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MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR Dear Fellow Angelenos, My Administration is committed to making Los Angeles the safest, most livable city in America. The Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD) is at the heart of our public safety strategy, and ensuring it is operating as efficiently and effectively as possible is critical to this work. We are making extraordinary strides in providing essential emergency and non-emergency services. The LAFD has established a new Operational Response Time, and made that information available to the public on the Department’s website. This creates greater accountability and allows the LAFD to track and measure its efforts to reduce response times — and it’s one of the most significant changes in the Department’s 129-year history. The LAFD has also unveiled a new SOBER (Sobriety Emergency Response) Unit to provide social services and support to homeless individuals struggling with chronic alcoholism. The SOBER Unit is an extension of the Sobering Center Facility established last year in partnership with LAFD and the L.A. County Department of Public Health. Additionally, we were awarded a $15.46 million grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which will be used to restore fire engines at four LAFD stations and hire additional firefighters to protect Angelenos’ lives and property. In an effort to improve the level of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) at Los Angeles International Airport, LAFD rolled out a 6-month EMS Enhancement Pilot Program that provides Advanced Life Support Cycle Teams, supported by an Advanced Provider Response Unit, in the LAX terminals. This pilot aims to speed up emergency response at a place where millions of travelers arrive every year. The LAFD is the finest fire department in the nation. This Strategic Plan reflects my belief that we can continue to provide a high level of service through sound investment, strong management and innovative policies. I look forward to working with you and Chief Terrazas in the new year to continue improving our emergency services in Los Angeles. Together, we will build a safer, more livable and well-run city for all Angelenos. Sincerely,

LOS ANGELES FIRE DEPARTMENT

STRATEGIC PLAN 2018-2020

TABLE OF CONTENTS FIRST IN SAFETY

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A WELL-RUN CITY

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GOAL 1: PROVIDE EXCEPTIONAL PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY SERVICE

GOAL 2: EMBRACE A HEALTHY, SAFE AND PRODUCTIVE WORK ENVIRONMENT GOAL 3: IMPLEMENT AND CAPITALIZE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY

A LIVABLE & SUSTAINABLE CITY

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A PROSPEROUS CITY

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GOAL 4: ENHANCE LAFD SUSTAINABILITY AND COMMUNITY RESILIENCY

GOAL 5: INCREASE OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONAL GROWTH AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Eric Garcetti 3


“EXCELLENCE OCCURS WHEN AN INDIVIDUAL RECOGNIZES AN OPPORTUNITY AND PURSUES IT WITH A PASSION.” -RALPH M. TERRAZAS FIRE CHIEF

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MESSAGE FROM THE FIRE CHIEF In 2015, the Department released the LAFD Strategic Plan “A SAFER CITY.” I stated at the time that I considered the document to be one of the most important documents ever produced by our Department because it would serve as our guide in creating the optimal LAFD. Three years later, I believe it was an accurate assessment. That 3-year plan created the direction and focus for the numerous successful initiatives we have implemented over the past three years. Most notable amongst these initiatives were the hiring of hundreds of new firefighters, the implementation of the Four Bureau Reorganization, the creation of innovative resources such as the Advanced Provider Response Unit and the Fast Response Vehicle, the establishment of the LAFD High School Magnet Program, the partnership with PulsePoint and many more. Through the collaborative efforts of our members, we were able to complete over 70% of the plan. I consider the achievement of 70% of our goals to be a success, however, we will strive to achieve even more in our new Strategic Plan…which we are calling A SAFER CITY 2.0. A SAFER CITY 2.0 was chosen for the title of our new strategic plan to represent that our strategies will be fewer in number but more refined and focused on critical objectives. It is also reflective of the progress we made in our first strategic plan. It is because of that progress that we have fewer goals and objectives in A SAFER CITY 2.0. As with the initial plan, we continue to align our priorities with Mayor Garcetti’s four priority outcomes: A Safe City A Well Run City Government A Livable and Sustainable City A Prosperous City Our alignment with Mayor Garcetti’s priority outcomes will ensure that achievement of our goals will also result in the achievement of the Mayor’s goals. I continue to believe that the most valuable asset of our Department is our people, and through our collective efforts we will achieve the vision described in A SAFER CITY 2.0. Sincerely,

LAFD VISION The Los Angeles Fire Department will provide exceptional Fire Protection and Emergency Medical Services by being metric driven, technologically sophisticated and community focused while reflecting the people we serve.

LAFD MISSION The Los Angeles Fire Department preserves life and property, promotes public safety and fosters economic growth through a commitment to prevention, preparedness, response and recovery as an all-risk life safety response provider.

LAFD CORE VALUES SERVICE – Dedication to our community PROFESSIONALISM – Honoring the Firefighter Oath INTEGRITY – Upholding moral and ethical conduct at all times RESPECT – Embracing diversity and recognizing individual worth INNOVATION – Taking creative risks to adapt and improve TRUST – Reliance on the integrity, strength and ability of our members

Ralph M. Terrazas Fire Chief

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THREE YEARS IN REVIEW 2015-2017 INITIATIVES AUGUST 2015 MAY 2015 Secured ownership of the Frank Hotchkin Memorial Training Center

