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become characterized

by of our senses with a nearly tinuDUS stream 01 mediated jmag~ - eaSily lated and lIuidly recombined by ever more and. at the same time. more readily available technology. I

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how the schools all! re路 thinking design eduJ cation in the face of accelerated cullural production. changes by new technologies,. and altered societal relations between the design producing/ronstructing sector and the lay public.

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The study of architecture. with its methodical h,listic approach 10 problem solving and its global and lory-laden consideration of design issues.. can ~"~,atL times. iI charming relit - a staid but dignified elder

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The place 01 arthilecturaleducation in a rapidly modernizing world has long been controversial subiect - certainly since 196a when during the uprising in Paris. Ecole des Beaux Artes became a specific focus of student anger and finally II under widespread internal dissention. The extent to which architectural practice tains its distinctiveness and autonomy with regard to other design practices - or extent to which it should attempt to emulate their success - is part of a larger sian of the value of architecturaltradltions in relation to the importance of ''''\it'd",'~ as a relevant and meaningful voice in contemporary culture,

u... We spoke with the heads of seven local architecture and design programs to

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~"P"lS" demonstrate a wide variety of concerns and reflect the differences in the and focus at each of the schools. The breadth of this discussion can be seen. by

I';',,",,;,. to rellect the broadening of our definitions of the parameters of design. education,and architecture.


:Smce t e \9 0 s, eter lZumthor 's b uildings have ~xerted a quiet and lautono mous authority within ~the contemporary architecI urallandscape. The crafts~~ship of his buildings, ~eir physical presence, sim'pHcity and sensitive use of materials leave a lasting ·mpression.

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ANDREW lIANG- HAS SERVED ON THE FORUM BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND HEADS THE FORM ZERO BOOKSTORE AND FORM ZERO EDmONs. e

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's greatest ~":hll""~, Frank has pro-

wa paper company

'Salubra' ",as repeatedly asked

amouS artl.sts to compose

fetor scales for practical use in ~he wallpaper industry. Le ~orbusier designed twO collee .ons for Sa\ubra in 193 \ (43 h ades) and H)59 (20 colors),

over the ~"st 4.0 years. without conGehry's is both

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the Pritz.ker upon (\997), $verre will finally have a

"""..,.d monumental added to

11957/59, the second collection I ~

was designed as the mark of ~ Le Corbusier's changing ideas I ] about architecture and paint;;, ling. The colors weft joined on ~ single color card as a \ .. t o""i'",' providing not only a tool. b ut also a ki nd of .... ;g, of purist color theory. ~ the first book,

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~:~~;:)o;i~~~:. Ruegg (ETH ~ examines the meaning E

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Recognized groundbreaking project. the N~:,dl'o \ I>"I1I'on for the Venice ~1'm'I'lin \962, Fehn produced an body of work.

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\5o" "l ln"I" architects, was part of the sch ool of archi-

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Le Corbusier. The sec.1 ,", ,,,,d and third volumes feature Corbusier 's Salubra colors

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them 111~~;::1:':'to themaking public for the S ~

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~;:s~,:;movement. ~ to his own yet intemational vision, Fehn 'S archi,,,,lure embodies the ~,,;on'" of Nordic tTadi-

",n sl, '" tl" vem ac ular a modern atehitecvocabulary. };

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trchitect: conceptual and \ ~tTuctura\ sketches and text by Zumthor recount the genesis of the Thennal Bath at ~al ( l996). of the Art useum in Bregenz (l997) ~ the Memorial and Museum buildi.ng 'topograof terror' in Ber\in

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the Salubra conecn on for C ,~ history of modem ",hit,,,·1 •

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Museum the srill-lin-

\E l of Peter Zumthor 's proects proceed from a patient "" arch for basic composition. paintings' provide\ irst clues about the design :and, at the same time , evoke .J:£ meditative pictorial atmOS- ~ p'here . The book presents \ three new projects by the a

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part of the collection

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or the 1930/3\ designs, Le Eorbusier did not simply con~ ine himself to the 43 color fones on which he relied as an architect and painter. Rather, organized the different light ones on 12 sample cards in a ay th at three to fi ...e colors culd be isolated or combined \ I Y using a slide band. 1n ....

