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Fish Your Wish

LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS 2

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The readers have their say on a MOCA whitewashing and football stadium plans.

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

December 20, 2010

DOUBLE DESIGNS ON DOWNTOWN’S FUTURE

INSIDE

A view of the Civic Park.

Problem projects, a big loan default, and other happenings Around Town.

Wilshire Grand Plan Gains Steam $1 Billion Complex Picks Up Political Support, and Some Opposition

Fields of Dreams Although No Team Is in Line for L.A., AEG Unveils Possible Stadium Designs rendering by Gensler

Volume 39, Number 51

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2

Urban Scrawl on Santonio Claus.

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rendering by HNTB

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rendering by HKS

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Possible auction for the Brockman.

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Designs from the architecture firms (top to bottom) Gensler, HNTB and HKS for a South Park football stadium. A winner for the 72,000-seat project is expected to be announced within 30 days. by Jon Regardie executive editor

A lens on Little Tokyo history.

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renderings courtesy Thomas Properties Group/AC Martin

Korean Air and Thomas Properties Group hope to open a 45-story hotel in place of the aging Wilshire Grand by 2015. However, the proposal has drawn some criticism for LED-illuminated signage that would be placed around the building. by Ryan Vaillancourt staff writer

New show at Chinese American Museum.

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14 CALENDAR LISTINGS 17 MAP 18 CLASSIFIEDS

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proposed $1 billion hotel and office tower project was poised to clear a major hurdle last week as the city Planning Commission considered a slew of entitlements for the Financial District complex. The commission was widely expected to approve the plan from Wilshire Grand Hotel owner Korean Air and its partner, Thomas Properties Group, on Thursday, Dec. 16. The vote came after Los Angeles Downtown News went to press. The meeting occurred more than 18 months after the companies announced plans to raze the 1952

structure and build a luxury hotel and office skyscraper in its place at Figueroa and Seventh streets. With commission approval, the plan would still require a final OK from the City Council. Thomas Properties Group officials have said they hope to begin demolishing the building in December 2011 and break ground on the 560-room hotel tower in December 2012. They aim to open the new hotel, which would also include 100 condominiums, in 2015. The office tower would follow at an undetermined time, depending largely on conditions in the currently weak office market. The hotel’s development agreement with the city, see Hotel, page 10

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he National Football League has yet to give any public indication that, if and when it returns to Los Angeles, it intends to do so in a Downtown stadium. That lack of commitment, however, is not deterring the team pushing a $1 billion stadium/convention facility in South Park. Last week, the plan’s proponents continued their recent blitzkrieg of drawing attention to the proposal. Anschutz Entertainment Group officials used a Wednesday, Dec. 15, press conference at the Convention Center hotel to unveil the selection of a project manager and what it termed an “owner’s representative” for the development at L.A. Live. They also revealed the three architectural firms that are finalists to design the 1.725 million-square-foot, 72,000-seat facility. AEG spokesman Michael Roth said that Denver-based Icon Venue

The Voice of Downtown Los Angeles

Group is working as the owner’s representative. The firm, which has consulted on projects including Denver’s $400 million Invesco Field and AEG’s O2 arena in London, was hired in October. In early November, it launched a bidding process among nine architectural firms, asking them to submit designs for a stadium that would fit on a 15-acre site in Downtown Los Angeles and also allow for the razing of the Convention Center’s current West Hall and the building of a new $350 million convention facility. Icon President and CEO Tim Romani said that the finalists in the design competition are Downtownbased HNTB, Beverly Hills firm HKS Sports & Entertainment, and Gensler, a firm with 35 worldwide offices that also designed the $1 billion Convention Center hotel. Romani said the goal is to select an architect within 30 days. The winner, he said, will be chosen see Football, page 10


2 Downtown News

December 20, 2010

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AROUNDTOWN Memorial Set For Jack Kyser

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he Downtown business community will have a chance to pay tribute to the late Jack Kyser on Wednesday, Jan. 12. Last week, the Southern California Association of Governments, where Kyser worked most recently, announced that the event “Celebrating the Life of Jack Kyser” will take place at 1:30 p.m. at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Downtown. Kyser, who worked at the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. for 19 years before joining SCAG this past summer, was known for the many reports he compiled and the astute economic analysis he dispensed, in layman’s terms, to journalists around the globe. Friends also noted his fun and playful side, highlighted by an office filled with toys and stuffed animals. He died this month from complications related to a kidney condition. Those interested in attending are asked to register in advance. Information is at scag.ca.gov.

clude a new public bidding process, or a developer coming forward with a new proposal for the site that is highlighted by the Pico House, Los Angeles’ first three-story structure. “We’re still optimistic,” Andrade said. “We’re talking to numerous parties who have shown interest to understand what might make the project more of a reality for them. We’re not standing still in any way.” The buildings are on the south side of El Pueblo and have sat unused for years due to a long-running lawsuit between the city and Old Los Angeles Company, whose partners include politically connected attorney and restaurateur Andy Camacho. Old L.A. held primary rights to develop the Pico-Garnier Block, but the city gave the El Pueblo commission the green light to launch a bidding process after the City Council voted in August to terminate settlement negotiations.

MOCA Director Ordered Mural Whitewashed

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None Bid to Run Key El Pueblo Project

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he effort to rehabilitate and lease the Pico-Garnier Block at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument hit a pothole recently, when no one responded to the city’s bidding process. Robert Andrade, general manager of El Pueblo, said although several interested parties approached the city about the seven-building complex, none submitted a bid by the Nov. 29 deadline. He said the next steps include surveying those who showed interest and learning why they declined to bid, and meeting with Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s economic development team about what steps to take next. He said potential outcomes in-

hen the Museum of Contemporary Art whitewashed a mural it had commissioned on an exterior wall of the Geffen Contemporary, its leaders stayed mum on its rationale for several days. MOCA finally issued a statement last week, clarifying that Director Jeffrey Deitch, who invited Italian street artist Blu to create the mural, made the call to paint over it. The artwork depicted rows of military-style wooden caskets draped in dollar bills instead of American flags. The museum acknowledged in the statement that the Geffen faces the Veterans Administration healthcare building on Temple Street and sits next to the Go For Broke Monument memorializing Japanese American WWII veterans. “[Deitch] explained to Blu that in this context, where MOCA is a guest among this

photo by Gary Leonard

The remnants of the two circular parking entrances and the Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain are the most recognizable landmarks as work continues on the $56 million Grand Avenue Civic Park. The project that will run between the Music Center and City Hall is slated to open in the summer of 2012.

historic Japanese American community, the work was inappropriate,” the statement said. Although Deitch invited Blu to paint another MOCA mural, the artist said in an email, “At the moment I am just watching the debate from a distance… and I prefer to not interfere with my personal opinions. My murals are often open to different interpretations. Deitch had his personal interpretation about this piece and he decided to censor it.” Neither the Veterans Administration nor the organization that maintains the Go For Broke Monument complained, but a spokeswoman for the monument said that several veterans who saw the mural found it “in bad taste.”