JANUARY 2016

JUNE

Launched the Nurse Prac��oner Response Unit

Introduced LAFD/LA Unified School District “Hands Only” CPR Training

Acqui AW13 “Fire 4

JULY 2016

Mul�ple buildin saved at Downt Pallet Yard Fire

DECEMBER 2015 Greater Alarm blaze at recycling plant

AUGUS

Establish Magnet P

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SEPTEMBER 2015

OCTOBER 2015

Ini�ated Fast Response Vehicle (FRV) program; Implemented “Immediate Dispatch” voice dispatch program

Implemented Tiered Dispatch System


E 2017

JULY 2017

NOVEMBER 2017

ired new Augusta 39 helicopter, 4”

Plan to explore Unmanned Aerial Systems approved by Los Angeles City Council

753 ci�zens trained during CPR Week; Introduced SOBER Unit

ngs town e

SEPTEMBER 2017 La Tuna Canyon Fire burned 7,194 acres

DECEMBER 2017 Skirball Fire threatened Ge�y Center; Creek Fire burned 15,619 acres

ST 2016

hed High School Programs

AUGUST 2017 2017 World Police and Fire Games in LA; $15.46 million SAFER Grant awarded to LAFD

AUGUST 2017 California Task Force 1 deployment to Hurricane Harvey

OCTOBER 2017 LAX EMS Enhancement Pilot Program launched; Automa�c Vehicle Locator ini�ated 7


FIRST IN SAFETY

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GOAL 1: PROVIDE EXCEPTIONAL PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY SERVICE STRATEGY 1: Improve emergency response times STRATEGY 2: Improve the delivery of Emergency Medical Services

STRATEGY 3: Improve fire suppression services STRATEGY 4: Ensure an effective deployment of resources STRATEGY 5: Prepare for large scale disasters STRATEGY 6: Ensure an optimal state of readiness focusing on terrorism and disaster preparedness

STRATEGY 7: Enhance homeland security strategic priorities STRATEGY 8: Increase Tactical Emergency Medical Support capabilities

STRATEGY 9: Provide exceptional customer service STRATEGY 10: Partner with Los Angeles County Fire

Department and Long Beach Fire Department to establish a leadership role in the County, State and Country

STRATEGY 11: Implement a program to address unwanted false alarms and fee collections

STRATEGY 12: Develop Apartment Inspection Unit STRATEGY 13: Support High Rise Ordinance that ensures

sprinklers are fully installed in all residential high rise buildings within the City

STRATEGY 14: Explore development of a program to regulate hazardous waste management within the City

STRATEGY 15: Improve National Fire Incident Reporting System procedures and reports

STRATEGY 16: Develop homeless encampment survey program for Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zone and other areas of the City

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GOAL

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As we continually strive to provide exceptional public safety and emergency services, the Los Angeles Fire Department will enhance our customer service delivery model by leveraging performance management principles, innovative technology and adaptable resources to save and enrich lives, and to prepare for disasters – while fostering and enabling community resilience. – ALFRED L. POIRIER, CHIEF DEPUTY, EMERGENCY OPERATIONS

LAFD provided structure protection at the Creek Fire where 115,000 residents were forced to evacuate their homes in December 2017.

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BRUSH FIRES The 2017 California brush fire season produced an unprecedented amount of wildfires. The LAFD battled three historic brush fires locally. The La Tuna Canyon Fire erupted on September 1, 2017, and was the largest brush fire in 50 years at 7,194 acres burned. Just three months later on December 5, with erratic Santa Ana winds gusting at over 40 mph, the Creek Fire in Kagel Canyon broke out destroying 60 homes, 63 outbuildings and burned over 15,000 acres. While many crews were battling the Creek Fire, the Skirball Fire ignited along the 405 Freeway, damaging 12 homes and destroying six. LAFD members engaged in an aggressive coordinated attack with partnering agencies to successfully limit the damages of many structures. These two simultaneous incidents depleted LAFD resources throughout the City; however, the Department-wide response was critical in preventing the loss of life, minimizing the destruction of structures and firefighter injuries. LAFD strike teams were also deployed to other major wildfires including the Mendocino Lake Complex Fire in Northern California (36,523 acres, 545 structures destroyed), Thomas Fire in Ventura County (271,750+ acres, over 1,000 structures destroyed), Lilac Fire in San Diego and the Anaheim Hills Fire in Orange County.

STRATEGY 1: Improve emergency response times • Continue implementation of Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) technology and related Computer Aided Dispatch enhancements • Enhance maps and other geographic information system related tools to improve situational awareness and public information • Integrate with other systems, such as Automated Traffic Surveillance and Control and coordination of traffic lights • Increase resource availability by providing transport to alternative patient destinations such as SOBER Centers and mental health clinics • Expand Fast Response Vehicle (FRV) Program to provide increased coverage to areas of high call load and long travel distance

STRATEGY 2: Improve the delivery of Emergency Medical Services • Develop and implement EMS Strategic Plan • Assess feasibility of implementing a firefighter/paramedic workload relief program • Implement Paramedic Assessment resources at the remaining 24 Fire Stations, enabling the Department to be fully rotational • Develop EMS Virtual Paramedicine Program that utilizes technology and social media platforms for minor patient assessments and treatment • Expand Department of Mental Health Information Sharing Trial Program citywide to connect at-risk homeless individuals with housing and services • Continue to expand Advanced Provider Response Units to have one deployed in each Battalion • Assess feasibility of implementing Ambulance Operator Program