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publication wHi accomthe exhibition of the work in the Gallery in

[Lt'''"'' in the autumn of

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oment of life concrete· y and deliberately CO~· tTUCted by the coUechve rganizarlon of a unitary embiance and a game of

work, Made famous by their Munster design, the Bolles + Wilson team has on to secure other large·scale commis. producing high quality designs with ~b'solu'e attention to the smallest of tectonic ILtD",),

vents,

-oniat Having to do -th the theory or praett at activity of construct-

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alionist 'ntemational.

~rom 1957 to 197'2 the

uhvert the conservative deology of Western

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societal conventions and, - ~eed: playe.d a-:entral role in the cnses U'I France in 1C)67-6S.

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lThe movement's broadIside attack on ' establisl., institutions and left its mark up"nl ,~ libertarian left, the koun,w,ulture, the ~ u'io,..'y events of more recent phefrom punk to

this book, author

Sadler \nvesti.artistic, archileeand cultural thee'particularly as they to later ideas on of the modem

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p n gmal french edt-

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~ tion of the ~

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rchirec(Urt Principe last year ~ tU)¢) marking the ~ ~Oth anniversary. of the original mantestos produced by . Virilio and Parent in 1966. The original . rine issues ~i11 be republished to book " Ifonnat as a facSlml ' 'Ie 1~dition accompanied by a tenth and final number, under the ~rovocative title "Disorientation and

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~islocarion."

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that end, Peter Wilson take up one of the principal ...

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winning of the competition for the /M'ue,nst,e, Library by Bolles and Wilson and move to Gennany marked a turning in their career. The thinness of previous became under Gennan influence solid ~nout~ to be buill. Now with various buildGennany to their name, they appear successfully tTansfonned themselves'

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lartistic and political bovement known as the ituanonist Tnternational orked aggressively to

jA'''h''lian-,bom Peter Wilson and Gennan. Julia Bolles studied at the Architectural jAsso<,i.tion in London in the 1970'S, Wilson within the embrace of the AA, to as ' unit master ' one of the leading of the school in the 1980's, His fanei. often mannered work of this period rem."",d quimessential paper archi tecture, as a masterful graphical stylist he was imitated both within the AA and furth ro ugh the influence of numerAA publications dedicated to his work, work today still embodies a refreshing f o,mn.and of arch itectural fantasy, echoing early years al the AA. ~

ffhis work provides 'interrogative overvie ~f the state of things lat the end of the cen~ury, Opening its ~ages to leading con~~mporar~ archit.eets, he tenth Issue pmoims recent theoretial evolution in urban ~esign and architecI ontes, from the topo ogieal "disorienta.on" developed in the by the advocates fthe theory of blique function, to e post-geometrical "diSlocation .. of the xponents of decontroction in the 90S, e question of the ateri ality of real pace in the future cupies a central osition at a rime hen ubiquitous and mmaterial virtual pace has arrived,

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o respond to these ssues, Paul Virino and Claude Parent ave called on Coop immel(b)lau, D. ~ • ibeskind, J. Nouve1, U . Seigneur, B, ~ schumi and f . ~ igayrou.

