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LAGNIAPPE

F E B R U A RY 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - F E B R U A RY 2 7 , 2 0 1 8 | w w w. l a g n i a p p e m o b i l e . c o m ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

Tension continues between the Fairhope City Council and Mayor Karin Wilson, who accuse of failing to communicate.

COMMENTARY

Arming teachers isn’t the answer to school shootings.

BUSINESS

The new Saraland Cracker Barrel is currently hiring full-time and part-time skilled positions on both the restaurant and retail side.

CUISINE

With pizza, pasta, subs and calzones, Navco Pizza provides a satisfying birthday meal, or two.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com

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STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

Prichard residents are getting restless amid the city’s financial woes and management practices.

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ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com DAVID GRAYSON Advertising Sales Executive david@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com

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ARTS

A review of Colleen D. Scott’s coming-of-age novel “Everybody Needs a Bridge.”

MUSIC

JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: J. Mark Bryant, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Randy Kennedy, John Mullen, Jeff Poor, Ken Robinson, Ron Sivak ON THE COVER: PRICHARD CITY COUNCIL MEETING BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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These days, the Underhill Family Orchestra doesn’t stop moving, so catch them as they make a homecoming appearance Friday at Callaghan’s.

FILM

Aubrey Plaza carries “Ingrid Goes West” through amusing, biting satire that is outrageous enough for wry chuckles, but recognizable and dangerous enough that it’s a memorable little film.

MEDIA

Press Club co-founder Jo Ann Flirt passes away.

SPORTS

The Gulf Coast Challenge, a football game between Southern University and Alabama A&M Sept. 22, “will be the ultimate HBCU experience,” according to organizers.

STYLE

It’s Boozie’s last word on Mardi Gras 2018, but with a break from cold, wet weather there’s no rest for the weary!

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GOING POSTAL tech and international businesses have opened in Alabama over the last decade. These companies need engineers and scientists, people who can communicate in multiple languages. Data show Editor: that, indeed, state universities outflank private schools in advancing knowledge and research Americans once embraced higher education as that drive our local economies. the great equalizer. State colleges and universities Further, state-supported institutions are esallowed children from working- and middle-class sential to the public good. They train the people parents to compete on a level playing field with who take care of us, such as teachers and health children from more advantaged backgrounds. care professionals. Moreover, communities with The race gap in higher education has also been a higher education-driven health care center show closing, with more African-American and Hissubstantial gains in patient care and overall health. panic students achieving degrees. Public universities have a $20 billion impact On this backdrop of accessibility and opporon the state of Alabama. For every dollar the state tunity, things are, unfortunately, changing. Due invests, taxpayers receive $12 in return, whether to the recession, states slashed higher-education in terms of jobs created or improvements in budgets in 2008. In consequence, tuition has health care. Data show citizens with advanced increased across the nation. For many American degrees earn more per capita. Simply put, public students, the financial burden of earning a college colleges and universities are a good investment degree quickly overshadows the dream. for the community and the individual. The recession forced Alabama to decrease the Alabama is home to exceptional institutions of higher-education budget by 34 percent in 2008. higher education of which the state is very proud. Despite steady economic recovery since 2011, Our colleges and universities have achieved it has been difficult to restore higher education funding to pre-recession levels. Our state colleg- national reputations for excellence and have es and universities have struggled to keep tuition helped fuel economic growth. Please support and encourage our elected officials in their efforts to costs down, but the question remains: How long can our public colleges and universities walk the restore higher-education funding and to continue the state’s positive momentum. tightrope between excellence and affordability without renewed state investment? University of South Alabama Student GovIn establishing state institutions of higher ernment Association President Carl Thomas education with the first land grants in the 1860s, and Faculty Senate President Elizabeth our forefathers believed education to be an VandeWaa, Ph.D. investment in the state. They wanted to build a well-trained, well-educated workforce and to creUSA SGA Past President Joshua ate knowledge centers that can attract business. Crownover and USA Faculty Senate SecreTo be sure, not all jobs or careers require tary Mara Kozelsky, Ph.D., are contributing advanced degrees, but many of the new jobs writers. created recently in Alabama do. Several high

Higher education creates opportunity, fuels economic growth

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AFC Mobile will always stay in Mobile To the people of the city of Mobile: I fell in love at Hank Aaron Stadium, on a hill over the left field fence. I fell in love, as so many kids do, with the crack of the bat, the concession-stand pretzels, the foul ball that sits on my desk even today. I was a Little League Baseball player, one of hundreds, maybe thousands in Mobile County, and rapidly on the way to becoming a sports-obsessed kid and, later, a sports-obsessed adult. I was an insatiable Atlanta Braves fan who wanted to be Chipper Jones when I grew up, and watched the Major Leagues from afar — maybe once a year up close and personal if I was lucky. But the BayBears were something else. The BayBears were my team in a real and personal way, the “home team” in the most literal and meaningful sense. Though I couldn’t grow up to be a ballplayer, those titans of my childhood inspired a passion that became a college major that became a career that became a minor league soccer team. I think about those days often, when I’m working an AFC Mobile match. I think about them when a team of 9-year-olds walks out with our players, or when I’m sprinting across the stadium to put out a table where they can get Chisom Ogbonna’s autograph. I think about them when I hear about a church league team that wants to play as “AFC Mobile” against the other teams who wanted to be “Manchester United” or “Barcelona” — the kids who, when asked about “their team” don’t think about a team in London, or in Atlanta, but in the stadium down the road. I think about them, and I’m proud. The BayBears recently announced that they’ll stay in Mobile through 2019. This is a good thing. I hope people go to watch them. I hope there are kids who get to sit on that hill, catch that foul ball and fall in love with the crack of the bat and the smell of the grass and an absurdly salty pretzel. I hope there are kids who get to fall in love, like I did. But if and when they can’t do it there, our stands will be open to them. And I promise to those kids, and to this city, that as long as I have a say in it, AFC Mobile will not leave this town. Sean M. Landry Co-owner, AFC Mobile


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BAYBRIEF | FAIRHOPE

Failure to communicate FAIRHOPE MAYOR, COUNCIL PRESIDENT TRADE BARBS AT MEETING BY JOHN MULLEN

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o steal a line from a great, old movie, it seems Fairhope is experiencing a failure to communicate. Or at least some city leaders feel this way. Tension from a memo Karin Wilson sent to all city employees directing them to talk with her before speaking with any member of the City Council came to the surface at a Feb. 15 council meeting. Wilson contended councilmen were going behind her back and not only talking with city employees but directing them in their jobs. At the root, she said, is a lack of communication between her and the council, one she said she has experienced every day since her election 18 months ago. Examples, she said, were too numerous to list. During the Feb. 15 meeting Wilson mentioned two other issues where she felt communication was lacking, a budget amendment for employee raises and an agenda item giving the Fairhope Arts and Crafts Festival Foundation sole ownership of the longtime annual event. Council President Jack Burrell said he had some communication issues of his own with Wilson. “You complained that there were no communications,” Burrell said to Wilson. “People, let me tell you about some communications that we don’t get. I received phone calls from Realtors saying that the civic center is for sale. This building is for sale. Folks, the council is responsible for all of the real property in Fairhope. There was no communication with the council.” Burrell went on to cite several other instances he’d heard the mayor was involved in or talking about while excluding the council. Burrell’s comments set up the following exchange between him and the mayor:

WILSON: These are absolute, outright lies. Those are ideas and I said there was no way we’d ever do that. You’re the ones that’s spreading lies. BURRELL: You didn’t see plans for this? You didn’t tell people that we were going to sell the civic center? I had a commercial Realtor call me because he wanted to know when we were selling the civic center. Are you calling him a liar? MAYOR: These are all lies. Absolute lies. Discussing ideas is not making decisions. Burrell added the city was trying to get a $10 million grant from the RESTORE Act council to improve city infrastructure, but none of the councilmen had received any communications or paperwork regarding the application. As Burrell polled each of the councilmen, who in turn said they had seen nothing on the RESTORE Act grant, the mayor responded: “I’ve talked to every single one of you about it.” “I guess we’re all five liars,” Burrell responded. As for the mayor’s memo, each councilman disputed the claims they were directing city employees, arguing it was vital for employees to speak to them in order to decide policy for the city. Jay Robinson spoke first and each councilman agreed with his points. “I read your comments and reasoning behind it and I respectfully disagree,” Robinson told Wilson. “What that memo does is takes away the council’s ability to get the information from the ground level and that’s really where most of it should come from. I have problems with it because it’s not a punishment to the council, it’s a burden to the employees and ultimately it’s going to be a burden to the citizens of Fairhope because they are the ones who are

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going to suffer from this.” Burrell, singled out by Wilson in the memo for his lack of communication with the mayor and employees, said no council members are telling city employees how to do their jobs. He went so far as to say he feels like he’s received calls enticing him to make decisions for city workers. “I get tons and tons of phone calls from employees asking for clarification,” Burrell said. “I’m extremely careful. Sometimes I think I’m being set up to direct them. “Despite what you read there is no directing of city employees on a day-today basis. I would ask the mayor to reconsider that policy.” As for the budget amendment on raises, Wilson said she again wasn’t in the loop. “In the 2018 budget I proposed to do a bucket for a merit increase,” Wilson said. “It is now on the agenda without any communication with me. It’s not what I proposed, there was no conversation or engagement on this to make the right decision that I believe would be right for our city employees.” Burrell, again, disagreed. The council passed the amendment to give every employee a 2 percent raise and set aside funds to award employees who excel with a merit raise. “You said you weren’t consulted on the raises and I think we came up with an outstanding compromise in that every city employee will get some sort of raise,” he said. “And some of them will get merit raises, and I think that was the intention.” Another sticking point for Wilson was the memorandum of understanding between the city and the Fairhope Arts and Crafts Festival Foundation. The mayor wanted the item pulled from the agenda to have more discussion with the Eastern Shore Chamber of Commerce, whose role in the festival was diminished or eliminated. Burrell interceded and told Wilson this was council discussion time, indicating she was speaking out of order. “This is unbelievable,” the mayor said. Lang Floyd of the festival foundation said there had been numerous discussions with all involved parties in recent months. “I have to respectfully disagree with the mayor,” Floyd said. “The chamber has been engaged. They were at a roundtable discussion with the arts center, the downtown merchants, the foundation representatives. And the chamber had a representative there and said the chamber’s not going to be involved this year.” Casey Gay Williams of the Eastern Shore Chamber agreed with Floyd’s assessment. The council voted 5-0 to give the foundation sole ownership of the annual Fairhope Arts and Crafts Festival for 2018-2020, or three years. The 66th annual Arts and Crafts Festival returns March 16-18 to the streets of downtown Fairhope.


BAYBRIEF | POLITICS

‘A good first step’ SEN. DOUG JONES TALKS SCHOOL SAFETY IN WAKE OF PARKLAND SHOOTING BY JASON JOHNSON

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n his first stop on a statewide tour, United States Sen. Doug Jones visited several places in Mobile, but while the planned focus was on local issues, the national concern over last week’s mass shooting at a South Florida high school that killed 17 people appears to have followed the freshman senator home. Unlike Democrats from more liberal states, Jones played to Alabama’s pro-gun proclivities during his contested campaign against Roy Moore last fall — calling himself a strong proponent of the Second Amendment and an avid hunter. But it’s an issue that’s not as cut and dried for Jones. Taking questions from journalists this week, he didn’t mince words on his support for a bipartisan bill moving through the Senate aiming to strengthen and streamline the federal background check system used to vet those purchasing firearms. He’s not alone in that support, either. The bill, introduced by Sens. John Cornyn (R-Texas) and Chris Murphy (D-Connecticut) just two days after the Parkland shooting, has already garnered support from many in the GOP, including President Donald Trump. However, echoing recent comments from the Democratic Party’s leadership, Jones suggested Trump’s support was an abrupt about-face. “I’m glad he’s [supporting the bill] because last week when he submitted his budget, he was going to cut the background check system by $12 million,” Jones said. “We’ve got to fund it fully and fund additional technology for it. So, I’m very glad to hear that, I just hate it took another tragedy for him to say it, because there’s been a lot of people in Congress saying that for a long time.” Unlike more aggressive gun control measures that have been discussed following this and other mass shootings, the Murphy-Cornyn legislation has a much narrower focus: reinforcing requirements for federal agencies to report crimes on the National Instant Criminal Background Check System and create financial incentives for states to do the same. Jones noted that, had the U.S. Navy reported a domestic violence court-martial of former Airman Devin P. Kelley to the proper background systems, it could have prevented him from buying the assault rifle he used to kill 26 people in a Texas church last November. Jones said the Murphy-Cornyn bill would be a “very good first step” but said it would have to be the “first of many” to curb the frequency of mass shootings in the U.S. He said a solution couldn’t address guns alone, but would need to retool mental health services and school safety procedures as well. To that, Jones said states need to look at addressing school safety from “a standpoint of construction,” and added that, with Trump’s trillion-dollar infrastructure proposal in the works, Congress might actually be in position to help states. “There are some school systems in Alabama right now that do a pretty good job of protecting schools because they’ve got funding,

where they can lock down doors or lock down classrooms. But you go into the Black Belt of Alabama and they don’t have that,” he said. “People are also going to have to have an appetite to change their culture. We got used to getting on airplanes through metal detectors, and I think we’re going to have to do the same thing with schools.” Jones echoed concerns raised by conservatives about the FBI’s response to warnings about the Parkland shooter, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz. Just over a month before he killed 17 people, the FBI failed to act on tips about “Cruz’s gun ownership, desire to kill people, erratic behavior, disturbing social media posts” and “the potential of him conducting a school shooting,” according to reports. Florida Gov. Rick Scott has since called on FBI Director Christopher Wray to step down, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions has ordered the Department of Justice to review what went wrong. Trump, though, has used the bureau’s misstep as another way to question the ongoing probe of whether his campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 presidential election. “They are spending too much time trying to prove Russian collusion with the Trump campaign — there is no collusion,” Trump wrote in a Tweet. “Get back to the basics and make us all proud!” Jones agrees the FBI “dropped the ball” and said people would probably need to be “called on the carpet” to find out how it happened and prevent it from happening again. However, he said that individual failure isn’t “an indictment of the entire FBI by any stretch of the imagination.” “I thought it was highly inappropriate for the president to blame the FBI and say they were too focused on a Russian investigation instead of this,” Jones said. “Those are local folks down there in Florida, who I’m sure had other things going on and they just dropped the ball. This had nothing to do with the Russian investigation.” With regard to mental health, in addition to increased funding Jones appeared to support greater resources to assist teachers and law enforcement agencies with identifying and mitigating potential threats from students who may harm their classmates. One of the notable points in the analysis of last week’s shooting has been the well-documented concern teachers, parents and students had about the danger Cruz posed. He had a history of erratic behavior, had been sent to an alternative school program and was eventually expelled from his school about a year before he returned with an AR-15 assault rifle. While Jones said there’s always more to be done, he acknowledged that these are “tough issues.” “I think to some extent we’re still in a little bit of a learning curve about mental illness and what to be on the lookout for. Whether somebody can truly predict something like this could happen, I don’t think they could, but clearly more should have been done,” he said. “There were warning signs there, and I think there were warning signs in past [incidents].”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Start from scratch MOBILE HOUSING BOARD CONSIDERS CREATING NEW NONPROFIT PARTNER BY DALE LIESCH

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he Mobile Housing Board of Commissioners is in the midst of absorbing employees from its nonprofit arm, Mobile Development Enterprises. Members were, therefore, hesitant to agree to create another nonprofit when it met Wednesday, Feb. 14, despite the recommendation of new Executive Director Akinola Popoola. Instead, commissioners gave Popoola permission to explore the creation of another nonprofit, all while voicing their concerns. “We’ve spent a year and a half winding down a nonprofit,” MHB Vice Chairman Reid Cummings said. “How will this differ from MDE?” Popoola told Cummings it would be legally different from MDE and be used in the future to secure grants MHB wouldn’t be able to get on its own. As things currently stand, Popoola said, the authority would not be able to apply for grants on short notice. He said he felt uncomfortable using MDE given its history. “We’re better off starting a new one, due to the various things that have happened,” Popoola said. In June 2017, commissioners voted unanimously to begin absorbing most MDE positions into MHB. The move began as a result of a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Inspector General report that, among other findings, determined a conflict of interest existed between the nonprofit and a contractor starting in 2011. Commissioner Norman Hill, who was MDE’s first official employee when it began, defended the nonprofit, but acknowledged it didn’t operate as intended. “It had a good set of bylaws and a good mission, I think,” Hill said. “How it got off course is another story.” As for a new nonprofit, Hill asked Popoola for examples of what it would look like. Without a framework,

Hill said, he didn’t understand why MDE couldn’t be used. “Bring us what you want to do,” Hill said. “Let us review in draft, the bylaws, members and structure. I would’ve liked to have seen what you’re talking about.” MHB attorney Raymond Bell told commissioners MDE would be dormant once the employees were officially transitioned through the Mobile County Personnel Board, but it would not cease to exist. Commissioner Breanne Zarzour agreed, raising concerns over the need to create a new nonprofit.

[MOBILE DEVELOPMENT ENTERPRISES] HAD A GOOD SET OF BYLAWS AND A GOOD MISSION, I THINK. HOW IT GOT OFF COURSE IS ANOTHER STORY.” “Why can’t we restructure the one we have now?” Zarzour asked Popoola. MHB Chairwoman Kimberly Pettway also said she didn’t see the need for starting a new nonprofit. Popoola reiterated it would be better to start fresh. “It’s a good idea, but with what happened under MDE I believe it’s always better to start fresh,” he said. “We want it to have a fair chance.” Most housing authorities operate nonprofits, Popoola said. Some have multiple organizations for various actions. Many of the region’s larger housing boards have nonprofits; however, none Lagniappe profiled operate like MDE.

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The Housing Authority of the Birmingham District has two nonprofits, the HABD Scholarship Foundation and the Magic City Housing Development Corp., spokesman Joseph Bryant said in an earlier interview. The scholarship foundation provides education and training for residents with donated money and proceeds from an annual golf tournament, he said. Some of the scholarship’s board members are HABD employees, according to Bryant. The Magic City Housing Development Corp. helps pay for other activities not covered by the authority and also sponsors an essay contest. The latter nonprofit is maintained through development fees from Park Place, a Hope VI initiative. At the time of the original interview, Bryant said, there is no ongoing fundraising for it. Huntsville has a nonprofit to represent its tax credit entities, but at the time of the interview with interim Executive Director Sandra Eddlemon it was inactive. The Housing Authority of New Orleans, which recently redeveloped some of its properties, uses one nonprofit entity, office administrator Tomeka Jackson wrote in an email message last year. The Crescent Affordable Housing Corp. has its own board of directors, which includes two HANO employees and a resident. It is operated as a subsidiary of HANO. The nonprofit doesn’t handle any of HANO’s day-to-day operations and doesn’t share any bank accounts, Jackson wrote. The funds for the nonprofit, as with Birmingham and Huntsville, come from developer fees. The organization also doesn’t have its own employees, she wrote. Unlike MDE, none of the nonprofits in Huntsville, Birmingham or New Orleans have their own employees. In addition to working to make changes to MDE, commissioners were also ordered to have MHB pay back HUD $5 million in non-federalized funds. The board approved the repayment plan Feb. 14 as well. The board is slowly making progress on its goal of absorbing MDE employees. The 18 employees still on the MDE payroll will become MHB employees soon, Bell said. In other business, commissioners approved paying $151,000 for a bulk trash truck. The GVWR 33000-model truck would allow board employees to pick up bulk trash at the authority’s properties on a daily basis. Five or six employees will be trained to operate the truck through a local community college program. One MHB employee currently has a commercial driver’s license. The truck comes with a five-year warranty. Under an old contract, the board outsourced its bulk trash pickup at a cost of $146,000 per year for one- or twice-weekly pickup. “I don’t know if this is a good idea or not,” Cummings said. “I don’t know if by spending $150,000 we’re biting off more than we can chew.”


BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Conspiracy, conviction BUSINESSES ‘WEREN’T AWARE’ OF INVOLVEMENT IN IMMIGRATION FRAUD BY JASON JOHNSON

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Florida man convicted of pulling several local business owners into a massive conspiracy to illegally bring foreign nationals into the United States will be spending three years in prison and forfeiting more than half a million dollars to the federal government. In October 2017, a jury in Mobile found David J. Jimenez guilty of conspiracy to commit visa fraud, conspiracy to commit money laundering and one substantive count of money laundering. The conspiracy was a means by which Jimenez sustained a long-running scheme to illegally obtain EB-1C visas for Chinese nationals in exchange for cash he kept himself or distributed to other co-conspirators. The EB-1C visa program allows U.S. businesses in joint ventures with foreign corporations to bring higher-level “executives and managers” from overseas into the country much faster than they could using other visa programs. Prosecutors contend an EB-1C visa is the “fastest tract” for foreign workers, their spouses and children to become permanent citizens. From 2010 and 2015, Jimenez established fraudulent ventures between companies in China and the U.S. by recruiting business owners in Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and elsewhere to “sponsor” an immigration petition for a Chinese national. The business owners were told they’d receive up to $30,000 for each successful petition, according to a press release announcing Jimenez’s conviction. The owners would provide documentation about their companies to Jimenez, who would create “fraudulent” documentation to make it appear as though the businesses had an existing relationship with a company in China through an established joint venture. That information would then be submitted to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in order to obtain EB-1C visas for Chinese nationals who typically put up from $200,000 to $300,000 of their own money for the expedited path to U.S. citizenship. Some of the businesses he recruited were in Mobile, Daphne, Saraland, Orange Beach, Pensacola and Brewton, though others were as far away as Miami. Altogether, there were more than two dozen companies that became involved with Jimenez’s scheme. So far, Lagniappe has only been able to identify a partial list of the local businesses involved, as U.S. Attorney Richard Moore’s office and clerks with the federal court in Mobile have declined to release a complete list of witnesses from Jimenez’s trial in October. Those identified include Diamonds Gentlemen’s Club, McClure Electric, Wildflowers Boutique, Jack Green Insurance Agency, Mickey Bradford Inc. (Micky Bradford’s Collision), Gulf Coast Air & Power Inc., Miller Resources LLC, Brown Brothers Construction and Adams Electric LLC. Lagniappe reached out to several of those businesses but was unable to find anyone who would discuss the case. Based on statements

made by prosecutors in 2016, there could be at least half a dozen other business from the area pulled into the Jimenez scheme. One of those is known to be Eco Strong Solutions LLC, which was owned by Fairhope resident Christopher Allen Dean. Dean pleaded guilty in 2016 to a single charge of conspiring with Jimenez to commit visa fraud for his role in helping to recruit businesses for their efforts. Dean was also one of approximately 30 witnesses called by the government during Jimenez’s trial — a group that also included several local business owners. While Moore’s office has maintained none of the business owners involved were aware Jimenez was using them as part of an elaborate fraud scheme, prosecutors also declined an opportunity to firmly rule out any criminal charges against them. Asked if any of those establishments or their owners could face charges, Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Bodner said last November that “a number of local business owners cooperated with this investigation, and some of those individuals testified during trial. The U.S. Attorney’s Office can make no further comment.” Testimony at trial indicated most business owners were at least aware the use of their companies’ information would lead to the immigration of a Chinese national and potentially profit for themselves or their businesses for visa applications processed successfully. At least some involved with one local business actually traveled to China during their experience with Jimenez, though details about the purposes of that trip are unclear. It’s also unclear exactly how many Chinese nationals made it into the country as a result of Jimenez’s scheme, though not every visa application was successful. It’s also unclear who or where the Chinese nationals that did make it to the U.S. are today. District Judge Kristi DuBose acknowledged some were still in the country at Jimenez’s sentencing in late January. “There are a number of Chinese nationals who entered the country and we don’t know who they are or where they are,” she said. “There are people who got these visas.” On DuBose’s order, Jimenez was sentenced to 33 months in federal prison for his three criminal convictions and ordered to pay $550,000 to the federal government — purportedly ill-gotten gains from his multi-year criminal conspiracy. The majority of those funds will be generated from the sale of his home in Davie, Florida, according to documents included with DuBose’s Feb. 9 sentencing order. At his sentencing hearing, Jimenez apologized for the pain he’d caused his children and wife, who was in Mobile from South Florida to support him along with other family members, friends and ministers who’d worked with him over the years. According to court records, Dean, who has already pleaded guilty, will be sentenced for his role in the immigration conspiracy during a hearing in Mobile scheduled to take place in June.

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BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Report to the principal’s office BALDWIN, GULF SHORES CALL ON STATE TO MEDIATE SPLIT TALKS BY JOHN MULLEN

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o, who made it to the principal’s office first? As the split negotiations between the Gulf Shores City School Board and the Baldwin County Board of Education erupted into an all-out war, both sides claimed in open letters to be the first to ask for intervention from the state. Baldwin County’s missive from Superintendent Eddie Tyler was the first to publicly assert it had appealed to interim State Superintendent Ed Richardson, Ph.D., to intervene. The letter contained several accusations and insinuations, some concerning Interim Gulf Shores Superintendent Suzanne Freeman, Ph.D. “After three weeks of talks with representatives from Gulf Shores City Schools, we are disappointed that they have refused to negotiate in good faith and we have agreed to submit our concerns to the State Superintendent for resolution,” Tyler wrote. “Gulf Shores has refused to respect our sincere concerns regarding the serious consequences of a rushed split this summer, leaving only a matter of months to prepare.” In an announcement released after its Feb. 15 board meeting, the Gulf Shores board said it would not join the fray by addressing charges made by Tyler. “Gulf Shores City Board of Education has no intention to respond directly to the accusations, personal attacks and irresponsible rhetoric compiled throughout the statement Baldwin County Superintendent Eddie Tyler released yesterday,” the board’s note stated. Gulf Shores said it first broached the subject of engaging Richardson during the failed talks of Feb. 8 in Robertsdale. During that meeting, the Gulf Shores announcement says, its representatives agreed to bring in a mediator, but says the county was against engaging Richardson. “At our last meeting … Baldwin County Board representatives insisted we halt all negotiations until an independent mediator was engaged to determine our start date,” the letter stated. “In an effort to make meaningful progress, we immediately agreed to consider this proposal as long as the mediator had significant education experience and further suggested that Dr. Richardson, or his appointee, be requested to provide this mediation. “Both of our recommendations were vehemently opposed by Baldwin County Board representatives.”

Gulf Shores’ statement indicated it was glad the county came around to its way of thinking. “We are pleased that the Baldwin County Board of Education has agreed to the necessity of involving State Superintendent Dr. Ed. Richardson to intervene regarding the official start date for Gulf Shores City Schools,” the letter stated. The letter added Gulf Shores made the initial contact with the State Department of Education about intervening. “We subsequently sent a letter notifying Baldwin County of this action prior to Eddie Tyler’s Feb. 14 press release,” the letter stated. “We have full confidence in Dr. Richardson’s intimate knowledge of city school-county school separations and look forward to working with all parties to reach a resolution that is in the best interest of the children.” Officials at the State Department of Education said meetings with both teams will be scheduled within the next two weeks. One of Baldwin County’s two major concerns before negotiations began was its lack of a superintendent. The county said it would be illegal to make agreements with anyone other than a sitting superintendent. It went on to make veiled insinuations about Gulf Shores’ choice for an interim superintendent, Freeman. “They have appointed an interim superintendent, who was released from her contract as the Trussville City School superintendent,” Tyler wrote. “This is likely why Gulf Shores has gone out of their way to be clear that their new interim superintendent is not being considered for any permanent position.” Freeman served as superintendent to two startup city systems, Trussville near Birmingham and Pike Road near Montgomery, and for Cullman County. Richardson and Freeman worked together as members of the Pike Road team and have worked together at the same school systems in the past, records indicate. According to news reports, Freman’s tenure at Trussville wasn’t without controversy. In 2012, WBRC-TV reported Trussville “Board President Bill Roberts had said … the motivation for ending Freeman’s contract was the recent departure of Trussville High School Principal Zack Barnes. Barnes was the fifth principal in seven years to

leave Trussville High,” the report said. Baldwin County’s second concern was where students living outside of Gulf Shores city limits but attending schools there would attend classes if Gulf Shores opened doors in fall 2018. “Schools in the area are overcrowded and I have nowhere to send 600 children,” Tyler said after Gulf Shores announced Freeman’s hiring. Gulf Shores addressed that issue by announcing on Feb. 9, the day after negotiations fell through, any students enrolled in Gulf Shores City Schools in grades 7 through 11 for the 2018-19 term could finish at Gulf Shores High School tuition free if they so choose. Tyler said this was the tipping point for Baldwin County to halt negotiations. “At our last meeting, we proposed engaging an independent mediator to try and speed up talks and make meaningful progress,” Tyler said. “The city of Gulf Shores representatives told us they would go back to meet with their board and get back with us the next day. Instead of getting back with us, they put out a press release to the public offering to take students from outside their city limits into their school system, so long as they are paid for doing so. “By including an additional 580 students, Gulf Shores would receive nearly $3.5 million more in funding for the first year, while their additional expenditures would be minimal.” A county solution is in the works for those students as well, but is not expected to be in place before 2019. Baldwin County hopes to open a school for grades 7 through 12 in Orange Beach for the 2019-20 school year, citing the new facility as the reason it seeks a split date of 2019. For Gulf Shores to ignore this, Tyler said, is an insult to the Baldwin County Board of Education. “Gulf Shores’ demands to start in 2018 are ridiculous knowing that their reason for leaving was spurred by our decision to build new facilities in Orange Beach,” Tyler wrote. “They knew that these facilities would be complete and ready for students in August 2019. To know this from the beginning and still demand a 2018 start date is disrespectful at best.” Tyler said the rush to open this fall and other alleged affronts by Gulf Shores to Baldwin County representatives through public letters and press releases also influenced his decision to halt negotiations. “Previously we raised concerns about the legality of not having a superintendent, and instead of simply informing us of their intentions to resolve this matter, they again went to the public with their actions in some condescending tone about the legitimacy of our concerns, even though the law is clear on this matter,” Tyler said. “It is our belief, for these and other reasons, that Gulf Shores has not been negotiating in good faith. I do not believe they intend to negotiate in good faith, but only act in a selfish manner to accomplish the goals they first set out — which is the opposite of negotiating.” Gulf Shores’ announcement said it is withholding comments on the accusations but will continue moving forward. “We do, however, want to make it crystal clear that the Gulf Shores City Board of Education will continue holding itself to the highest professional standard and will act with integrity throughout this process,” the note stated. “We understand the weight our words carry, the impact our actions make and the significant influence we have on children due to the positions and enormous responsibilities that have been entrusted to us as members of the Gulf Shores City Board of Education.”

BAYBRIEF | ECONOMY

Aerospace hub AIRBUS-BOMBARDIER PARTNERSHIP LOOKS TO BRING HUNDREDS MORE LOCAL JOBS BY DALE LIESCH

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hallenges from United States-based manufacturers to a proposed partnership between Airbus and Bombardier are “still possible,” Airbus Americas Chairman Emeritus Allan McArtor told a gaggle of reporters Tuesday as officials announced more specifics about a deal that would lead to the construction of a second final assembly-line facility in Mobile. Most recently Boeing challenged Bombardier over allegations the Canadian company used government subsidies to dump its C-Series aircraft into the American market. However, the U.S. International Trade Commission found in favor of Bombardier and deemed Boeing had not been injured as a result of the allegations. “That was a big victory for this team you see up here,” McArtor said, joined by a panel of officials from Airbus and Bombardier. Boeing officials have been vocal in the past about its beef with Bombardier, with a Boeing adviser telling the

Economist magazine “strangling the baby in the pram may prove rather convenient.” Airbus and Bombardier have entered into a partnership to build the C-Series single-aisle aircraft at a second final assembly line in Mobile. Barring any regulatory issues, officials expect approval of the partnership to be granted by the second half of this year. From there, construction of the second final assembly line would begin “as soon as possible,” said Bombardier President and CEO Alain Bellemare. “This is very exciting,” he said. “You’re going to see a U.S.-built aircraft for the U.S. market.” While officials stressed that plans between the two companies are still being finalized, Jeff Knittel, chairman and CEO of Airbus Americas, said the collaboration could result in about 600 new jobs and a new $300 million investment at the Brookley Aeroplex. “The joint venture beings together the power of two

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terrific companies,” he said. Those figures include 400 jobs at the proposed C-Series final assembly line and roughly 200 jobs at the Airbus final assembly line once it expands to build more than four planes per month. The shipping of components for the C-Series final assembly line will be very similar to what Airbus does now. While components for the jets will arrive from all over the world, roughly 50 percent of those parts will be manufactured in the U.S., according to Philippe Balducchi, head of the C-Series Integration Project. The officials felt confident the partnership could lead to greater U.S. sales for both companies as the single-aisle market expands. Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines has ordered 70 C-Series jets and worked with Airbus on its A320 line. The A320 series and the C-Series are very complementary, Bellemare said. The C-Series, which has 100 to 150 seats, can be offered to customers first for new routes. Customers can then move to the A320 series once a new route is established, McArtor said, meaning the jets will not compete with one another. The C-Series final assembly line will stand parallel to the current Airbus final assembly line just to the north, McArtor said. The presence of a second final assembly line is also expected to attract more suppliers. “With this, the commercial magnet of Brookley will be literally doubled,” he said. “I would think you’d find a lot of suppliers even more motivated to locate here.” The Airbus footprint currently has about 160 acres that are not being used, Airbus U.S. Manufacturing Facility Vice President and General Manager Daryl Taylor said. With the construction of the second final assembly line and expansions to other buildings, he said, the footprint would need to be expanded slightly.


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Pistol-packing teachers aren’t the answer ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

a disgruntled teacher known to be carrying a gun. Talk about tenure. Maybe I’m in the minority here, but I don’t necessarily think I’d feel like my kids are safer if 50 or 60 teachers are toting guns on their hips. It’s school, not prison. Altercations between students and teachers are not exactly uncommon these days. How smart is it to add the potential struggle over a loaded gun to that equation? Critics of even the slightest bit of gun control are correct — making legal purchase of assault rifles unavailable to the general public won’t stop a crazy person from attacking a school, church or country music concert. But it will at least make it less easy for such people to inflict maximum casualties. As for protecting schools, it just seems like the most logical thing the state and country can do is hire trained law enforcement officers for every school. Yes, that’s expensive, but when the airline industry was threatened by terrorism we spent billions improving security at airports. Surely protecting school children should be at least as high a priority. We have plenty of money to fight pointless wars for decades on end; maybe we can set some of that aside for protecting schools. Meeting force with force is, sadly, the best deterrent we have unless we can figure out a way to return to a time when public massacres weren’t part of life. But let’s not load educators up like they’re teaching at the O.K. Corral.

THEGADFLY

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Of course there are no easy answers to any of this because the first part of stopping the carnage is trying to identify psychopaths before they do something evil. In many cases there were warning signs. In others there weren’t. In some shootings law enforcement officials dropped the ball, and in others they never saw it coming. So we argue over the root causes. Lack of mental health coverage and the subsequent failure to institutionalize dangerous people are always pointed to as major issues. Easy access to extremely powerful weapons is another. School safety is yet another. In almost every one of these horrible tragedies someone makes the argument that one armed, well-trained person in the right place could have stopped the attack. With that in mind, Alabama State Rep. Will Ainsworth plans to drop a bill in this current session that would allow school teachers to carry concealed weapons in the classroom if they’ve gone through proper gun-safety training. It seems almost impossible to believe the solution we’re seeking is to have as many people as possible packing heat in school. The downsides of such a law are obvious. Inevitably an imbalanced teacher will shoot up the school, or someone will leave a gun out where the students get it, or there will be a perceived life-or-death situation in which a teacher shoots and later we argue about whether that is what should have happened. Imagine what administrators would have to go through when firing

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

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ill we one day soon drop off the kids at school knowing their teachers are armed, trained and ready to gun down any potential mass murderer bent on harming the students? If one Alabama lawmaker has his way we will. The idea is perhaps a natural response to the horrors of school shootings that have happened in other parts of the country. We’ve been fortunate in this state not to have experienced a school killing spree like the one that took place in Parkland, Florida, last week — or the many others that have taken place nationwide since Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold became the poster children for school murderers on a dark day in Columbine, Colorado, nearly 19 years ago. I say we’ve been lucky because kids have brought guns to school, although none that I know of were intent on mass murder. Every community in the United States faces the same issue of guns winding up at school. Just last week there were two incidents of guns on campus in the Mobile-Baldwin area. Fortunately neither resulted in anyone being hurt. In the wake of last week’s killing of 17 students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, we’ve begun the same worn-out debate about how to stop the next one before it happens. As usual there’s the logical outrage over how the shooter gained access to an assault rifle, countered with arguments that background checks and law enforcement both failed. Before long, we’re divided along political lines and everything is lost in the hot air of the same old arguments. How anyone can continue to advocate for the sale of assault rifles, “bump stocks” and military-style magazines capable of turning one person into a killing machine is beyond me at this point. I’m a gun owner and believe in the Second Amendment, but when James Madison wrote that particular part of the Bill of Rights, he and the other Founding Fathers were still muzzleloading flintlocks at a blazing rate of one shot per 30 seconds. The first Gatling gun was still more than 60 years away. It’s hard to believe Madison wouldn’t have had added at least a few caveats to the Second Amendment if he’d been writing it while watching Stephen Paddock massacre 58 people at a Jason Aldean concert in Las Vegas four months ago, or witnessed Nikolas Cruz use an assault rifle to kill 17 high school students and teachers last week. With each bloodbath the arguments for everyday Americans being able to access such weapons, the means to make them fully automatic and cartridges carrying hundreds of rounds grow weaker and more far-fetched. The latest one I heard was that people need such firepower to kill off the hoards of wild hogs tearing up property across the country. I hope that’s a joke. As with any of our biggest hot-button issues, gun control discussions immediately get you labeled as either a tearful snowflake who would throw every gun into a volcano or a bloodthirsty maniac whose gun will have to be pried from his cold, dead hand. But there are plenty of us who do believe a “wellregulated militia” is necessary to keeping a country free and also think it’s been amply demonstrated that selling assault rifles to the general public is a phenomenally horrible idea. There are enough hunting rifles, shotguns and pistols scattered across the fruited plains to make our government or any other think twice about attempting subjugation of the populace by force. But while we argue, lunatics are using assault rifles to make bigger and bigger bloodbaths.

ORANGE BEACH MAYOR TONY KENNON AIMS TO TRANSFORM GULF COAST TEENS INTO PROPER BELLES AND BEAUS.