STRATEGY 3: Improve fire suppression services • Develop and implement an Unmanned Aerial System Program • Conduct Annual Field Incident Management Team Training • Institutionalize after action reporting process for significant incidents • Expand cadre of wildland qualified Command Officers • Institutionalize a process for ordering and utilizing fixed wing aircraft • Enforce “No Trespassing” Ordinance in Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zones to increase public safety and reduce risk of fires

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GOAL

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The San Fernando Valley attracts nearly two million people daily who live, work and play in one of the most diverse, attractive communities in the world. The native brush in the mountainous regions surrounding the Valley poses inherent risks and the potential for wildland urban interface fires that may threaten our community. Vegetation fuel loads in the Santa Monica Mountains, multi-agency communications and interoperability in the Mutual Threat Zone and evacuation challenges throughout the 260 square miles comprising the San Fernando Valley represent a few examples of our ongoing public safety concerns. These concerns demand a proactive posture that ensures the development of comprehensive planning processes specifically designed to improve efforts related to prevention, response and recovery from emergencies that may occur not only in the San Fernando Valley, but in our neighboring communities as well. – TREVOR RICHMOND, DEPUTY CHIEF, OPERATIONS VALLEY BUREAU


STRATEGY 4: Ensure an effective deployment of resources

• Complete Standards of Cover deployment analysis to determine the optimal distribution and concentration of resources and ensure a safe and effective response force for fire suppression, EMS and specialty response situations • Incrementally modify resource deployment based on the Standards of Cover recommendations • Enhance FireStatLA capability to provide predictive deployment analysis • Research and support development agreements through new developers to fund enhanced Department resources and fire facilities

STRATEGY 5: Prepare for large

scale disasters

• Provide command level training to strengthen response efforts during catastrophic events • Implement an enhanced and improved system to recall members to report to duty during catastrophic incidents or major disasters • Work with the Emergency Management Department and Police Department to increase the number of registrants on Los Angeles Emergency Alert Systems • Provide an updated Earthquake Emergency Response Manual to provide standard operating guidelines • Develop resiliency plans in preparation for heavy rainfall in post burn locations • Maintain a roster of qualified and relevant personnel to staff resources during a disaster and continue relevant training

STRATEGY 6: Ensure an optimal state of readiness focusing on terrorism and disaster preparedness

• Collaborate with law enforcement and intelligence agencies for information exchange, operational capacities and joint training exercises • Set standards on regional strategies for response, training and education by drawing on the counterterrorism efforts of partnering agencies

STRATEGY 7: Enhance homeland security strategic priorities

• Review and revise existing emergency plans ensuring Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Neurological integrated response and update LAFD Standard Operating Procedures • Identify critical infrastructure and key resource locations and vulnerabilities

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GOAL

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The Los Angeles/Long Beach Port Complex is approximately 7,500 acres of land and water and 43 miles of coast. The area includes the Vincent Thomas Bridge, Port Terminals, Catalina Terminal, World Cruise Center, the USS Iowa, Marine Fuel Terminals, Ports O’Call and many marinas with live-a-boards and cliffs located along San Pedro Coast. The LAFD has a responsibility to respond to life-threatening emergencies, disasters and terrorist acts in and around the Los Angeles/Long Beach Port Complex. In situations where seconds count, from capsized and sinking vessels to vehicles plunging in the ocean, the LAFD must arrive quickly to save life and property. The LAFD is looking into a fast response vessel that will reduce response times by 87% and provide paramedic services within three minutes to all parts of the Port of Los Angeles, which will greatly benefit the public we serve. Your safety – on land and sea – is our priority! – RONNIE VILLANUEVA, DEPUTY CHIEF, OPERATIONS SOUTH BUREAU

STRATEGY 8: Increase Tactical

Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) capabilities

• Enhance capability by staffing FRV with TEMS personnel within each Bureau • Expand TEMS program, developing a diverse and dedicated cadre and ensure specialized, highly dedicated and trained personnel availability for terrorism and active shooter incidents • Develop a program to deliver training such as Multi-Assault Counterterrorism Action Capability, “Stop the Bleed” and “Run-HideFight”

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Operations West Bureau is faced with response challenges that are unmatched throughout the City of Los Angeles. Our service delivery area incorporates the Los Angeles International Airport, the eclectic Venice Beach, the touristic streets of Hollywood, canyon and hillside communities, an ever present wildland environment, and two prominent academic institutions of higher learning. These response challenges are met each and every day with focused preparation, superior training and a willingness to provide exemplary service to a most deserving community. Our members assigned to West Bureau are honored to be tasked with educating a diverse population, by stressing the importance of disaster preparedness. These men and women are shining examples of those serving with courage, integrity and pride.

On December 6, 2017, the 405 Freeway was shut down and four homes, including some multi-million dollar properties, were destroyed when the fastmoving Skirball Fire scorched vegetation near the Getty Center in Los Angeles.