Renovated Bristol Hotel Opens

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eveloper Izek Shomof last week said that a renovation of the Bristol Hotel is complete, and that the project has opened to residents after the city finished with its final inspections. Shomof purchased the 1906 edifice for $2.5 million in 2009. The transfor-

mation of the 104-year-old structure at 423 W. Eighth St. turned the onetime residential hotel into an affordable housing complex. Shomof said he plans to enroll the property, which will offer 107 efficiency units, in the Section 8 federal rent subsidy program. The ground floor holds a D-Town Burger Bar, which opened about two months ago. The project was privately funded and Shomof has not disclosed the budget.

MPG to Default on Two California Plaza

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roubled real estate firm MPG Office Trust announced last week that it will default on its $470 million mortgage for Downtown’s Two California Plaza. The company, which recently saw a change at the top with the resignation of Nelson Rising, said the move is the first step required toward restructuring the loan as it seeks to work with lenders to reduce and manage its obligations. The 54-story 1.3-million-square-foot propsee Around Town, page 7

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4 Downtown News

December 20, 2010

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EDITORIALS MOCA, the Mural and the C Word

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debate raged in the past week following the Museum of Contemporary Art’s decision to commission, and then whitewash, a gigantic mural on the north-facing wall of its Geffen Contemporary in Little Tokyo. While the work is gone, a certain level of rancor remains. At this point, two things are clear: 1) MOCA officials dropped the ball and should have been better prepared, and 2) those quick to call this “censorship” should re-think their public proclamations. There is a big difference between an arts institution choosing what it displays and how it handles its business — especially when that business is in the greater context of a neighborhood — and a government censoring speech or squelching a populace’s ability to express itself. As Los Angeles Downtown News reported last week, MOCA commissioned an Italian street artist who goes by the name of Blu to create the mural in advance of an April 2011 show on street art. The massive work was both completed and whitewashed on Thursday, Dec. 9, though many Downtowners had noticed its progress four or five days before that. The mural showed rows of coffins, the pine boxes partially obscured by green $1 bills. The bills clearly were a replacement for the customary American flags draped over the coffins of soldiers killed during wartime. The artwork appeared to be Blu’s commentary on the military battles the nation wages. After getting heat for the whitewashing, MOCA released a

statement noting that the north wall faces the Go For Broke Monument, a memorial to Japanese Americans who fought in World War II, as well as the Veteran’s Administration healthcare building on Temple Street. “The museum’s director explained to Blu that in this context, where MOCA is a guest among this historic Japanese American community, the work was inappropriate,” the MOCA statement said. MOCA is right not to display the image on the outside of the building for an extended period (the Art in the Streets show is slated to run through September 2011). There would be much less of a problem if the controversial mural were mounted inside the building, but the exterior placement is grossly insensitive to the community, to veterans of the nation’s wars, and to the families of soldiers killed in battle. There’s a finer point here than the subject of the artist’s commentary. A key component of certain art forms is prompting debate and questioning such matters as the motivation to send a nation’s people to war. When is it right to ask them to be willing to come home in metaphorical pine boxes? The big Downtown question is why MOCA did not arrange for such a provocative work to be placed in an appropriate setting. We wonder how in control museum Director Jeffrey Deitch — a former New York gallery owner well-versed in street artists and their iconoclastic tendencies — was of the process. Did he give carte blanche to Blu and not have an inkling of what the artist would create? Did he see sketches and not fathom the

impact it would have until the work was on a huge building? What sort of advice and guidance did he provide? If MOCA was keeping a close eye on this important site, then there never would have been the need for the controversial whitewashing. Maybe this is a lesson learned for the museum’s rookie director. That leaves us with the issue of censorship, always a hotbutton topic, one that is often misunderstood. In the classic sense, censorship refers to a government or authoritarian body using its power, and maybe its police or military force, to prevent expressions it finds distasteful or otherwise opposes. This can mean preventing people from making political statements in public against a ruling party or forcing a publisher to stop printing poetry or other writings or artwork critical of the state or its leader. This can mean threats or physical intimidation. We are used to hearing tales of this and similar forms of censorship in North Korea, China or the Cold War-era Soviet Republic. There have also been plenty of examples where rights of free speech are trampled within the United States, though we hang on to the notion that they don’t rise to the most egregious level. Censorship is a very serious charge, and it takes legitimate criticism too far in the case of MOCA and the mural. It is a different matter when a museum makes the decision on whether or not it should display a piece of work it commissioned in the first place.

Understanding the Stadium Timeline

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nschutz Entertainment Group President and CEO Tim Leiweke raised some expectations and sparked some squawking recently when he announced a three-month window on the company’s plan to put together the pieces of a South Park stadium deal. Either this is simple gamesmanship or Phil Anschutz wants to make sure he doesn’t waste time and money like so many have previously. Los Angeles has been without professional football since the Raiders and Rams both left following the 1994 season. Although no one with Anschutz’s money and power has sought to bring the league back, affluent

and connected folk such as Ed Roski and Mike Ovitz have tried. The NFL has never shown an inclination to kowtow to someone else’s schedule, and it is hard to see that happening here. Then again, the recent collapse of the roof of the Metrodome, home of the Minnesota Vikings, could throw things into disarray and lend sway to an L.A. bid. The Vikings were already widely mentioned as a Los Angeles candidate before the building fell apart. As Los Angeles Downtown News reported last week, Leiweke used an appearance at a Central City Association luncheon to say he wants to reach an agreement with the city by