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

A pessimistic case for the lottery ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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couple buys a few lottery tickets hoping to hit the jackpot. On their way home, they discuss all the things they would do with their winnings. Of course, they’d quit their jobs the next day, pay off all their debt and put some aside for the kids’ college funds. The wife wants to redo the kitchen or maybe even get a new house. The husband has had his eye on a boat for years. Maybe they could finally buy that vacation home or go on the honeymoon they never got to take. They giggle at the thought of all the long-lost relatives who would suddenly show up with their hands out. “God, we’d have to use the money to move to Mars to get away from cousin Johnny,” says the husband. “Yeah, he’d probably try to put a hit out on us with our own money,” the wife jokes. About the time they start planning their third vacation and discussing their mountain chalet, they hit the Florida-Alabama line. Later that night they will, of course, learn the honeymoon and house hunting will have to wait as they only got two numbers on one of their “quick picks.” But at least cousin Johnny won’t be visiting anytime soon. “It was worth the five bucks to dream,” says the wife. “We’ll get to Paris one day anyway, I promise,” says the husband. As the rest of their dreams dissipate into the Alabama night sky, the money they spent on those tickets stays in Florida, helping to fund scholarships for kids in Tampa and Tallahassee instead of Tuscaloosa and Talladega. In 2016, the Florida lottery sold $6.2 billion in tickets, providing a $1.8 billion contribution to education for the 2016-17 school year. According to flalottery.com, the lottery has contributed more than a $1 billion to education each year for the past 15 years and more than $32 billion since its inception. More than 775,000 students have attended college on a Bright Futures scholarship. On Monday, Democratic candidate for governor and Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox unveiled his plan for a state lottery, estimating it would generate $300 million for education in Alabama. He says his plan has four “cornerstones” — college scholarships, workforce development opportunities, statewide pre-K and supplementing underperforming schools. His Democratic challenger, former Alabama Chief Justice Sue Bell Cobb, has offered a similar plan that would also fund pre-K and other child care programs, career tech and would bridge the funding gaps with federal Pell grants. Obviously, this is not a new idea. Alabama is one of the only states without a lottery. Former Gov. Don Siegelman was elected in 1998, promising a statewide referendum on it. He delivered on the referendum but it was defeated in 1999, and Siegelman went on to have troubles of his own after that, to say the least. But that was almost 20 years ago. The state is a lot different now and the possibility of a lottery doesn’t even seem to make Republican lawmakers’ faces screw up as much as it once did. But, of course, the lottery is not without its opponents — mainly those whose biggest fear is it will take money out of their own pockets — but there are others who make moral arguments (although many of those moral arguers are funded by the aforementioned money people — ahhh, America!). Anyway, one of the common moral criticisms is it preys upon poor people, who buy more lottery tickets than folks who are better off, which, of course, makes sense. These critics say kids who are better off are often receiving the scholarships or other spoils the lottery provides on the backs of

the lower class, which may not be benefiting from it as much. Then there is the sin argument, but it’s really hard to listen to that one considering our state seemingly has no problem being in the booze business. Even states with lotteries that have poured billions into education have folks complaining about the way the funds are distributed. “It still makes my blood boil a little bit when I see the lottery tout how many billions of dollars they’ve raised for education,” said Mark Pudlow, longtime spokesman for the Florida Education Association, the state’s teachers union, said on tcpalm.com last March. “Right away, the lawmakers just used that money, essentially put it into the regular pot, and education funding did not go up,” Pudlow said. “Over the years, education funding has gone down so that we’re now once again one of the bottom states when it comes to spending for public education.” In fact, the misuse of education funds is a common gripe in many of the states with a lottery. I absolutely think these are all valid criticisms. Well, except the sin one. I have never believed lawmakers should be in the business of legislating morality. Sinners gonna sin. But, sure, lotteries do prey upon poor people. But so do high sales and low property tax rates, which we lead the nation in. Do you think that’s going to change any time soon? Hell to the no. There is a better chance of Nick Saban leaving Alabama to pursue a theater career as the next lead in “Hamilton.” So why do you think we should prey upon the poor even more, you cold-hearted columnist? Well, at least with the lottery, some of the funds may actually benefit the poor, like the programs for pre-K and career tech. Well, don’t you think our state will misuse the funds like other lottery states have? Oh my god, yes, yes, yes! I know they will. They will find loopholes to use it for Medicaid and prisons and shoring up the general fund and for Chip and Joanna Gaines to perform a “fixer upper” on the gubernatorial beach mansion. It will be wildly misused, for sure! It won’t be illegal though; they will make sure to leave themselves enough legal wiggle room to stay out of jail … probably. You say, “Well, maybe this lottery is not a very good idea then, Ashley. Some of the Republican candidates say we don’t need it, we can just manage the money we have now better.” To that I say, “Bahahahahahahahaha. Puhleez. Are we talking about the same people who used once-in-a-lifetime oil spill money to close a Medicaid funding gap because they had no other options? Um, OK.” We all know “better management” is not going to happen. It’s just not. And a lottery is not going to solve all of our problems, either. But at least it will give us a new pot of money, which again will no doubt be misused, but maybe, just maybe, some of it will be left over after all of the lawmaker malfeasance to do a little good. At this point, I’ll gladly take the crumbs. Think about it: If Walt Maddox’s projections are accurate and $300 million is generated, even if they misuse two thirds of it and only $100 million went into an education fund, that’s $100 million more going to it than there is now. It is sort of the equivalent of only receiving a payout for getting three lottery numbers correct instead of all six. Sure, I’d rather see the whole jackpot go into education, but at this point, I’ll take whatever we can get. Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 13


COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

‘Black Panther’: Origins and power of a symbol BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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t has been said that symbols are tangible objects used to represent the intangible. All cultures have them. They serve as a language all their own. Whether it’s a nation, sports fans or two people in love, symbols serve as a representation of who we are, what we believe and what’s most important. Inherent in symbols are human values. The recent release of the new blockbuster Marvel film “Black Panther” is a profound example of the power of a symbol and its ability to unite, inspire and call out the best in people. The superhero in the movie may be fictional, but unbeknownst to many the symbol finds its motivating and uplifting origins here in Alabama. In his acclaimed historical work “Cradle of Freedom: Alabama and the Movement that Changed America,” University of South Alabama Writer-in-Residence Frye Gaillard chronicles how “the Cradle of the Confederacy became — with great struggle, some loss and much hope — the Cradle of Freedom.” Gaillard recounts the efforts of civil rights luminaries well known to history, but even more important, he narrates the commitment and actions of everyday men and women that were so pivotal in dismantling the racial caste system that existed in America. From his book, it’s evident the little-known foot soldiers, along with local leaders and their stories, is what formed the backbone of the modern civil rights movement. One of those lesser-known yet profound stories took place in Lowndes County, in Alabama’s Black Belt. In

1965 Lowndes County was 81 percent black but, as Gaillard makes known, “every instrument of power, political and economic was in the hands of the whites.” The very institutions that should have served to protect the rights of blacks, such as the sheriff and local/state law enforcement, were and had been the very instruments used to murder, terrorize and instill fear. But fearlessness was beginning to displace fear in Lowndes County. A group of determined Lowndes County blacks, led by such individuals as John Hulett, formed the Lowndes County Christian Movement for Human Rights. They understood that the power to bring change lay in getting blacks registered to vote, and then out to the polls on election day. Young blacks from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) also came to the county to assist. The number of black registered voters in Lowndes County began to rise. Local blacks even stepped up to run for office. However, there was one major problem: They had no political party. The dominant party of the time, the Democratic Party, had raised its filing fee to $500, putting it out of reach for black candidates. Lowndes County blacks decided to form their own party: the Lowndes County Freedom Organization. What symbol did they chose to represent their party? A black panther. Thus, when blacks from Lowndes County went to the polls in the fall 1966, they did so in support of candidates registered under their newly formed Black Panther Party.

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Present in Lowndes County organizing and assisting during this time was a young black law student from California named Huey Newton. Newton only stayed a few weeks, but when he went back to California he took the symbol of the Black Panther, and along with his friend Bobby Seale, gave it a new ethos or meaning. Gaillard relates: “As their [Newton and Seale’s] militancy began to draw national attention, John Hulett and his friends were not at all happy with this use of their symbol … They thought these swaggering young men in the ghettos, who sometimes seemed to be spoiling for a fight, were caught in a different understanding of black power. To them, as far as Hulett could tell, the panther was primarily an emblem of rage. In Lowndes County, Alabama, it was a symbol of democracy, and the militancy that burned at the heart of that [Lownde’s County] struggle was simply a refusal to be pushed aside.” So it is that from the Black Belt of Alabama came the significance of the Black Panther. For Hulett and other blacks in Lowndes County, this symbol represented the courage and audacity of blacks to believe and act upon their rights as American citizens. To act on a belief that they, without hate or the desire for revenge, could and would exert the type of civic power needed to take a seat at the political and economic table denied them for so long. It was a symbol of their ability in the present to bring about positive change in the future. It embodied their aspirations and fueled them with inspiration. In 1970, John Hulett made history. He was elected sheriff of Lowndes County. The Marvel character Black Panther was birthed in the cauldron of the civil rights movement. Yet the use of the Black Panther as a political symbol and also as a comic book superhero was totally coincidental. Stan Lee noted in a 2011 interview, “I created the Black Panther with Jack Kirby some years ago, and what I wanted to do … I wanted to create the first black superhero, but I wanted to avoid stereotyping … see, in doing a superhero, the first thing you have to think of is, what is a good name for him, and what is a good superpower? I thought of ‘The Panther,’ ‘The Black Panther.’ It occurred to me I’d set the scene … the stories … in Africa.” What wasn’t coincidental, though, was that as Lowndes County blacks appropriated the Black Panther as a symbol of power and positive change, for the first time the comic book Black Panther gave black Americans a superhero that looked like them and came from a continent they had for generations wrongly been told was devoid of any significant history, meaning or value. 2018 is a long way from 1966, but the message of that Lowndes County symbol — excellence, agency, unity and possibility — is as compelling and profound now as it was then.


COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Alabama Republicans, be ready for a conservative revolt BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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oug Jones’ win last December has given national Democrats something to look forward to in the upcoming 2018 midterms. If a Dem can win in Alabama, think what that might mean for the rest of the country! That Democratic optimism overlooks some key factors. Consider in November 2016, there were many Republicans in Alabama who preferred another option on the ballot besides Donald Trump. Nonetheless, when they went to vote, they held their noses and cast ballots for Trump. They would have preferred Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio or Ben Carson. But given the choices were Trump or Hillary Clinton, they went with what they thought was the leastbad option. It is also likely that some of those same voters against their better judgment cast a ballot for Roy Moore last December. What do you suppose the mood of those voters headed into this election cycle is like? Although they may like what Trump has done in his first year as president, some of Trump’s accomplishments deviate from what most consider to be the traditional model of conservative Republican governance. Earlier this month, nearly the entire Alabama congressional delegation — with the exception of Reps. Mo Brooks (R-Huntsville) and Gary Palmer (R-Hoover) — voted for $300 billion in new spending to keep the government open. Brooks embraced his “no” vote. He made national headlines by calling it a “debt junkie’s dream.” Palmer was not quite as enthusiastic, explaining he was disappointed to

be forced to vote against funding for the military. Both of those members were fulfilling campaign pledges to get a handle on federal spending in ways to address the national debt. And to be fair, the other Republican members of Congress from Alabama have, at times, voted against raising the debt, even in the Trump era, but not this time. In Alabama, the buyers’ remorse vote against Trump and the current GOP status quo might not come in the form of voting for a Democrat, but voting against the incumbent in this June’s Republican primary. The coalition that gave Donald Trump overwhelming victories in the 2016 Alabama Republican presidential primary and the general election will not be as fired up as it was back then. For the most part, when bucking conservative orthodoxy, Alabama Republicans have avoided punishment. Richard Shelby, Spencer Bachus, Jo Bonner and Terry Everett feasted off of pork-barrel spending during their entire tenures. Their reward was multiple terms. For Alabamians, the name of the game then was bringing home the bacon. What if, given we’re in a post-presidential election midterm cycle, it is different? Traditionally, the party that attains power in the executive branch suffers in the following midterm election. The numbers bear this out. In midterms since 1862, the president’s party has averaged losses of about 32 seats in the House and more than two seats in the Senate. There is a lot of historical headwind facing Trump and by association GOP officeholders. This could come in the form of a revolt within the party. The most obvious evidence of this is in Alabama’s

second congressional district, a seat currently held by Rep. Martha Roby (RMontgomery). This summer, she will have four opponents in the primary. In the past, she has shown an ability to dispense with those threats for her party’s nod in multiple election cycles. Yet she remains a target, and with the mildest whiff of dissatisfaction she could be more vulnerable this go-around. Even if Roby prevails, as well as Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-Haleyville), who also faces a primary opponent, there will still be resources used to defend their turf, which might be needed in a tight general election in November. It was not that long ago that a Democrat won in Alabama’s second congressional district. Former Montgomery Mayor Bobby Bright, who is one of Roby’s GOP primary opponents, held that seat as a Democrat for one term. It was almost a perfect storm for Bright to have pulled off that unlikely victory in 2008. Jay Love, the GOP candidate that year, had a tough primary race against Harri Anne Smith, who would later endorse Bright. Bright also had the benefit of running as a Democrat down ballot from Barack Obama, who was running to be America’s first African-American president. That resulted in a high turnout of Democratic voters.

TRADITIONALLY, THE PARTY THAT ATTAINS POWER IN THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH SUFFERS IN THE FOLLOWING MIDTERM ELECTION … SINCE 1862, THE PRESIDENT’S PARTY HAS AVERAGED LOSSES OF ABOUT 32 SEATS IN THE HOUSE AND MORE THAN TWO SEATS IN THE SENATE.” While it took those circumstances, it demonstrated that a Democrat could pull off a win. If Republicans have learned anything from last December, it is to not take Alabama voters for granted. There are many reasons for Republicans to be dissatisfied. Trump’s agenda has stalled in Congress, and while it may not be the fault of those in the House, there is political hay to be made. One of the things Roy Moore, Luther Strange and Mo Brooks beat each other up over was ending the 60-vote filibuster rule in the U.S. Senate to move things through Congress. Whatever the reason for intraparty GOP frustration, it fuels an anti-incumbent fervor. In a state where Republicans still are the odds-on favorites in most major campaigns, all the action then goes to the primary. To incumbent Alabama Republicans running for re-election in contested primaries, from the governor’s mansion all the way down to county constable: Do not take anything for granted.

Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 15


BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Saraland Cracker Barrel currently hiring BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

T

he new Cracker Barrel scheduled to open midApril in Saraland is currently hiring, according to a news release. Openings are available for full-time and part-time skilled positions on both the restaurant and retail side. “One of the most distinguishable aspects of Cracker Barrel is the authentic memorabilia and Americana décor that reflects the unique families and culture of the community it serves,” Cracker Barrel media relations manager Breeanna Straessle said. “It’s all genuine artifacts pulled from the brand’s warehouse, which holds over 90,000 pieces of Americana — no replicas. A complete mock-up of the new Saraland store is currently set up on the campus of Cracker Barrel’s corporate office in Tennessee,” she said. Interior adornments for the new restaurant will include: vintage instruments that pay homage to the Gulf Coast’s jazz music roots; two walls dedicated to the Gulf of Mexico and the important role it’s played in Mobile County, including the fishing and shipbuilding industries; vintage illustrations of marine life; a wall dedicated to baking with antique kitchenware and food cans; a wall dedicated to apparel making that features a spinning wheel and dress; a recreation-themed wall featuring an antique croquet set and roller skates; and other walls that, while not localized to the Saraland community, also display local-area vintage finds. Those interested in applying for positions at Cracker Barrel and/or having an early look at the Saraland floor plan can visit the company’s website.

Commercial real estate moves

• Vallas Realty Inc. recently announced Cook Out, a Greensboro, North Carolina-based fast-food restaurant chain, has purchased the former PDQ eatery formerly located at 116 S. University Blvd. near the University of South Alabama.

Cook Out is known for its drive-thru barbecue, burgers and more than 40 milkshake flavors, according to John Vallas with Vallas Realty. Cook Out currently has Alabama locations in Tuscaloosa, Jacksonville, Auburn and Huntsville, with other sites opening soon in Troy and Opelika. In 2014, Food Drink & Franchise magazine ranked Cook Out No. 9 in its “Top 10 Southern chains the rest of the U.S. needs to know.” • AdvanTec Manufacturing USA Inc. is leasing 35,680 square feet of industrial space located at 22955 McAuliffe Drive in Robertsdale. Jeff Barnes, broker with Stirling Properties, handled the transaction. • Wine & Canvas is leasing some 2,487 square feet of retail space in Square One Shopping Center at 907 Hillcrest Road in Mobile. This marks the first Mobile location for the art and entertainment company. It plans to open in May, pending city of Mobile approval. Angie McArthur, broker associate with Stirling Properties, represented the tenant. Terry McKinney with Delaney Properties worked for the landlord. • American Deli has leased some 1,500 square feet of restaurant space located at 5701 Old Shell Road in Mobile. Leigh Dale Younce and Buff Teague of JLL managed the transaction and worked for the landlord. • According to Stacy Ryals of Hosteeva Realty, around $1 million was paid for 9 acres located in Baldwin County on County Road 20 in Foley by the property developers of upscale Sevilla Place Apartments.  Plans are in place early this year to break ground on the 126-unit complex. Amenities will include a fitness center, clubhouse, pool, enclosed parking and kids’ park. The site is also situated due west of OWA entertainment park. • Smoothie King has leased some 1,600 square feet of space in Athens Retail Center, located at 1260 U.S. Highway 72 in Athens. The store will include a drive-thru and it

16 | L AG N I A P P E | Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8

is scheduled to open in the early summer. Angie McArthur with Stirling Properties represented the landlord. Jim Ivie with Zenith Retail Group LLC worked for the tenant in the transaction. • Beauty World is leasing some 5,000 square feet of retail space in Spanish Fort Town Center, located on Town Center Avenue in Spanish Fort. The retailer will be located next to Kohl’s and plans to open in the late spring. Angie McArthur with Stirling Properties represented the landlord in the transaction.  

Local pest control firm recognized nationally

Gail and Jim Yongue, owners of Daphne-based Mosquito Joe Pest Control, were recently honored at a national convention. According to a news release, the company received a “Maverick Designation” award, which is given to recognize top-performing franchises in a number of key metrics. The firm also earned the 2017 “Best Buzz” award for having the highest customer satisfaction scores in their class. This is the second year in a row the local husband-and-wife team have earned both awards. The couple acquired their Mosquito Joe territory in 2015 and attribute most of their early success to superior customer service. Mosquito Joe provides mosquito control services to residential and commercial customers in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Their services are available throughout the year since, reportedly, mosquitoes are active in climates of 50 F. or higher. The company takes an educational approach to prevention by providing customers with tools to assist in reducing mosquito breeding areas on their property. “It’s pretty simple; the reduction or elimination of breeding areas will greatly reduce the mosquito population,” co-owner Gail Yongue said. Plans are in place for the company to relocate to a new headquarters in Mobile later this year.

Providence Medical Group adds nurse practitioner

Family nurse practitioner Andrea Mayfield has joined the clinical staff of Providence Medical Group – Dawes, located at 8833 Cottage Hill Road in Mobile. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing from the University of South Alabama. Mayfield comes to Providence Medical Group from USA Medical Center in Mobile, where she worked in the emergency department. She is board certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners and has special medical interest in diabetes management, pediatric health management and preventive health care education. Providence Medical Group is the area’s largest nonprofit network of primary care and specialty physicians with more than 20 locations across South Alabama and Southern Mississippi. The medical group has 70 physicians in specialties including family medicine, endocrinology, rheumatology, general surgery, radiation oncology and more. More information about the nonprofit can be found on its website.


CUISINE THE REVIEW

Navigate to Navco for a meat and cheese fix

NAVCO PIZZA PASTA SUBS 1368 1/2 NAVCO ROAD MOBILE 36605 251-479-0066

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

THE CHEESE IS SO PLENTIFUL IT FORMS A TOP CRUST, THE CANOPY OF WHICH HID THE TREASURES THAT MADE THIS PIZZA ONE OF MY FAVORITES IN THE CITY.” Where to? I’d never been to Navco Pizza. I’d tried once, but got hung up in traffic after work and they closed at 8 p.m. Another time they closed even earlier for a holiday. On this blessed day of my birth we were able to make it to the corner of Navco Road and McVay Drive at an early (for us) 11:20 a.m. These two clowns love to go on reviews. I shamefully admit we don’t get to do it enough due to scheduling snares, but I could feel Graham’s excitement as we entered the building. Making sure the kids didn’t blow our cover, I told the nice man behind the counter we were going to be ordering a “stupid” amount of food because we were eating lunch there and taking the rest home for dinner. I also instructed him to roll it out as it comes in traveling boxes. Graham kicked off the order with spaghetti and meatballs ($7.59). It was the first thing to make it to the table and my little 50-pound mini-me was impressed with the amount. “Dad, feel how heavy this plate is!” Yes, the plastic foam container was hearty to say the least. Good, thick spaghetti was cooked tenderly with two or three giant meatballs. He said he wasn’t going to share any more than a couple of noodles with brother and dad, but I

Photo | Daniel Anderson / Lagniappe

I

had my birthday all to myself. Almost. I never take the day off, but for the most part I was free. It was a week of no school because of Mardi Gras break and my musiclesson load for the day was no more than two or three students, so I grabbed Lucas and Graham for some muchneeded father-sons time. These outings usually begin with talks of school, a little teasing about girls, maybe a plan for a bike ride, but the conversation always sharply turns toward food. Yes, these two have inherited the “live to eat” gene, and I don’t know if I am proud or sad. Thank goodness they’re both as thin as I was at the ages of 8 and 12, so without too much worry we can strap on the feedbag and eat like idiots every now and then.

Head to Navco Pizza for a mixed Italian menu of pies, calzones, pasta, subs and salads served in unassuming surroundings. eventually changed his mind. The red sauce was slightly sweet out the tomatoes and onions! His taste buds are maturing to where and the meatballs were excellent. we no longer pick out these things. Buffalo wings ($6) were the next to arrive. Normally I don’t As I mentioned before, it was my birthday, and the birthday boy care for wings from pizza parlors because they aren’t fried. For gets to go to the Big Show. If pizza is the name of the game, then these I would make an exception. True, it isn’t really Buffalo-style the Navco Special ($8.59) should be the route to take. unless they are fried nude and coated in hot sauce and butter, but My close friends know I am not super crazy about pizza, but this batch was still pretty good. I can change my tune for this stuff. SauI’d ordered them hot, and while the sage, beef, ham and pepperoni could give temperature was there the spicy heat was just the 10-inch Navco Special a meat lover’s present enough to discourage my progeny. reputation, but it doesn’t stop there. Onions, There may have been a touch of lemon bell peppers, black olives, mushrooms and pepper and a little more heat from another tomatoes appease the veggie craver in this THREE MEN EATING AS source, but nothing hair-raising. I’ll say I omnivore pie. enjoyed them but won’t go out of my way to A bird’s-eye view proved you could see no REAL MEN OFTEN DO, get them again. sign of what we were about to eat. The cheese Lucas was head over heels for his meal. is so plentiful it forms a top crust, the canopy INDULGING IN MEATS AND From the moment he saw the menu on the of which hid the treasures that made this pizza CHEESES WHILE DRINKdrive over he was determined to make it a one of my favorites in the city. calzone ($7.69) day. The choices were all As planned, we took home so much food I ING SYRUPY-SWEET TEA meat, Italian, American and country. My didn’t have to spend a dime on dinner. Come little gunslinger opted for country. to think of it, there was so much food that I AND DR. PEPPERS CAN DO It’s a glorified ham sandwich with ham, forgot I also ordered a Deluxe Sub! I’m not MORE GOOD THAN HARM. bacon, onion and tomato all held together bitter. My bill was still under $40 and I got with American cheese in the fold-over crust. two meals out of it. He was almost bragging about his selection, Pizza on my birthday? I’d never dream begging me to try it, and I was proud for of it. But this day it worked. Looking at the him. No one is claiming these guys are Italian, and this isn’t what faces of my two favorite inventions, different as can be but both you’d find at a pizza chain, but with a name like “country” you unmistakably sharing my DNA, I couldn’t ask for a better lunch. are getting what you ask for. The only sting is that as I gain another number, I notice them It doesn’t get much more country than thick-cut bacon and growing up too fast. American cheese. Of course, size matters to these kids and the Three men eating as real men often do, indulging in meats and calzone was as impressive as the massive spaghetti plate still becheeses while drinking syrupy-sweet tea and Dr. Peppers can do ing enjoyed by a determined-to-finish Graham. The true victory in more good than harm. Thank you, Navco Pizza, for an excellent this was seeing my pre-teen eat nearly half of it without picking birthday. You owe me a sub. Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 17


DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

$10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 525-9177

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$) CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 622-0869

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($)

E WING HOUSE ($)

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($)

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

FATHOMS LOUNGE

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 29660 AL-181 • DAPHNE • 626-3161 3151 Daupin St• 525-9917 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($)

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

LODA BIER GARTEN ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

MAMA’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($)

D’ MICHAEL’S ($) D NU SPOT ($)

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557 3915 Gov’t Blvd. • 219-7922 PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 Eastern Shore Center • Spanish Fort • 625-6544

NOURISH CAFE ($)

HEALTHY WHOLE FOODS & MORE 101 N Water St. (Moorer YMCA)• 458-8572

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($) 562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($) GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

PANINI PETE’S ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031 BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

THE GALLEY ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($) INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($) LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

R BISTRO ($-$$)

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

ROLY POLY ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

‘CUE

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575 COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000 CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

18 | L AG N I A P P E | Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($) 3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

DROP DEAD GOURMET

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$) BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 829-9227

BAY BARBECUE ($) 59 N Florida St.

