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inSites

2016

magazine of the department of landscape architecture and environmental planning

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inSites is a publication of the Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning at Utah State University. 4005 Old Main, Logan, UT 84322 (435) 797-0500 Cover: Thanksgiving Point Charrette (pg. 12) Alumni - Please help us by providing your most up to date contact information. Email changes to tanya.rice@usu.edu or go to Contact Us at laep.usu.edu. Graphic design and layout - Christina Fleener and Mary Ann Anderson

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contents 4

Greetings from the Department Head

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Inside the Studio and Out: Urban Design

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Slovenian Exchange

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Make a Difference

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Inside the Studio and Out: Bioregional Planning and Workshops

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Common Studio Remodel

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Alumni Updates

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Inside the Studio and Out: Residential Design and Madison Farm

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Technology Updates

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CELA Conference

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Inside the Studio and Out: E-Studio and Utah Real Estate Challenge

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Curriculum Updates

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Charrette Week Charrette and Senior Capstone Experience

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Dean's Prize Competition

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A Fond Farewell

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Service LearningCommunity Design Team Summary and ASLA

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Field Trip 2015: Travel Experience in Germany

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Speaker Series

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Inside the Studio and Out: Recreation & Open Space

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Field Trip 2016: LAEP Students Expand Horizons in New York City

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Scholarships and Awards

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Inside the Studio and Out: Planning for Wildlife and Geodesign

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Traveling through China on Sabbatical

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Incoming MLA Students

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of activity and financial stability never before seen on our campus. In fact, I would challenge any peer program to show they have an equally successful chapter. Dave’s oversight of our Community Design Teams is also training future practitioners, aiding Utah citizens, and demonstrating why ASLA is an organization to be closely involved with, both now and during one’s career.

Greetings

from the department head

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ince 2008, LAEP has been awash in an annual succession of change, with each year bringing a new wave. Looking back on 2015-16 the pace was no different, though there were certainly new highs achieved. The commotion that surrounds us this summer is a reminder that more progress is underway. All of this allows me to again share with our alumni and friends a series of outstanding updates.

In March, the world’s largest annual gathering of faculty in our discipline came to Utah as LAEP hosted the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture’s annual conference. CELA2016 (CELA2016.com) brought near record numbers of colleagues and graduate students from across the globe to the 4-day event held in Salt Lake City and Logan. Some 400 colleagues shared research paper presentations, toured LAEP and the rest of campus, and saw first-hand the landscapes of the Beehive State. Last hosted by Utah State in 1983, this year’s conference was widely hailed as the best in many years. The year past was the first for CREATE 2020, the department’s new program for using differential tuition to help push our students’ national competitiveness. Students, faculty and Advancement Board members submitted an array of proposals-for-funding during three cycles of calls. The impacts have been felt immediately with changes to facilities, student resources, the Speaker Series, and LAEP’s first-ever Internship Coordinator. Through the leadership of students and faculty, we have seen the Student ASLA chapter grow by leaps and bounds. David Evans, with support from the Utah Chapter of ASLA, has guided that growth. His successive groups of student officers have brought the club to a level

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Alumni support for LAEP students brought many important impacts this year. The 75th Anniversary Scholarship Endowment was created through joint gifts by Bob Behling (BLA ‘73), Joe Porter (BLA ‘63) and Justin Hamula/ Hunter Industries (BLA '95) to commemorate that milestone event, and fund recruitment of top students. The inaugural Vern Budge Business Leadership Lecture was delivered by Richard Shaw, FASLA (BLA ‘72) thanks to the endowment created by Larry Harmsen (BLA ‘83) to honor his former professor. Through the endowment of Tina and Kelly Gillman (both BLA '99), CRSA and the Woodbury Corporation jointly funded the Diversity in Landscape Architecture Scholarship. This summer the noise and dust of remodels surround us. The Common Studio Phase I remodel of a year ago ushered in a new approach to studio culture in LAEP. In July, Phase II began, which will include a new technology area that unifies our plotting and scanning devices, and will include 3D printing and a laser cutter. Also a sorely needed Seminar Room/conference space and a new kitchen will be added. Next, we’re creating a new teaching and critique space in the Grad Studio. This will serve our Bioregional Planning and MLA students, who will be housed together for the first time starting this fall. Next door, the former seminar area is being converted into our new Visualization Lab, which will support research and advanced computing related to planning and design, and was made possible thru research funding for recent faculty hires. The Lab will enable students to engage in cutting-edge technologies while working with faculty on an array of landscape problems. How can you help? Our path to national competitiveness relies upon alumni like you who will partner in the effort. Whether you graduated in 1963 or 2003, there are as many opportunities to make a difference as there are different alumni. I hope you will join us as we together move boldly into LAEP's new era.

GO AGGIES!


make a Difference - alumni support Larry Harmsen

Vern Budge Business Leadership Speaker Series This year, Larry Harmsen (BLA ‘83) started the new Vern Budge Business Leadership Speaker Series. This effort was in honor of his time at Utah State University, the principles he learned from the LAEP Department, and specifically, Professor Vern Budge (who taught in the department for 36 years). “During my time at Utah State (1978-1983), I pursued two degrees – Business Administration and Landscape Architecture. Thus, my experience was bit unusual compared with most LAEP students, and my interests and strengths gravitated more towards the practical implementation of a project rather than theory or design. As a result, I’m probably not very good at design (Dick Toth would agree), but I always had an ability to assess economic viability and business practicality. Naturally, I quickly embraced Vern’s courses and greatly appreciated gaining a better understanding of the nuts and bolts of areas such as grading and drainage. To me, these were some of the most useful classes I took while earning my BLA . Now that I have the opportunity to give back to the Department, it was easy to honor Vern by helping start a speaker series that hopefully brings business-oriented content to LAEP students for years to come.” On April, 15th, 2016 the LAEP students were honored to hear the first speaker in this series, Richard Shaw, FASLA (BLA '72). It was an excellent presentation, and Vern and his family were able to attend the presentation and a banquet held that night. Larry Harmsen has been an active member of the LAEP Advancement Board, and the Department is very grateful for his support of the Department and the students.

Linda Snyder

Richard E. Toth Graduate Scholarship Linda Snyder (BLA ‘81) is an extraordinary example of an alumna who keeps giving back - with both her time and resources. Linda currently serves with Jan Striefel as the CoChair of the LAEP Advancement Board. She also started a new scholarship for students like herself, who are non-traditional students need a little more financial assistance. Naming the scholarship after Dick Toth, LAEP faculty member for 29 years, was an obvious choice, as he helped her advance in her education. When asked why she wants to be so involved with the LAEP Department, Linda states: “For me, it is fun to spend time with old friends and classmates, meet alum's and faculty who are doing creative work at the leading edge of our fields, and to experience students’ excitement and commitment.” “Dick was the Chair of the Department when I was a student. I was a 27-year-old single mom, recently divorced, with 2 young children. I was on fire with the potential of landscape architecture to improve environments and change people's lives for the better. I loved the professors and the work. After 2 years at USU, Dick worked it out for me to spend a year at MIT studying community planning and urban design for my senior year. That opportunity launched me into my career in the public sector and higher education. He challenged me and had confidence in me, even though I was way out of the norm for a USU student in 1978. Almost 40 years later, I still believe that landscape architecture and environmental planning change the world. I love the idea that there are other non-traditional students out there that the Toth Scholarship will help.”

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make a Difference - alumni support Jan Striefel and Craig Hinckley TERRA Scholarship

Jan Striefel and Craig Hinckley are both BLA graduates from 1978. They are now the endowment creators of a new scholarship called The TERRA Scholarship. Jan explained why she wanted to create this scholarship, and how it will benefit future generations: “I wanted to do this because I believe so strongly in the Department, the students it produces, and the work that they all do, and I am very grateful for the education I received, which afforded me the opportunity to pursue and luck into the career path that I did. I know that sounds trite and blasé, but it’s just the truth. I wanted it to fund scholarships, specifically to enhance existing scholarships, because I felt and still feel that the existing scholarships are underfunded and really don’t provide the financial support that is needed. For that reason, I did not want it to be named for me, so I came up with Terra — Latin for Land. I also wanted it to be somewhat generic, hoping that others who might have small amounts to donate and wish to, could add to it and feel that they are supporting the department at whatever level they can. It seems like there needed to be a place for donors and friends with small amounts in the budget and no specific goal except to add support, to put their resources at whatever level. I personally think this is a tremendous opportunity for fundraising that has yet to be pursued. (Additionally, not everyone likes me and may not contribute it if had my name on it!) The other prong on the fund is on-going departmental needs to be determined by the Department Head. It seemed that there was an on-going need for equipment, materials, spaces, and other stuff that didn’t have a source of funding, so hopefully, this helps. I hope it ultimately serves the Department well.” Jan and Craig’s contribution for this new scholarship is one of the largest received in the department, and will benefit future generations of Landscape Architecture students with larger scholarship amounts and better department resources.