-ARMANDO HOGAN, DEPUTY CHIEF, OPERATIONS WEST BUREAU

STRATEGY 9: Provide exceptional

customer service

• Maintain a 72-hour turnaround for fire prevention related complaints • Conduct surveys to assess Department performance for all aspects of service delivery • Develop and implement annual Domestic Violence and Human Trafficking Awareness Training for all members • Provide training and awareness related to handling mental health emergencies

STRATEGY 10: Partner with Los Angeles County Fire Department and Long Beach Fire Department to establish a leadership role in the County, State and Country • Implement Joint Project Partnerships within the region to collaborate on initiatives that impact the fire service • Develop Incident Command Team Program between City and County Fire Departments • Collaborate with Los Angeles County Fire Department and Los Angeles Area Fire Chiefs Association to host the Firehouse World Conference in Los Angeles beginning in 2019

STRATEGY 11: Implement a

program to address unwanted false alarms and fee collections • Develop ordinance and fee structure for unwanted false alarms • Implement training program for affected field and special duty personnel • Track high incidences of unwanted alarms and collect revenue for violations • Develop a system to more efficiently manage high probability of unwanted false alarms

STRATEGY 12: Develop Apartment Inspection Unit • Draft local Apartment Inspection Ordinance and identify proper staffing model to establish an equitable business model for all apartment buildings • Develop standardized fee schedule and Apartment Inspection Ordinance cycle for state mandated annual inspections

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GOAL

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STRATEGY 13: Support High Rise Ordinance that ensures sprinklers are fully installed in all residential high rise buildings within the City • Provide ongoing evacuation and preparedness education to business owners and tenants with an emphasis on high rise buildings • Provide awareness to building owners, tenants and elected officials on the viability of high rise sprinklers

STRATEGY 14: Explore development of a program to regulate hazardous waste management within the City • Partner with State and local agencies to explore transferring the regulatory control of hazardous waste from LA County to LAFD/Fire Prevention Bureau

STRATEGY 15: Improve National

Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) procedures and reports

• Develop a manual to provide consistent data entry and technical support for NFIRS users • Provide training to all officers to achieve uniformity in incident and activity reporting • Develop relevant metrics through FireStatLA Section to monitor data collection and make recommendations for improvement

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Be prepared Los Angeles! It is very easy to get distracted about emergency preparedness living in Los Angeles. Our near perfect climate, tons of outdoor activities and everyday life all make for easy distractions in preparing for an emergency. In 2017, many people in our Country and abroad were affected by substantial natural disasters. Earthquakes, wildfires, hurricanes and flooding were almost everyday news. Although natural disasters seem to happen every day, these life-changing events should not be taken lightly. In Southern California, we are all too painfully aware of the potential devastation from earthquakes and wildfires. My hope is that everyone develops a plan to prepare their family for a natural disaster, but hope is not a strategy. Winston Churchill once said “Failing to plan is planning to fail.” The better you pre-plan your disaster plan, the better you will be able to deal with a disaster when it occurs. Make a plan, get a kit and be informed. -PHILLIP T. FLIGIEL, DEPUTY CHIEF, OPERATIONS CENTRAL BUREAU


STRATEGY 16: Develop homeless encampment survey program for Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zone (VHFHSZ) and other areas of the City

During Hurricane Harvey, CA-TF1 Medical and Rescue Specialists assist a disoriented and dehydrated 68 year-old gentleman.

• Create task force with partnering agencies to complete initial sweep of at risk brush areas to develop long-term mitigation measures • Validate property ownership and identify proper entities for enforcement • Institutionalize VHFHSZ survey process by activating during brush clearance activities, issuance of annual Brush Departmental Bulletin and as necessary by field resources

CA-TF1 AUGUST 27, 2017 Hurricane Harvey made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane in Texas. Harvey was the strongest hurricane to hit the U.S. in more than a decade. On August 27, 2017, FEMA’s Urban Search and Rescue LAFD California Task Force 1 (CA-TF1) was activated to respond in Houston. CA-TF1 deployed to Katy, Texas where they conducted search and rescue operations, assisted with evacuations and reconnaissance. Water Rescue Teams also successfully rescued 50 adults, four children and 12 animals. As the team was demobilizing from this incident, CA-TF1 was rerouted to Montgomery, Alabama on September 6, 2017 to provide emergency response staging in anticipation of Hurricane Irma. Shortly thereafter, CA-TF1 reported to the Big Pine area in the Florida Keys where they performed search and rescue operations, search data collection and coordinated medical treatment and transportation in an area with over 2,000 homes. CA-TF1 worked in coordination with CA-TF4, AZ-TF1 and AZ-TF3 in an operational area that had no power, phones or running water. The teams worked from satellite communications and generator power. This mission, the longest deployment in history for the continental United States, and this team provided assistance to the most vulnerable parts of the country. It was a very proud moment for the LAFD. 17


A WELL-RUN CITY

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GOAL 2: EMBRACE A HEALTHY, SAFE AND PRODUCTIVE WORK ENVIRONMENT

STRATEGY 1: Create and implement an organizational structure to address human resources, personnel management and workplace environment

STRATEGY 2: Ensure the safety and accountability of members on-scene of emergencies

STRATEGY 3: Expand opportunities for members to improve overall health and wellness

STRATEGY 4: Develop more robust mental health support initiatives and fitness evaluations for LAFD personnel

STRATEGY 5: Reduce workplace injuries to minimize workers’ compensation costs

“THOUGHTFUL WORKPLACE DESIGN CAN BE A POWERFUL TOOL FOR SUPPORTING AND ENCOURAGING OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE.”