BRICK PIT ($)

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$) BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

A LITTLE VINO DOMKE MARKET

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

BAY GOURMET ($$)

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051 GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 312 Schillinger Rd • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

ROYAL STREET TAVERN SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

7 SPICE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$)

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

FIVE ($$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

LAUNCH ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

WILD WING STATION ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$)

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

THE BLIND MULE ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

MEAT BOSS ($)

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($)

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

HOOTERS ($)

4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($)

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($) SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700 LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$) MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

NOJA ($$-$$$)

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98•Daphne • 273-3337

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$)

FAR EASTERN FARE

SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$) EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$) 4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

SOUTHERN NATIONAL ($$-$$$)

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

BENJAS ($)

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

CHARM ($-$$)

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

CHINA DOLL ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400 360 Dauphin St • 308-2387

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$) LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171


FUJI SAN ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$) QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

LIQUID ($$)

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$)

9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

ISLAND WING CO ($)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

MANCIS ($)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

LULU’S ($$)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

OFF THE HOOK MARINA & GRILL ($)

MUG SHOTS ($$)

CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

CAJUN INSPIRED/FRESH SEAFOOD & MORE 621 N Craft Hwy • Chickasaw • 422-3412

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366

RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100 BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 1108 Shelton Beach Rd •Saraland • 473-0757 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

WEMOS ($)

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

MAMA MIA!

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

C&G GRILLE ($)

TAQUERIA CANCUN ($)

PALACE CASINO:

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$) AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE

GRIMALDI’S ($)

MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

CINCO DE MAYO ($)

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

DON CARLOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT

GUIDO’S ($$)

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

MARCO’S PIZZA ($)

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 2409 Schillinger Rd S • 525-8431 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

MIRKO ($$) PASTA & MORE

CQ ($$-$$$)

STALLA ($$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

BLU ($)

TERRACE CAFE ($)

WIND CREEK CASINO:

HARD ROCK CASINO:

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

EL MARIACHI ($)

LA ROSSO ($$)

JIA ($-$$)

212 Fairhope Ave. • 928-8108

1252 Gov’t St. • 301-7556

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE

EL PAPI

SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

615 Dauphin St • (251) 308-2655

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839

THE DEN ($-$$)

29669 Alabama 181 • Spanish Fort • (251) 625-3300

EL CAMINO TACO SHACK ($)

JONELLI’S ($)

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

LOCAL SEAFOOD AND 40+ BEERS

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

COAST SEAFOOD & BREW ($-$$)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

AMAZING ARRAY OF MOUTH-WATERING FOOD.

ITALIAN COOKING

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

MIGNON’S ($$$)

TREASURE BAY:

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

BEAU RIVAGE:

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

AZTECAS ($-$$)

SEAFOOD

ROOSTER’S ($)

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$)

3172 International Dr. • 476-9967

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

POOR MEXICAN ($)

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413 3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

ISLAND VIEW:

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

RAVENITE ($)

THIRTY-TWO ($$$)

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$)

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

THE BUFFET ($-$$)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($)

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

LOS ARCOS ($)

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360

FIRE ($$-$$$)

PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SCARLET PEARL:

9380 Central Avenue D’Iberville • 800266-5772

FUEGO ($-$$)

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

CHEF WENDY’S BAKING ($-$$)

FUZZY’S TACO SHOP ($)

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

CLASSIC ALL-AMERICAN CASUAL CUISINE WITH OVER 100 OPTIONS.

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$)

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$)

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621 5713 Old Shell Rd.• 338-9697

TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783

MADE-TO-ORDER FESTIVE TREATS AND SPECIALTY CAKES.

UNDER THE OAK CAFE ($-$$)

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

WATERFRONT BUFFET ($$-$$$)

ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

CHOPSTX NOODLE BAR - $-$$

THE BLIND TIGER ($-$$)

SOUPS, SALADS, FRESH SEAFOOD, AND MORE

VIETNAMESE SANDWICHES, PHO, AND APPETIZERS.

quality food and simple unique cocktails

SCARLET’S STEAKS & SEAFOOD ($$$)

IP CASINO:

BUTLER’S BAR & LOUNGE ($$)

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

SAVORY STEAKS AND SEAFOOD

EXTRAORDINARY DRINK MENU, COCKTAILS

Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 19


CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

Southern National up for James Beard Award BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

I

Birmingham) is up for Outstanding Bar Program. There’s a lot of talent in this state. I’m glad to see it being recognized. We will know the finalists Wednesday, March 14, at 8:30 a.m. central time as they are streamed and livetweeted from the James Beard Foundation website.

WeMo Bier Garten nears completion

The former Hungry Owl at the corner of Schillinger and Cottage Hill roads will soon be the new LoDa Bier Garten serving our thirsty and hungry neighbors to the left. Expect a sleek look with plenty of taps and enough German potato salad to feed both sides of the city. In a building known for its hamburgers, it’s fitting that LoDa West (as we are certain to call it) will be serving up the amazing burgers we fell in love with in the downtown location, but in a more kid-friendly environment. Shooting for a mid-March opening, things may stretch closer to April. Either way, it will be here soon.

Dublin to open before St. Paddy’s

Not open as of yet, The Dublin Pub and Eatery has announced they will be open in time to have their first annual St. Patrick’s Day party this year. Plans for an Irish breakfast at 6 a.m., a fish and chips eating contest and six bands throughout the day show they’re coming out of the gate hot. No word on the actual opening date but social media shows they are shaping up their menu and putting the finishing touches on the building. Recycle!

20 | L AG N I A P P E | Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8

Photo | Facebook/Matthew Coughlin

can see why. Last Saturday I was at the bar of Southern National for a little nibbling, sipping and ogling with Tim behind the bar and Chef Duane Nutter working the kitchen. Grilled okra with peppers and a pimiento cheese dish blew me away, as did the wine. I spent a little time with the bourbon menu and found a delightful Colonel E.H. Taylor (from Buffalo Trace) complementary to the dessert menu. I love bourbon with chocolate but it’s even better with panna cotta with crushed Nutter Butters. Nutter and restaurateur Reggie Washington have made quite the pair. “We are just so very happy for our team and my hometown of Mobile,” says Washington. “We are so thankful to have had the opportunity to bring our talents to the Gulf Coast and truly appreciate the warm welcome and overwhelming support we’ve received so far.” When I heard Southern National was a semifinalist in the category of Best New Restaurant for the James Beard Awards, there wasn’t much shock. They’ve taken the city by storm, always busy with no reservations (except Valentine’s Day), and it seems the new hasn’t worn off. The ink on the menu never dries, with Nutter constantly creating masterpieces, so best of luck to them. Southern National wasn’t the only Alabama restaurant to be nominated. A trio of Alabama chefs was nominated for Best Chef South. Bill Briand of Fisher’s Upstairs in Orange Beach is a name we’re familiar with. David Bancroft of Acre (Auburn) and Timothy Hontzas of Johnny’s Restaurant (Homewood) also made the cut. Highland’s Bar and Grill (Birmingham) is up for Pastry Chef and Outstanding Restaurant, while The Atomic Lounge (also

The menu of Chef Duane Nutter has helped earn Southern National in downtown Mobile a “Best New Restaurant” nomination from the James Beard Foundation.


Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 21


COVER STORY

Residents restless amid financial woes in Prichard BY DALE LIESCH AND JASON JOHNSON

T

22 | L AG N I A P P E | Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8

Photo | Daniel Anderson

wo police officers blocked the entrance to the position and arrested in late January. municipal complex when resident Howard Porter Prosecutors say “well over $100,000” could be missattempted to enter a regular meeting of the ing from the city’s coffers because of Blackman’s alleged Prichard City Council last week. Another resident, theft, and the situation has driven concern among some Quinn Austin Pugh, was forcibly removed from the same council members about how much financial information meeting after speaking longer than the time he was allotthey receive from Gardner and his administration. ted to address the elected leadership of his city. At a press conference he organized last week, Both incidents highlight a growing tension between Councilman Lorenzo Martin told reporters there was a residents and city leaders amid Prichard’s continuing disconnect between the mayor and council that has left financial struggles in the wake of the arrest of a top them somewhat in the dark about the city’s day-to-day administrative employee. Both men have criticized the finances. He said it’s been “tough to get public records city’s financial standing and both have raised concerns over the past year” from Gardner’s office, though he about city leaders’ handling of Prichard’s finances and didn’t shift any blame from council either. daily operations. “This has happened on my watch and whatever Porter told Lagniappe he was banned from attendbacklash comes from speaking up, I’m not afraid of that ing the council’s public meetings for a month following process. There’s not many ways you can take anything a “unilateral” directive from Councilwoman Severia from a municipality without someone knowing,” Martin Campbell Morris the week before. “I was told I was not said. “I challenge the mayor and council to sit down with our attorneys to get a better allowed in a council or committee clarity and understanding of where meeting for 30 days,” Porter said. we are and what we’ve done.” “There was no vote, no motion.” Martin said the council has made According to Porter, he was a point to ask for more detailed listed as a speaker on the agenda for TWO POLICE OFFICERS financial documentation since it was the Feb. 8 meeting when Campbell Morris abruptly asked to move the BLOCKED THE ENTRANCE TO discovered the city had gone over budget by as much as $300,000 council into an executive session. since October. THE MUNICIPAL COMPLEX However, with only three members “We did approve a resolution in attendance, Porter said CounWHEN RESIDENT HOWARD that would give us public-record cilwoman Ossia Edwards voted information,” he said. “As of now, PORTER ATTEMPTED TO against it. I have not gone into the office and “They tried to give me a letter,” ENTER A REGULAR MEETasked for additional information, but Porter added. “I don’t know what it I will.” said because I would not accept it.” ING OF THE PRICHARD CITY Martin said he would like to have Porter said he plans to file a temaccess to the city’s check registry COUNCIL LAST WEEK. porary restraining order to regain and other documents in order to help access to the meetings. Campbell control the city’s finances. Morris did not respond to a request “Our budget regulates us for the for comment on the issue. entire year,” Martin said. “If we’re not going to enforce those line items, what’s the point of having a budget?” Financial issues Like Martin, members of the press have had some While Prichard has weathered funding problems in trouble getting information about the state of the city’s the past, concerns about its financial solvency and fiscal financials as well. However, on Jan. 12, the State of management surged in February following the arrest of Alabama put a lien on all of the property and property one of Mayor Jimmie Gardner’s close assistants on mulrights held by the city of Prichard over nearly $24,000 in tiple charges of theft and abusing his public position. unpaid taxes. Though he was previously listed as “chief of staff” Those “withholding taxes” are typically withheld on the city’s website, Gardner has referred to James A. from employees’ paychecks to be sent directly to the Blackman only as his former “administrative executive federal or state governments. Probate records indicate assistant” since he was publicly terminated from his the state placed a similar lien on the city’s properties last

Last week the Prichard City Council listened to residents concerned over financial accountibility and recent hires. December over $1,800 of unpaid “withholding taxes.” Though it’s unclear how or whether that will affect the city’s overall financial picture, most city leaders shown documentation of the month-old tax lien by Lagniappe seemed to be hearing about it for the first time. Gardner said he had no advanced knowledge of the lien and turned over any information like that to Mobile County District Attorney Ashley Rich’s office. Asked about the other financial issues facing the city, the mayor said Prichard was $1.5 million in the red when he was elected but has since recovered. He added Martin is blaming him for poor fiscal management for political reasons. Gardner blamed the overages in the monthly financial reports on a computer glitch and said Martin was “incorrect.” “The city cannot function when dealing with these distractions,” he said. “I refuse to get caught in the middle of a personality fight.” As for access to the financial documents, Gardner said councilors already have them, through QuickBooks software. “They have the ability to look it up themselves,” he said. “We’ve offered to train them on it.” WKRG reported Prichard outsources the handling of its finances, paying Robert Headrick Jr. CPA, LLC, $11,533 per month.


COVER STORY Gardner said he would like to move the city forward and focus on infrastructure projects. He touted his administration for resurfacing more streets “than in the last 20 years.” At the Feb. 15 meeting, Severia Campbell Morris asked the council to consider a forensic audit of the city’s finances to help get it on the right track. “Do we want to get serious about this, or do we want to chit-chat about it?” Campbell Morris asked her fellow councilors. “I’m not a thief and I don’t think the mayor is a thief. If you want to know the truth, a forensic audit is the answer.” While Gardner said an audit was currently underway, he said he was “good” with the idea of a forensic audit. Edwards said the council should first sit down with the budget and review it line by line. The council decided to review the budget itself before asking Gardner to recommend an audit.

City real estate purchases

Blackman currently faces up to 21 criminal charges, but while few details are known about the allegations against him, early comments from prosecutors give the impression at least some of his suspected activity involved the purchase and resale of real estate. While he was originally arrested on 17 counts of first-degree theft, Blackman was hit with four additional charges earlier this month for using his position for “personal gain.” At the time, Rich’s office said Blackman allegedly directed the city to purchase property he then put in his own name or in the name of his wife, who records indicate is Francis Deleslie Mabien. A recent Lagniappe review of property records involving Blackman, Gardner and the city of Prichard found a handful of real estate transactions throughout 2017, including some Blackman personally oversaw and could have possibly benefited from financially. One involved a tract of land at 4808 Outlaw Road in Prichard. According to a deed of sale, the city of Prichard purchased that parcel from a Florida-based company for $1 in April 2017. It lists a fair market value of roughly $69,000, according to county land records. On May 26, 2017, Blackman’s wife purchased the same property on Outlaw Road from the city for $100. However, because deeds often don’t disclose the full sale price of real estate transactions, it’s possible the property sold for more. Based on the deed for that sale, the transaction from the city to Mabien was prepared by Assistant City Clerk Kim W. Green. Another quick land transaction involved a property purchased on Michael Donald Avenue within the Mobile city limits. It was purchased by Prichard for $100 from the Alabama Department of Revenue in April 2017 after the previous owner, Randall Daugherty, was delinquent on his state taxes. The city then sold the same property to a man named David Miller for close to $2,000, as well as “other good and valuable considerations” just over a month later. Again, Alabama law does not require the true price of such transactions to be recorded on the deed itself. The deed on the Michael Donald Avenue property was signed by Gardner, who it lists as the grantor on behalf of the city. It also appears to have been prepared by Blackman himself, although, based on the deed, it wasn’t recorded with the Mobile County Probate Court until several months later.

Also in 2017, the city purchased two vacant lots in the Whistler community from Texas resident Murra Frances Hill. It was valued at $39,700 but cost Prichard just $10, according to the deed of sale. As of Feb. 21, there was no indication of the city having sold either of those parcels. During this same period, it appears Blackman also personally purchased an interest in a residential property at 3438 Stovall St. in Prichard. According to a quitclaim deed filed last August, Blackman paid $300 to Margaret Hunter for an interest in that property through a sale that appears to have been prepared by Green as well. On the document, though, Blackman lists his address as 855 Wildwood Ave. in Mobile, which is different from the address listed during both of his recent arrests. A search of county property records indicate the Wildwood address is actually a property Gardner owned in Mobile for a number of years, though he and his wife also own properties in Prichard and Eight Mile. While all of these land transactions are recorded in public documents, investigators have not confirmed whether any of them are tied to the criminal charges Blackman is currently facing nor whether there was anything improper about them. Some city officials have privately questioned the authenticity of some of the names and signatures listed on them, though there have been no allegations of outright fraud against Blackman and he has not been charged criminally with any fraudrelated offense. When asked about the property purchases, Gardner said anything he approved as mayor would have also gone to the City Council for approval.

Concern over police

In addition to worries over the city’s finances and communication with councilors, residents also voiced concern over the recent hire of Maj. Dewayne Hill at the Prichard Police Department. As Lagniappe previously reported, the PPD hired Hill in 2017 despite multiple problems during his 20-year career with the Mobile Police Department. The subject of several internal affairs investigations, Hill was eventually forced to retire over allegations he improperly used funds from an account tied to MPD’s Police Explorers program — allegations leading to multiple criminal charges for fraudulent misuse of a credit card, to which Hill later pleaded guilty. At last week’s meeting, Bomani Williams said the hiring represented a “major hill to climb” for the city and its reputation. The city’s reputation presents a unique challenge for Bomani and Sheena Williams, who recently started a charity to help students in local schools. “Prichard is the laughing stock of Mobile right now and it shouldn’t be,” Bomani said. In addition to Hill, Prichard Police Chief Walter Knight has also been the subject of internal investigations. In 2014, then Capt. Knight was placed on administrative duties while claims he obstructed justice were investigated. Because Prichard’s department doesn’t have an internal affairs division, the allegations were reviewed by MPD. News reports suggest Knight was accused of “trying to hide a domestic violence arrest warrant” that had been signed against a former officer in Prichard.

When reporting on Hill’s hire by Prichard last year, Lagniappe attempted to ask both the PPD and MPD about the conclusion of their investigation and whether Knight was cleared of any wrongdoing, but so far both departments have refused to discuss the matter. While the investigation was completed, spokeswoman Charlette Solis said at the time MPD Chief Lawrence Battiste didn’t want to discuss the investigation “as a courtesy” to the PPD. It’s worth noting Battiste was formerly chief of the PPD and worked alongside Knight for years. Battiste has since denied a second request to discuss the investigation.

Concerned citizens

Porter said the city’s financials are “in terrible shape” and made it a point to bring up the fact Gardner left this week for Paris, where he will reportedly meet with leaders of Benin. “I don’t see how they let the mayor out of the country with the fog over him,” Porter said. “The mayor is responsible for the missing money as much as anyone.” Both Gardner and city spokeswoman Melanie Baldwin said the Paris trip was for economic development purposes. Baldwin also mentioned the trip was in part planned as a meeting between “sister cities,” although Benin is a country and not a city. In a phone interview, Gardner said it was an opportunity to speak about a possible convention center and hotel project for Prichard. Pugh mentioned Gardner’s trip when he criticized the city at the council’s Feb. 15 meeting for not looking out for the youth of Prichard. “You ought to feel embarrassed,” Pugh said before mentioning the timing of Gardner’s trip. “What’s wrong with you all? You guys ought to feel ashamed.” Pugh then called councilors “insubordinate workers” to the residents and the youth of the city. Council President Derrick Griffin responded. “Tone it down a notch,” he said. “We’re not going to be called names.” After his time was up, Pugh made more comments and was escorted out of the meeting by police. From outside, Pugh’s cries of “they don’t want to know the truth” could be heard over the comments of resident Paula Blevins, who admonished councilors over interactions with citizens. “You all need to do better,” Blevins said. Resident Bomani Williams asked the council to stop the mayor’s trip. Resident Katie Davis asked councilors to post all financial documents where residents could review them. “The handling of finances show you have no authority over the job you’re supposed to be doing,” Davis said. Resident Leonard Miller put the financial onus on Gardner. “The mayor needs to be held responsible for money stolen from his city,” Miller said. “This is the first time this has happened under any mayor in this city.” Miller added Gardner brought Blackman into the fold. “The ex-police chief brought in — he’s not a criminal yet,” Miller said. “He must not have checked his background.” Miller then turned to the council and criticized them for not holding Gardner accountable for “tearing up the city.” “God is watching Prichard, Alabama,” Miller said. “We want to see what this council is going to say to the mayor.”