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1997

[J! 110 L FOUNded 1912 tIC \"..oo.~

FOlIf'odEd 19119 4 'S UC \rllCbr~ W G ~rud(f'~ An

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istic and vet pragmatic notion lay at he genesis of the California public university ystem : that of a state polyechnic university to meet he educational aspirations f a large variety of Lalifornians interested in dvancing their understandng of the modern environment and more particularly ts technology. The polyechnic is designed to offer n affordable education which provides both the readth of a liberal arts rogram and the specificity f a professional program. t is pertinent in contemporary terms to locate the Department of Architecture t Cal Poly Pomona within this tradition of the public polytechnic as the genetic mprint of this egalitarian tructure continues to maniest itself today. At Cal Poly richly diverse student opulation has the oppor-

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nvironmental Design is a oray into 'practical art.' In e traditions of art and esign, design is considered rt contaminated by the eQuirements of necessity nd use. The course for nvironmental Arts at OTIS nderstands that the practical rt is in fact poised to be a ost profound art. The

en the NOW

'-,=il::-h-;Ii"tt:-Ie-,..----'ard for the iIIennial fever which migh aptivate g/obal cultures, CI-Arc recognizes the act that the fictional pro'ections of life in the year 000 have failed to conince' us that this momenous turn in the calendar ill coincide with a system f t~hnological operations

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l10ws us an

rena to transress the undaries of singular discilines such as Architecture, urniture. Landscape Design,

500 .. UC sn.rd£HJs

BAadl. MA..rdo.

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raduate chool of Architecture and rban Planning of UCLA was ounded in 1964. the world as awash in the idealism, ptimism and agonies of an ra that saw the birth pf social ctivism and the environmenI movement, the beginnings f the information explosion, s well as the astonishing ccomplishments of the rld's first youth culture. The

ow an nmistakable movement oward a new American art nd architecture which will e a vital expression of the ssentials of present-day life nd a necessary conseuence of the rapid developent of modern technology, ich will retain the rich her-

ile these words appear to a resoonse to contemooary events. they were writ-

ented by and given ng. purpose, and inten hrough its interaction with se and the practices of life.

ROSSBREEDS. CROSSRESSING. ROLE REVER -

FOt.WdEd 1919

Four.dt:d 19114 220 Gsllldum MARd..MA 6P11D

fouHckd 19} I sa uc ~Tuduo~

fouNdEd 19as

242 UC ~11ICb~

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ust as

architects meL'.~e,-,-fro-:-cm-y-e~a~'-s~ Of recesion they now confront a harpty altered landscape of ractice. Fragmented and speialized practice areas, internaionally dispersed collaborators nd consultants, an increased mphasis on design-build and iminished fees all reQuire ajar changes in our profesional attitudes and approachs and must also be reflected n our schools.

Ii1rl1Y 1937. by USC School

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ulture is always based on he concept of the crisis. e future, the idea of rogress. and the inalienbfe search for knowledge.

la{on w:a~JIt&dASi ears ago, modem technoloy consisted of such dvances as industrialization nd rural electrification.

ftt:1Ol!: ~o• • •" uture which has indeed n~ to paraphrase J.G. allard. annexed into the resellt. We are left with he creation of new realiies. which if at times are

dvanced technology to invesgate the myriad dynamic sysems that interact with archiecture and that are best

he way we live, leam, and en interact. Our faculty nd students are embracing hese advances, while main-

ssues which are re-shaping th rofession. ne issue is control. In haucer's Canterbury Tales. he wife of Bath asks "What do omen want?" The answer is ust what architects have alw anted, "mastery," Architects

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;The ehal-

L,-",--:::....,__Jlenge for ntenor Design programs oday is to develop a disdpli· ary project in the context a highly competitive and volatile market. The Department of Interior Design at Woodbury UniverSity thus understands ts mission not simply to elay the information and kilts necessary to successful rofessional practice, but to roject an identity for the iscipline through a syntheti esign-research education with a broad base in the libral arts and sciences. This Department

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emergence of an interior practice with a focused zone of expertise whose opoortunities will be iverse. and whose design nterventions will be comple nd fluid . We conceive the


, creative discipline of

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desire to enter willingly THE NOW: the most