– KRISTIN CROWLEY, DEPUTY CHIEF, FIRE PREVENTION AND PUBLIC SAFETY BUREAU

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GOAL

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There is emerging evidence that many work-related factors and health factors outside the workplace greatly influence the safety and health problems confronting today’s fire service. Training programs such as Firefighter Survival Training and Live Fire Training have focused on reducing worker exposure to risk factors in the work environment itself. Our Behavioral Health Program has focused on reducing or managing stress and offthe-job lifestyle choices that place members in higher risk categories. The Department is committed to programs that are closely integrated with related human resource functions, such as behavioral health care, employee assistance programs and workers’ compensation assistance which lead to a more productive and healthier membership. – FRED J. MATHIS, CHIEF DEPUTY, ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

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STRATEGY 1: Create and implement an organizational structure to address human resources, personnel management and workplace environment • Assess the feasibility of hiring a consultant to research and plan the implementation of a new organizational structure • Ensure frequent messaging from the Fire Chief and provide consistent training to all members on the value of human resources, personnel management and a professional workplace environment • Develop and evaluate performance metrics to serve as benchmarks for success and assess the work environment on a continuous basis • Develop a comprehensive and all inclusive workplace sensitivity training for all members

STRATEGY 2: Ensure the safety and accountability of members onscene of emergencies • Restore Emergency Incident Technicians to all Battalion Commands • Research and explore utilization of technology to enhance on-scene safety and accountability • Develop Operational Risk Management training to be provided at Company Officers Responsibilities and Expectations Program, Chief Officers Continuing Education Program and Officers Continuing Education Program • Research and implement policies, practices, procedures and strategies to mitigate organizational risk exposures


INNOVATIVE EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES UNIT The newly formed Public Health Unit, within the EMS Bureau, has introduced several new and innovative field resources to better serve our community and our changing EMS service demands. The FRV is a rapid, Advanced Life Support resource that provides timely, life-saving intervention, on-scene triage and is also capable of fire suppression. The APRU, staffed by an EMS Advanced Provider (nurse practitioner or physician assistant) and a firefighter paramedic, has a wide clinical scope of practice. In addition to providing a linkage to care for EMS “super users,” who have become dependent upon the 911 system for their chronic medical and social issues, the APRU can treat and release low acuity patients in the field, thus avoiding unnecessary ambulance transports. The APRU also provides medical clearance for patients with behavioral emergencies, and can provide transportation directly to a mental health urgent care facility. The SOBER Unit, placed into service in November 2017, performs medical screening of public inebriates and transports these patients directly to a Sobering Center, where the patients can receive alcohol abuse counseling, diversion programs and transitional housing. These new resources provide timely, directed care for these vulnerable patients and represent a paradigm shift in our service delivery model, matching an appropriate response to these growing subsets of patients. Los Angeles International Airport bi-annual training exercise

– MARK ECKSTEIN, MD, MEDICAL DIRECTOR, COMMANDER, EMS BUREAU

STRATEGY 3: Expand opportunities for members to improve overall health and wellness • Review and revise the LAFD Fitness Program • Provide a diet and nutrition guide for LAFD members • Partner with the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine for firefighter skin cancer screening program • Create and implement a fire station hygiene program

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GOAL

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STRATEGY 4: Develop more robust mental health support initiatives and fitness evaluations for LAFD personnel • Develop a Behavioral Health Program strategic plan to address mental health needs and provide applicable training • Provide training to increase awareness of firefighter suicide and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder • Update the Family Medical Leave Act policy including development of a reference guide and Departmental Bulletin

STRATEGY 5: Reduce

workplace injuries to minimize workers’ compensation costs • Develop an Injury Prevention Program • Collect, research and evaluate data to identify work place injuries due to high risk “nonemergency” activities • Assess feasibility of implementing a proactive wellness program aimed at reducing workers’ compensation costs • Improve the Return to Work program by developing and formalizing a methodology for tracking members off duty long term • Institute a baseline functional movement evaluation prior to entering and throughout the Recruit Training Academy to ensure physical fitness standards are maintained

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Over 180 firefighters were onscene at the Arts District Fire near Downtown Los Angeles which spread from a pallet yard to six neighboring buildings on July 23, 2016.


GOAL 3: IMPLEMENT AND CAPITALIZE ON ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY

STRATEGY 1: Implement enterprise analytics and

reporting capabilities to leverage all available data assets

STRATEGY 2: Work with City Information

Technology Agency partners to implement improvements to LAFD’s emergency communications systems and infrastructure

STRATEGY 3: Implement technology initiatives

to improve workforce management systems

STRATEGY 4: Research, assess and implement

advanced technologies that provide the LAFD with innovative, agile operational advantage

“THINK BIG. START SMALL. WE OFTEN LET COMPLEXITY BE THE ENEMY OF EXECUTION. OUR FOCUS IS ON QUICK, INCREMENTAL WINS SO THAT WE LEARN AS WE GO, EACH STEP INFORMING THE NEXT.”

– SCOTT PORTER CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BUREAU

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GOAL

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Information technology has an increasingly significant role in achieving each of the Fire Department’s strategic objectives. As a leader and innovator in public safety and emergency services, the LAFD will become more agile in our ability to proactively assess, select and implement technologies that provide operational advantage and insights in the most efficient, timely and cost-effective manner. – SCOTT PORTER CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BUREAU

STRATEGY 1: Implement enterprise analytics and reporting capabilities to leverage all available data assets • Create standardized data management, transformation and access mechanisms in order to simplify access to department data assets • Enhance the value of departmental data by deploying powerful, easy to use, enterprise business intelligence, data visualization and reporting tools • Speed innovation and insights by exploiting machine learning technology and advanced data analytics tools • Create member driven data culture by providing self-service reporting and data visualization capability at all levels of the organization