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ART ARTIFICE

Mobile native’s novel stirs courage and reflection BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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t’s not often the view through a single window offers so many vistas at once. However, that’s what author Colleen D. Scott has given readers in her debut effort. The Mobile native spent most of her adulthood balancing the corporate world with parenthood but her recent retirement prompted a return to an old love: literature. The product is her novel “Everybody Needs a Bridge,” a coming-of-age story aimed at the Young Adult (YA) market that hit racks Feb. 20. Through its story, readers are afforded a look across time, place and even into themselves by following its protagonist Erin as she navigates the cultural pitfalls of late adolescence and early adulthood before finding her personal magnetic north. Though Erin’s hometown is never named, it will ring familiar for Mobilians. Everything from places to Mardi Gras to the civic hostesses named for flowers pegs it as a place we know. Opening in the early 1980s, Erin is moving from a private religious school to the largest and most hallowed public high school in her area. Pitfalls abound and Erin’s inner dialogue elicits paradoxical response. On one hand, this reader completely related to her quandaries, the eggshells the teen walked on, every move heavy with her fear of judgment and mistakes. It was also amusing from the vantage point of adulthood, where you’re afforded the luxury of a wider perspective and seeing teen angst for its overwrought reality. It stirred this

reader’s sympathies across a geographical and gender gap, striking common ground in all our stories. Erin finds a few friends among the emotional minefield, with none more important than Brittany. Through her new pal, she passes all the gateways of adolescence. There’s even a little rebellion in there, nothing too terribly scandalous even if illegal. Most of what Erin learns through those years is confidence to follow her heart and head in equal measure. She musters courage and builds confidence as athletic and academic successes follow. It’s also during high school she meets Emmett, a standout football player whose studiousness and personal magnetism make him an instant hit on campus. Erin is drawn to him, yet frightened by her realizations. Emmett is African-American while Erin is white. Though both are high achievers, the norms of their place and time make romance a perilous proposition. Concurrently, Brittany drifts into dangerous places of her own. Her slow-motion disintegration vexes Erin, whose protective instincts hit a wall. The central character’s arc shifts as she and Emmett head to the state university. Familiar obstacles arise but are met with more aplomb. Eventually those years bring the most crucial decisions of Erin’s life, things that forever reshape the world of everyone around her in unforeseen ways. Scott’s roman á clef is well written. Perfectly for its market, it is straightforward and not too “writerly.” It bears the

It wasn’t terribly long ago that a regular feature of Mobile cultural life was a monthly get-together where arts world denizens would convene casually on the reg. All were welcome to a different arts venue each time for a laid-back happy hour filled with gnoshing, imbibing and disciplinary cross-pollination. Now Art After Hours will return on an every-other-month basis. The next is slated for Feb. 27, 5:30-7 p.m. at Sway Gallery (10 S. Conception St.). Attendees can enjoy complimentary wine, beer samples from Oasis Texas Brewing Co. and light appetizers while they learn about the local arts scene. For more information, call 251-432-9796 or go to mobilearts.org.

February MOJO highlights youngsters

Carrying forward with a desire to ensure the longevity of jazz into the future, the Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed will highlight the efforts of local youngsters with their latest event,

THOUGH ERIN’S HOMETOWN IS NEVER NAMED, IT WILL RING FAMILIAR FOR MOBILIANS. EVERYTHING FROM PLACES TO MARDI GRAS TO THE CIVIC HOSTESSES NAMED FOR FLOWERS PEGS IT AS A PLACE WE KNOW.” “I realized I couldn’t really tell my story without highlighting the important people along the way that gave me courage. So it was important to me to show what an impact friendship can have when you’re trying to live a courageous, ordinary life,” Scott said. Scott aims to release her second novel in late spring or early summer 2018. Its setting is derived from the Eastern Shore of Mobile Bay and revolves around social views on mental health. “The heroine is in that role simply because she seeks professional help for mental health issues. That is so much why people don’t reach out and ask for help, or help when they see something going on, why people resist help when it’s offered is because of the stigma,” Scott said.

“The Next Generation: Passing the Legacy Torch.” It unfolds Monday, Feb. 26, 6:30 p.m. in Bernheim Hall of the Ben May Main Library (701 Government St.). The evening features the ensemble work of The Jazz Studio, a project of the Mobile Big Band Society under the direction of Hosea London. They will be joined by the Davidson High School Jazz Band Septet under the direction of Jeremy Messer. PowerLines Poetry Troupe will also perform. Admission is $15, $12 for students/military and $10 for MOJO members. For more information, call 251-459-2298 or visit mobilejazz. org.

MSO Two of a Kind welcomes guest pair

Grammy-winning cellist Zuill Bailey is fresh off a year of exhilaration after picking up the highly sought award last year for his live recording with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra. On February’s closing weekend, Mobilians will have Bailey all to themselves when he joins the Mobile Symphony Orchestra at

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the Saenger Theatre (6 S. Joachim St.). The show’s title — “Two of a Kind” — refers to the inclusion of another distinctive talent in special guest conductor André Raphael. Together they will lead the charge through a rich display of classical sounds that opens with Sergei Prokofiev’s ballet “Romeo and Juliet.” Bailey will join the orchestra for Franz Joseph Haydn’s Cello Concerto No. 2, a rarely heard work that will make its Mobile debut under Bailey’s bow. The program will conclude with Edward Elgar’s celebrated “Enigma Variations,” a series of vivid musical portraits of his closest friends. Tickets range from $15 to $75 and can be purchased by calling 251-432-2010, online at mobilesymphony.org or at the MSO box office (257 Dauphin St.). Student tickets cost $10. Through the MSO Big Red Ticket program sponsored by Alabama Power, students in grades K-12 can attend the Sunday performance free when accompanied by a paying adult. More details are online at mobilesymphony.org.

ARTSGALLERY

Art After Hours returns this month

subtle marks of keen observation — such as a bit about children quietly talking in the dark or girls dancing along “to the ghost of” music vanished — but never gets lost in an affair with its own voice. The characters are well drawn without being pedantic. The emotional exchanges are tangible. As said initially, it provides readers a look into a time past but maybe not as distant as we wish. In service to full disclosure, I know many of the people in the tale and recall some of its events. Scott gilded nothing. It also affords a hopeful look into the future through extrapolation. If past barriers can seem quaint with 30 years’ passage, then what current difficulties might be overcome with more time? Scott also supplies insight into ourselves through witness of Erin’s thoughts and tribulations. Not only can readers relate to this young woman but they will also ponder others instrumental in their own journeys.


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BAND: THE UNDERHILL FAMILY ORCHESTRA, MYFEVER DATE: FRIDAY, FEB. 23, 7 P.M. VENUE: CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB, 916 CHARLESTON ST., WWW.CALLAGHANSIRISHSOCIALCLUB.COM TICKETS: $8 AT THE DOOR

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Photo | Skate Mountain Records / Alyx Gardner

During breaks in an exhaustive tour schedule, The Underhill Family Orchestra found time to record “Tell Me That You Love Me,” available soon on Skate Mountain Records. t’s 4 p.m. on a Thursday afternoon. Skate Mountain Records’ The Underhill Family Orchestra has been on the road since daybreak. However, the road is both a familiar and welcome environment for this ragtag group of local musicians, and the band’s frequent, extensive tour runs are rare in the local scene. Guitarist Steven Laney says the band’s dedication to touring comes from the ideology “you don’t get anywhere by sitting still.” This statement also resonates throughout the band’s music. Their versatile sound is an inventive form of indie roots rock with Americana overtones that tends to take listeners through a variety of emotional states, from elation to serenity. This aural personality is personified through a live show that quickly establishes a passionate bond with audiences as well as bands who share the stage with them. The positive impression Underhill portrays both on and off the stage can be rewarding both musically and socially. “We get asked a lot if you get to spend money on hotel rooms, but we don’t,” Laney said. “We like to sleep on floors and hanging out with the people who come out to our shows. We have friends everywhere. We want to hang out with them. We sleep on

their couches and have a good time.” Laney says the social network aspect of Underhill has also played a great role in gathering listeners into the fold as well as opening new stages in different cities. This particular run of shows is taking the band back to Charleston, South Carolina, for a show with She Returns from War. When singer-songwriter Hunter Park brought her She Returns from War project to SouthSounds Music Festival in 2016, she and the members of Underhill became fast friends, which opened channels for shows in the two group’s respective hometowns. Laney says SouthSounds has been instrumental in making connections with bands from other cities, and the band looks forward to seeing old friends and making new ones at SouthSounds this year. “I think SouthSounds is a really fun way to do that,” he explained. “Since it’s coming back around, we have a lot of bands that we’re excited to see. That’s where we’ve met a lot of the bands that we play with in Charleston, specifically She Returns from War and High Divers. That’s how we got hooked up with our friends in SUSTO.” Underhill is also heading to Charleston with the future in mind, preparing for its first album on Skate Mountain Records. One of the label’s first clients, Laney says Skate Mountain has provided a family environment for Underhill. Laney and fellow band

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MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Welcome home, Underhills

member Roy Durand have dedicated some of their spare time working at the label, and the band thrives in Skate Mountain’s practice space, which Laney says has strengthened their creativity. Underhill’s first offering on Skate Mountain is what the band describes as a “digital 45,” which will fill the time until the release of a full-length. Laney says the moniker for this double-serving of singles is a tribute to the vinyl medium with which singles were released in the past. “The 45 release is such an important part of the legacy of music,” Laney said. “When we looked at the songs that we had and what we wanted to be on the album, we had a couple of songs.” One side of this digital 45 will feature a song familiar to seasoned Underhill fans. The band originally released “Showdown at St. Lawrence” in 2013, with a companion music video. When the tracks for this song were originally laid, Underhill featured Jimmy Lee, Jeremy Padot and Brian Wattier. Not only does this track reflect the band’s reformed lineup but it also incorporates recently conceived musical elements. “We had been toying with new ideas for it, so we wanted to share those ideas and immortalize them,” Laney said. “We’re really amped on those songs. I get to play some really cool guitar stuff on ‘Showdown at St. Lawrence’ that I really love.” The B-side of the digital 45 will be Underhill’s version of The Monkees classic “I’m a Believer.” However, the group’s rendition is worlds away from the classic pop rock hit penned by Neil Diamond. Laney describes Underhill’s version as “more of a slow dance than a hand jive.” Underhill delivers “I’m a Believer” with a slow, loving poignancy that transforms this song in to a modern indie love ballad that blends well with the lyrical aspect of the song. “The song is really beautiful,” Laney said. “The illusory material and the lyrics are proudly and smartly written. I’ve always loved those words. When it came time to play it, the only way that made sense was to make it sweet and sentimental.” The digital 45 serves as a harbinger for the band’s upcoming full-length, “Tell Me That You Love Me,” to be released “around summer or middle spring.” However, Laney says the band already has tentative release dates for singles leading up to the album’s release. The guitarist said the album will be driven by dynamics adding a dramatic aspect. According to his description, “Tell Me That You Love Me” will take on the nature of a stage play in three acts, with a “fun” introduction and a “cinematic turn” in the final song acting as the grand finale. Underhill divided studio time between Dauphin Street Sound in Mobile and White Buffalo Studios in Los Angeles. Throughout the process, producer Noah Shain (Jimmy Lumpkin & the Revival) was there providing guidance. This was Underhill’s first experience with a producer and Laney said the band welcomed Shain’s input throughout the process. He especially appreciated Shain’s “loving quality that he has for creating.” However, Laney says there were times when Underhill had to acclimate Shain to their reality. “We recorded it during Mardi Gras, one of the biggest celebrations in Mobile,” Laney said. “Noah was kinda struggling with how the music was supposed to feel. We said, ‘Come hang out at the parade for a minute.’ We were working on a song that lives in and enjoys that second line band kind of feel. As soon as he heard, he came back in and said, ‘You know, I think I understand this.’” Even though the full-length is months from being released, The Underhill Family Orchestra remains busy. Laney says they will be shooting “maybe a couple” of music videos and releasing “maybe three singles,” as well as promoting the release on social media — which Laney says is obligatory for the current music industry model. Of course, the band will also be playing as many shows as they can in as many cities as they can visit, and making more friends along the way. Laney says the Callaghan’s crowd should enjoy their friends/showmates MYFEVER, which he describes as maintaining the “sentimental part of Manchester Orchestra” while featuring “a lot of the same elements as SUSTO and Motel Radio.”


MUSIC EXTRA

SouthSounds Music & Arts Festival returns to downtown Mobile BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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or the past seven years, the SouthSounds Music & Arts Festival has brought bands from the Southeastern music scene to stages throughout downtown Mobile. Since its inception in 2012, music lovers from the Azalea City and beyond have been able to experience some of the best new projects the region has to offer, with occasional established acts added for good measure. One of the great things about SouthSounds is you never know which act could be the next to break big into the national scene. Notable bands such as St. Paul & the Broken Bones, Hurray for the Riff-Raff, Lost Bayou Ramblers, SUSTO, Banditos, Boyfriend and Sweet Crude have graced stages at SouthSounds. This year, organizers say they are also moving some of the public stages to re-focus

on the venue aspect of SouthSounds, which showcases some of downtown’s best live music venues, including O’Dalys, the Brickyard, The Merry Widow, The Blind Mule, Alchemy Tavern and more. SouthSounds 2018 is scheduled for April 13-15, and the initial lineup indicates the festival aims to maintain its reputation as one of the Southeast’s premier musical events. Before the festival begins, organizers will bring Dr. Dog (with Kyle Craft opening) to Soul Kitchen for the official SouthSounds Kick-Off Party on Thursday, April 12. The critically acclaimed band’s haunting mix of indie rock and folk should perfectly set the tone for the weekend. Of Montreal, from Athens, Georgia, will provide festival-goers with a round of avantgarde indie pop complemented by a psychedelic

stage show. Singer-songwriter and local favorite Corey Smith will be returning to a legion of dedicated fans. J. Roddy Walston & the Business’ energetic mix of roots and garage rock will make an unforgettable Azalea City debut. The band from Richmond, Virginia lit up Hangout Music Fest in 2015 and is touring in support of its fourth studio album, “Destroyers of the Soft Life.” New Orleans will be represented by Ivan Neville and his Dumpstaphunk project, as well as the queen of Crescent City hip-hop, Boyfriend, whose unique verbal flow drives a live show that takes on the air of an exotic cabaret. Alabama garage rockers Lee Bains III & the Glory Fires’ rock ‘n’ roll magnificence will be a memorable SouthSounds experience. But that’s just a taste. The SouthSounds 2018 lineup will also include Paul McDonald, Charley

Crockett, Sweet Crude, The Cordovas, Great Peacock, Walker Lukens, The Underhill Family Orchestra, Lisa Mills, Jamell Richardson, The Red Clay Strays, I’magene (formerly known as Continuum), Jimmy Lumpkin, Kalu & The Electric Joint, Blackwater Brass, Frankie Boots, Eric Erdman, Molly Thomas, Forest Fire Gospel Choir, Abe Partridge, The Shunnarahs, Laurie Anne Armour and Brenda Bledsoe. In the coming weeks, SouthSounds organizers will be adding to this already impressive list. Early bird tickets are on sale now through the festival’s website (www.southsoundsfest.com). General admission weekend passes are set at $25. Gold-level weekend passes, which include entrance to the April 13 Corey Smith show at Soul Kitchen, cost $45. Single VIP passes cost $90, or $150 for a pair. These early bird prices will only last until April 1, after which prices go up.

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MUSIC BRIEFS

New soul

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Yeah, Probably Date: Friday, Feb.23, 7:30 p.m. Venue: Manci’s Antique Club, 1715 Main St. (Daphne), www.mancisantiqueclub.com Tickets: $5 at the door

Photo | Facebook | Yeah, Probably

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eah, Probably is bringing its award-winning, homegrown sounds to Olde Towne Daphne. This band has one of the freshest sounds in the Mobile Bay area. With shared roots in their college jazz band, Shea White (guitars/vocals), Quintin Ayers (bass) and Phillip Baggins (drums) have mastered a smooth, seductive blend of funk, soul and pop that is regionally unique and undeniably appealing. This talented trio used its SouthSounds 2017 sets to pull a number of new listeners into the fold, rising to the top of Lagniappe’s “New Southern Music” and “Mobile Bay” showcases. Yeah, Probably’s Manci’s set will feature tracks from the band’s new, self-titled EP. This foursong collection uses pop overtones to breathe new life into blue-eyed soul. Harmonic vocals featuring alto soul move over a satiny bed of cool instrumental grooves. The trio’s original material and crowd-winning covers should make for a lovely evening at Manci’s.

Music meets literature

Band: John Darnielle Date: Monday, Feb. 26, with doors at 7 p.m. Venue: Laidlaw Performing Arts Center, 5751 USA S. Drive, www.southalabama.edu Tickets: Free (limited seating) The University of South Alabama’s Independent Music Collective (IMC) has brought the Azalea City a number of unique, intimate live performances from a varied list of singer-songwriters. From roots country to innovative folk, no genre is off limits. The IMC will combine efforts with The Stokes Center for Creative Writing for an evening of music and written word by John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats. Since the mid ‘90s, the Mountain Goats’ catalog has been dominated by an acoustic-based sound that falls in a Daniel Johnston-esque limbo between classic rock and alternative folk. While the group’s lineup has rotated a long list of musicians, Darnielle has remained its creative epicenter. The Mountain Goats’ latest release is 2017’s “Goths,” an album living up to its title with the Bauhaus-inspired opener “Rain in Soho.” While “Goths” draws influence from bands ranging from Siouxsie & the Banshees to Joy Division, Darnielle’s trademark offbeat approach to songwriting provides a solid foundation. Music will not be the evening’s only feature. Darnielle is also an accomplished author who has penned literary works including “Wolf In White Van” and “Universal Harvester.” When he’s not entertaining the crowd with songs, Darnielle will regale them with readings from his books.