Design, Urban

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all existing eor.struct,on at any within which

architectural

materials, prolighting,

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~;:;:;.~~':,"i:t:ical in these

sion. Students encouraged to learn , h"ou"h the art and science

~~:~~~~::~e~,~periments with lei cross-dressing,

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In this, ~C I -A," ,.. II explore the of popularized knowli view of the of technology and the Is unique

reversals, or ship jump-

~nde,'sta, nd both the poten-

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settings i'v"'~" with history is i the both the design stuand the lecture class. examination of this I is key to the stuunderstanding konst,anl change in how we our environment ' '''IUI,'es creative resolution. this end as the artist

a scale larger than that considered by Urban peSlgn, At the same time,

~;:~~:~~: dismantling

~~:~~~~o:an academic

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of beauty, proportion, hannony that have

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(local govemand the exigenof practice),

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,~;:::~~~~o;~tlher than ~ and culsupport of h,,"anlsl is transforming the tradiI arenas of the architecI historian and critic. New on the role of rep-

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It is recognized it is a far more comII method of teaching the conof applied rather

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,on the architectural practice, and

their appreciation of of

F

ALL

1997

~c,otl,e, Iss,ue is simply angst,

to engaging contemPOculture and technology to exploring new Wil'(S and i ' propositions - a p urse"d through a studioI nle",;I~ curriculum with a on design theory, as I as on digital and multi-

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of advanced informawith accelerating change not be daunted by it. A Architecture students in programs f nrougn,oulthe world g~in颅 the skills and self路confinecessary to be q an international practice. addition to programs' and Italy,

greater currency can through an advanced ~P''''''''.be.n on multiple levsurfaces, and networks.

~ejectln. the role of finish-

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~~~~::?,particularly as it is through digital

theoretical practice and khal yl,, ",' s the most

campus provides I setting for studYln ~ and

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in designs that are of the activities, and sensibili-

within the realm of the , thoughtful and specialstudio world, while at

design studios

b ",'e,cts incorporating ecosocial and political and involving planners, I"'d."'o~ architects, other professionals and community and political participants in the design process.

~U"'II"" win manifest them-

the that it

lechn,olo,gl"s: simplY,

and through existstn'ct'Jre" Without the ~u,o"n of establishing a r . rou,nd- or the requisite p ">dlJctlon of lone

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idea that the academy an elite cultural guardian a less informed public

Albers once said':;oJIY!V( art is or was IT are already ern in its time. daring with - as well and new, ing a constant change in seeing and feeling. If revival had been a verpetual virtue, we would still live . and earth pits. In art p",,"ele an education for a (as in architecture) of 'double-edged' visutradition is to create, oll'50a,tllal designer: a most not to revive. " ~ nl,en"e and focused studio

~n,se,"b,'e - creative influential even limited authority. the help of the

area of computer lechnolc.-I We have found that hard路 and basic skills are just of the story: innovations ' ~tIIlzl"g the technology are altering the entire design