February on plans to raze the Convention Center’s West Hall, and replace it with a $1 billion stadium and a $350 million new hall. He said that is also the timeframe for when he wants to know if league owners will OK a return to Los Angeles, and to know which team would move here. What one should keep in mind is that Anschutz and Leiweke know how slowly things move in Los Angeles. Saying “Do it in three months or it doesn’t get done” is a good way to propel action, as is dangling the money the city would make from an improved convention facility. Then again, these are experienced businesspeople, and if they

know that achieving their goals will take six or nine months, they will probably wait. As stated on this page last month, AEG’s track record with L.A. Live and Staples Center merits it a shot with Downtown football. Part of this includes city support, and it would be nice if local government could move quickly, also, as we say, out of character when it comes to development. But given the city’s dire financial straits, it can’t afford to let this one slip by. Whether the NFL will meet AEG’s schedule is a far different and more complicated matter. Unless, of course, there’s one in the bag and we just haven’t been told yet.

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com • email: realpeople@downtownnews.com facebook: L.A. Downtown News

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December 20, 2010

Downtown News 5

Opinion

The Readers Speak Up Website Comments on a MOCA Whitewashing, Downtown Football and More

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os Angeles Downtown News posts comments to stories on our website. Here are some of the most recent responses. Additional comments appear on downtownnews.com. Further responses are welcome.

Regarding the article “MOCA Commissions Mural, Then Whitewashes It,” by Ryan Vaillancourt, posted online Dec. 9

M

aybe MOCA should actually look at what’s going on the wall first before approving a commission. Otherwise, just let local street artists’ graffiti cover the wall. —posted by Whitman Lam, Dec. 10, 12:41 a.m.

for cars — if you clear the intersection, you’re OK. Not so. You can only step off the curb if the little walking man is still visible. Once the red hand is flashing, even with a generous countdown left, you are in violation. I got cited last Christmas — guess I should be grateful it was only $140. —posted by Michael, Dec. 7, 12:34 p.m.

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he $190 is so totally outrageous. I wonder why we’re not gathering torches and marching to Parker Center! I’m kidding... a little. The thought that they can get away with what amounts to highway robbery infuriates me. —posted by Mak, Dec. 10, 6:59 p.m.

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alking out as the hand flashes makes driving difficult. People who begin walking at the number 3 or 2 cannot make it across, and drivers trying to make left turns are held back from the 1 second mark during the amber to red transition for opposing traffic. We must all lose a second here and there when it benefits many, pedestrians and drivers alike. Another good idea for peace and profit is to ticket drivers who lay on their horns for 30 seconds or more. I overlook Fifth Street, and from 6-9 a.m. and 3-7 p.m. I have counted as many as 20 enraged horns that lasted more than 30 seconds. —posted by DDDoug, Dec. 11, 7:36 a.m.

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don’t approve of censorship, but the artist’s choice of subject matter was poorly chosen, insensitive and insulting. It deserved to be whitewashed. The artist has ignorantly wasted an opportunity that the hundreds of artists in the Arts District who live within blocks of the building would have loved to have had, and done a better job to boot! —posted by Maandrews, Dec. 10, 10:43 a.m.

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OCA sez: Wait a second: Street art might actually not conform to the predominant political hegemony and may advance views that jar safe conventions? Why didn’t anyone tell us before? —posted by Mick, Dec. 10, 12:54 p.m.

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his is just like Diego Rivera vs. Rockefeller more than half a century ago. So sad. —posted by Cecil Summers, Dec. 11, 12:54p.m.

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hatever their reasons, I am thankful to MOCA for removing this egregiously offensive mural. The painting was in extremely poor taste on numerous levels. This artist chose to paint this cynical, slandering piece at the very moment when men and women who believe in the virtues of this nation are sacrificing their lives in its name. People have lost their husbands, wives, sons, daughters, parents — and they deserve healing and peace, rather than a morbid, oppressively negative statement which invalidates the reasons their loved ones chose to valiantly place themselves in harm’s way. To have this in sight of the VA building and the Go For Broke building is not only distasteful, it is cruel. —posted by Thank You MOCA, Dec. 12, 5:45 p.m.

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think it was beautiful. It was an incredibly controversial message to convey, but that’s what art and artists are for: to push the envelope of culture and society. I feel the pain of those who are offended. I too have friends and family in the military. But you need to comprehend what this painting was saying before passing judgment on the work or the artist. I think it was actually paying service to those who have fallen in the line of duty and condemning our government for the deaths of our solders for, what many believe, are unjust wars. I can understand why this could anger some people. The art may suggest that the fallen hold less meaning, but I say they hold more. They gave their lives for something they believed in; the finger is pointed at those who sent them into harm’s way for economic reasons. —posted by Jesse, Dec. 13, 7:38 p.m.

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Regarding the article “Leiweke Wants NFL Plan Within Three Months,” by Jon Regardie, posted online Dec. 8

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’m glad to see this project moving forward. It appears that Mr. Leiweke has a passion to getting this done but will not be used by the NFL for leverage. The city of Los Angeles and the NFL need to recognize that AEG has stepped up and developed the very best plan since 1994. For the uninformed residents who don’t support the effort, don’t ruin it for those of us who do. —posted by CW, Dec. 8, 4:23 p.m.

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ow! Maybe we can get him to build the subway to the sea and a few parks Downtown while he’s at it. —posted by Bob Dobolino, Dec. 10, 10:53 p.m.

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ill love to have the Rams back, and will support any team that relocates to the best city. But please, no Raiders! —posted by Manny, Dec. 13, 8:55 a.m.

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ikings! Vikings! Vikings! —posted by Tiffany Gonzalez, Dec. 14, 1:17 p.m.