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STRATEGY 2: Work with City Information Technology Agency partners to implement improvements to LAFD’s emergency communications systems and infrastructure • Replace aging portable radio inventory with modern, multi-band radios that enable interoperability with surrounding agencies • Complete required maintenance and upgrades to voice radio systems • Upgrade fire station alerting network infrastructure and systems to enhance performance and resiliency • Implement mobile broadband data network to enhance field capabilities and improve situational awareness • Assess and implement the necessary infrastructure and personnel required to support the four geographic bureau dispatch model


STRATEGY 3: Implement

technology initiatives to improve workforce management systems • Replace aging network staffing system with a modern, flexible and robust system • Improve the management of employee records from recruit to retiree by eliminating duplication and consolidating around a single system of record • Improve the management of member training and certification records by eliminating record keeping duplication and leveraging existing learning management systems

UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS (UAS) On November 7, 2017, the Los Angeles City Council approved the Department’s policy for deployment and use of UAS to fight fires, improve efficiency of training and respond to high risk incidents. The LAFD is one of the first major metropolitan fire departments to obtain a Certificate of Waiver/Authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration to operate UAS as part of its initial action hazard mitigation and response matrix.

STRATEGY 4: Research,

assess and implement advanced technologies that provide the LAFD with innovative, agile operational advantage • Continue to develop and deploy AVL technology to enhance dispatch decision making and emergency resource management • Develop and deploy enhancements to CAD and field resource systems that enhance situational awareness and realtime decision making • Evaluate, experiment and deploy advanced and emerging technology platforms that enhance operational performance and resiliency such as cloud, broadband, smart devices and “Internet of Things” • Implement an enterprise fire inspection management system to replace aging, disparate and disconnected inspection related systems with a single, enterprise fire inspection system

Timely and accurate communication is essential in getting the right resources in place to mitigate an incident. The LAFD plans to deploy drones in a variety of emergency scenarios, where the complexity or scope of the incident requires critical decision making on the part of the incident commander and/or pose a significant risk to firefighter safety. The LAFD continues to capitalize on advanced technology to provide our fire service professionals greater awareness and access to critical information which results in safer and more effective actions.

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A LIVABLE & SUSTAINABLE CITY

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GOAL 4: ENHANCE LAFD SUSTAINABILITY AND COMMUNITY RESILIENCY

STRATEGY 1: Continue targeted outreach to high risk

populations through Community Risk Reduction based on data analyses

STRATEGY 2: Enhance efforts to recruit diverse candidates reflective of the communities we serve

STRATEGY 3: Enhance LAFD Youth Programs to ensure consistency and access for all youth

STRATEGY 4: Prepare bond proposal for fire department facilities

STRATEGY 5: Standardize a Department-wide succession plan STRATEGY 6: Improve services and access for vulnerable populations

“POSITIONING OUR DEPARTMENT TO MEET THE FUTURE CHALLENGES THAT OUR COMMUNITIES WILL FACE AND PREPARING THOSE COMMUNITIES TO ENDURE WITH COURAGE.”

– GRAHAM EVERETT, DEPUTY CHIEF, ADMINISTRATION BUREAU

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GOAL

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The LAFD is taking the initiative to develop ideas that will make the Fire Department more sustainable and environmentally friendly. New construction of fire stations incorporate energysaving features. Opportunities and initiatives are sought to encourage water conservation, such as discontinuing lawn sprinklers and recycling water during the Engineer examinations. Community resilience is the ability to prepare for anticipated hazards, adapt to changing conditions and withstand and recover rapidly from disruptions. Activities, such as disaster preparedness— which includes prevention, protection, mitigation, response and recovery— are key steps to resilience. LAFD programs such as Community Risk Reduction and Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) help residents proactively protect themselves against hazards, build self-sufficiency and become more sustainable. – FRED J. MATHIS, CHIEF DEPUTY, ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

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STRATEGY 1: Continue targeted outreach to high risk populations through Community Risk Reduction based on data analyses • Assess community safety needs and use data collection to prioritize risks and evaluate strategies and results • Install additional public access Automatic External Defibrillators (AEDs) and bleeding control kits at appropriate venues and businesses throughout Los Angeles • Work with the Community Emergency Response Team in response and recovery capabilities within each of the four Bureaus • Partner with LA Unified School District to deliver hands-only CPR and first aid education to all high schools

STRATEGY 2: Enhance efforts to recruit diverse candidates reflective of the communities we serve • Target recruitment efforts to increase the number of female firefighters in the LAFD (5% by 2020) • Develop and deliver a new recruitment campaign including a new public service announcement • Enhance efforts to track and evaluate the effectiveness of our recruitment efforts • Accept applications for firefighters and re-open hiring process in Spring 2018

Second LAFD Girls Camp held at Fire Station 81 in April 2017.


COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION UNIT Community Risk Reduction is the identification and prioritization of risks, threats and hazards followed by the implementation and evaluation of strategies to lessen their impact. The Los Angeles Fire Department uses an integrated approach that balances emergency response capabilities with proactive measures by involving the community in problem solving and strategic implementation. CPR training, smoke alarm installation programs, fall prevention and bleeding control are just a few of the topics currently being addressed through the Community Risk Reduction Unit. Ongoing evaluation of priorities, methods and results allows the LAFD to identify trends in the community and partner with public and private agencies to address current safety issues. This community-based approach helps provide innovative solutions and increases the efficiency and effectiveness of the LAFD’s proactive public health and safety efforts.