as a fonn of research argument. The f,,;ult of this curriculum is production of designers are confident when with the and who actively

~~~.:;;~~,:altemative design of dynamic environ, the Department its obligation to its own version on II is


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ALL

'nvironmentat degradatio f a now universal aspect 0

ntemporary growth - th uburbs. Additionallv. th niversity has developed rld路renowned Center fO! Studies j proximity to th

:ollege of Environmenta

This center provide~ rchitecture students with a pportunity to gain insigh' 路om a growing and chang ing model for a sustainabl, 'nvironment. This brings th, polytechnic institution OM gain closer to the origina'

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lotion of educating for th' p ublic benefit.

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'997

a i d by Coy Howard, with ontinued work by Peter orrego) - a kind of itinerrv through layered sets of issues. These issues indude 'xplorations

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From object centered work. :0 space centered work.

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to

rk cen tered around both

nown and new relationships etween object and space

From physical and material :0 abstract, conceptual, and phemeral

From the handmade, to the :ool-made, the machine~ade, and the electronically r ade object/space From the production of the 'One-Off' through the 'Several -Off' to the 'Manyfrom custom design to fenera' and universal design

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From individual concems to cial concerns to worldly long the way, loopholes are cknowledged - loops are ade which fold back upon :he paths described above nd experience is gained 'rom having undertaken the itinerary. Design is experinced as an endeavor comp ri sed by a field of many ~u ltipricitous modes and 'ealms of operation. and that 'ach developing designer hO embarks upon a future ill chart a unique path rough this field.

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'ealities will emerge out of e study of the legitimate orces at work in our cul-

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If the search 'or freedoms has been at he heart of most avant arde projects. for 25 years CI-Arc has rehearsed this nthusiasm' with relentless 'Iarity. What is less known r remembered in the very truggles for creative open路 ess is the strategic rigor eeded to activate the heer anarchic impulse to 'hallenge authority. The embers of the SCi-Arc ommunity will refocus on e idea of discip line and recision, two conditions 'equired for optimum per'ormance. This is no ;traight-edge mentality ~r. as integrity and p rofessionalism are not an nherently political agenda, or a dress code. merely he conduit for the force of ew ideas.

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architecture is enhanced :he Department's strong ties :0 other academic programs in he School of the Arts and 'chitecture and throughout :he University. Encouraging d ents to understand archi:ecture in relation to the other rts - to art history, film, theIter, philosophy - contributes :0 increasing the awareness of :he radical importance of rchitecture and urbanism to :ultural life as a whole. 'ne of the most diverse, dis'ersed, exasperating and !xhilarating urban environents anywhere in the world, .os Angeles and its rich herrovides a model to which we Isp ire as well as an object of ,ur study and investigation. Ie Department of :hitecture and Urban Desig aintains its commitment ,th to being in the contemf arv world o f architecture i th fu lsome pleasure and fas'ination and to critiquing that ,rid without hesitation.

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accredited archi tectural eduto a popuof several people. Woodbury has initiated forma l with ElEA.

graduates have the POrtunity to develop nowledge in a wide range f areas, to become enaissance men and men .

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university intends that its illingness to take risks, seize pportunities and embrace onstructive change is a dear xample to our students. For hem and for the practice of rchitecture the bar is continu-

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:ives, and internships ; by bringng nationallY and internationally ognized architects, designers. rities. and historians to the niversity community; and by aking available a dynamic facIty and group of visiting crities. e Department actively recruits and has been fortunate to 'etain) faculty representing both F tabliShed and emerging voices n design education and p ractice'i !ach of whom is expected to be ighly motivated and proposiional, serving as an inspiration :0 students who will realize the mportance of developing an rticulate position with regard to ~esign in varied imagjnative and ~ aterial contexts.

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~iverse range of activities. elec-

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is dedicated to more profes-

look beyond the boundaries a problem. For our part, the ~niversity is opening an extenof our architecture school collaboration with Mesa ~ommunity College in San

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(l:l))Ml ·1610 "'(l:1Sj851_ _ M·!(c. . . . . , ........

3,

PA ULA G OLDMAN

--

ANARCHITECTURE Works by Gordon Matta-Clark OpenIng Reception : 1991 8: 30 · 9:30pm

Nov 19, 1991 . Jan 18, 1998 Wed · Sun, 11

U.

P AULA' GOLDMAN

WOO DBURY

U.

8.

am· 6 pm

JANE C RAWFOR D

11Il"ItfI*I c.lUlIogue ANARCHITECTlJRE

(1di1ed by Pel.. NoIviI' /oI1IIe MAK CIr'rW, .ssav by John VIU, 30 P89U, 13 llull,alions) ...In

o.cern.

"..----_..... --.....-

"Roland Rainer: Confessions·

_ _ 1IhI:l.t:3O·.:30"",

F_.,_",,,, __

~

COMMENT

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TIlE FORUM welcomes letters comments and suggestions.

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Please send all correspondence to: The Los Angeles Forum for Architecture & Urban Design P.O, Box 661327 Los Angeles. CA 90066 - 9327 Ph: 213/ 852-7145

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Newsletter, Fall 1997