Adrenaline pump Band: Super Bob Date: Thursday, Feb. 22, with doors at 7 p.m. Venue: Alchemy Tavern, 7 S. Joachim St., www.alchemytavernmobile.com Tickets: Free For years, this unsigned Washington, D.C., outfit has been spreading its musical hybrid of metal, EDM and hip-hop through the highways and byways of America. Super Bob not only uses its music to increase its following, but also puts on an explosive live show that seems to make instant dedicated fans. Super Bob is touring in support of its double-album release, “BBBob” and “Rock ‘n’ Roll.” This double-shot of Super Bob’s trademark sound features a rhythmic verbal flow that falls somewhere between Zach De La Rocha (Rage Against the Machine) and Fred Durst (Limp Bizkit) and measures of edgy groove metal filled with adrenaline.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | February 21 - February 27

WED. FEB 21

Bluegill— Matt Neese Blues Tavern— Art, 8p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Callaghan’s— Phil & Foster Felix’s— Jimmy Lumpkin Duo Flora Bama— Rebecca Barry Trio, 11a// Neil Dover, 3p/// Mario Mena, 7p//// Rhonda Hart and Jonathan Newtown, 7p Lulu’s— Adam Holt, 5p

THUR. FEB 22

Bluegill— Al and Cathy Blues Tavern— McBro Acoustic Duo, 8:30p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 1p// Dueling Pianos, 4:30p/// Mark Sherrill, John Joiner, Chris Newbury, Jose Santiago, 5p//// Brandon White, 9p//// Mario Mena Duo, 9:15p Listening Room— The Weeping Willows, 8p Lulu’s— Howlin’ Jack, 5p Manci’s— Ross Newell McSharry’s— Rock Bottom, 7p

FRI. FEB 23

Beau Rivage— Mary J. Blige, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Strictly Isbell, 6:30p Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12p// Jeri, 6p Blues Tavern— Fat Lincoln, 9p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese Duo, 6p Boondoacks Bar and Grill— Funkhouse Fever Trio, 8p Callaghan’s— Underhill Family Orchestra Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Will the Chill El Camino— Glass Joe Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Flora Bama— J. Hawkins Duo, 2p// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p/// Scott Kohen, Lisa Shengi, Doug Habbena, 6p/// Jo Jo Pres, 10p//// Bruce Smelley, 10:15p Golden Nugget— The Guess Who Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Perkins Road, 9:30p IP Casino— Michael McDonald, 8p Listening Room— 30 | L AG N I A P P E | Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8

Stephen Lee Veal, Ric McNaughton and Steve Varnes, 8p Lulu’s— Rebecca Barry, 5p Manci’s— Yeah Probably McSharry’s— DJ Shadow, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Harrison McInnis Quartet, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Lefty Collins, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Christina Christian Duo, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — The Dunaway Brothers, 6:30p Soul Kitchen— Keke Wyatt, 8:30p

SAT. FEB 24

Alchemy— Glass War and Seven Year Witch, 10:30p Beau Rivage— Mary J. Blige, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Edward David Anderson, 6:30p Bluegill— Quintin Berry, 12p// Matt Neese Duo, 6p Blues Tavern— Ric McNaughton Band, 9p Callaghan’s— Motel Radio Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ M.Bezzle Felix’s— Bust Flora Bama— Jo Jo Pres, 10a// Lauren Murphy and The Psychedelics, 1p//// LeaAnne Creswell Duo, 2p//// Hung Jury, 5:30p//// Al and Cathy, 6p//// Foxy Iguanas, 10p//// Brandon White Duo, 10:15p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Perkins Road, 9:30p Hard Rock (Live) — The Fab Four, 8p Listening Room— Lara Hope and The Ark-Tones, 8p Lulu’s— Rock Bottom Duo, 5p Manci’s— Rondale and the Kit Katz McSharry’s— DJ Chi, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Christina Christian, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Chris Herenroder, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Stephen Sylester, 6:30p Saenger— Mobile Symphony Orchestra: Two of a Kind Top of the Bay— Scott

Morlock

SUN. FEB 25

Big Beach Brewing— Honeyboy and Boots, 3p Bluegill— Jimmy Lumpkin, 12p// Matt Neese Duo, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Jam, 6p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Callaghan’s— Edward David Anderson, 7p Felix’s— Matt Bush Flora Bama— Rusty McHugh w/Jason Justice, 12:30p// Perdido Brothers, 4p/// Kevin Swanson, 7p//// Bruce Smelley, 8:30p Frog Pond— Grayson Capps, Dylan LeBlanc, James LeBlanc, Cary Hudson, Corky Hughes, Katrina Millers, 2p Listening Room— JeshYancey, 8p Lulu’s— Sticky Too, 2p McSharry’s— TRad Irish Session, 6:30p Saenger— Mobile Symphony Orchestra: Two of a Kind

MON. FEB 26

Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese, 6p Felix’s— Quintin Berry Flora Bama— Founders and Friends, 12p// Cathy Pace, 4p/// Zachery Thomas Diedrich, 7p//// Petty and Pace, 8p Listening Room— Cory Branan, 8p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. FEB 27

Bluegill— Shelby Brown Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— T. Bone Montgomery and Mac Walter Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Felix’s— Chris Huchin Flora Bama— Perdido Brothers, 4p// Johnny Barbato, 7p/// Bruce Smelley, 8:30p Listening Room— Comedy with Josh Cocks Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 7p Lulu’s— Brandon Coleman and Drew Nix, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Denver Hawsey, 6p


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In social media satire, #BFF becomes #WTF

A

FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM ubrey Plaza is disturbingly good as a young woman with a near-fatal case of FOMO in “Ingrid Goes West,” a black comedy that skewers social media culture, and then some. The premise is satirical, but the “feels” are real, because Plaza brings Ingrid so fully to life, even if the entire point of the film is that she is basically dead inside. When the film opens, we see a series of annoyingly perfect Instagram posts from a beautiful young woman’s wedding. As she gushes, humblebrags and hashtags, our antihero Ingrid scrolls through ever more frantically on her smartphone, “loving” each post even though she’s actually going berserk. After she storms the wedding, sprays the bride with mace and gets sent to a mental institution, we realize she never actually met the unfortunate, photogenic woman in real life. A single sympathetic online comment following the death of her mother was enough to hook Ingrid into obsession. This window into her loneliness is one of the view clues we get

AREA THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Road South Mobile, AL (251)639-1748 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin St Mobile, AL (251) 438-2005 REGAL MOBILE STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Drive Mobile, AL (844) 462-7342 AMC JUBILEE Square 12 6898 Highway 90 Daphne, AL (251) 626-5766

about Ingrid’s impossibly needy inner life. Having learned nothing during her mental health stay, which is shown in a rather hilariously glib montage, Ingrid hungrily dives back into the virtual world and develops a new obsession: pictureperfect Instagram “influencer” Taylor, played by Elizabeth Olsen. With a modest inheritance from her recently deceased mother, Ingrid moves to Los Angeles and ingratiates herself deviously into Taylor’s “IRL” life. She fakes a dognapping to meet Taylor and, with shades of “Single White Female,” styles herself to match her. Of course, Taylor is so self-involved that she doesn’t notice; after all, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, and as an “influencer” that is the name of the game. Meanwhile, Ingrid forms a bond, in spite of herself, with her lovable landlord, the only genuine person around for miles, a decent guy who is obsessed with Batman and played by O’Shea Jackson Jr., the irrepressibly charismatic son of Ice Cube who has only otherwise been onscreen portraying his father in “Straight Outta Compton.” He is a normal person with a

modicum of concern for Ingrid, and they have chemistry that she, naturally, exploits into furthering her fake lifestyle. Rosé flows, kimonos are donned and many photos are snapped and filtered, but Ingrid isn’t cool enough for Taylor for long, especially when a more vicious hanger-on arrives in the form of Taylor’s loose-cannon brother. Wily enough to see through her façade and mean enough to exploit her weaknesses, the brother threatens Ingrid’s friendship with Taylor, and Ingrid is willing to go to any lengths to stop him. The film slips smoothly from black comedy to higher-stakes dysfunction and violence, with a fitting end for one and all. Aubrey Plaza carries this story through amusing, biting satire that is outrageous enough for wry chuckles, but recognizable and dangerous enough that it’s a memorable little film. And when, like I did, you realize you’re using the same phone case that both Taylor and, of course, Ingrid, use, will you feel horror, or gratification? “Ingrid Goes West” is currently available to rent.

NEXUS CINEMA DINING 7070 Bruns Dr. Mobile, AL (251) 555-5555 AMC CLASSIC WHARF 23151 Wharf Lane Orange Beach, AL (251) 981-4444 COBB PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 923-0785 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 State Hwy 181 Spanish Fort, AL (251) 626-0352 Nexus Cinema Dining 7070 Bruns Dr Mobile AL 36695 251-776-6570

Photos | Neon / Paramount

LEFT: In “Ingrid Goes West,” Aubrey Plaza is an unhinged social media stalker who moves to L.A. and insinuates herself into the life of an Instagram star. RIGHT: Natalie Portman stars in “Annihilation,” leading an expedition team into an environmental disaster zone and not finding what she expects. NEW THIS WEEK ANNIHILATION

A biologist (Natalie Portman) signs up for a dangerous, secret expedition in which the laws of nature don’t apply. All listed multiplex theaters.

GAME NIGHT

A murder mystery party turns into a wild and chaotic night for a group of unsuspecting couples, including Rachel McAdams and Jason Bateman. All listed multiplex theaters.

EVERY DAY

Based on David Levithan’s bestselling novel, this tells the story of Rhiannon, a 16-year old girl who falls in love with a mysterious soul named “A” that inhabits a different body every day. All listed multiplex theaters.

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NOW PLAYING

I, TONYA AMC Mobile 16, AMC Classic Wharf BLACK PANTHER LADY BIRD All listed multiplex theaters, AMC Classic Wharf Nexus Cinema Dining. PHANTOM THREAD EARLY MAN AMC Jubilee Square 12, AMC All listed multiplex theaters. Classic Wharf SAMSON THE SHAPE OF WATER AMC Mobile 16 All listed multiplex theaters. WINCHESTER HOSTILES All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. THE 15:17 TO PARIS THOLIPREMA All listed multiplex theaters, Regal Mobile Stadium 18 Nexus Cinema Dining. MAZE RUNNER: THE PETER RABBIT DEATH CURE All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. FIFTY SHADES FREED MOLLY’S GAME All listed multiplex theaters. AMC Classic Wharf 15, Cobb THREE BILLBOARDS OUT- Pinnacle 14 SIDE EBBING, MISSOURI 12 STRONG Crescent Theater, AMC Classic All listed multiplex theaters. Wharf, Regal Mobile Stadium 18, FOREVER MY GIRL AMC Jubilee Square 12 All listed multiplex theaters.

DEN OF THIEVES All listed multiplex theaters. PADDINGTON 2 All listed multiplex theaters. THE POST All listed multiplex theaters. THE COMMUTER All listed multiplex theaters. DARKEST HOUR All listed multiplex theaters. INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY Regal Mobile Stadium 18 JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE All listed multiplex theaters. THE GREATEST SHOWMAN All listed multiplex theaters. FERDINAND Eastern Shore Premiere Cinema STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI All listed multiplex theaters.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS FEBRUARY 21, 2018 - FEBRUARY 27, 2018

GENERAL INTEREST

ACT Practice Test The Daphne Public Library will host a free ACT practice test Feb. 24 at 8 a.m. for students in 10th, 11th and 12th grades. Call 251-621-2818, ext. 211, or email lyoungblood@daphneal.com.

Vegan Chili Cook-Off The inaugural Vegan Chili Cook-Off will be held Saturday, Feb. 24, 4-6 p.m. at Serda Brewing, 600 Government St. $10 to enter, $10 to taste and judge. Visit arcforallbeings.org.

Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542.

DAR Genealogy Seminar Alabama Society Daughters of the American Revolution invite the public to a genealogy seminar with special guest Elizabeth Crabtree Wells on Saturday, Feb. 24, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Call 251-438-4739.

Public Talk “Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind: A Limitless Legacy,” a talk by Lynn Hanner on Thursday, Feb. 22, at 6 p.m. Admission is free. University of South Alabama College of Nursing, Room 1020. Call 251415-1109.

Adoption Event Friends of the Mobile Animal Shelter will be at B&B Pet Stop (5035 Cottage Hill Road) with lots of adoptable pets on Saturday, Feb. 24, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

An Evening with Dr. Synthia Saint James Bishop State Community College Foundation’s Scholarship Gala is Thursday, March 1, 7 p.m. at the Mobile History Museum. An art exhibit reception will celebrate this world-renowned visual and multicultural artist, author and illustrator of 27 books. Email Edra Finley, bishopfundraising@gmail.com.

Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141.

Town Hall Meeting on Channel Widening The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, will host a town hall meeting to discuss an ongoing study to determine the feasibility of increasing the width and depth of the Mobile Harbor Federal Navigation Channel. Thursday, Feb. 22, 6-8 p.m., Mobile Convention Center, 1 S. Water St. TomatoPalooza Get the best tomato varieties for the Gulf Coast! Buy your tomato plants online and pick them up from the Mobile Botanical Gardens’ MarketPlace on Saturday, Feb. 24, 9 a.m. noon. Visit mobilebotanicalgardens.org. Orange Beach Seafood Festival Benefiting the Orange Beach Sports Association’s youth initiatives, features 95 arts and craft vendors, food booths, a car show and live entertainment. Saturday, Feb. 24, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Wharf. Visit http://gsob.co/2AxEau8. Practical Gardening Class A six-week class at Mobile Botanical Gardens on how to look at your landscape and select plants, soil preparation, proper plant maintenance and more. Thursdays through March, 6:30-8 p.m. Call 251-3420555 or visit mobilebotanicalgardens.org. Daphne Farmers Market Fridays from 2-6 p.m. Daphne’s Farmers Market at the corner of Main Street and Santa Rosa, 2305 U.S. Highway 98. Sweetheart Dinner Third annual Sweetheart Dinner Dance featuring the Mobile Big Band Society. Three hours of big-band favorites, dancing and dinner buffet; 7-10 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 23 at Battleship Memorial Park. Visit Eventbrite.com.

Rabies Clinic The Mobile County Health Department offers $10 rabies shots. This Saturday’s clinic is at Dauphin Island Town Hall, 1011 Bienville Blvd., 1:30-3:30 p.m. Call 251690-8823. Heart Health Program On Feb. 27, Dr. Stephanie Grosz will speak about heart disease risk. 1 p.m. in the DePaul Center at Providence (6801 Airport Blvd., Mobile). Includes heart-healthy snacks. Lecture is free, but reservations are required; call 1-877-416-1620. Winter Wednesday at Bellingrath Learn about the interesting winter borders and containers throughout the gardens from Bellingrath’s horticulture management team. Winter Wednesdays sessions are held each week in the Magnolia Room, 10:30-11:30 a.m., through Feb. 28. Call 251-459-8864. TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Spanish Fort Presbyterian Church. Call 251-625-6888. Toastmasters Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters.org for more information. Parade celebrating 100 years of Alba School. Saturday, Feb. 24. 10 a.m. Over 35 bands, floats and boats will parade from the Greer’s in Bayou la Batre to Alba School. The school has been an integral part of the Bayou la Batre community since its inception. Superintendent Martha Peek will serve as grand marshall.

FUNDRAISERS

Mardi Gras Cleanup Join Mobile Baykeeper and Thompson Engineering for a post-Mardi Gras litter cleanup and debris removal on One Mile Creek, Saturday, Feb. 24, noon to 3 p.m. to see exactly how much Mardi Gras litter ends up in our waterways. Call 251-433-4229.

Chili for Charity Ecumenical Ministries’ 18th annual Chili for Charity is Saturday, Feb. 24, at Oak Hollow Farm, 14210 Greeno Road in Fairhope. Chili, live music, games, kids activities and more. 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 251-928-3430 or visit www. baldwinemi.org for tickets.

Free Baldwin Pops Winter Concert “20 Years in the Making,” Baldwin Pops Winter Concert, Thursday, Feb. 22, 7 p.m., Fairhope Civic Center. Call 251-987-5757 or visit www.baldwinpops.com.

“Tears of July” Friday, Feb. 23, the locally filmed movie “Tears of July” will be screened twice at the Daphne Civic Center, 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The showing will benefit the Exceptional Foundation of Daphne.

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Many More Miles Baldwin Bone & Joint’s annual collection of shoes for the homeless outreach program continues through Saturday, March 24. For drop-off locations, call 251621-5387.

ARTS “The Mousetrap” Theatre 98 presents Agatha Christie’s “The Mousetrap,” directed by Timothy Guy. Feb. 23-25 and March 2-4, 350 Morphy Ave., Fairhope. For tickets and showtimes, call 251-928-4366 or visit www.theatre98.org.

Center Series is held weekdays through Feb. 28. Art demos various days at 10 a.m. at the Orange Beach Welcome Center (23685 Perdido Beach Blvd.); lectures each weekday at 2 p.m. at the Gulf Shores Welcome Center (3459 Gulf Shores Parkway). Visit GulfShores.com/ WelcomeCenter. Spanish Moss Miniature Art Show March 1-30 at Mobile Art Council. Nothing larger than 5”x5” paintings or drawings.

MUSEUMS Family Festival Day Join Mobile Museum of Art for a day of free family activities celebrating new exhibitions on Saturday, Feb. 24, 10 a.m. to noon. With musical and interactive dance performances, all ages are invited to explore themes of African-American identity. Call 251-208-5200. “Permian Monsters: Life Before Dinosaurs” Take an adventure 290 million years in the past when bizarre-looking animals dominated life on land and sea. Traveling exhibition on display through June 3. Visit exploreum.com.

Power Lines Poets Power Lines Poets, a Mobile-based poetry troupe featuring local writers and performers, returns to the Mobile Museum of Art for a slam poetry session Thursday, Feb. 22, at 6 p.m. Call 251-208-5200.

“Galapagos: Nature’s Wonderland” In the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, there is a paradise unlike any other: the Galapagos Archipelago. Immerse yourself in this spectacular film at the Exploreum, until May 26. Visit exploreum.com.

“The Miracle Worker” “The Miracle Worker” is the inspiring true story of young Helen Keller and her teacher, Annie Sullivan. Feb. 23, 24, 25 and March 2, 3, 4. Showtimes are Friday and Saturday 7:30 p.m. and Sunday 2:30 p.m. Call 251-602-0630.

“Titanic: Honour & Glory” “Titanic Honour & Glory” will run through April 15 at the History Museum of Mobile. In addition to the exhibition, the museum will host monthly events. Call 251-301-0273 or gavin.snyder@ historymuseumofmobile.com.

“She Kills Monsters,” Take a journey into fantasyland with the comedy-drama “She Kills Monsters” Feb. 22-24. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $16. For advance purchase, call the box office at 251-460-6305. Theatre USA, 5751 USA S. Drive, Mobile.

“Right on Course” The United States Sports Academy’s American Sport Art Museum and Archives is open free to the public weekdays, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. One of the newest exhibits is “Right on Course.” Visit www.asama.org.

John Darnielle Join the Stokes Center for Creative Writing and the Independent Music Collective Monday, Feb. 26, 7:30 p.m. at Laidlaw Performing Arts Center for a both a musical performance and a reading by John Darnielle. Art After Hours Enjoy complimentary wine, beer samples from Oasis Texas Brewing Co. and light appetizers as you learn more about Mobile arts and culture! Tuesday, Feb. 27, 5:30-7 p.m. Sway Downtown, 10 S. Conception St. Call 251-432-9796. Garden Sketch Club Join Mobile Botanical Gardens every Friday for art in the gardens. Artists meet from 2-4 p.m., with guidance and advice available from Derek Norman. All experience levels welcome. General admission $5 for nonmembers. Call 251-342-0555 or visit mobilebotanicalgardens.org. Art Demonstrations Gulf Shores & Orange Beach Welcome

“Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is the latest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Savage Ancient Seas” “Savage Ancient Seas” will transport GulfQuest guests to a time when the last of the great dinosaurs roamed Earth and swam the seas. Visit www.gulfquest.org. Fairhope’s Founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday), 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com.


Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Walk for Life Friends of Women’s Care Medical Center host a 5K and fun run at 8 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 24, at six Baldwin County locations: Bay Minette Courthouse Square, Gulf Shores Johnnie Sims Park, Daphne Village Point Park, Loxley Municipal Park, John B. Foley Park in Foley and Fairhope Municipal Pier. Visit www.friendsofwcmc.org. Battleship Shootout Lacrosse Tournament Youth lacrosse tournament will feature some 50 teams competing on Saturday, Feb. 24, at Battleship Memorial Park, 2703 Battleship Parkway. Run at the Brewery Join Fleet Feet Sports and Serda Brewing (600 Government St.) for a run on Sunday, Feb. 25, 4-6 p.m. New Classes at LeFlore Classes offered at LeFlore High School include Art for Kids (ages 6 and up), Art for Adults, pre-ballet & tumbling (ages 4-6) and self-defense for women & girls (ages 12 and up). For more information, call 251-2081610 or go to MOBILECAP.ORG. Group Rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9

a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@ rideSAMBA.com. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Bingo Join Via! Health, Fitness, Enrichment Center at 1717 Dauphin St. for bingo every Tuesday and Thursday, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Call 251-478-3311. Bridge Lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fitness and Athletics Classes Classes at Palmer Pillans Middle School include Tai Chi, bellydance, candlelit yoga, Piyo Tone and piano. Call 251-463-7980 or visit mobilecap.org. Pickleball for Adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School on Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or visit communityactivitiesprogram.com. Ballroom Dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via! Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com.

Ballroom Dance The Moonlight Chassé Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

WORKSHOPS How to Use Your Smartphone How to navigate smartphones and make them work. Class covers Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, texting and more. Mondays, 6-7 p.m., at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Call 251-208-1650 or visit mobilecap.org.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www. baldwincountyal.gov Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre.com. Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450. Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth

Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope.com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope.com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www.cityoffoley.org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov. Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., www. cityofmobile.org. Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St., www.urban.cityofmobile.org. Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach.com. Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. thecityofprichard.org. Satsuma City Council: First and third Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 5464 Old Highway 43 Satsuma, AL 36572, 251-675-1440.

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MEDIA MEDIA FRENZY

Press Club co-founder Jo Ann Flirt passes away BY ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

J

o Ann Flirt, who worked in a variety of local media over her 85 years, passed away early this month after a short illness. Flirt was probably best known for her work as director of Historic Blakeley State Park for 40 years, holding the interim director’s position from 1977 through 2003, when she was finally named director. She retired late last year. But Flirt’s background was in journalism and she both worked and taught in the field for several years. She earned both bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Alabama and subsequently taught journalism and public relations there. Flirt founded or co-founded a number of local institutions, including the now-defunct Press Club of Mobile, the Mississippi-Alabama chapter of the Public Relations Society of Alabama, Public Relations Counsel Inc. and The Mobile Record. The Record was published daily and distributed around the county courthouse and downtown area and contained legal/public notices along with real estate and business news. Public Relations Counsel Inc. was an advertising/public relations firm. Her interest in journalism never waned and getting calls and letters from Flirt offering suggestions for improving the product was not an uncommon occurrence for those of us working in the business. But most of all she is credited with her untiring work to preserve and protect Blakeley State Park. I’m sure Jo Ann will be missed by all who knew her.

Edible coming to L.A.