Regarding the editorial “Mixed Reactions on the $190 Jaywalking Ticket,” published Dec. 6

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detail missing from the article is a definition of “against the light.” I’d bet most people think it’s like a yellow light

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December 20, 2010

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December 20, 2010

Downtown News 7

DowntownNews.com

Brockman Building May Hit the Auction Block Lender Hopes to Foreclose On and Sell Condo Complex, Though No Opening Is Imminent by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

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f all goes as planned for Bank of America, the Brockman Building, a once highly anticipated condominium complex, will be auctioned off to the highest bidder on Dec. 30. That does not mean that the property at 530 W. Seventh St. will open any time soon. Bank of America, which provided developer West Millennium with a $35 million construction loan in 2007, still needs court approval for the plan. A hearing is tentatively scheduled for Dec. 28. The developer filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in April 2009, after a protracted effort to stay above water as the housing market tanked. The 80-unit project above the restaurant Bottega Louie has wallowed in a sort of financial purgatory ever since because its value is believed to be far lower than its outstanding debt. In addition to Bank of America’s $35 million loan, West Millennium owes about $9 million to creditors who have placed dozens of liens on the property, according to bankruptcy court records. When West Millennium filed for Chapter 7, it stated that the property was only worth about $20 million.

photo by Gary Leonard

The Brockman Building, tied up in bankruptcy for more than a year, could be headed to auction.

If Judge Kathleen Thompson approves the auction of the building, it would be over the objection of West Millennium. According to court records, the developer is mulling a reorganization via the Chapter 11 bankruptcy process, instead of the type of liquida-

tion enabled by Chapter 7. Thompson gave West Millennium until Dec. 17 (after Los Angeles Downtown News went to press) to file the paperwork to convert the case to Chapter 11. If documents are not filed by the deadline, Thompson indicated that she would allow the foreclosure sale. There is also no guarantee that Thompson would allow a Chapter 11 conversion even if West Millennium meets the deadline. If an auction proceeds, it does not necessarily mean that a new buyer will snatch up the property on Dec. 30 and prepare to open it. The bank would retain the right to submit a so-called credit bid of up to the amount of its outstanding debt on the project, or about $36 million. A bidder would have to pay at least that amount, unless Bank of America is willing to take a loss on the project. Finding a buyer willing to pay what is essentially a 2007 price is not realistic, said Stuart Gabriel, director of the UCLA Ziman School for Real Estate. “It’s unlikely given the compression in property values from peak to trough that the initial investment will be recouped any time in the near future,” said Gabriel. Generally, when banks foreclose on real estate projects, they eschew acting as a landlord and instead hire a broker to arrange a sale for the highest possible price. Bank of America attorney Kenneth N. Russak, who is handling the bank’s request to proceed with the foreclosure and sale, declined to comment on the bank’s strategies, citing the ongoing legal matter. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

Around Town Continued from page 2 erty at 350 S. Grand Ave. is financed with commercial mortgage-backed securities debt, so the company must send a notice of default to begin any discussions about loan modification. “Two California Plaza is a key asset that is materially overleveraged,” MPG President and CEO David L. Weinstein said in a statement. “The Company would prefer to include Two California Plaza as part of its core set of assets, and expects to have the opportunity to explore various potential options for doing so once the asset is transferred into special servicing.” MPG Office Trust, formerly known as Maguire Properties, is the largest upscale office landlord in Downtown, with holdings that include US Bank Tower and Wells Fargo Tower. The company has already sought to rid itself of a group of Orange County properties that it acquired at the height of the market.

Skid Row Murder Suspects Arrested

L

APD detectives last week announced the arrest of a husband and wife accused of murdering Herbert Tracy White, 49, in the Continental Hotel in Skid Row. Edward Garcia Jr., 36, and his wife, 25-year-old Melissa Hope Garcia, were traced to a building on La Brea Avenue in Hollywood and arrested on Dec. 10. Police credited tips generated by media coverage of the killing with tracking down the suspects, who are believed to have tortured White. A maid at the rundown Continental Hotel, at Seventh Street and Towne Avenue in Skid Row, called the police on Nov. 29 when she discovered the dismembered remains of the victim in a backpack and wrapped in blankets under a bed. White was active in the recovery community, often making help calls to people in need of urgent sobriety counseling, according to friends.

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December 20, 2010

The History Lens New Photography Book Details the Past of Little Tokyo by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

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photo courtesy of Joe Suski

The 1927 Oliver juniors basketball team in front of the Stimson Institute/Daiichi Gakuen where they practiced.

photo courtesy of Kimiko Yokota

Waroku Yokota sits on a wagon bed surrounded by crates filled with lettuce and daikon radishes in 1908. It is one of the images in the new book Los Angeles’s Little Tokyo.

my family and great grandfather put in,” Morey said. “It’s pretty moving.” The book, which came out Nov. 21, is the first publication for the Little Tokyo Historical Society, an all-volunteer organization that operates under the umbrella of the Little Tokyo Service Center. So far it has been well received. The initial 1,200 copies sold out in about a week. It is now in its second printing. “Many people assume Asian Americans are new arrivals, but we’ve been here more than 100 years and we want people to know

The Asia Company was at the northwest corner of First and San Pedro streets in 1907. Owner Bungoro Morey is at the door wearing a white shirt.

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Members of the Maryknoll School orchestra pose for a picture in 1932. The school stood at Second and Hewitt streets. photo courtesy of the Morey family

hen Joshua Morey opened an insurance business in Little Tokyo about a year ago, he was returning to ground that is both familiar and familial. A couple of doors down from Morey’s First Street business is the space where his great grandfather Bungoro Morey opened what was then the largest Japanese-owned business in Los Angeles. The trading goods store called The Asia Company closed after World War II. Morey never met his great grandfather, nor did he ever step foot inside his shop, but the 28-year-old holds on to an image of his relative standing in front of his store, wearing slacks and a white shirt with suspenders, his hands tucked in his pockets as a horse and buggy turns the corner on First and San Pedro streets. The photograph is a family treasure. It is also one of about 200 images that make up the recently released book Los Angeles’s Little Tokyo, published by the Little Tokyo Historical Society. Using images collected from private donors, the Japanese American National Museum, the Toyo Miyatake Studio and the Los Angeles Public Library, the book chronicles the history of Little Tokyo and the contributions of Japanese Americans. Created to mark the 125th anniversary of the neighborhood, its photographs touch on traditions, sports, WWII and the community. “The book really helps us to remember the history of the neighborhood, and personally it helped me think about all the hard work

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our history,” said Bill Watanabe, executive director of the Little Tokyo Service Center. He added, “It’s American history.” Start With a Sailor The 127-page book begins with a brief history of Little Tokyo, which began in 1884 when Japanese sailor Hamanosuke Shigeta opened an “American-style café,” the neighborhood’s first business. It became home to Japanese Americans in the first half of the 20th century. During WWII, when thousands of Japanese Americans were sent to internment camps, it became an African-American neighborhood known as Bronzeville. After the war, the area again became the center of Japanese-American life in Los Angeles. It is now the biggest of the three recognized “Japantowns” in the country, said Deanna Matsumoto, a historical society volunteer who helmed the book effort. The other two are in San Francisco and San Jose. The publishers went to the community for help. Last year, the Historical Society held a picture drive, asking people to bring in old photographs. About 2,000 images were scanned before the final ones were chosen, Watanabe said. The images in the book span from the late 19th century to the present and are accompanied by text explaining the history behind each. Chapters are divided into themes including Enterprise, Traditions, Community, War, Sports and Creativity. “We wanted anything that showed how people lived, worked and played in Little Tokyo,” Matsumoto said.

