshly boiled crawfish to see if anyone could knock two-time reigning champion Sean Sullivan off his pedestal. But it was a fruitless effort. Sullivan, of FMTALK 106.5 fame, dominated for a third straight year, downing 51 ditch bugs in just three minutes. His next closest competitor was Dirty Dan from WBLX, who chowed down 38 crawdads, followed by our own Rob Holbert, who struggled onto the podium with 31. Holbert, a first timer in the contest, admitted being awed by Sullivan’s crawfish peeling speed. “I think he was using both hands and maybe his feet,” Rob reported. “He may he have a prehensile tail.”

Proving their hearts were in the game — or just that media people will never turn down a free meal — the assemblage proceeded to wipe out the entire table full of crawfish after the contest was over. All in the name of science!

Just paw-fect

My spies said Erin Go Pawfest, a benefit for the Friends of the Mobile Animal Shelter, went quite well despite a less-than-stellar weather forecast. People and their pets enjoyed Yappie Hour, a dog-friendly street party at Callaghan’s on Saturday afternoon, April 7. No word on how many Greyhounds or Salty Dogs were served, though I’m some “hair of the dog” was required on Sunday. The Green Dress Run also provided lots of fun, as pups ran with their owners through the OGD. My spies said their favorites were a cute French Bulldog wearing a pink and green kerchief, a spotted dog (maybe a spaniel of some type) wearing a green tutu and an elegant Doberman who just looked “fierce” (in a good way, not a scary way). The official T-shirt was also a huge hit, especially among the ladies. It read, “Sometimes a dog is as good as any man.” That is mostly true. Well, until you need the trash taken out or your oil changed. But other than that, sure!

Calling all cryptozoologists

A new local independent movie by filmmaker Jon Miller will air at The Crescent Theater on Saturday, May 5, and the title alone has Boozie inking this in her calendar. “Bo McGraw and the legend of the Alabama Big Foot” just has to be magnificent. Making it even more magnificent and destined to become a cult classic, I hear it features cameos by local celebs Uncle Henry and Killer Beaz. I will have to “save up” to make sure I get my ticket, right Killer? Anyway, being a mythical gossip columnist creature myself, Boozie has always felt a certain kinship with the sasquatch so I can’t wait to see it! Well kids, that’s all I got. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or some plain ol’ crawfish lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!


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Lagniappe April 11-April 17, 2018  
Lagniappe April 11-April 17, 2018