How to Give Contributing is easy through automatic transfers, checks, or credit cards. Please make your check payable to the LAEP Department, Utah State University and mail to: LAEP Department 4005 Old Main Hill Logan, UT 84322-4005 Please see usu.edu/giving for other options to support LAEP. For questions, please contact Tanya Rice (tanya.rice@usu.edu).

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In Memorium: LAEP Alumni Gary M. Coleman (BS '61) Clair J. Hardman (BFA '63) Morris E. Johnson (BS '49) Dr. Wesley L. Peterson (BS '52) Byron P. Stringham (BLA '00) Lorin C. Tonks (BS '61) Earl Reed Wyatt (BS '60) Ward Hastings (BLA '74)


make a Difference - alumni updates New LAEP Internship Coordinator and Development Assistant

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s an anchor for continued success and development, Tanya Rice (MLA ‘16) joined the LAEP staff in July 2016 to assist with internship coordination and program development, along with marketing. Her enthusiasm for the landscape architecture profession and interest in the growth and development of both LAEP students and the Department provides a springboard for building and empowering relationships between students, professionals and alumni. In her role as Alumni Development Assistant, Tanya will be enhancing LAEP efforts in alumni outreach, Advancement Board support, and fundraising. She will work closely with industry partners, donors and sponsors to support our students and faculty. As Internship Coordinator, Tanya will continue to strengthen LAEP’s legacy of providing rich career opportunities for students, and in turn bolster the Department’s position in our highly competitive world. She will work closely with Professor David Evans to enable students’ career readiness through creating and coordinating internships.

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tudent success is the goal of our profession. LAEP has a strong history of producing successful alumni, and we are pleased to highlight many of their 2016 successes.

2016 Alumni Job Placement

2016 Summer Internships

Keni Althouse Nolan Baker Desmond Fang Jared Hiatt Derek Lamb John Locke Stephanie Tomlin Johan VanZeben Hailey Wall Bryan Wilson Nicolette Womack

Shuolei Chen Chris Creasey David Durfee Susie Gomez Margie Haight Bret Hoffer Wayne Honaker Tyler Knab Tyson Murray Joseph Nelson Emmalee Olsen Ryan Stauffer Darci Williams Steve Woody Ariel Wright

Civil Solutions Group – Providence KP Landscape Design – Heber Spurr Weston & Sampson – Boston Landscape by Design – Alpine Landform Design Group – SLC Bureau of Land Management - SLC Ferh & Peers Transportation – SLC Vanzeben Architecture – Ogden LOCI – SLC Pacheco Koch – Dallas City of Boise – Boise

Off to Graduate School Megan Criss James Hansen Jason Parkinson

University of Arizona – MLA Arizona State University – Masters of Architecture Utah State University – MLA

LA Firm - China Stantec – Boston PlaceWorks - CA Clallam Conservation District – WA BrightView - Denver LOCI – SLC Blue Collar Landscape Design – Logan Jordan River Commission – SLC Novatek - Provo BRAG – Logan CTA Architects – Montana S & B Landscaping - Logan PEC – West Jordan Connect One Design – Colorado Vanes

Reflections from 2016 BLA Graduates "The professional world perspective and experience that Professors David Evans, Todd Johnson and Caroline Lavoie brought in during projects and my job searching process were extremely valuable. Their suggestions helped me get my portfolio ready, landed interviews and eventually a job. Also, I would like to thank all my classmates and everyone in the department for creating such a vibrant and family-like studio culture! You guys are the BEST!" Desmond Yuning Fang, Weston and Sampson - Boston

“One of the biggest impacts for my success in landing this job was the killer mentor program that LAEP provides. It was the best way to network and show all that I learned in school. I highly recommend students getting involved and taking advantage of that.” Bryan Wilson, Pacheco Koch - Dallas

“I am super grateful for the many people who have gotten me to this point. My husband and I couldn't be living the life now that we've wanted for years without the direction of the staff at USU. USU taught me to work hard, stay focused and use computers to better explain complex and hypothetical ideas.” Nicolette Womack, City of Boise

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LAEP hosts CELA 2016 Conference

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his past spring, the Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning at USU was pleased to host the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture’s (CELA) annual conference from March 2326, 2016 in both Salt Lake City and Logan. The Intermountain West was an appropriate setting for the theme of the conference of Dilemma : Debate. It highlighted the 21st century dilemmas facing the profession, and the importance of the process of constructive debate and discussion in bringing about constructive solutions and proposals. The theme was embodied through a lively series of graphics, swag, and (likely a CELA first) customlabeled libations courtesy of Wasatch Brewing. By all accounts, the conference was a great success! Over 370 Landscape Architects representing academia, as well as the private and public sectors, from 8 countries (Canada, China, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and the United States) came

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Opening Reception: Sean Michael speaks at The Leonardo Museum

The “Dilemma” Debate: Members of the panel


Field Trip: Great Salt Lake Shorelands Preserve

Field Trip: Exploring Daybreak

Keynote Speach: Laurie Olin receives the CELA Lifetime Achievement Award Coffee Break: Reception after Laurie Olin’s presentation

Student Helpers: A group of LAEP Students wearing CELA schwag

together to share ideas and be challenged by 255 speakers, 25 poster presentations, and 6 films. These conference sessions took place in the Salt Lake Marriott Downtown at City Creek. And as SLC ComiCon was taking place across the street, this conference set a high bar for future conferences as the first featuring cosplay. The conference’s Campus Day took place on LAEP’s home field at USU’s main campus in Logan. On the way

Campus Tours: LAEP students guide tours around the USU campus

to Logan, participants were able to experience some of what Utah has to offer on one of four field trips to either Daybreak, Park City, the Swaner Ecocenter and Preserve, or the Great Salt Lake Shorelands Preserve. After lunch in LAEP’s recently renovated Common Studio, Laurie Olin, FASLA shared insights into his distinguished career and was honored as the inaugural CELA Lifetime Achievement Award recipient. The events at USU’s LAEP Department culminated with a dinner reception and performance by

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Dinner Reception: At the Riverwoods

Appetizer Reception: At the Riverwoods in Logan

the CrossRoads Project, which grapples with the challenges faced by climate change. Back in Salt Lake City, LAEP’s own Bo Yang was recognized for his outstanding Research and Creative Work, Junior Level. Associate Professor Yang represents the best of LAEP. Fittingly, Craig Johnson joined the event to be inducted as a CELA Fellow, becoming LAEP’s only member of the Academy of Fellows. And the 2016 CELA Annual Conference well represented USU’s LAEP department, with attendees raving about how incredibly wellorganized, inspiring, and engaging it was – “one of the best ever”. And one of the best programs in Landscape Architecture!

Entertainment: The CrossRoads Project performing at the Riverwoods

To learn more about the conference, and to access the online materials from it, please visit CELA2016.com.

Closing Reception Awards: LAEP Professor Bo Yang receiving his CELA award for his outstanding Research and Creative Work, Junior Level

Closing Reception Awards: LAEP Professor Emeritus Craig Johnson is inducted into the CELA Academy of Fellows

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charrette week

Charrette and Senior Capstone Experience

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tudents love to discover the possibilities of a place, applying their analytical skills to understanding the issues and problems of a real life situation. The Senior Capstone experience provides just such an opportunity. The studio operated in an open “Studio Culture�/Capstone/ Practice-like way, with students selecting their subjects (Identity/brand, campus revitalization, urbanization, development connectivity, land bridge/open space) and exploring them as a group. In Utah County at Point of the Mountain, Lehi City and Thanksgiving Point lie in an area in the midst of major growth. LAEP student teams focused on their attention on geographic projects areas with specific redevelopment plans, as well as applying sustainability aspirations and the reinforcement of density for parts of this metro area. Of particular note were three teams that discovered the benefits of hooking up a walkable route from commuter transit to a proposed light rail stop Top Right: Charrette Teams practicing Middle Left: Project Site Diagram Bottom Left: Students visit Thanksgiving Point Bottom Right: Thanksgiving Point

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Top Left: Land Bridge Design Top Right: Residential Diagram Middle Right: Sustainability Team- The Museum of Ancient Life Bottom Right: Connectivity Team- String Together GravityUrbanization-Connectivity Development

that could create a new development path for Thanksgiving Point. The three teams proposed 1) an overlay transit-oriented district surrounding the Frontrunner commuter station, 2) reorganizing Thanksgiving Point’s “Farm Country” to create a walkable link to the commuter station, 3) a similar development opportunity across I-15 at the proposed light rail stop near Adobe’s headquarters, proposing a dense development on 70 acres with a pedestrian crossing of the freeway. Professors of the course commented on the “profundity” of this discovery! Other teams explored: 1) a land bridge for elk crossing and significant new park and open space opportunities at the existing gravel pit at Point of the Mountain, 2) explored the lack of food and agricultural awareness that is part of the south valley legacy, 3) proposed public school programs, 4) designed a community garden and a public market, and 5) “Team Sustainability” looked into ways in which a broad sustainability initiative could be adopted by Thanksgiving Point, including consideration of economics, the environment, community and art. The teams presented their findings to an array of stakeholders at Thanksgiving Point. The ensuing conversation uncovered additional issues of Lehi City involvement, as well as the need for a more contemporary look at how the remaining land should be developed. LAEP students will have had an impact on the future of Lehi and Thanksgiving Point.