The black and white photos detail everyday life in Little Tokyo: smiling residents, kids playing in the streets and famous landmarks like the James Irvine Japanese Garden, One striking image taken around 1908 shows Waroku Yokota sitting on a wagon bed surrounded by crates filled with lettuce and daikon radishes. Yokota, who at the time ran the Yokota Transfer Company, rests his elbow on a crate and smiles at the camera. Another shows the class photo of the Maryknoll School orchestra taken in May 1932. The school was at Second and Hewitt streets. The nearly 30 Japanese-American children in the picture hold drums, violins, trumpets and trombones. A handful of photographs detail the neighborhood’s Bronzeville era, including a 1946 image of the Bronzeville Arcade at 316 E. First St. Up to 70,000 African-American and Latino families lived in Little Tokyo during that time, according to the book. Change is not new to Little Tokyo, and the recent influx of non-Japanese residents to Downtown, along with the growing Korean business influence in the neighborhood, is bringing change on an almost daily basis. That is why it is important to record the area’s past, Watanabe said. “We welcome change, but we want people to appreciate the history of this neighborhood,” he said. Los Angeles’s Little Tokyo is available at littletokyohs.org. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.


December 20, 2010

Downtown News 9

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Future Architects’ Downtown of the Future USC ‘Mega Review’ Takes Over City National Plaza by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

T

he top two floors of City National Plaza’s north tower are currently un-leased and vacant, but they were buzzing with some 700 young architects, urban designers and planners last week. The USC School of Architecture took over the floors for what they called a “mega review” of student work. Students from all levels and every land use discipline offered at the university displayed their work before a jury of peers and outside experts. The work depicted a Downtown of the future, with ideas on everything from activating defunct buildings to greening the Los Angeles River with adjacent park and farmland. “This is showtime,” said architect and professor Doug Campbell, who added that for many of the students, the review would determine their final grade and whether or not they graduate. “They’re either ready for their close-up, or they’re not.” Historically, the school has hosted its final project reviews on campus, but there is currently no available space large enough to accommodate the walls of renderings and hundreds of Foamcore models. “And, having it here in Downtown is a wonderful access to the city,” Campbell said. The review started on Dec. 10 and continued on Dec. 13. At times, the setting was library-like — focused and quiet, except for the sound of students explaining their projects to as many as two dozen peers. Other

photo by Gary Leonard

Students in the graduate level Landscape Studies program envisioned a greener, more sustainable Los Angeles River.

USC School of Architecture students await their turn at presenting their work to a jury of professors and outside experts.

times, it felt more like a gallery opening, with people discussing the work in hallways lined with colorful renderings of an imagined slice of the Los Angeles of the future. Students in the school’s Masters in Landscape Architecture set their sights on the mostly industrial and civic patch of Downtown anchored by Union Station, Los Angeles State Historic Park and the Los Angeles River. In reality, aside from the park, the area is mostly covered in pavement and dotted with

ined parkland to the east. When water levels are normal, water would flow south. In flood scenarios, overflow would fill the basins and water parkland. “The focus is very much on urban places and conditions, which is a natural given that we’re USC,” said Bob Harris, director of the Landscape Architectural Studies program. “If we weren’t focused on the urban, you should be mad at us.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

photo by Gary Leonard

old industrial buildings. Even the river, with its flood-protecting concrete embankments, feels cold and gray. Students such as Collin Heffern brightened the area, re-making the riverbanks as green space. Heffern envisions the river lined on the east side with urban forestry and community agriculture uses. Student Zhu Yilang dreamed up a flood relief system that would eliminate the unwelcoming concrete embankments: ditch the banks, and create basins that flow into imag-

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rendering by Gensler

Continued from page 1 based on criteria including the experience of both the firm as a whole and the staff on the project, down to the production architects; a firm’s ability to deliver the project on budget; and the creativity and innovation it offers for the plan. “This building, in a market like L.A., has to be special,” he said. Suites and Screens Display boards from the firms all showed early-stage designs of a stadium with a retractable roof. The Gensler rendering depicted a stadium with a long, thin oval window placed on its side above the end zone,

giving view to the Ritz-Carlton/J.W. Marriott hotel. It showed two levels of luxury suites — Romani said there will be more than 200 in the stadium — above the first level of seating. Video screens were in two corners. The HNTB design included a large video screen on the exterior of the building, fronting 11th Street. It had a protruding lower level, a mezzanine and then two floors of suites, topped by an upper deck. The HKS designs on display did not show a field-level view, and instead revealed a building with sweeps and sail-like curves, and a retractable roof set diagonally over the field. Representatives of the firms were effusive about the project, and stated that the $1 billion budget is feasible, even as a new stadium in New York, which houses two NFL teams, soared well over that price.

rendering by HKS

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“We know the budget is right. We know the site is right,” said Terry Miller, president and CEO of HNTB. In detailing the schedule, Romani and AEG Executive Vice President Ted Tanner echoed a timeline previously laid out by AEG President and CEO Tim Leiweke. The goal is to start the entitlements process early next year and to begin building the new convention facility, which Romani labeled Pico Hall, in early 2012. Contrary to Leiweke’s previous pronouncement that the new hall would open before the West Hall is razed, ensuring no temporary decrease in convention space, Romani said there may be a period where neither hall is operable. The goal, he said, is to “minimize” how long that will be. Romani said construction on the stadium would begin by Dec. 1, 2012, and finish in time for a team to play its first game in the fall of 2015. Leiweke has said the stadium would host about 50 events a year, with less than 15 being for football. Other times a floor could be placed over the playing field and the building could be used for business gatherings. A new website for the project launched Wednesday night, thelaeventscenter.com, echoed that aim. “It is not just a stadium,” Romani stated. “It is a massive expansion of the Convention Center.” Industry Competition While the process for choosing an architect and the basic timeline for the project appear firm, other elements are still in the early stage.