South Alabama is getting a new, food-based magazine this spring aimed at covering the cuisine scene from Mobile to Montgomery. Edible will launch in mid-March, according to publisher Alyson Sheppard, and will distribute 15,000 publications across Southwest Alabama. Sheppard said it will be available in restaurants, bars and grocery stores. “Edible Lower Alabama is a print magazine covering food and beverage culture from Montgomery to Mobile. It celebrates local culinary traditions and tells true stories about the way we eat and drink today, be it at farm-to-table restaurants, roadside barbecue joints, urban breweries or strip-mall taquerias,” Sheppard said. “We want Edible L.A. to help connect readers with everyone in this vibrant food economy: regional farmers, producers, chefs and bartenders from the Black Belt to the Redneck Riviera.” Edible will be free on newsstands and is available for delivery by subscription. Sheppard said it will come out seasonally every three months. A Foley native, Sheppard started her journalism career interning with Lagniappe and has gone on to edit and write for publications such as Popular Mechanics, Esquire and Playboy. “Last year I was a finalist for a couple of big writing awards from the International Association of Culinary Professionals and Tales of the Cocktail. I lost them both, so I decided to become a publisher and buy my own awards,” Sheppard said. “That’s a joke, but I did feel like I had reached a point in my career where I could produce something entertaining, educational and cool all on my own. Hopefully you will agree.”

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE PARONOMASIA BY MATT GINSBERG / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Like most seamen, supposedly 5 Writer who said “Women are meant to be loved, not to be understood” 10 Holiday celebrating the arrival of spring 13 Islam’s final pillar 17 Nonirons 19 Two make a Hamilton 20 Handel’s “Messiah,” e.g. 22 Narrow passages for killer whales? 24 Kitchen nooks 25 Zodiac feline 26 Backs down 27 Fable about smoked salmon? 28 Kvetches 30 Balneotherapy site 32 “Yeah, right” 33 Raised some vegetables? 35 Decrease in the number of people named Gerald? 40 Hot Wheels maker 41 Are no longer 42 Mother ____ 43 Gulager of “The Return of the Living Dead” 44 In amongst 45 Number of bits in a byte 48 Gradually diminishes 50 Abstract artist Mondrian 51 First mass consumer product offering Wi-Fi 53 Sticks for breaking things 54 Belts for a Chinese leader? 57 Chaney who was called “The Man of a Thousand Faces” 58 Oakland’s Oracle, for example 60 Not budging 61 Cry from the mizzen top 62 Conveyance in “Calvin and Hobbes” 63 Overused 65 Storm harbinger, maybe 66 Gave a pick-me-up 69 Josip Broz, familiarly 70 Like many a campfire story 72 Responsibility lesson for a child 75 Inventors’ diaries? 77 So-called “Island of the Gods” 78 Ordinary Joe 80 Impose 81 Afterthought indicator 82 Well-known Cuban export 84 Fancy collar material 85 Lao-____ 86 Crucifixion letters 88 Guerre’s opposite 90 MGM’s lion, e.g. 92 Cloudophobia? 95 Opposite of a strong boil?

97 Pandora’s release 98 Like Verdi’s “La donna è mobile” 99 As-yet-undeciphered Cretan script 100 What brings the rocket to the pad? 104 Archaeologists’ study 106 Managerial exec 109 Mark Twain farce about a painter who fakes his own demise 110 Jewelry for the oracle at Delphi? 112 Versatile 113 Subleases 114 Arafat of the P.L.O. 115 What Simon does 116 Classic British roadsters 117 Rank things 118 Trix alternative DOWN 1 Not reporting as instructed, maybe 2 Induce ennui in 3 Fuss about “The West Wing” actor Rob? 4 Old English letter 5 Electricians 6 Several Russian czars 7 Resident of Riga 8 Cousin of a highboy 9 Part of a road test track 10 List heading

11 Runner Liddell depicted in “Chariots of Fire” 12 Pub container 13 It might pick up a passing comment 14 Contrived 15 Beverly Hills ____ 16 Kid 18 Colorful shawl 19 Neighbor of Palisades Park, N.J. 21 Chanteuse O’Shea 23 Declining because of age 27 China’s Chou En-____ 29 Best 31 Early arrival 33 Service with more than a billion users 34 Recurring role for Stallone 35 Groks 36 Philatelist’s item 37 Turn’s partner 38 Hebrew leader 39 Wack 41 Small undergarments? 46 Like some sprains and champagnes 47 Rev 49 Carried cash around? 50 Schoolmarmish 52 Superman’s birth name 55 Morales of “NYPD Blue” 56 Some Poe works 59 Mulligan 60 Un-to 62 Legal pause

64 “Come on in!” 65 Home, in slang 66 Buoyant cadences 67 “That is,” to Caesar 68 At a frantic pace 69 ____ bulb 71 Wood often used for bow-making 72 Help with the harvest? 73 V.I.P. at the Oscars 74 What’s human, they say 76 Needle-nosed fish 77 Grocer’s wheel 79 “____ de Lune” 83 Garfield’s girlfriend in “Garfield” 86 Tepid approval 87 Small, biting fly 89 Lined with trees 91 Playwright Sean who wrote “Juno and the Paycock” 93 Lets out, e.g. 94 Step on it 95 All thumbs 96 Second and fifth 99 Career employee 100 G.I.s of concern 101 Cuba, por ejemplo 102 Drink disliked by Buzz Aldrin [true fact!] 103 Strangely enough, they’re often even 105 Hershey chocolate 107 Doing the job 108 Shrek, for one 110 Voting affirmatively

ANSWERS ON PAGE 40

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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Gulf Coast Challenge ‘the ultimate HBCU experience’ BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

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hen the Mobile Sports Authority (MSA) reintroduced historically black college and university (HBCU) football to Ladd-Peebles Stadium, it was an immediate success. In its 2016 debut, the 5th Quarter Classic attracted more than 19,000 fans for a clash between Tuskegee and Florida A&M. Those five days of concerts, alumni festivals and parades had an estimated economic impact of $6,480,000, MSA’s largest return during the fiscal year. In addition, more than $2 million in scholarship offers went to area youth. Tuskegee returned in 2017 to face Jackson State in another successful 5th Quarter Classic. The back-to-back outpouring of support proved HBCU contests had found a home in Mobile. Now, MSA and area sponsors are ready to take the next step with the Gulf Coast Challenge, as announced recently in a news conference at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. “This game will replace the 5th Quarter Classic,” Danny Corte, MSA executive director, said in an interview with Lagniappe. “It got HBCU football reintroduced to Mobile. Now we will have locally based promoters putting on this game. I am very excited to be announcing this new event.” The Gulf Coast Challenge is set for Sept. 22 at 4 p.m. when Southern University plays Alabama A&M. “This will be the ultimate HBCU experience,” said Tim Hale Jr., the game’s director. “The organizers are embedded in the city of Mobile, so we want it to be great.” Among the events he listed are a free kickoff concert, college and career fair, team and alumni luncheon, golf tournament, Mardi Gras-style parade and a tailgate experience at Ladd-Peebles Stadium that will include a second line parade leading into the game.

Several local political leaders were present to offer their support. “The more I head about this game, I’ve been told they will fill the stadium,” Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson said. “That would be really cool to have 40,000 football fans here in Mobile.” “I am thrilled to welcome Southern University and their Human Jukebox Band,” Mobile County Commissioner Connie Hudson said. “And I know A&M will be well represented with their great fan base. This is going to be a fun time.” C.J. Small was present to represent the City Council. “While this is Levon Manzie’s district, he was under the weather. However, he wanted me to share the City Council’s excitement. All I can say is, ‘Let the good times roll!’” Representing the schools were Southern University’s Athletic Director Roman Banks and Head Coach Dawson Odums, along with Alabama A&M’s Athletic Director Bryan Hicks and Head Coach Connell Maynor. A game mascot named “Mardi” — dressed as a jester — was also introduced. Organizers hope the game will attract new teams every year. For more information, visit www.TheGulfCoastChallenge.com or call 251-281-8202.

Swinney to speak at UM event

Clemson head football coach Dabo Swinney is the keynote speaker for the 13th annual University of Mobile Scholarship Banquet on Tuesday, Feb. 27. Swinney, the former Crimson Tide wide receiver from Pelham and an outspoken Christian, will headline the gala event that begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Arthur R. Outlaw Mo-

bile Convention Center. General admission tickets cost $150. Sponsorships begin at $1,500 and may include an opportunity to meet Swinney during a VIP reception prior to the banquet, with priority seating at the event. “Coach Swinney’s life story and his insights into football and faith are inspirational, and we look forward to an uplifting and exciting event,” said Lauren McCaghren, senior director for alumni programs and annual giving. The evening will include performances by students from the Alabama School of the Arts at UM and feature highlights of recent university accomplishments and upcoming plans. Sponsorships and general admission tickets are available at umobile.edu/ banquet, by phone through the UM Advancement Office at 251-442-2587 or via email to advancement@umobile.edu.

College briefs

• Spring Hill College men’s soccer has announced its spring schedule. The opening game sees the Badgers host UM at 3 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 23. SHC will travel to Hattiesburg on March 10 for games with William Carey University and Southwest Mississippi Community College. On March 17, the Badgers will play Faulkner University and the University of Montevallo at Montevallo, before participating in a 7v7 tournament hosted by Millsaps College on April 7. The two final games of the spring semester feature a trip to Pensacola on April 14 to take on the University of West Florida and Pensacola Christian College. • The University of South Alabama’s Chyna Ellis has been named the Sun Belt Conference Women’s Basketball Player of the Week for the second time. The senior center had a historic night against Coastal Carolina as she earned the program’s first triple-double since 1989, collecting 12 points, 10 rebounds and 10 blocks. Ellis became the all-time block leader in SBC history by surpassing Kaetlyn Murdoch’s mark of 279. Her 10 rejections were a career high and set the individual Mitchell Center record for blocks in a game. She also collected 10 points, eight rebounds and three blocks in a win over Appalachian State. • For the second time this season, the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference has named Spring Hill’s Jewel Hill its Women’s Basketball Player of the Week. During a two-game win streak, the senior guard out of St. Luke’s Episcopal shot 17-of-32 from the field and 6-of-8 from behind the arc as well as 13-of-16 from the free-throw line. Hill also finished the week with 19 rebounds, eight assists and five steals. • Two members of the USA men’s basketball team have been honored as Sun Belt Players of the Week. Junior Rodrick Sikes won the first honor after averaging more than 26 points per game during two straight wins. Sophomore Josh Ajayi was recognized after he averaged 21.0 points and 11.5 rebounds in two other wins.

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SPORTS FROM BEHIND THE MIC

Most SEC football fans should find reason for optimism BY RANDY KENNEDY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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t’s a great time to be a fan of the Southeastern Conference. Alabama and Georgia not only made the college football playoff, but turned the national championship game in Atlanta into an all-SEC party. A third team, Auburn, beat both of the finalists and came within a win in the SEC Championship Game of reaching the playoff instead of Georgia. Florida, Texas A&M, Mississippi State, Arkansas and Tennessee all have new coaching staffs, which always brings a renewed sense of optimism. Missouri finished last season as one of the hottest teams in the country, winning six in a row at one point. But which fan bases have the most reason to be happy and optimistic about the present and the immediate future? Here is my brief assessment of all 14 programs and where their fans currently reside on the happiness meter. Alabama Five national championships in nine years is more than even the most optimistic Alabama fans could have expected when Nick Saban arrived in Tuscaloosa. Alabama fans who are complaining about a recruiting class that was ranked the seventh-best in the country should try another hobby. This is Elon Musk-level rich-people problems. Georgia The Bulldogs are in that sweet spot where Alabama fans resided after losing to Tim Tebow in the 2007 SEC Championship Game. Yes, the loss to a great team and the eventual national champion hurts, but there is no sweeter time for a sports fans than knowing your team is on the precipice of being a championship contender for the next decade. A No.

1 recruiting class also helps lessen the burn. Texas A&M Only Alabama (Saban), Clemson (Dabo Swinney), Ohio State (Urban Meyer), Florida International (Butch Davis) and Texas A&M currently have a head coach who has won a national championship. Aggie fans believe Jimbo Fisher will be as successful in College Station as he was at Florida State. They’re betting $75 million over 10 years on it. Florida Dan Mullen already knew how to Gator chomp when he returned to Gainesville. Florida fans are sure the championships will return now that their former offensive coordinator has been swept away from Mississippi State. Auburn Auburn fans have every reason to be more content than fans at Florida and Texas A&M. But there’s not a consensus among them that Gus Malzahn is going to be able to consistently beat Georgia and Alabama. At Auburn it always starts with those two rivals. South Carolina Two teams from the SEC and another from the state of South Carolina made the playoff — neither was the Gamecocks. Still, fans seem to be warming to what Will Muschamp is building. Missouri When Missouri has been good in recent years it’s been because of excellent defense. But in Drew Lock they have

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the top returning quarterback in the SEC. That’s reason enough for Tiger fans to be more optimistic than usual. Tennessee The good news for the Vols: They stole away a very good coach from rival Alabama and he’s saying and doing all the right things in his first month on the job. The bad news: If Jeremy Pruitt is too successful he’ll be headed back to his alma mater when Saban retires. Kentucky With the Big Blue basketball team struggling, Kentucky fans may actually be paying attention to football. What they will find is a team destined to be fighting to get into a bowl game every year. Mississippi State New head coach Joe Moorhead has never coached anywhere south of Georgetown. But he does inherit a solid roster and one of the all-time greats in Starkville — quarterback Nick Fitzgerald. Ole Miss Coach Matt Luke is a great guy who loves Ole Miss and beat rival Mississippi State. That’s a pretty good start for a program picking up the pieces. Arkansas New coach, same challenges for a team without a strong home state to recruit. Vanderbilt Wins over Middle Tennessee and Tennessee gave the Commodores an argument for being state champions. But it still wasn’t good enough for a bowl berth. LSU There’s still talent on the LSU roster, just like there always will be. But a home loss to Troy last season and a recruiting class that was the worst in a decade has many fans on the bayou wondering if Ed Orgeron is more than just a likable guy who fits the Hollywood description of how an LSU coach is supposed to walk and talk. Randy Kennedy writes a weekly column for Lagniappe and is co-host of “Sports Drive” every weekday from 3-6 p.m. on WNSP 105.5 FM, the country’s first all-sports FM station.


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STYLE HOROSCOPES WINTER OLYMPICS HIGHLIGHTS

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 36

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PISCES (2/19-3/20) — With the return of warmer weather, you’ll put on some too-short shorts and accidentally expose yourself during a bike ride. “I thought it felt a little breezy in here.” You win a bronze medal in cracking cliché jokes about curling. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — You’ll celebrate Mobile’s Spanish heritage at Tomatopalooza by incorporating elements from La Tomatina. You still don’t separate your whites from your colors in the wash. Your high score in micromanaging will be marred by allegations of doping. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — During a litter clean-up of One Mile Creek with Mobile Baykeeper this weekend, you’ll briefly consider pocketing a sealed pack of ramen noodles. No one can accuse you of not being thrifty. A slow-motion replay of your careless missteps will go viral. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — You’ll escape from a dull conversation by pulling off a frontside 900, followed by a backside 360, topped with a double cork 1260. You perfect your snow angel technique in the sands of Gulf Shores. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — Growing tired of your boring old wardrobe, you’ll take style cues from Johnny Weir. You’ll be crowned the next queen of Mardi Gras. Your sassiness will earn a sponsorship offer from Snapple. LEO (7/23-8/22) — You’ll grow bushy mutton chops in an effort to win a James “Beard” Award. You’ll embark on a threeweek food truck diet. Your life can be described as a neverending downhill slalom. VIRGO (8/23-9/22) — You’ll get meat sweats at the inaugural Vegan Chili Cookoff at Serda’s Brewery. After you bathe in the fermentation tanks, they’ll be forced to rename their porter “Rear Slop.” You’ll speed skate your way out of an undesirable relationship. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — Inspired by the film “Black Panther,” you’ll claim to be the true King of Wakanda. But we all know you’re really just a peasant in Wakoffda. Judges will award mixed scores of your finesse. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — Perplexed by the origins of the midtown odor, you’ll follow your instincts and implicate the entire 36608 ZIP code. It’s true what they say: Sh*t rolls down Spring Hill. You’ll lobby Congress to force biathletes to use water guns. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/21) ­­— You’ll be disappointed to miss out in qualifying for the winter Olympics when you bring water skis to a cross-country skiing competition. You’ll obviously finish dead last, but you’ll smelt some low-quality gold and make a medal of your own. CAPRICORN (12/22-1/19) — After picking up lunch from the dozens of Mardi Gras food stands near your office, you develop an addiction to Conecuh sausage and funnel cakes. At least you’ll have no problem qualifying for the summer Olympics dead lift competition. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — Eager to get ahead in life, you’ll enroll in Tony Kennon’s School of Proper Manners. Then you’ll attend a Mardi Gras ball under a giant Confederate flag. You finish in last place for obnoxiously taking vertically oriented cellphone videos.


STYLE BOOZIE

The good times rolled right on over us BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

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ell, well, well. We made it through the Gras. Barely. Usually we have a quiet period for a while after the good times stop rolling. Folks rest their livers and lick their wounds. Some of those wounds are psychological; some are physical. (Hey! It’s OK. Float riding and doing “the worm” can be dangerous.) But wounded or not, no one took a breather after this Mardi Gras. The beautiful weather this past weekend brought out peeps in droves by land and by sea. So I’ll give you a little bit of the skinny on that, but first I have a few leftovers from Lundi Gras and Fat Tuesday. So go ahead and remove the plastic wrap, stick this column in the microwave and nuke it on high so you can dig on into this week’s oh-so-tasty gossip.

Mega Lundi Gras

Since we went to press early on Lundi Gras day, we didn’t get a chance to report the rest of the Carnival scoop in the last issue. So we are fixin’ to do that right now, y’all. The weather was nasty for most of the day on Saturday, Feb. 10, so they canceled the Mystics of Time parade that was set to roll that night. I’m sure it made sense at the time, but Mother Nature is quite unpredictable. And of course, since they canceled it, it turned out to be a nice night. That’s just the way it works. I am sure it’s really hard to make those calls and really easy to Monday morning quarterback, so I’m not complaining. But many did, especially those who had come in from out of town to see the parades. They rescheduled the parade for Monday. The MOTs

Cowboys return

Everyone was waiting with bated breath to see how the satirical Comic Cowboys would come back this year after facing controversy last year over signs many folks viewed as offensive and racially insensitive. They were so incendiary, in fact, it caused a couple of politicos to resign from the group, including Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson. With so much contention, their signs were literally held under wraps this would ride before the Order of Doves and Infant Mystics, year, covered with tarps at their annual barn party and right up until they which was not good for the out-of-towners trying to catch rolled away from the Civic Center. the parade on Saturday but provided a supersized parade But with so much great material to work with this year (Roy Moore, for locals Monday night. Donald Trump, Mobile City Council president debacle and yet another Unfortunately, it created quite a bit of cluster-youman who had sex with a horse out in the county — just to name a few), the know-what around the Civic Center. The organizations Cowboys did not disappoint, covering all of those topics and more. And rolled on a different route to try and prevent this but it was still a mess. The MOTs’ signature dragon floats were with just the right tone — they were biting and funny but not offensive. I mean, they were offensive, but in a good way. And they poked some fun at awesome as always but were really late, causing some little ones to fall asleep on the parade route. However, we themselves, too, for last year. Self-deprecation is always a winner! Good to see them back in their groove. did hear that if their clothes got dirty, some of the riders But still, I don’t think we’ll see any politicos running back to join were throwing Tide pods. (Boozie hates she missed that, anytime soon. As one of their signs read, “The three things politicians fear those things aren’t cheap! Also, not delicious, teenagers!) the most: Being caught with a live boy, a dead girl or a membership in the But anyway, my spies who were trying to get to the Comic Cowboys.” IM tableau had trouble finding places to park and many missed it. We hear it was fabulous, though, as they celebrated their 150th! The spies said the band was great No rest for the weary and everyone was out on the floor getting down. Happy The weekend after Mardi Gras is usually pretty quiet, but with the warm Birthday, IMs! You don’t look a day over 149! temps everyone wanted to be outside. One of my spies said on Saturday night new downtown restaurant El Papi was standing room only and Briquettes and Grand Mariner were on one-hour waits. Also, we heard Pirate’s Cove in You’re so second fiddle! The Knights of Revelry paid tribute to famous side- Josephine, which just underwent renovations, was packed out with boaters all weekend. Our spies said the renovations looked great but the Bushwackers kicks with their floats on Fat Tuesday. Some of Boozie’s favorites were: Batman’s boy wonder, Robin; Shrek’s real tasted the same — perfect! We did get one odd report that an Orange Beach police officer was all hot ass of a sidekick, Donkey; and Tom Hanks’ volleyball, Wilson, who is quiet but an excellent listener. No word and bothered that dogs were out on the beach. Wonder what the pooches were on if there were any Tide pods or packages of Conecuh suspected of? Barking and entering? Dog-mestic violence? OK, those were sausage thrown, but a couple of my spies who watched just bad so I’ll stop there. the parade at The Royal Scam said they were inundated with so many footballs and beads they thought they had Well kids, that’s all I got. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic won the Fat Tuesday lottery — although some minor or scandalous or some plain ol’ Mardi Gras leftover lovin’, I will be there. bruises were reported. Ciao!