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service learning

Community Design Team

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uring the past academic year, LAEP students volunteered to provide design services to individuals, community groups, non-profit organizations and public agencies throughout Utah. These Community Design Team (CDT) projects collect cost recovery fees that are used to support the student chapter of the ASLA. With these funds, the chapter hosts social and educational programs within the department, sends student officers to the national ASLA conference and contributes to the endowment of an LAEP scholarship. Since fall semester of 2014, student teams have completed over 30 projects for the citizens of Utah, and created a financial resource that enriches the LAEP community.

The CDT projects represent important real-world experiences that enhance student portfolios and provide unique client interaction and design insights. The CDT teams are vertically integrated groups of from 3-7 members. A job captain works with the program manager and the principal-in-charge. The program manager in 2015-2016 was Derek Lamb, a senior. Derek volunteered for the entire year and managed 12 teams. He developed a system

Top Left: Pump Track Perspective Middle Left: Lassig Formal Design Bottom Right: Perspective Design Far Left: Cache County Fairgrounds Design Far Right: Roosevelt Plan

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of production management, client communication and scheduling that added significantly to the success of the program. Professional Practice Assistant Professor David Evans served as the principal-in-charge. The intent of the program, in addition to supporting the citizens of Utah, is to create a practice experience for the students based on the disciplines of budget, schedule, team management, design review and public facilitation.

ASLA Student Chapter

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he presidency of the Student Chapter of the ASLA has deepened their working relationship with the Utah and National Chapters, added to the social and educational life of the LAEP community, and established the foundation for a professional and effective student chapter going forward. The draft of the first student chapter handbook was prepared in 2016. This handbook will ensure continuity within the annual change of presidency, and help to improve the current roster of social and educational programs.

For the second year in a row, the presidency has represented the department at the ASLA national conference, and led the alumni ‘tailgate’ celebration. In collaboration with the Utah Chapter, the students are working to advance the mentorship program, deepen social engagement with the Utah members and build a system for the review of portfolios and guidance on placement strategies. In 2016, the students voted to establish a scholarship to support an LAEP student to serve as the program manager for the Community Design Team program, and help to secure the financial viability of the student chapter. All of the LAEP matriculated undergraduate and graduate students joined the national chapter in 2016, and significantly broadened student participation.

2015- 2016 LAEP Student Chapter Presidency Officers: Top Left to Right: Secretary: Andy Quebbeman, VP of Social and Community Development: Kendrick Ostergaard, President Elect: Alonzo Rhodes, President: Thomas Terry, and Professor Dave Evans Bottom Left to Right: Treasurer: Mark Jensen, and VP of Public Relations: Yuning Fang Not Pictured: VP of Professional Development: John Locke

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inside the studio and out

Recreation and Open Space

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n fall 2015, Dr. Ole Sleipness taught the Recreation Design and Open Space Planning studio, which integrates his research focus areas within the studio experience. The interface between public and private lands, natural amenity based development, and the role of recreational landscapes in rural community growth and change were dominant themes throughout the semester’s projects and activities.

Twenty-five junior and second-year graduate students engaged a variety of project scales along the Wasatch Front. They applied recreation planning and design approaches, while developing and refining technical skills in landform and site grading, circulation design, as well as visual representation. Throughout the semester, students

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interacted with a variety of LAEP alumni who generously provided project review and professional mentoring. In their first project, The Draper Open Space Master Plan, students collaborated with LAEP alumni Jeremy Call (MLA '03) and Jesse Bell (BLA '04) of Logan-Simpson Design as well as stakeholders and staff from the City of Draper in generating conceptual recreation design alternatives for approximately 4,000 acres of public open space land in Draper, UT. Within teams, students proposed designs for key areas of the open space network, tackling issues of the wildland urban interface, fire prone landscapes, and bridging among competing interests of various recreation user groups. LAEP graphically illustrated design alternatives for local


decision makers and the public to choose how best to utilize this valuable resource of public open space. LoganSimpson Design’s subsequent Master Plan, which features the creative work of LAEP students, was unanimously adopted by the Draper City Council in 2016. The semester’s capstone project for the historic Logan Canyon Forest Camp was jointly completed in the Recreation Studio and the Planting Design Studio taught by Professor Phil Waite. Students evaluated the historic Logan Canyon Forest Camp for its potential to facilitate ecological literacy. Students used Richard Louv’s (2005) Last Child in the Woods and case studies of other residential environmental education centers to strategize way to engage students with nature, and mitigate the effects of

what Louv describes as “nature deficit disorder.” To accomplish this goal, students evaluated the Logan Canyon Forest Camp for its potential and utilized data generated by drone flight. As part of their design package, students produced schematic master plans, planting plans, grading plans, and modeled existing landforms. They presented their work to environmental education pioneer, Jack Greene. Fall 2017 projects are planned to expose students to the broad array of recreation and open space issues along the Wasatch Front, as well as in similarly situated landscapes across the West and beyond.

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inside the studio and out

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Landscape Planning for Wildife

he longest inland river in North America, the Bear River, passes through Cache County, Utah, to end in at the Great Salt Lake. There are three national wildlife refuges in the Bear River watershed. The Great Salt Lake is a critical ecosystem, and a global stepping stone for many migrating birds. Although Cache County accounts for less than 17 percent of the Bear River watershed area, it accommodates 70-80 percent of the population in the watershed, and Logan is the largest city in the watershed. Four graduate students - Keni Althouse (MLA ‘16), Tanya Rice (MLA ‘16), Lynda Smith (MLA ‘16), and Jennifer Wiseman(MLA ‘16) - studied the watershed with Professor Shujuan Li in LAEP 6110 Landscape Planning for Wildlife. The project was focused on wildlife habitat linkages in the County. Currently, most of the critical habitat areas are distributed in the valley, on the west side of the County. There are also many critical habitat corridors that stretch into the east side of the County, the mountain area. However, layout of the existing urban development in Cache County threatens the connections of the habitat corridors tom large habitat patches in the valley. The student team investigated important corridors and barriers in the County with computer modelling (Linkage Mapper) and local knowledge. Development, agricultural, and recreational activities are the most influential and the largest causes for wildlife habitat corridor fragmentation and disconnection within Cache County. Although wildlife habitat has been less a consideration at the county level land use planning, students argue that it is important to integrate wildlife habitat into local planning. Students selected a sample site to further illustrate possible landscape design solutions for habitat corridor protection, public education, and urban development.

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inside the studio and out

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Geodesign Studio

eodesign Studio is an elective course open to junior and graduate students. Students in this studio are encouraged to apply the latest geographic information and tools for planning and design projects. This year’s class offered a variety of projects, such as park accessibility assessment, bike lane planning, viewshed analysis for hospitals and assisted living centers. 2016 marks the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service. Chris Creasey, a junior in the Geodesign Studio, chose to study national parks in Utah for his final project. The “Mighty Five” campaign, launched by the Utah Office of Tourism in 2013, resulted in a 34 percent increase in visitors in the last two years five most well-known national parks (Arches, Bryce, Canyonlands, Capitol Reef, and Zion). Chris’ project looked at the success of the “Mighty

Five” from a different perspective. Chris commented, “The increased crowds have changed the experience of visiting the natural wonders of southern Utah.” 'How can visitors enjoy the nature, without the crowds?' His work asked. With Flickr’s API, Chris extracted the location information of 18,678 geotagged Flickr photos taken in the “Mighty Five.” He conducted a point density mapping to demonstrate the most frequently photographed locations. Combined with other relevant site and visitor’s information, the project has its ultimate goal of suggesting alternative trip plans for visitors who “enjoys taking the road less traveled.” Chris also established a website to publish his project information. A simple scan of the QR code below will lead you to the project website. Chris extended this work beyond the class project, and the ongoing work can be found at the website.