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Continued from page 1 which has been agreed to verbally but needs approval from the council, is for 20 years. The second tower would be Downtown’s first new office skyscraper in more than 20 years. The smaller, 45-story hotel is its own kind of first for the city, said First Deputy Mayor Austin Beutner. It’s the first time the city will have razed a large building to replace it with a new one, said Beutner, whose office helped negotiate the city’s development agreement with Korean Air and its parent company, Hanjin. “To do it with labor is a big deal,” Beutner said. The developers have already reached accord with two key unions: Unite Here Local 11, which represents hotel workers, and the Los Angeles-Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades Council. The hotel agreed to a $10 million deal with hotel workers to pay severance and healthcare benefits once the Wilshire Grand closes. Those 480 workers will have first crack at jobs at the new hotel. The deal with the construction union calls for the hotel to prioritize hiring of local union men and women. Look at the Lights The project has garnered some key backers, as well as a few foes. Ninth District Councilwoman Jan Perry has championed the project, which is expected to generate some 7,200 construction jobs on the site, plus another 5,000 indirect jobs through the multiplier effect, according to Thomas Properties Group. “This is major, major, major,” Perry said of the project’s ability to generate jobs in a down economy. Despite the political support, the hotel’s request to incorporate some elaborate, LED-illuminated signage has proven controversial. The project has been opposed by groups such as the Coalition to Ban Billboard Blight. The sign plan, which involves lighting mostly around the base of the hotel, was expected to be the major sticking point at last week’s commission meeting.

December 20, 2010

Tanner and Romani followed up on Leiweke’s proclamations of an aggressive 90day window in which AEG hopes to reach agreement with the city on the plan to tear down and build a new convention facility. That is also the time period for when AEG hopes to know whether or not the NFL would approve the project, and to have a solid idea on which team would come to Los Angeles. The latter aim is complicated by a competing proposal from Ed Roski, who was AEG founder Phil Anschutz’s partner in developing Staples Center. Roski has long been working on an $800 million stadium proposal in the City of Industry. That project has already secured environmental approvals the Downtown plan needs. Tanner stated that the South Park project, where AEG is partnering with Casey Wasserman, would be privately financed (Leiweke has said AEG would back bonds for the $350 million convention replacement). He also said AEG is already “testing the market” for naming rights and founding partners. Despite the enthusiasm, the missing piece of the puzzle is a team. Although NFL franchises including the Jacksonville Jaguars, Minnesota Vikings and San Diego Chargers have been reported as candidates to move to Los Angeles, none has committed to leaving home. Asked if the stadium could rise without a team, Tanner said, “I don’t think so.” Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s office supports the project, in part because it is poised to grow the city’s tax base, even though the hotel won’t have to pay the full Transient Occupancy Tax (the 14% fee paid by travelers commonly known as the bed tax) when it opens in 2015. The developers originally requested a temporary waiver of the bed tax, claiming that the project would not pencil out without it. A similar waiver was granted for the J.W. Marriott/Ritz-Carlton hotel at L.A. Live for 25 years, saving Anschutz Entertainment Group an estimated $246 million. The development agreement reached by the city does not entirely waive the bed tax for the Korean Air project. Instead, the hotel will have to pay its bed tax at current levels — the hotel is now paying $3.5-$4 million annually — through 2015. Once the hotel opens, it will pay more bed taxes every year in as-yet unspecified increments, delaying the requirement to pay the full 14% tax based on new revenue numbers. The agreement is a break for the hotel, but also a net gain for the city. The general fund, which relies partially on bed taxes, is protected, Beutner said. “If you were to score this deal on a golf course, it would be right on the fairway,” he said. Ayahlushim Getachew, senior vice president at Thomas Properties Group, said that the developer was able to “re-tool” the numbers on the project to make the deal work with only the partial bed tax waiver, instead of the full waiver granted to AEG. The development agreement also requires the hotel to provide a host of socalled community benefits, including about $8 million in streetscape improvements along Seventh Street; funding for a new Downtown shuttle; an underground access portal that will link the hotel to the Seventh Street Metro Station across the street; and a quarter-acre outdoor plaza with public access. Jim Thomas, CEO of Thomas Properties Group, said he hopes the project will go before the City Council for final approval by March. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.


December 20, 2010

Downtown News 11

DowntownNews.com

HEALTH The Pros and Cons of Statins

for many years as an alternative and natural therapy to lower LDL levels. In an article published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, 31 patients who were unable to tolerate statins received 1,800 milligrams of red yeast rice twice daily, and another 31 received placebos. This dose of the supplement resulted in therapeutically significant declines in total cholesterol and LDL levels with no muscle or liver side effects. Clearly, there are alternatives to statins to lower cholesterol if side effects prevent their use. Even though no evidence has shown that any of these approaches have similar reductions in risk of heart attack and stroke, it’s vitally important to continue to seek avenues to lower cholesterol and live a heart-healthy life. Dr. David Lipschitz is the author of Breaking the Rules of Aging and is the director of The Longevity Center at St. Vincent Infirmary Medical Center. Article copyright 2010 creators.com.