Members of the Community Risk Reduction Unit teach handsonly CPR and AED use to community members (including Councilmember David Ryu, CD4) at the Griffith Observatory on November 6, 2017, during the LAFD CPR Week event.

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GOAL

4

STRATEGY 3: Enhance LAFD Youth Programs to ensure consistency and access for all youth • Increase staffing in the Firefighter Recruitment Section to manage youth development programs and events • Develop Code of Conduct, liability waivers and training for all members working with youth • Increase the number of females attending the LAFD Youth Programs • Assess the feasibility of a “train to hire” program for qualified youth program participants

STRATEGY 4: Prepare bond

proposal for fire department facilities • Assess and prepare a list of facilities to be built and/or renovated for placement on 2020 ballot

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STRATEGY 5. Standardize a Department-wide succession plan • Identify pertinent positions requiring a succession plan • Identify training, education and experience requirements for identified positions

STRATEGY 6: Improve services and access for vulnerable populations • Ensure public trust of immigrant population per Executive Directive No. 20 so that all residents feel safe and supported when accessing City services and resources available to them • Enhance evacuation notification procedures for vulnerable populations


LAFD YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS The Los Angeles Fire Department is committed to the development and success of all youth throughout Los Angeles. Youth Development Programs provide early education and orientation into a career within the LAFD and are designed to enlighten youth and young adults between the ages of 14-21 about opportunities in the fire service. This early introduction also supports the long term recruitment effort to hire diverse candidates that represent the communities we serve. The four youth programs currently offered by the LAFD are the High School Magnet Program, the Youth F.I.R.E. Academy, the Cadet Program and Girls Camp. The goals of the LAFD youth programs are to not only provide basic technical competencies in firefighting but to develop communication, teamwork, leadership and life skills with LAFD mentors as a positive character and role model. The youth served in these programs develop a sense of community service, gain self-confidence and obtain the skills necessary to be successful in any career they choose.

On September 14, 2017, Drill Tower 40 graduates the most female recruits in its history.

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A PROSPEROUS CITY

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GOAL 5: INCREASE OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONAL GROWTH AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

STRATEGY 1: Create and implement a Professional

Development Section for individualized advancement and education

STRATEGY 2: Develop specialty and skill specific training

opportunities for personal and professional growth

STRATEGY 3: Develop Fire Officer Operational Development Training

STRATEGY 4: Create a professional foundation for firefighter recruits

“IMPROVE, GET BETTER AND BECOME A BETTER VERSION OF YOUR FORMER SELF.” – JUNE GIBSON, FIRE ADMINISTRATOR, ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BUREAU

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LOS ANGELES FIRE DEPARTMENT

FOUNDATION

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LAFD FOUNDATION The Los Angeles Fire Department Foundation serves a vital role in the Los Angeles community. The Foundation supports the LAFD by providing essential safety equipment, training and technology upgrades not funded by the City’s budget. This partnership has not only enhanced the capabilities of the men and women of the LAFD, it has widened public outreach by supporting several youth programs throughout the City. To date, The Foundation has provided support for the following equipment and programs: • Brush firefighting helmets • Heavy-duty washing machines for extracting hazardous chemicals from firefighter gear • Durable flashlights designed for firefighting and rescue • Stair chairs that limit back strain and allow rapid patient evacuation • Advanced Provider Response Unit • Community Risk Reduction Unit • Critical veterinary care for Urban Search & Rescue K9’s • Forensic investigation tools for arson investigators • Helicopter multi-role night vision capability • Youth programs to develop character and train future firefighters • Citywide Adopt-A-Fire-Station Projects • Unmanned Aerial Systems • Sponsorship of Medal of Valor and award ceremonies • Citywide community events And a special thank you for their support in the funding of this document, The LAFD Strategic Plan: A SAFER CITY 2.0.

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GOAL

5

Adapting the LAFD culture to effectively address attrition, turnover, current and evolving needs is a formidable and ongoing challenge. It is no longer sufficient to rest on past successes. It is incumbent on leaders at all levels within the LAFD to continuously grow, develop and improve the organization. Developing, maintaining and enhancing professional and personal development opportunities has become more important within the LAFD and is absolutely critical for those aspiring to higher ranks. The LAFD will define a clear path for personal and professional growth within the organization by recognizing this obligation to provide a structured systematic approach for career planning and professional development. Through our collaborative efforts we will focus on training, education, performance evaluation, job shadowing, job rotation and mentoring the future leaders of this Department. – RICHARD RIDEOUT, DEPUTY CHIEF, TRAINING AND SUPPORT BUREAU

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STRATEGY 1: Create and implement a professional development section for individualized advancement and education • Establish Public Service University for education and training opportunities • Develop a mentorship program for guidance and professional development with sensitivity to the diverse needs of the members • Develop a preparatory program for each promotional rank to include position taskbooks when appropriate • Expand EMS training and education opportunities

STRATEGY 2: Develop specialty

and skill specific training opportunities for personal and professional growth

STRATEGY 3: Develop fire officer operational development training • Develop consistent, scenario based Command and Control Training to improve emergency operations skill level

STRATEGY 4: Create a

professional foundation for firefighter recruits • Align Drill Tower Academy with State Firefighter I Certification • Align LAFD training programs with California state firefighter certification tracks • Establish regional recruit training location for outside agencies • Identify methods and adopt recommendations to improve retention of recruits and probationary firefighters