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inside the studio and out

Urban Design

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all 2015, Professor Caroline Lavoie's urban design studio continued LAEP’s partnership with the City of Boise Planning and Development Services Department. The focus of the studio project was to engage public and private groups in a conversation about “how to shape a proud future� for the Central Bench area of Boise, to develop research and design ideas, and ways to revitalize the area. Diverse groups of stakeholders that form the neighborhood were involved. During the semester, the students dug deep into the challenges encountered by residents, business leaders and potential developers in Boise, Idaho. The class identified five key land use activities and foci that helped creating a structure for future growth and redevelopment of the Central Bench area. This is a former industrial area (1800 acres) ripe for redevelopment. The five student teams developed programs, concepts and illustrative plans for each of their focus, but also coordinated ways of developing their programs and design that could fit needs of this changing and growing population.

The need for collaboration for public acceptance is crucial in urban design, and this project involved a multiplicity of of stakeholders (from citizens of all backgrounds, administrators, residents, traffic engineers, city and community planners, architects, developers, other fellow professionals).

Above: Large scale models facilitate interaction with the public and communication among teams. Models promote understanding of scale while working to develop design intervention.

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Designing a Vision for the Boise Bench

The five teams with areas of focus are listed below: (1) Orchard Street Corridor with the Retail/Commercial and Mixed-use District (2) Residential District and the Boise International Market (with Lori Porecca, MLA ’06) (3) Industrial Activity District (from oil, gas, refineries, etc.) and its Farm Tanks (4) Health Community District (5) Open Spaces and Infrastructure of Larger Systems and Neighborhood Connectivity The students identified and created planning and design solutions to enhance the Central Bench’s rich historic legacy. They led an open house meeting of various stakeholders and residents, and provided a formal presentation to the City of Boise with all stakeholders invited. This spring 2016, the project, as a class effort, won a Utah ASLA Merit Award.

Top Left: Jason Parkinson (BLA, '16) presenting the large scale model

Top Right: Detailed Plans from The Open Space and Connectivity and the Orchard Corrider Team

Left and Below: September Open House

meeting led by students with various stakeholders in Boise, ID

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inside the studio and out

Bioregional Planning

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ontinuing the work of the 2014/15 Bioregional Planning (BRP) studio with the Logan River Task Force, the 2015/16 BRP studio developed alternative futures for the Blacksmith Fork and Little Bear watersheds. These watersheds face growing pressures from population growth, climate change, agriculture and grazing, recreational use, as well as developments surrounding the watershed, such as the expansion of transportation networks along the Wasatch Front.

Top Right: Blacksmith Fork Canyon and Hyrum Reservoir Middle: Meeting with county planner Josh Runhaar (BLA '02) Bottom: Meeting with planners at BRAG planning office

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For the first time Geodesign was introduced into the Bioregional Planning curriculum in an eight week module at the beginning of Fall semester. In a joint studio with LAEP 6100 – Regional and Community Planning – the graduate students prepared the landscape analysis for a case study area at the south of Cache Valley. The Geodesign module culminated in a one day Geodesign workshop with Prof. Carl Steinitz. This was a challenging opportunity for both LA and BRP students to collaborate and learn from one another

on many different levels. The students used the insight acquired in the workshop to analyze and develop environmental assessment models and land use allocation models for the entire Blacksmith Fork and Little Bear watersheds. These models informed the scenarios they created for four alternative futures. The first future, “business as usual”, illustrated the consequences of existing planning policies; while the other futures addressed issues in the watershed that the students


identified during the semester. For example, one future addressed the potential loss of rural character by defining development boundaries to conserve the green infrastructure of the watershed. Other futures explored the recreational and open space opportunities available in the watershed, as well as opportunities to promote local agriculture and renewable energy. The BRP students completed the semester by teaching 50 9th grade students about the watershed and the geodesign process in their own Geodesign workshop at the InTech High School. As group leaders, they were able to teach what they had learned during the semester in a highly successful workshop. In the end, the students became teachers.

Top Left : BRP students in studio learning geodesign software Top Right: Geodesign software shows impact of planning proposals Above: Students inspect the study area from the air Bottom Left: BRP Students teaching geodesign Bottom Right: Geodesign workshop with 9th grade students

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Bioregional

Workshops

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n October 2015, Carl Steinitz led a one day Geodesign Workshop at USU. The workshop was initiated as part of an EPA environmental education grant awarded to the RS/GIS Lab and the Bioregional Planning program. Local planners and stakeholders from the community, as well as USU faculty and graduate students, were invited to develop alternative futures for south Cache Valley. The workshop explored how to retain the rural character of Cache Valley, while accommodating double the population by 2040. Using Geodesignhub software, developed by Prof. Steinitz and Dr. Ballal of the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis in London, Prof. Steinitz guided the 28 participants through the geodesign process. Participants created planning projects and policies for future development that addressed the expansion of residential and commercial development, transportation, recreation as well as the conservation of water, biodiversity and landscape character. The software enabled participants to quickly evaluate and update their proposals in a collaborative process. By the end of the day, six stakeholder groups, which were led by LAEP graduate students, presented their proposals for the future of Cache Valley. Following the workshop, the BRP graduate students used the geodesign software to negotiate one final proposal and an implementation plan. The workshop (and the resulting case study) formed the basis for a workshop with 9th graders at Intech High School in North Logan. Since the teenagers of today will be living our visions for tomorrow, should they have a say in the planning of those visions? Can high school students make planning decisions? With these questions in mind, we joined five Bioregional Planning graduate students to test geodesign in secondary education – for the first time ever. After simplifying the Geodesign case study that MLA/BRP graduate students had developed for South Cache Valley, the BRP students led 50 ninth graders through the geodesign process in three, 1 ½ hour sessions. In the end, five stakeholder groups of ninth graders – farmers, young people, older folks, developers and environmentalist –presented their visions for the study area. The high school students had little difficulty using the Geodesignhub software. They enjoyed the team work, and were able to formulate plans and projects, as well as develop well founded proposals. Many students expressed feeling enabled by the workshop in comments such as: “I enjoyed how seriously we were treated and that our opinion mattered” and “I really liked this workshop because it gives us a chance to really stop and think about what our future will be like”. This experience showed us that geodesign and visioning is not just a practice for experts and adults. Exposing young people to a geodesign curriculum may change their understanding of and attitudes about environmental issues and the consequences of planning decision. The earlier we introduce young people to planning concepts, the better they can formulate their own ideas about their future.

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inside the studio and out

Land Use Planning for Residential Design

Housing for Downtown Logan F1

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Figure 1: Open space, circulation, vegetation and homes allocation for the two-block redevelopment project. Figure 2: This is the proposal to redevelop the block cores of two residential blocks in the western sideof downtown Logan. The project creates an open space corridor that connects the canal on the west side to the businesses to the east by a sequence of plazas and small parks cutting through the blocks. Some high density townhomes are built along this open space. Figure 3: Sketch sequence showing the project concept development.

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his Spring, our juniors and some second-year graduate students had an intense and productive semester full of creative, bold, and high-quality proposals under the direction of Professors Dave Anderson and Carlos Licon. The level of self-direction and the insight of their contributions was evident throughout the Land Planning for Residential Design Studio. This semester had too many good things happening, and at times, felt very demanding in terms of time to produce, refine, and present ideas and projects. Everyone in the class embraced the challenges of having several faculty teaching, as well as the variety of topics covered in this course. After a unique design opportunity with the Madison Farm project, where the class had to propose housing options for a group of people with special needs in a distant location, the junior class had to reconfigure to tackle a local

project, focused on the revitalization of Logan’s downtown through a housing planning strategy. This project comes to LAEP through the Community Bridge Initiative, a partnership created by the City of Logan and the Provost’s Office at Utah State University, where students in different programs address issues and problems identified by the city. In our case, Mayor Peterson and the Logan City’s Planning Department have been directly involved in making this collaboration possible. Other participants include the Logan Downtown Alliance and a group of business owners who shared ideas and comments with the students. The project was framed under the idea that every city and town needs a well defined downtown area, where a variety of informal and formal activities can happen. This physical space is the main stage for community life. It builds identity by providing a shared space and promoting encounters and gather-