Drugs Can Lower Cholesterol, But Sometimes Have Side Effects by Dr. DaviD Lipschitz

drugs must be stopped. but other medications usually are required. f ever a type of medication could be The risks of liver abnormalities are inCurrently, the most frequently employed called miracle drugs, statins fit the bill. creased if other cholesterol-lowering drugs, alternative drugs impair cholesterol absorpThese powerhouses lower total cholester- such as gemfibrozil (Lopid), or therapeutic tion from the bowels. The most frequently ol and LDL levels, which, in at-risk patients, doses of niacin are prescribed in combina- prescribed is ezetimibe (Zetia), which has significantly reduces the risk of heart attack tion with statin therapy. Because abnormali- been shown to lower cholesterol levels, but and stroke. What’s more, recent research ties can be asymptomatic, liver function tests not to reduce the risk of heart attack and has shown that if a patient shows other risk must be measured six weeks after a patient stroke. factors for heart disease but has normal cho- starts taking a statin. Zetia also has been shown to cause myolesterol levels, statins still can reduce heart Although statins appear to reduce the pathy and muscle pains. Another alternaattack risk. Claims also have been made that risk of Alzheimer’s disease, some patients tive is cholestyramine (Questran), which is statins reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease taking these drugs complain of memory taken as a powder dissolved in water. Not and even some cancers. loss. In some cases, mood swings, behavior- without side effects, cholestyramine causes Unfortunately, even though these wonder al problems and depression also have been constipation. drugs likely save millions of lives, side effects reported. Rare but significant side effects Finally, there is a dietary supplement, red with statins are common. As many as 10% of include insomnia, indigestion, heartburn yeast rice, which has been recommended patients are unable to tolerate statins because and constipation. * of muscle inflammation (myopathy) that Side effects are more inHeart women, In The of Downtown Los Angeles. In common The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. results in pain that is most severe in the arms, small-framed individuals, those taking multiIn ThepleHeart of Downtown Angeles. legs and shoulders. medications, diabetics andLos patients older In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. Inbut The Heart Muscle pain is usually mild, severe than of 65. Downtown Los Angeles. * muscle breakdown, called rhabdomyolysis, If side effects develop in a patient taking occasionally occurs. This can lead to severe statins, alternative approaches can be tried. In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. kidney failure and death. Frequently, patients First, more powerful statins given in lower taking statins develop neuropathy, which doses either daily or every few days can be damages the nerves, affecting the upper and as effective in lowering cholesterol without lower limbs. Neuropathy also can cause side effects. Although much more expensive, numbness, tingling and difficulties with gait rosuvastatin (Crestor) can be given at a dose On Grand and Pico. 2 blocks of L.A. On Grand and Pico. Just Just 2 blocks east east of L.A. LIVE!LIVE! On Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocks east of L. and balance. of 2.5 milligrams either daily or two or three Damage to the liver, as evidenced by ab- times weekly and can lead to adequate low- On Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocks east of L.A. LIVE! normalities in liver function tests, is the other ering of cholesterol. There is also some eviGrand and Pico. Just 2 bl On Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocksOn east of L.A. LIVE! major side effect of statins. Liver damage oc- dence that the addition of the dietary supple* 2 blocks *east of L.A. LIVE! * Just On Grand and Pico. curs in 1%-2% of patients taking the drugs. ment coenzyme Q10 may reduce or prevent If abnormalities are minimal and do not side effects caused by statins. * * * increase over time, many experts believe If changes in medication strength don’t that treatment with statins can be contin- relieve symptoms, other approaches can be ued. However, if damage is considerable tried. More intensive diet control and exerPatient-Centered Medical Care Close to Work, Close to Home: or if the abnormalities increase, use of the cise may lead to a reduction in cholesterol,

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12 Downtown News

December 20, 2010

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CALENDAR

photo courtesy of the Chinese American Museum

The Chinese American Museum show Dreams Deferred: Artists Respond to Immigration Reform features pieces addressing the hot-button topic, including “Star Spangled Exclusion” by Shark Toof. The work focuses on the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act.

photo courtesy of Swank

The exhibit that runs through May features work by 18 people, including local graffiti artist Swank’s “Tied Up.”

photo courtesy of the Chinese American Museum

“We Are Human Girl Spanish” was a collaboration between local artists Ernesto Yerena and Shepard Fairey.

From the Streets to the Dream Chinese American Museum Uses Graffiti Art to Address Immigration Reform

American Museum is housed in a hisDEChetoric6Chinese structure at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical by Katie Schaufelberger

T

s! w e N E r o f ✔ Sign Up

Monument, and its exhibitions typically focus on events and people stretching back more than 150 years. ews.com or DowntownNin the That sense of history gets tossedht ha out window rner at nd cothe t rig r llis ai pe m up s/ e mbol in th Artists s.com/form to Immigration new Dreams Deferred: Respond EWS Lo E-Nexhibit ntownnew ok for this sy www.ladow P U N IG S Reform. In fact, the exhibit featuring artwork exploring the hot-button topic is primed to make an impact on the present, as well as the future. The exhibit, which opened this month and runs through May 22, 2011, features work from 18 local artists, many of them of the street and graffiti variety. For a graffiti artist known as Shark Toof, it was both an opportunity to get work in a mainstream venue and a chance to touch on a subject matter that hits close to home “I rarely do work focused on political issues,” said the artist, whose painting “Star-Spangled Exclusion” is in the show. “I’m Chinese American, and I experienced issues with racism growing up. We don’t always address where these issues originally come from, and it takes a long time for them to dilute.” Shark Toof’s work normally appears on electrical boxes, freeway on- and off-ramps and construction sites. His CAM piece addresses the 1882 Chinese ExclusionnNAct, which sustow ews .Downsees /L.Aartist omThe pended Chinese immigration. shades of the bill .c k o o b ce Fa in today’s immigration debate. All of the artists appear to stand in favor of reform benefiting immigrants. Some are symbolically straightforward: In one untitled installation by an artist with the street tag Cache, a chicken is fenced in by wire, looking toward its eggs behind a white picket fence. CAM guest curator Tim Jieh said the show was conceived this summer in response to the progress of the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act. The bill, which is being considered in Congress, would grant