• Develop Incident Management Team Type III California Incident Command Certification System (CICCS) Qualification • Create cadre concept for specialized training to obtain certifications • Provide training to selected members for certification in UAS • Create fire suppression reintegration program for members who have served in other capacities for extended periods of time • Implement an instructor development program for California State Fire Training courses such as CICCS and National Wildfire Coordinating Group

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LAFD FIRE FACTS FIRE LOSS IN DOLLARS

$156.8M PROPERTY LOSS $75.3M CONTENT LOSS $232.1M TOTAL LOSS

INCIDENTS BY YEAR 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000

PERSONNEL

0

FIRE 3,216 SWORN PERSONNEL FIRE 379 CIVILIAN PERSONNEL

2015 2016 2017 EMS Incidents

Incidents

INCIDENTS BY CATEGORY 4.3%

INSPECTIONS

31,078

3.3%

Miscellaneous

INSPECTIONS

35.9%

Basic Life Support

Other Fire Types

0.9%

6.2%

Structure Fire

Automatic Alarm

Average Annual Inspections by Fire Station Members

139,947

VHFHSZ INSPECTIONS

Average Annual VHFHSZ Parcels Inspected

5.7%

42.1%

Non-Emergency

Advanced Life Support

1.6%

Rescue

COMMUNITY SURVEY I approve of the job the LAFD is doing.

LAFD treats residents in a fair, courteous, and professional manner.

How is the LAFD at suppressing fires?

Strongly approve Somewhat approve Somewhat disapprove Strongly disapprove Not sure

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How is LAFD at responding to medical emergencies?

Very good job

How is LAFD at customer service and community outreach?

Somewhat good job Poor job Not Sure

Fair job


OPERATIONAL RESPONSE TIMES Structure Fire Critical ALS EMS Non-EMS

2016

2017

05:06

05:09

05:35

05:40

06:30

06:36

06:16

06:24

(MM:SS)*

*LAFD Operational Response Time: The time interval that starts when first contact is made (either through 911 or the fire dispach center) and ends when the first Standard Unit 1 arrives on-scene.

FIRE FATALITIES 25 20 15 10 5 0

RESOURCES

2015 2016 2017

AVERAGE CALLS PER DAY BY DISTRICT

94

Engines

93

Paramedic Ambulances

42

Trucks/Light Forces

41

Basic Life Support Ambulances

28

Assessment Trucks/Light Forces

Average calls per day Up to 10

15

11 - 20

Brush Patrols

21 - 30

6

31 - 40

USAR Companies

41 - 55

6

Airport Units

6

Helicopters

5

106 FIRE STATIONS

5

14 BATTALIONS

Dozers/Loaders Fire Boats

4

Hazardous Materials Squads

4

4 BUREAUS

Swift Water Rescue Teams

4

Foam Tenders

1

Heavy Rescue 39 39


40 40


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Associations and Foundations Chief Officers Association United Firefighter of Los Angeles City First-In Fire Foundation LAFD Foundation MySafe:LA

Eric Garcetti Mayor Ralph M. Terrazas Fire Chief Fire Commission Delia Ibarra, President Andrew Glazier, Vice President Jimmy H. Hara, M.D. Jimmie Woods-Gray Rebecca Ninburg

Project Managers Betty Bonada Kristina Kepner

Los Angeles City Council President Herb J. Wesson, Tenth District President Pro Tempore Mitchell Englander, Twelfth District Assistant President Pro Tempore Nury Martinez, Sixth District Gilbert A. Cedillo, First District Paul Krekorian, Second District Bob Blumenfield, Third District David E. Ryu, Fourth District Paul Koretz, Fifth District Monica Rodriguez, Seventh District Marqueece Harris-Dawson, Eighth District Curren D. Price, Jr., Ninth District Mike Bonin, Eleventh District Mitch O’Farrell, Thirteenth District JosÊ Huizar, Fourteenth District Joe Buscaino, Fifteenth District

Consulting Team Sam Schwartz Engineering Photo Credits Harry Garvin, Brian Humphrey, Gary Apodaca, Greg Doyle, Adam VanGerpen, Chris Conkle, Bernard Falkin, Ojromero88, Jasper De Jesus, Branden Silverman, Peter Sanders, Alex Gillman, Mark Masek and Jorge Arrellano Front Cover: Brian Litt Back Cover: Kody Schmidt Back cover: LAFD High Rise Unit Inspectors were instrumental in the timely completion of the Wilshire Grand Center, a 1,100-foot skyscraper representing the tallest building west of the Mississippi River.

Executive Staff Chief Deputy Fred Mathis, Administrative Operations Chief Deputy Alfred Poirier, Emergency Operations Deputy Chief Graham Everett, Administration Bureau Deputy Chief Kristin Crowley, Fire Prevention and Public Safety Bureau Deputy Chief Richard Rideout, Training and Support Bureau Medical Director Marc Eckstein, Emergency Medical Services Bureau Chief Information Officer Scott Porter, Information Technology Bureau Fire Administrator June Gibson, Administrative Services Bureau Deputy Chief Phillip T. Fligiel, Operations Central Bureau Deputy Chief Ronnie Villanueva, Operations South Bureau Deputy Chief Trevor Richmond, Operations Valley Bureau Deputy Chief Armando Hogan, Operations West Bureau

@LAFD @LAFDtalk

@LosAngelesFireDepartment

Facebook.com/ LosAngelesFireDepartment 41


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LAFD Strategic Plan 2018-2020  
LAFD Strategic Plan 2018-2020