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ings of people. It is a public space, democratic, and free by definition. This space is also a reference for the larger urban area and offers employment, leisure, and commercial possibilities. Diversity is another component of any downtown, where visitors and residents can find multiple kinds of people and activities. Diversity builds communities by acknowledging the different components of society, such as age, income, education, ethnicity, abilities and preferences. The vitality and relevance of a downtown area depends greatly on activities taking place in a healthy, safe, and comfortable environment. Activities and participants change throughout the day as well as from weekends to weekdays. The number of visitors can also change dramatically in a downtown area. Holidays, festivals, and other events and demonstrations, can bring large groups of people to specific parts of downtown. The daily flow of businessrelated activities also has its own rhythm and cycles. Downtown residents bring life into the place during times where the typical downtown commercial and employment activities may not. A more regular presence helps develop a stronger sense of commu-

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F5 Figure 4: Rendered image showing the intersection of 100 S and Main Streets in downtown Logan. This image shows new buildings proposed on the east side of Main Street. Figure 5: Center Street and 100 East Intersection. View from the Tabernacle corner.

nity and identity. By consequence, downtown becomes a more inviting and welcoming place. The students’ task in this project was to explore how the city of Logan can continue building a livable downtown supported by residential development proposals. They were assigned to develop and present different housing proposals to the City Mayor, the planning staff and business owners. The sites chosen for this project covered a variety

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of spaces with different needs and characteristics. Collectively, these projects help develop a larger strategy to establish different types of permanent residents in downtown Logan. Some elements considered during the project included housing densities, parking, public spaces, mixed commercial areas, connections to existing uses and phasing options for implementation. The students’ proposals were presented at Logan City Hall to a Figure 6: Overall view of a three block redevelopment along between 100 West and Main Street. The proposal includes a linear promenade cutting through the three blocks and connecting a series of plazas, businesses, and public buildings. Figure 7: Proposal for redevelopment of the adjacent area south of the Logan Tabernacle block. This project includes high density housing mixed with commercial development and a green corridor along 100 S Street with commercial development and a green corridor along 100 S Street.

Figure 8: Housing and commercial buildings surround a large outdoor space. This area creates a hub for different performance and art venues in downtown Logan.

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large group of interested stakeholders. Mayor Petersen and several City Council members attended the presentation, and shared comments and questions with our students. Together with local business owners, they discussed the merits and feasibility of the ideas presented by the students. Mayor Petersen expressed that this is the type of collaborations the Community Bridge Initiative is looking to address. Overall, our students provided the city of Logan with a creative, functional, and integrated vision of a vibrant downton.

ect. His knowledge of special needs planning and design helped students get beyond the issues of “barrier free�, and into the realm of creating an extraordinary community of the highest standard.Madison Madison Farm:

Madison Farm: Above: Madison Fields Design Below: Madison Fields Illustrative Master Design Plan

LAEP 3120 tackled planning and design for the Madison House Foundation and its next special needs community on the Madison Farm site near Washington, D.C. Under the direction of Professor Todd Johnson Practitioner-in-Residence, students were challenged to create a community of residential units using design principles and patterns that would be effective community for adults in the autism spectrum. Professor Keith Christensen also supported this proj-

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inside the studio and out

E-Studio

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he “E� of this course stands for Entrepreneurship, a word that is traditionally the domain of business and finance worlds. But, when business schools and product designers as notorious as Steve Jobs adopt design process methods to tasks like the iPhone design, we should take note. Combining design process with entrepreneurship concepts reinforces our traditional sources of power and augments these foundational business concepts. The objective of E-Studio, is to take work deeper than conventional studio formats allow.

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The Utah Real Estate Challenge: The LAEP/Huntsman Team Professor Todd Johnson, Hailey Wall, John Locke, Sierra Hoffer, Brett Hoffer, and Kurt Altvater


UREC Financial Images: Exterior Elevation Designs of the Hub @ Ashton Station Middle Images: Retail and Creative Office designs and store fronts Lower Right: Project site diagram

At the invitation of alumnus and Advancement Board member Kurt Altvater (BLA '81), four students were assembled to tackle the Utah Real Estate Challenge. Seniors Hailey Wall (BLA ’16) and John Locke (BLA ’16), and Junior Brett Hoffer (BLA ’17), worked in conjunction with Serra Hoffer from the Huntsman School of Business. This LAEP/Huntsman School team finished second place, garnering a $10,000 prize. As a continuation of the LAEP 4100 project with the City of Boise, two E-Studio teams also submitted projects to ASLA.

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2016 Dean’s Prize Competition

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The Jury included Associate Dean Brian Warnick of the College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences, Logan City Mayor Craig Peterson, Charles Darnell, Vice-President of USU Facilities, Campus Planner Jordy Guth, and David Anderson, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture.

pring Semester 2016 marked the second annual Dean’s Prize competition for the LAEP sophomores and first-year graduate students in LAEP 2720, Site Planning and Design. The competition focused on the preparation of a landscape master plan for the 4th North Corridor of Logan. This project contributed to the Community Bridge Initiative that exists between Logan City and Utah State University. The Dean’s Prize is an opportunity to provide a real-world experience for our students, get feedback from high profile jurors, acknowledge the high-quality work the students are

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Above: Dean’s Prize winners meet with USU President Stan Albrecht

producing, improve student design and illustrative skills in a competitive environment, and bring a fresh, tangible enthusiasm at the end of a long semester of studio work.

From Left to Right: Professor Dave Evans, Professor Dave Anderson, Jonathan Cook, Drew Hill, President Albrecht, Jessica McGarvey, Aubrie Rhines, Trevor Kennedy, Ben Ash and Kyle Funk.


The students formed 10 teams with 3-4 members each to address two segments of the 4th North Corridor in Logan. The 4th North Corridor was split into two distinct projects. Five of the teams competed on the segment of 4th North from Main Street to 7th East, and the other 5 teams competed on the segment from 7th East to the Canyon Gateway. For each of the projects, the competition carried a first prize of $750 and a second place prize of $250. Much like many professional competitions, the Jury re-

LAEP Students, Trevor Kennedy and Jessica McGarvey presenting their project to CAAS Dean Ken White and USU President Stan Albrecht.

viewed the boards on the merits of the work and their storytelling impact, and not on a presentation by the teams.

Jury Members judging the Dean's Prize Projects From Left to Right: Vice President of USU Facilities Charles Darnell, Professor David Anderson, CAAS Associate Dean Brian Warnick, Logan City Mayor Craig Peterson and Campus Planner Jordy Guth.

Project 1: 1st Place

Ryan Stauffer, Austin Markley, and Matt Starley pictured with Dean White

The jury appreciated the variety of innovative design concepts, the quality of the graphic representation and the storytelling impact of the work. Dean White invited the winning teams to meet with USU President Stan Albrecht and present their winning design concepts.

Project 1: 2nd Place

Jessica McGarvey, Trevor Kennedy and Ben Ash pictured with Dean White

Dean's Prize Gathering in the Common Studio

Project 2: 1st Place

Project 2: 2nd Place

Madison Merrill, Drew Hill, and Aubrie Rhines, Skyler Smith, Brad Jonathan Cook pictured with Dean Bennett, and Kyle Funk with Dean White White

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Travel Experience in Germany Field Trip 2015

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uring the 2015 LAEP International Travel Course, Professor Barty Warren-Kretzschmar led ten LAEP students led through northern Germany for twelve days, visiting Hannover, Bergen-Belsen, Quidlenburg, Bernburg, Dessau and Berlin. An important goal of the trip was to promote networking opportunities between the USU and German landscape architecture students, as well as to expose students to the educational approaches of German universities. The students visited and worked with students from three different universities: Leibniz University Hannover, Anhalt University of Applied Sciences in Bernburg, and the Technical University of Berlin. The travel experience was also an opportunity for the students to reflect on the transition of German society since WWII as it is manifest in projects and progress within the profession of landscape architecture. The students saw first-hand how cities in Germany strive for Top: View of Hannover Middle: Touring Hannover Bottom: Leibniz University in Hannover: Students working on charrette in the LA studio

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sustainability. Bicycling and walking through Hannover and Berlin, they experiencing how public and alternative transportation systems promote livable cities. They toured Berlin with landscape architect Nicole Ulbrig, who introduced them to urban parks and projects that embodied sustainable design concepts. The group also explored German historic landmarks such as the Berlin Wall and the Brandenburger Tor, the Sachsenhausen concentration camp memorial and the glass dome of the German parliament or “Reichstag� building. Finally, a highlight for many was spending a night in the historic Preller Haus of the Bauhaus in Dessau, where the Bauhaus students had their ateliers. Such a trip is about more than just sight seeing and networking opportunities. The value of international travel is the opportunity to see what other countries value and have accomplished in order to reflect on the values and objectives of one’s own society. Hopefully, the ideas, concepts and projects that the students were exposed to during the trip have left an enduring imprint on their professional lives. Top Left: Dinner with MLA students at Anhalt University in Bernburg Top Right: Technical University of Berlin, USU students discuss a TU student project with Professor Cordula Loidl-Reisch Middle: Brandenburger Tor in Berlin Bottom: Sanssouci in Potsdam

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LAEP Students Expand Horizons in New York City Field Trip 2016

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n May 8, the day after USU graduation, fifteen students from Utah State University’s Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning (LAEP) spent ten days in New York City learning from landscape architects and exploring landmarks. Dave Anderson and Caroline Lavoie, Associate Professors in the LAEP Department, led the trip, which was the first time the travel course had gone to the Big Apple. New York City was chosen as the destination to expose the students to an amazing urban area, and is an example of how a densely populated place can function. It’s very different from the suburban and rural areas the LAEP students are used to in the Intermountain West.