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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendor’s Lien retained in Deed from David F. Pruitt and Linda M. Pruitt, husband and wife to Michael Sharpe and Meridith Sharpe  dated July 30, 2015, and Recorded in Book  LR7289, Page 1459 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, notice is hereby given that the undersigned as holder of said Vendor’s Lien  will under power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on the  March 20, 2018  at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 2, UNIT ONE OF DEER RUN ESTATES SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 44, PAGE 30, OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT NON EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER, ACROSS AND UPON A 30 FOOT WIDE STRIP OF LAND LYING IMMEDIATELY EAST OF THE ALABAMA-MISSISSIPPI STATE LINE AND RUNNING FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, SOUTWARDLY ALONG THE ALABAMAMISSISSIPPI STATE LINE TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE PARCEL OF LAND CONVEYED HEREBY. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS.  AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS”  BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF THE PROBATE WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. David F. Pruitt and Linda M. Pruitt Mortgagee John T. Bender, Attorney McFadden, Lyon & Rouse, L.L.C. 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL 36609 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Joy K. Davis, a single person, originally in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., on the 26th day of July, 2010, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6686 Page 1198; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 19, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot T-2, Spring Lake, Unit One, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 65, Page 63, in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  242 Spring Lake Drive N, Mobile, AL  36695. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A, Mortgagee/Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  352555727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/ foreclosures 430477 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018

FORECLOSURE

RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in Default having been made in the terms of that certain property the right to redeem the property under certain vendor›s lien deed executed on August 24, 2014 by Zandra circumstances. Programs may also exist that help persons Coxwell as grantee to Kevin Frost and Sue Nell Frost as avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should grantors, which was recorded in the Office of the Judge of be consulted to help you understand these rights and Probate Mobile County, Alabama in Map Book 103 Page programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is 45 by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale con- made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured tained in said vendor›s lien deed, the following described by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposhighest bidder, in front of the north entrance of Mobile it of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds County Courthouse located at 205 Government St Mobile, made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and Alabama 36644 during the legal hours of sale on March place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must 15, 2018: Lot 2 of the resubdivision of lots 15,16, & 17 be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day Block C Glen Acres Subdivision 1st Addition as recorded in at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address Map Book 103 Page 45 Probate Court of Mobile, County.  indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to Said sale is for the purpose of paying said vendor›s lien award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highdeed and costs of foreclosure. Kevin Frost, Holder of est bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Vendor›s Lien 920 Dawes Rd. Mobile, Alabama 36695 Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and 251-591-0302 purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018 against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC, Mortgagee/ MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Transferee. Elizabeth Loefgren Default having been made in the payment of the indebted- SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  ness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Watson 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www. Kenneth Altman Jr. and Deborah H. Altman, Husband and sirote.com/foreclosures Wife, originally in favor of Edward Jones Mortgage, LLC, 429667 on the 26th day of January, 2012, said mortgage recorded Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 28, 2018 in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6857 Page 1924; the undersigned Wells MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will Default having been made in the payment of the sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile by Freda Farris Naman, unmarried, originally in favor of County, Alabama, on April 19, 2018, during the legal hours Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nomiof sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the fol- nee for Reverse Mortgage Solutions, Inc., on the 15th day lowing described real estate, situated in Mobile County, of June, 2015, said mortgage recorded in the Office of Alabama, to-wit: Lot 29, Hushi-Oka Subdivision, Second the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: Unit as recorded in Map Book 9, Page 336 in the Office of LR7278, Pg: 1746; the undersigned Reverse Mortgage the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Solutions, Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by Property street address for informational purposes:  7576 virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, Cornwallis St., Saraland, AL  36571. THIS PROPERTY WILL will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS RE- Mobile County, Alabama, on March 29, 2018, during FLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF in and to the following described real estate, situated THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 11 Country Club SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WAR- Woods, Part C, as per plat thereof recorded in Map Book RANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, 19, Page 107 of the records in the Office of the Judge of USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED for informational purposes:  728 Spring Station Rd , THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an Mobile, AL  36609. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN interest in property the right to redeem the property un- “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, der certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF attorney should be consulted to help you understand these THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebted- THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR ness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non- AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase an interest in property the right to redeem the property price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next busi- under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist ness day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves An attorney should be consulted to help you understand the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postpone- ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote ment or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The Transferee  Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. 430149 Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018 to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE real estate and to credit its purchase price against the Default having been made in the payment of the indebt- expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the edness secured by that certain mortgage executed by real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancelBrooke D. Walters, a married man, who acquired title as lation. Reverse Mortgage Solutions, Inc., Mortgagee/ a single man and Melissa Walters, originally in favor of Transferee. Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nomi- Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 nee for Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC, on the 14th day Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/ of July, 2015, said mortgage recorded in the Office of foreclosures the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: 426220 LR7285 Pg:1861; the undersigned Lakeview Loan ServicLagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 28, 2018  ing, LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedCounty, Alabama, on April 12, 2018, during the legal hours ness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Ozellar of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the fol- D. Clarke, a single woman, originally in favor of Amerilowing described real estate, situated in Mobile County, quest Mortgage Company, on the 3rd day of January, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 57, Pine Run, Unit Two, Part B sub- 2001, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of division, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 4942, Page 26, Page 108, of the Records in the Office of the Judge 0656; the undersigned U.S. Bank National Association, of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street ad- not in its individual capacity but solely as trustee for the dress for informational purposes:  950 Jackson Creek Cir, RMAC Trust, Series 2016-CTT, as Mortgagee/Transferee, Mobile, AL  36695. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on March 15, 2018, THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  interest in and to the following described real estate, THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: North 65 RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE feet of Lots 1 and 2 of Block 2, resubdivision of Block 3 AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE of Zimlich and Strauss Addition to Mobile as recorded in

42 | L AG N I A P P E | Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8

Deed Book 156, Page 52 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes: 600 Tutle Avenue, Mobile, AL  36604. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. U.S. Bank National Association, not in its individual capacity but solely as trustee for the RMAC Trust, Series 2016-CTT, Mortgagee/Transferee.   Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorneyfor Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/ foreclosures 424129 Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 28, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Perry D Chapman, and Carrie L Chapman, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Countrywide Bank, a Division of Treasury Bank, N.A., on the 22nd day of April, 2005, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5767, Page 1228; the undersigned Bank of America, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on March 15, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 3, Camelot, According to Plat thereof Recorded in Map Book 20, Page 65 of the Records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  4976 Camelot Dr, Mobile, AL  36619 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a nonrefundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Bank of America, N.A., Mortgagee/Transferee  Pam King SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 426544 Lagniappe HD Feb. 7, 14, 21, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on September 8, 2010, by Shawntell L. Wheeler, as Grantee to Iras Development Company, Inc., Inc., an Alabama corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate,

Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book 6697, Page 918, and said vendor’s lien having been last assigned to EMON, LLC, which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book LR7123, Page 1597, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on March 14, 2018. Lot 115, & 116 as per plat of TIMBERLAND, UNIT VI as recorded in Map Book 124, Page 55, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. EMON, LLC Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama  36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD Feb. 7, 14, 21, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Lillian Dean and Luke Rivers, husband and wife, originally in favor of Ameriquest Mortgage Company, on the 16th day of November, 2000, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5169 Page 1001; the undersigned Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for ABFC Mortgage Loan Asset Backed Certificates Series 2001-AQ1, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on March 8, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 1 and 2 in Square 136 of the West Gordon Division of the Favre Tract. Said lots being situated at the Southwest Corner of Charles and Selma Streets, fronting on Charles Street 85 feet and running back along the South side Selma Street of uniform width, 100 feet according to plat thereof recorded in Deed Book 34 N.S. Page 150, in the Office of the Judge of probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  400 Charles Street, Mobile, AL  36604 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for ABFC Mortgage Loan Asset Backed Certificates Series 2001-AQ1, Mortgagee/Transferee. Pam King SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 422323  

Lagniappe HD Feb. 7, 14, 21, 2018

PROBATE COURT

I, Don Davis, Judge of Probate, in and for Mobile County, Alabama, do hereby certify that the following resolution of the Mobile County Commission was filed with the Probate Court on the 15th day of February, 2018, viz: RESOLUTION WHEREAS, the Mobile County Commission has previously established precincts and voting centers for all Mobile County elections; and WHEREAS, some of the existing voting centers are not large enough, or are not suitably accessible, or are inconvenient due to traffic, parking and travel time issues, or for other reasons it is necessary to designate a new polling center; and WHEREAS, the Mobile County Commission has determined that there exists a necessity for relocating voting centers to make it easier and more convenient for the citizens of Mobile County to vote; and WHEREAS, a plan for alleviating the above conditions has been created for and studied by the Mobile County Commission; NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the premises, it is hereby resolved: PRECINCT 31: The name of the voting center for Precinct 31 has been changed, and the voting center for Precinct 31 is changed from Plateau


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com Community Center 850 Edwards Street Prichard, AL 36610 to Robert L. Hope Community Center 850 Edwards Street Prichard, AL 36610. PRECINCT 51: The voting center for Precinct 51 is moved from Saving Grace Lutheran Church 1500 Snow Road South Mobile, Alabama 36695 to Seven Hills Baptist Church 8950 Airport Blvd. Mobile, AL 36608. PRECINCT 53:  The name of the voting center for Precinct 53 has been changed, and the voting center for Precinct 53 is changed from Hillcrest Baptist Church 1204 Hillcrest Road Mobile, AL 36695 to Volunteers of America 1204 Hillcrest Road Mobile, AL 36695. PRECINCT 62: The voting center for Precinct 62 is moved from Kate Shepard Elementary School 3980-B Burma Road Mobile, AL 36693 to Ebenezer Baptist Church 5051 Ebenezer Drive Mobile, AL 36609. PRECINCT 64: The voting center for Precinct 64 is moved from St. Monica’s Catholic Church 1131 Dauphin Island Pkwy. Mobile, AL 36605 to Revelation Missionary Baptist Church 1711 Taylor Lane Mobile, AL 36605. PRECINCT 79:  The voting center for Precinct 79 is moved from Callahan Boys and Girls Club 6585 Carol Plantation Road Mobile, AL 36582 to Magnolia Springs Baptist Church 6058 Theodore Dawes Road Theodore, AL  36582. DONE and ADOPTED this 14th day of February, 2018. STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE I, John F. Pafenbach, County Administrator, hereby certify that the attached is a true and correct copy of a resolution adopted by the Mobile County Commission on the 14th day of February, 2018. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand  and the official seal of the Mobile County Commission on this 15th day of February, 2018. John F. Pafenbach County Administrator 

time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama. Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama.edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 10:00AM local time on Tuesday, March 6, 2018, in Room AD023 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 trentdavis@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 28, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE

Erica Tiffany Singleton, whose whereabouts are unknown, must answer Mignonette F. Sams’ statement of claim by March 21, 2018, or thereafter, a judgement by default may be rendered against her in Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 2018                                  Case No. SM 2017 001652 00, Circuit Court of Mobile County. Done this 21st day of February 2018.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION

PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: JUANITA TRAYLOR, Deceased Case No. 2018-0271 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 9th day of February, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. TRACY TRAYLOR JOHNSON as Executrix under the last will and testament of JUANITA TRAYLOR, Deceased. Attorney of Record: Thomas B Walsh Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: SUSIE BETTY CLARK DRAWNS Case No. 2017-2200 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 7th day of February, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. DINAH FAYE DRAWNS MCQUEEN as Executrix of the estate of SUSIE BETTY CLARK DRAWNS, deceased. Attorney of Record: RACHELE ALEXANDER REIS Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 28, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: WILLIE ROY BINGHAM Case No. 2017-2409 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 9th day of February, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. LATEDRA BINGHAM DIXON as Administratrix of the estate of WILLIE ROY BINGHAM, deceased. Attorney of Record: PATRICK COLLINS Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ESTHER M. SHEPPARD Case No. 2017-1075 Take notice that Letters of Administration on the Annexed Will have been granted to the below named party on the 1st day of February 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. SANDRA E. POTTS, as Administratrix CTA under the last will and testament of ESTHER M. SHEPPARD, Deceased. Attorney of Record: WILLIAM A. DONALDSON Lagniappe HD Feb. 7, 14, 21, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: MEISLER HALL GENERATOR INSTALLATION University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB #17-82 USA BID #8020501 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00PM local time on Tuesday, March 13, 2018, at Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the

Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 14, 2018

Estate of: Atty. Jarett C. Crawford, Deceased. All clients of Atty. Jarett C. Crawford, deceased, should claim their files by March 23, 2018.  Files may be claimed from 1407 Dr. M.L.K. Jr. Ave, Mobile, AL.  36603.  Files may also be claimed by contacting Victor Crawford at 251-2095400.  Any files not claimed by March 23, 2018 will be shredded and destroyed shortly thereafter. Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018 

STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2018 Regular Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT. SYNOPSIS: Relating to Class 2 municipalities; to further provide for the appointment of members to a board of adjustment; to provide for qualifications of members, and appointment and terms of  supernumerary members; to further provide for appeals to the board of adjustment and the time of appeals from administrative decisions; and to further provide for notice and grounds for appeals and that appeals to the board of adjustment will be heard de novo. Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 14, 2018

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers hosts Mobile Harbor improvement town hall meeting, Feb. 22 The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, will host a town hall meeting to update all interested parties on the ongoing study to evaluate impacts of widening and/or deepening the Mobile Harbor Federal Navigation Channel. The meeting is open to the interested public and will be held at the Mobile Convention Center, 1 South Water Street, Mobile, Ala., on Feb. 22 from 6 to 8 p.m. Free parking is available in the parking lot just south of the Mobile Convention Center on Water Street, between Church and Government Streets, adjacent to Cooper Riverside Park. Free parking is available for persons/vehicles with a handicapped permit in the underground parking lot of the Convention Center. The Mobile District commander will provide an overview of the District and the ongoing studies for the proposed harbor improvements project. After the Corps presentation, members of the public will have the opportunity to ask the commander and team questions, make comments and share concerns related to possible impacts associated with the potential project. The town hall meeting is one opportunity to share comments that will become part of the preparation of a Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the proposed project. In addition to the meeting, members of the public may submit comments by email to MobileHarborGRR@usace.army.mil or by mail to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, 109 Saint Joseph Street, Mobile, AL 36602. For more information, on the proposed Mobile Harbor Federal Navigation Channel project, visit http://www.sam.usace.army.mil/. Lagniappe HD Feb. 7, 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 5054 Old Shell Road (Northeast corner of Old Shell Road and Border Drive North.) for Use, Parking Surface, and Buffer Variances to allow a restaurant in a Neighborhood General Subdistrict of the Traditional Center District (R-1, Single-Family Residential District), with an aggregate parking surface and no parking lot buffering along a street frontage; the Zoning Ordinance does not allow a restaurant in a Neighborhood General Subdistrict of the Traditional Center District (R-1, Single-Family

Residential District), all parking surfaces must be paved with concrete, asphalt, asphaltic concrete, or an approved alternative paving surface, and parking lot buffering is required along street frontages. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 8th day of February, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 801 Spring Hill Avenue (West side of North Bayou Street, extending from Spring Hill Avenue to St. Francis Street.) for a Parking Lot Buffer Variance to not require a 3’ high wall or fence with vegetative buffer along the parking lot street front property lines on a commercial site within the Downtown Development District; the Zoning Ordinance requires a 3’ high wall or fence with vegetative buffer along street frontages of a parking lot on a commercial site within the Downtown Development District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 8th day of February, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 907 Hillcrest Road, Suites F & G (East side of Hillcrest Road, 490’+ South of Piccadilly Square Drive.) for an Administrative Appeal of a staff determination to allow one parking space per 300 square feet of gross floor area for a proposed painting class studio allowing class members to be sold wine and beer in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District; the Zoning Ordinance requires one parking space per 100 square feet of gross floor area for any business selling food or beverage in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 8th day of February, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 921 Dauphin Street (South side of Dauphin Street, 550’+ West of South Broad Street.) for Parking and Access/Maneuvering Surface and Parking Lot Lighting Variances to allow a parking lot with an aggregate surface and reduced lighting on a commercial site split-zoned R-1, Single-Family Residential and B-1 Buffer Business Districts (rezoning to LB-2, Limited Neighborhood Business is pending); the Zoning Ordinance requires parking and access/ maneuvering surfaces to be paved with concrete, asphalt, asphaltic concrete, or an approved alternative paving surface with lighting providing a minimum of one foot-candle on the parking surface on a commercial site (and LB-2 Districts) split-zoned R-1, Single-Family Residential and B-1 Buffer Business Districts. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 8th day of February, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 4568 Halls Mill Road (North side of Halls Mill Road, 715’+ West of the North terminus of Laughlin Drive.) for Parking and Access/Maneuvering Surface Variances to allow the retention of aggregate parking and access/maneuvering surfaces at a school in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District; the Zoning Ordinance requires parking and access/maneuvering surfaces to be paved with concrete, asphalt, asphaltic concrete, or an approved alternative paving surface at schools in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 8th day of February, 2018.  BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 2540 Old Shell Road (Northeast corner of Old Shell Road and North Florida Street.) for a Sign Variance to amend a previously approved Sign Variance to allow a wall sign on a non-street frontage wall on an end-unit tenant at a public street intersection on a multi-tenant commercial site in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District; the Zoning Ordinance limits wall signs for an end-unit tenant at a public street intersection on a multi-tenant commercial site to walls only facing public streets in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 8th day of February, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 1124 Hillcrest Road (West side of Hillcrest Road, 350’+ South of Johnston Lane.) for a Sign Variance to allow a digital electronic message center sign within 300’ of residentially zoned property in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District; the Zoning Ordinance does not allow digital signage within 300’ of any residentially zoned property in a B-2, Neighborhood Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama.This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 8th day of February, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on March 5, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 1703 Dublin Street (Block bounded by Dublin Street, Rotterdam Street, Belfast Street and Brussels Street.) for a Front Yard Setback Variance to allow an entrance canopy within 13’-10” of the front property line at a church in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District; the Zoning Ordinance requires a 25’ front yard setback for all structures over 3’ high in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 8th day of February, 2018. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 23 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  9845 Taylor Ave., Irvington, AL 36544. 2008 Lexus IS250 JTHBK262285066215 Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 23 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  1111 Oakdale Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer 1GNDS13S732259597 Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 23 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  267 Ingate St., Mobile, AL 36607. 2004 Chevrolet Avalanche 3GNEC12T54G195189 Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 23 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  413 Terrill St., Mobile, AL 36603. 2002 Toyota Camry 4T1BE32K52U535696 Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 23 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  315 Lee St., Chickasaw, AL 36611. 2009 Jeep Patriot 1J4FT28AX9D170151 Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 23 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  1050 N Hickory St., Loxley, AL 36551.

2004 Ford Explorer 1FMZU67K74UC40033 2009 Chevrolet Malibu 1G1ZG57B39F181475 1992 Chevrolet GMT-400 1GCDC14Z9NZ173137

Lagniappe HD Feb. 14, 21, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2005 Ford Escape 1FMYU03155KA14169 1998 Toyota Camry 4T1BG22K4WU239773 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  1628 Nawlin St., Mobile, AL 36615. 2005 Ford Explorer 1FMZU63K55UA92374 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  11543 Olivia Dr., Wilmer, AL 36587. 2008 Ford Crown Vic 2FAFP71V18X154163 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  7836 Jones Rd., Wilmer, AL 36587. 1994 Ford F150 1FTDF15R2RLB23050 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  7731 Theodore Dawes Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 2012 Dodge Charger 2C3CDXBGXCH163313 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  2911 Mill St Unit B, Mobile, AL 36607. 2008 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WU583889273708 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  3151 Moffett  Rd., Mobile, AL 36607. 2008 Nissan Rogue JN8AS58T98W012848 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  5662 Cottage Hill Rd., Mobile, AL 36609. 2005 Chrysler 300 2C3JA43R85H674648 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  706 Mt Sinai Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 2014 Dodge Avenger 1C3CDZAB3EN139267 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  7665 Walter Tanner Rd., Wilmer, AL 36587. 2007 Dodge Charger 2B3KA53H97H866954 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  2307C US Hwy 31 S., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2000 Toyota Camry 4T1BG22K0YU003625 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  2103 Wagner St., Mobile, AL 36617. 2009 Cadillac DTS 1G6KD57Y79U106945 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  7145 8th St., Mobile, AL 36608. 1996 Chevrolet Caprice 1G1BL52P1TR165460 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on March 30 , 2018 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  4666A Schimpfs Lane W., Mobile, AL 36619. 1992 Toyota Celica JT5ST87K0N0110619 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, 2018

Fe b r u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 8 - Fe b r u a r y 2 7 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


Lagniappe: February 21-February 28  
Lagniappe: February 21-February 28