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The group visited a number of open spaces within the city, including: Central Park, the High Line, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Prospect Park, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Teardrop Park, the 9/11 Memorial, the East River Esplanade, the Hudson River Parkway, Paley Park, and Greenacre Park. They also spent time with prestigious landscape architecture firms, observing what landscape architects do on a daily basis. In addition, the group toured the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim, Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, St Patrick’s Cathedral, Rockefeller Plaza, and Columbus Circle. The landscape architecture firm West 8 is working on a project that involves turning Governor’s Island into a park,


Central Park: The students visiting the Bethseda Fountain in Central Park

Central Park: Gathering with Joe Porter in Central Park

Teardrop Park: The students visiting Teardrop Playground

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Featured Image: Governor's Island (pg. 34): Students explore Governor's Island on a private tour

Brooklyn Bridge Left: Students take a photo in front of the Brooklyn Bridge city skyline Below: Brooklyn Bridge sketch by Bryan Wilson

which opens in July 2016. The Aggies received a private tour of the work being done on the island by Jamie Maslyn Larson (MLA ‘97), a USU alumnus and principal at West 8 New York. The group visited Nelson Byrd Woltz, a firm charged with designing the plaza for the Hudson Yards project, currently the largest mixed-use development in the country. Hudson Yards is located at the north end of the High Line. The plaza will be completely on structure, illustrating to the students that cities have layers and levels underground that have to be considered, coordinated, and planned for. They learned that it is far more challenging to create open spaces on top of other structures. Consideration must be given to hardscape material and plant selection, irrigation, planting media, drainage, and many other factors.

The High Line: Visiting the High Line

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In conjunction with the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, the students were given a hard hat tour of the newly opened World Trade Center Transit Hub. The tour was hosted by Westfield, the retail development company creating the shopping experience inside the Transit Hub.

Firm Visit: Students visiting the Nelson Byrd Woltz Firm


World Trade Center Top: Students visit the World Trade Center Transit Hub Middle Left: View from above Ground Zero Middle Right: 9/11 Memorial with the Transit Hub

Another highlight of the trip was visiting Central Park and being guided by the Central Park Conservancy historian and photographer, Sara Cedar Miller. Much was learned about Olmsted and Vaux’s efforts to create different areas of the park. On another afternoon, the group visited the north end of Central Park, accompanied by USU alumnus Joe Porter (BLA '63), who now lives in Manhattan.

The design of such spaces has to be thought through and analyzed to be successful.” The trip was a wonderful cap to the undergraduate careers of 10 of the 15 students who had just graduated. Everyone’s minds were expanded and enhanced by the people and places experienced in this amazing city.

Places like Central Park and the High Line are an important contrast to have in a busy city, according to Sara Jackman, an LAEP sophomore student who attended the trip. “I think I gained a greater understanding of the importance of open space in cities and urban design,” Jackman said. “I loved being able to still be in this busy city, but feel the peace and calm of nature around me. If they don’t have parks and open space, they don’t have anything. Prospect Park: Students hanging out in Prospect Park

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Figure 1: View of Dujiangyan

Traveling through China on Sabbatical -Bo Yang, Associate Professor

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o traveled in China in his sabbatical year to learn from exemplary projects in stormwater management and resilient urban design. He admires ecological wisdom inspired eco-practices that provide real and permanent good. Renowned cases include the Dujiangyan irrigation system in Chengdu, Sichuan Province (over 2300 years old), Fushougou in Ganzhou, Jiangxi Province (900 years old), and Beihai Tuanchen (Round Castle) in Beijing (800 years old). All of them involve sophisticated drainage designs still in use today.

To alleviate the acerbated urban flood syndrome, China initiated the “sponge city” movement in 2015, and released a list of 16 pilot cities, including: Wuhan, Chongqing, Xiamen, Zhenjiang and others. In the next three years, each city will enhance its storm drainage performance to allow rainwater to be stored, purified, and utilized with a permeation system, i.e., treating stormwater like a sponge. With lessons learned from these 16 pilot cities, by 2020, China expects to have 20 percent of its cities to adopt lowimpact development (LID) strategies

Figure 1: Bo Yang in Dujiangyan

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that enable efficient absorption and reuse of water, and by 2030, with the number rising up to 80 percent. Bo had the pleasure to visit a number projects from which the “sponge city” construction is obtaining design inspirations. His favorite project is the Dujiangyan irrigation system. It offers the benefits of agricultural irrigation, municipal water supply, navigation, ecological conservation, tourism, and others, for tens of millions of people through generations. The most intriguing aspect of its hydraulic system design is that it automatically diverges upstream water in a seasonally alternated four-to-six ratio, and detains 80 percent of the sediments (Figures 1 and 2). The second project that Bo enjoyed was the Hong Village in Anhui Province, established c.a. 1190-1194. Rainwater harvesting and circulation facilities are built into it's architectural designs (Figure 3). The Yuezhao Lake, located in the middle of the Village, serves as a water storage facility for domestic use, fire control, and most obviously, a community amenity and


Figure 4: Yuezhao Lake in Hong Village

Figure 3: An architecture detail of a rainwater facility in Hong Village

social space (Figure 4). Planning and design of the Hong Village are artistic expressions of the Chinese ancient wisdom in sustainable water management that integrates ecology with function. In addition to looking back into history for design inspirations, more

recent, significant examples are also found in Nanjing and Wuhan, when they upgrade and “green” their modern sewer systems and infrastructure. Figure 5 shows a newly constructed LID street in Nanjing, a design based on the city’s warm and humid climate and for on-site stormwater detention. Continuous environmental monitoring documents the street’s performance. The top section of Figure 5 shows the conventional drainage approach, and the bottom section reflects the LID approach.

riverfront development in Wuhan completed in 2013. Wuhan is one of the first “sponge city” pilot case that receives 400 million RMB ($63 million) per year for drainage infrastructure improvements. As part of the city-wide landscape and drainage improvement plan, the Chu River & Han Street (Figure 6) are constructed to connect the three major lakes in Wuhan (Sha Lake, Shuiguo Lake, and the East Lake) for better drainage, flood control, and to add to Wuhan’s recreational opportunities and urban amenities.

According to the chief designer, street flooding has been observed in the top section, while never in the LID section, a fact also verified by the empirical data collected on site. Finally, Figure 6 shows a

Bo is excited to return to Logan in the Fall, and he looks forward to sharing what he learned about “sponge city” development in China with his students and colleagues.

Figure 5: Conventional drainage on the LID street in Najing

Figure 6: The Chu Riverfront Development in Wuhan

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Slovenian Exchange

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pring Semester 2016 took LAEP students Ash Mayberry, Nelson Champion, and Hayley Borden on the adventure of a lifetime as participants in our exchange program with the University in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

During their five months abroad, they have seen and done many things they consider to be “unbelievable�. Once they worked through details like getting their class schedules and registering with the city, they became comfortable with their new lifestyle. As part of their program, they were exposed to Graduate students, seniors, and sophomores. Those different classes gave them ample opportunities to be exposed to different processes and designs. Their drawing class provided field trips around Ljubljana, where they got to draw the amazing views of mountains and valleys of Slovenia. This unique experience also offered travel to other countries: Austria, Slovankia, Hungary, Italy, Croatia, Bosnia, and Spain. They were exposed to different styles of architecture, art, and breathtaking scenery. These students will return the Logan campus for Fall 2016, to share their knowledge and adventures.

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Nelson looking out at Slovenia Country

Hayley and Ash in front of Postjna Caves

“Weekends happen to be the best time for travelling, because all you have to do is hop on a train or bus and suddenly you’re at the mountains, a lake, the beach, or a small town with yet another castle on top of a very steep hill” -Hayley Borden

Nelson, a friend and Ash on a balcony in Budapest

Hayley and friends in Celje, Slovenia

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LAEP Common Studio Created

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he first phase of the LAEP Common Studio was completed in March 2016, with Professor Dave Anderson overseeing the construction. The Common Studio represents the first major facilities upgrade in the Fine Arts Visual building since the Graduate Studio was remodeled in 2009.

In 2015, the LAEP undergraduate studios were reconfigured with the juniors at the north end (former senior studio), the seniors at the far south end (former freshman studio) and the sophomores and freshmen combined into what was the former junior studio. This left FAV 210 (the original sophomore studio) available to create a new Common Studio.

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This configuration nestles the sophomores and freshmen between the two upper division classes and promotes communication between all the classes. The Common Studio includes a raised platform for presentations, millwork for reference materials, paint, carpeting, furnishings, and media equipment. The remodeled space was envisioned as a multi-functional, communal area that could serve as a hub for socializing, brainstorming, discovery, presentations, and establishing department comradery. LAEP Department Head, Sean Michael remarked: “The Common Studio represents a remarkable partnering of students and faculty, in which both graduates and undergraduates spearheaded a vision for reconfiguring the BLA studios. Central to the proposals and the ensuing design charrette was supporting underclassmen through a democratic layout of the studios. The chosen solution revolved around the junior and senior studios being situated to emphasize peer mentoring and free movement between classes. The Common Studio was the other vital element to the plan.� The second phase of the Common Studio will be completed Fall 2016 and will include a seminar room, kitchenette and "maker space" for plotters, 3D printer, laser cutter and other technology.

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Technology Updates by Professor Benjamin George

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s someone whose research focus involves online education and landscape visualization, I have a keen interest in emerging technologies and how those are applied to improve our student’s education. Here are a couple of advances on the technology front that are currently happening in LAEP, as well as some that are on the horizon.

outputs provided by the drones. Students are now able to gather data that would have formerly cost thousands of dollars and taken a considerable amount of lead-time. Currently, I am working with USU to establish an Aerial Imagery and Remote Sensing certificate program in the LAEP Department. Through gaining this certificate, students will become proficient in the operation of drones and cameras, and also the software necessary to export and utilize the gathered data. Recent federal legislation has cleared the way for this program, and I hope to have it in place by Fall of 2018.

LAEP Visualization Lab This fall will see the initiation of a research lab dedicated to landscape visualization and analysis. This research lab will be managed by myself, Prof. Barty WarrenKretzschmar, and Prof. Ole Sleipness, along with input and collaboration from several other faculty members. I am personally very excited about this lab and the opportunities it will provide for both visualization research and the development of our students. The lab will feature several state-of-the-art technologies, including a large format multi-touch table, Vive virtual reality headsets, a Microsoft HoloLens, Wacom drawing tablets, several powerful rendering stations, and an aerial drone. This will give faculty the opportunity to pursue a variety of research at different scales and enable our students to gain valuable experience working with the latest hardware and software. In the future, will be a place that will push the boundaries of landscape visualization and representation.

The Digital Library of Landscape Architecture History Aerial Drones This is a student-led initiative to incorporate drones into the design process. Initiated by Mark Jensen (BLA ‘16) and Thomas Terry (BLA ‘16) pictured above, along with the help and engagement of many other students, LAEP students have used drones to conduct site inventory and analysis of dozens of sites across the state. Often used for the Community Design Teams, the drone-gathered data provides students in the program with highly detailed aerial imagery and contour maps of project sites. The response from the students and faculty has been extremely positive, as we all recognize the value of the data

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This year I was also honored to receive the Award of Excellence from the Utah Chapter of ASLA for the Digital Library of Landscape Architecture History (DiLiLAH). DiLiLAH is a database of virtual tours of historic landscapes from around the world. DiliLAH features 30 virtual tours from gardens around the world. DiLiLAH is used in LAEP History of Landscape Architecture to provide students with the opportunity to virtually visit many of the most important landscapes throughout history. DiLiLAH is available on the web at: http://gardentaining.com/dililah/ index.html


Curriculum Updates

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andscape architecture is a broad discipline that allows practitioners a wide variety of specialties to concentrate in. Most of us also acknowledge that the education we received in college was just the beginning of our professional development, and we all recognize the necessity for continuous learning. In the spirit of ‘continuous improvement.' The LAEP faculty has spent many hours of research, exploration, and discussion on how to improve our curriculum to better meet market conditions. Additionally, one of the findings of the 2011 LAAB (Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board) accreditation report encouraged us to find ways to streamline or reduce the required credit load and introduce opportunities for students to take appropriate electives.

As we considered the curriculum and its content, we recognized that we cannot teach every student every thing they need to know to be a professional landscape architect. Sometimes we only expose students to information; at other times we may require a thorough understanding and/or application of a topic area. In some topic areas we require students to demonstrate mastery. Any course content is divided between knowledge a student needs and the experience and/or skills a needed to implement the acquired knowledge. Lastly, we also recognize that the most important thing we can impart is how to learn, so that they become life-long learners. Our emphasis in recent years on “studio culture” has been aimed in part at this effort to inculcate continuous professional improvement.

sequence. We recognized the opportunity to consolidate two courses, and by so doing reduce overlapping, or redundant content. In the spring of 2016, LAEP 3610 (Detailing and Construction Methodologies – junior level - 3 credits) and LAEP 4110 (Construction Documentation – senior level - 4 credits) were consolidated into one course (LAEP 4110) offered in the spring semester of the junior year. Professors David Evans (4110) and Phil Waite (3610) worked extensively to meld their two course contents /goals into a five credit studio intensive course. This consolidation frees up two credits worth of electives, and opens up a time slot in the fall of the senior year that provides greater scheduling flexibility. A corollary step in this effort was to make the required irrigation course (offered by Plant Soils and Climate) required for LAEP students into an online and optional course. By making the course optional and allowing students to take it online, it frees up time in their schedules for other elective courses or flexibility in when it is taken. A similar effort at curriculum improvement was undertaken in two sophomore year courses: LAEP 2700 and LAEP 2720. Historically, LAEP 2700 covered site inventory and analysis, while LAEP 2720 covered basic site design and planning. After much discussion and debate, it was decided that students would benefit from an course

In this curriculum review process, some of our research findings indicated that of all landscape architecture programs nationally, LAEP was in the top tier in terms of the number of courses in its construction curriculum

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integrated that combined inventory, analysis, design, and planning in a seamless process. Beginning in the fall of 2014, these two course were integrated by Professors Keith Christensen, Todd Johnson, and David Evans. The two courses are now labeled as Analysis and Design I & II. Though there was no course credit reduction, the integration of the two courses has led to improved learning and better preparation of LAEP students. Other curriculum changes have involved the conversion of some of our face-to-face courses into either blended (both face to face and online) or completely online courses. This effort has included LAEP 1200 (2-D Graphics), LAEP 1300 (2-D Color Graphics), PSC 2620 (Woody Plants), LAEP 2300 (History of Landscape Architecture), and LAEP 3600 (Landscape Materials). Online courses provide several benefits to students, the two most notable being flexibility in scheduling and the ability for distance education of place-bound students. Place-bound students can take several of our courses early in the curriculum sequence before coming to campus. Changes to the graduate curriculum also support LAAB recomendations. for greater flexibility in the graduate program for students to explore their interests and complete their thesis in a timely manner. Each change was evaluated as to whether it would continue to support

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the department's graduate mission to (1) prepare future professionals to address the vast and dynamic issues and landscapes of the Intermountain West; and (2) engage in creative intellectual work that contributes to the theory and practice of landscape architecture. The revised curriculum has a renewed focus on environmental planning and closer collaboration with the Bioregional Planning Program through some shared courses, increased support in research methods and thesis preparation, and increased GIS instruction. Further, graduate students will now select a 'track' in which their studies will be focused, such as Design Practice, Environmental Planning, Geospatial, Water Resources, etc. According to their track, students will select from LAEP courses that were previously required for all graduate students and other supporting electives. The changes both lessened the total credit load from 89 credits to 80 credits, as well as expanded the available electives from 6 to 15 required credits, many of which are to be used in emphasis tracks. The process of curriculum refinement will continue as we prepare graduates for the marketplace of the 21st century.

A Fond Farewell

AEP’s long-time Staff Assistant, Kathy Allen, is a face and voice recognized by many. Over her 10+ years in the Department, Kathy was a sustaining force for both faculty and students. Kathy’s every day motivation was the students of LAEP – who she loved. She worked tirelessly to see that student needs were met, and to support and assist them. She is still in touch with many former students, and cherishes her time and the people in LAEP. We are sad to see her go, but very happy for the opportunity she has to enjoy retirement along the Oregon Coast.

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LAEP Speaker Series

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onnecting students with a breadth of topics and practitioners in our discipline is at the core of LAEP’s Speaker Series. Situated where Logan is, these talks are an irreplaceable part of the total experience our students receive.

Each year a dozen or more lectures are given by guests. The annual Craig Johnson Fund for Excellence Lecture enables imminent voices in conservation, ecology and wildlife planning to share their expertise. In April, Professor Joan Iverson Nassauer, FASLA/FCELA, traveled from the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and Environment, where she is a distinguished faculty member. The author of several books and numerous other publications on ecological aspects of design, Joan serves as Editor-in-Chief of Landscape & Urban Planning, and has conducted several million dollars of grants and contracts related to landscape ecology, watersheds and human relations to the land. Joan is among the thought leaders who he has cited as instrumental in the discipline. Of Craig’s own impact, Joan remarked, “he definitely is on my own list of influential integrative designers who use science, and I am his fan”. This spring also witnessed the inaugural delivery of the Vern Budge Business Leadership Lecture. Created to honor the legacy and impact of Vern’s training of generations of LAEP grads, the Lecture is made possible by the vision and generosity of Larry Harmsen (BLA ’83 ), whose gift created the endowed fund of the same name. Fittingly the first Lecture was delivered by fellow Distinguished Alumnus Richard Shaw, FASLA (BLA ’72), who enthusiastically agreed to share the talk as a tribute to his former professor. Richard’s leadership in the profession is remarkable, and his ties to USU run deep, his father being the renowned Utah State biology professor and plantsman Dr. Richard J. Shaw (‘48, ‘50 MS). Richard’s talk showcased his decades of work at Design Workshop, sharing hard won lessons on business with a packed auditorium of students, friends and faculty. Top: Joan Nassauer presenting at the Craig Johnson Fund for Excellence Lecture Middle: Hailey Wall (BLA ‘16), Joan Nassauer and Professor Caroline Lavoie (not pictured) hiking the Crimson Trail in Logan Canyon Bottom: Richard Shaw (BLA ‘72) presenting the Vern Budge Business Leadership Lecture

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LAEP 75th Anniversary Scholarship new scholarship

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n 2014, LAEP kicked off the 75th Anniversary of the program with a huge celebration over Labor Day weekend. Over 200 of the LAEP family gathered to mark this historic occasion, and it was an overwhelming success. Alumni and former faculty from many eras were in attendance, swapping stories and memories, taking pictures and sharing their journeys. As a special celebration of this milestone, the 75th Anniversary Scholarship Endowment was created through joint gifts by Bob Behling (BLA ‘73), Joe Porter (BLA ‘63), and Justin Hamula/ Hunter Industries (BLA ‘95). This scholarship will benefit LAEP for many years to come, allowing us to recruit top students to USU, as we move toward a Century of Excellence.

laep anniversary celebration toward a century of excellence

1939 - 2014

Top Left: Joe Porter Bottom Left: Justin Hamula Bottom Right: Bob Behling

Chris Creasey receiving the Craig Johnson Scholarship Award

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Emmeline Zenger receiving the Utah ASLA Memorial Scholarship Award from Tina Gillman, Utah ASLA

Alonzo Rhodes and Emmet Pruss receiving the Kenji Shiozawa Scholarship Award

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Scholarship Awards

Laval Morris Travel Scholarship

2016-2017 recipient Jillian Virgi, at Durmitor National Park in Zabljak, Montenegro. Jillian used funding from the Laval Morris Travel Scholarship to travel to sites in Montenegro, Greece, Israel, and Italy during summer of 2016.

2016- 2017 Scholarship Awards Craig Johnson Scholarship Chris Creasey David Jensen Scholarship Susie Gomez Kenji Shiozawa Scholarship

Emmet Pruss and Alonzo Rhodes

John Nicholson Scholarship Nelson Champion and Haley Borden Kenneth Volkman Scholarship Logan Oates  Laval Morris Travel Scholarship Jillian Virgi LAEP Faculty Scholarship David Durfee MLA Class of 1981 Scholarship Mary Oliver Josephine Beach Traveling Scholarship

Stephanie Tomlin

WILA/Diversity in LA Scholarship McKenna Drew GAIA Scholarship Megan Criss Utah ASLA Memorial Scholarship Emmeline Zenger

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2015-2016 Awards

Student Awards

Outstanding Sophomore Outstanding Junior Senior Leadership Award Senior Faculty Medal Outstanding 1st Year Grad Outstanding 2nd Year Grad MLA Leadership Award Graduate Medal

Faculty Awards

Craig Johnson

Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA) Fellow 2016

Emmeline Zenger Chris Creasey Hailey Wall John Locke Mary Oliver Susie Gomez Tanya Rice Keni Althouse

Bo Yang

• 2017-2020. Spatial form of sponge unit under urban viaducts and its landscape performance. National Natural Science Foundation of China. PI: Lihua Yin, Co-PI: Bo Yang ($135,476) • 2016 Excellence in Research and/or Creative Work Award (Junior Level). Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA)

Shujuan Li

• Shujuan Li and her fellow authors were awarded the William R. Boggess Award for: Li, Enjie, Joanna Endter-Wada, and Shujuan Li, 2015. Characterizing and Contextualizing the Water Challenges of Megacities. JAWRA 51(3): 589-613

Benjamin George

• Award of Excellence from Utah ASLA for his virtual tours

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Incoming MLA Students Meredith Andrus

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eredith graduated with a BS in Conservation Biology from Brigham Young University. After graduation she found her love of landscape design while working at Glover Nursery in West Jordan. She believes very strongly in the conservation of finite resources and habitat for Utah’s native species both plant and animal. By pursuing an MLA at USU she hopes to not only create beautiful landscapes and promote proper land management but help prevent further destruction of habitat and loss of resources.

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Tonya Randall

onya graduated at Brigham Young University-Idaho with a bachelors in Psychology in 2012. After working for over three years as security in a mental hospital she decided to leave the field and explore other options eventually landing on the decision to pursue landscape design. She made this decision after realizing how important beautiful places are to healing and wanted to help contribute to the work of conservation. She enjoys reading, hiking, trail running, painting, and small wood working projects. Tonya was born in Lincoln, Nebraska but grew up near St. Louis.

Incoming MsBRP Students

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Aubin Douglas

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ric grew up in Orem, Utah and loved worked for its parks department for 10 years. He received a B.S. in Education from Utah Valley University and a graduate certification in Special Education from Brigham Young University. He taught in Utah and Idaho for 10 years before attending graduate school at Idaho State University. Eric received a M.S. in Speech Language Pathology and has enjoyed working as a speech pathologist for 5 years. Now in Logan, he is excited to enter the MLA program at USU and return to the world of landscape planning and development.

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Jason Parkinson

ason, from Mapleton, Utah, graduated with his BLA from USU in May 2016. Jason’s fascination with the outdoors and animals sparked an interest in habitat design and sustainable practices. He believes that good design practices are pivotal to the success and enjoyment of each land use. Jason’s passion for seeing potential in a project and designing the details pushes him forward to expanding his knowledge of design and to apply it to new challenges while continuing his education at USU.

ubin graduated from the University of Colorado in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies and a minor in geography. She has gained valuable skills volunteering at various local organizations including the Boulder County Watershed Initiative, the Denver Aquarium and as a soil sampler for Boulder County. Through these opportunities, she has built an experiential understanding of the skills needed to work with both private and public organizations on shared lands. Water issues facing the western U.S. are her prime interest, so she is pursuing a graduate degree in Bioregional Planning.

Andy Witt

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Eric Astel

ndy graduated with dual degrees in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Environmental Science from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 2013. Since then, Andy has been with Miller Ecological Consultants developing and implementing habitat models assessing how endangered fish species are affected by different river flows. Andy’s experience in analyzing both the dynamics of the natural world and how human driver’s influence those processes, provides a unique interdisciplinary viewpoint for addressing environmental issues. Andy brings this acumen to the Bioregional Planning program, hoping to improve upon the management of western water resources.

New Graduate Program Director

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r. Keith Christensen has assumed the role of Graduate Program Director for LAEP. Keith began his professorship in LAEP back in 2008, having earned his MLA from our program, and his PhD from Disabilities Studies at USU. Dr. Christensen will oversee the advising of incoming students until they have established a committee chair, monitor timely progression through milestones of degrees, interact with the School of Graduate Studies, and provide general management of our graduate programs.

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inSites - 2016 The Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning Magazine College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences Utah State University 4005 Old Main Hill Logan Utah 84322-4005 laep.usu.edu

DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING

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inSites 2016  

This is a magazine publication of Utah State University's Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning Department for 2016

inSites 2016  

This is a magazine publication of Utah State University's Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning Department for 2016

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