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citizenship eligibility to young undocumented immigrants if While that has the strongest ties to the past, the show is they go to college or serve in the United States military. intentional in aiming for present-day audiences. That effort Museum curator Steve Wong said CAM has no stance on comes not just in the subject matter, but by the choice of artimmigration reform. Rather, the artwork is intended to foster ists whose youth and street sensibilities skew young. dialogue about the issue. He noted the sense of timeliness Starts“Young people in the area can come outside and there’s in the works, even the ones that are less confrontational and a mural December 10 from one of these artists outside their home,” said have a playful side. Wong. “A lot of them are really influenced by street art.” That aspect comes into play in a series of three paintings The historical perspectives several artists take in their works by a street artist who calls herself Sand One. Her anime-like could also open the doors to discussions of the past. For female characters have exaggerated eyelashes, jewelry and tat- example, Kristy Lovich’s mixed-media images on wooden toos, and serve food in places with names like Gangsta Sushi. discs use photos she found from Ellis Island. The piece, called Wong said the works were inspired by the artist’s mother, “Short Memory, Narrow Views,” puts illustrations of people who was a social worker in Mexico before coming to the U.S. plugging their ears or drinking coffee obliviously surrounded and taking a food service job. by the photos, some showing immigrants being separated Check OurtheWebsite formobility Full Movie Listingsmay LADowntownNews.com “It addresses downward that immigrants from their families. have to take on, coming here,” Wong said. “I wanted to look at the history of even European immiA Dream Debated grants who were experiencing similar immigration policies,” These days, the very idea of “immigration reform” of- Lovich said. “It seems like there’s a failure to realize that we ten sparks to mind thoughts of Latinos in the United were all immigrants.” States. Wong said that while that may be the case, Chinese Patrick Martinez took a personal approach, using portraits Americans are significantly impacted as well. He said Asian of his parents in his works. His mother emigrated from the Americans make up 40% of the undocumented popula- Philippines, and an image of her is overlaid with a neon sign Starts tion in the University of California system, with Chinesethat reads, “Trying to make a dollar out of 16 cents.” American students representing the second largest number in “I17 wanted to communicate this dream-chasing in December that group. America,” Martinez said. “The words come from rap lyrics, The show continues the museum’s immigration theme, with this idea of trying to get ahead.” following the June opening of Remembering Angel Island, an While many images depict a dark view of the American exhibition on the Angel Island immigration station in San dream, photographer Eriberto Oriol’s images show peoFrancisco Bay that ran from 1910-1940. ple continuing to fight for it directly, with Downtown Los “Immigration is a very complicated, many-layered issue,” Angeles as the subject. His photos portray the huge May Day Jieh said. “Art makes it more appealing to talk about.” rally for immigration overhaul outside City Hall in 2006. Dreams Deferred has an educational component. The sec- They show people draped in American flags. Check Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com ond room of the exhibit includes an interactive timeline of Dreams Deferred continues through May 22, 1011, at the immigration milestones, allowing visitors to chart their fam- Chinese American Museum, 425 N. Los Angeles St., (213) 485ily’s personal immigration history. 8567 or camla.org.

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December 20, 2010

Downtown News 13

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WHAT’S IN STORE

fish ($65), native to the Amazon River basin, has the brightest coloring, while the East African Frontosa cichlid ($120) is striped. Another hybrid is the red-orange King Kong parrot cichlid ($45). Since cichlids may attack each other, Truong recommends not putting them together in a tank. Instead, he recommends other fish or the small Asian tiger lobsters ($15) that he stocks.

Liberty Fish and Pet Tortoises, Birds and a $600 Fish in Chinatown photo by Gary Leonard

The store’s specialty is the Flowerhorn cichlid. This one sells for $199. When full grown, they can cost up to $600.

in the front of the store holds dozens of small, bright orange koi, but is dominated by two huge, old white koi that were brought to the store from a Downtown office that no longer had room for them. The young koi go for $7-$10, and the store also sells Betta fighting fish ($10) and fancy goldfish, a variation popular in Chinese culture, with a more curved body shape ($5). The big white koi are also for sale ($150).

Truong said. It’s a veritable if curious menagerie, with standard and exotic fish, birds and reptiles, though no dogs or cats. As part of a series about Downtown retail, Los Angeles Downtown News checked out what’s in store.

Flowerhorn Power: Liberty’s standouts are the Flowerhorn cichlids, a rare breed of fish imported from Malaysia and Thailand. They line the back wall, each in a separate tank (like many cichlids, they’re territorial), and sell for up to $600. The fish are hybrids, a mix of cross-breeding in the 1990s. They’re brightly colored and have markings that admirers say look like Chinese letters. “The cichlids with the brighter patterns and bigger heads are more desirable,” Truong said. He began stocking them in 2002 and said he sells about one a month. Most of the cichlids in the store aren’t fully grown yet, and go for a relatively affordable $150-$200.

Simple Swimmers: Truong, 27, stocks more than 50 breeds of fish. The large tank

Try the Lobster: It’s easy to spend a lot on water-bound creatures at Liberty. The Discus

photo by Gary Leonard

Bryan Truong, the owner of Chinatown’s Liberty Fish and Pet Shop, with some of the store’s offerings. by Katie Schaufelberger

L

ike many stores in Chinatown, Liberty Fish and Pet Shop is a family business. It opened in 1995, and Bryan Truong took over from his uncle about 10 years ago. On most days Truong’s younger brother manages the store. “We’ve outlasted other pet stores that were in the area, and now we’re the only one here,”

Birds of a Feather: Truong said his family didn’t open the store out of a major interest in animals, but rather because they saw it as a good business opportunity. The approximately 200 birds for sale are proof of that, and are priced according to the rareness or popularity of their coloring: The pretty lady goldfinch parakeets are $75 for green, $105 for yellow and $150 for blue. There are also white doves ($15) that can be released during special events, as well as cockatiels ($64). Truong’s favorites are the canaries ($45-$55). “They’re the real songbirds,” he said. Slow Ride: Easier to keep track of are the somewhat rare yellow- and red-foot tortoises, native to South America, which sell for $195. On the lower end of the price spectrum are the rabbits ($15). Truong said they sell quickly, usually while they are still babies. He said the birds, rabbits, tortoises and fish that aren’t sold remain in the store. Bare Necessities: Liberty has a number of cages, tanks, pet foods and other supplies. One thing they don’t have is the pet shop staple of puppies or kitties, even though Truong himself has two dogs that he adopted. In a nod to his furry friends, the store has a small section devoted to dog collars and treats. But he’s drawn a line, for now: He refuses to stock anything for cats. Liberty Fish and Pet Shop is at 665 N. Broadway, (213) 628-9664.


14 Downtown News

December 20, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

EVENTS

Wednesday, dec. 22 Christmas Live! Nokia Theatre, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., lalive.com. 8 p.m.: L.A. Live gets into the holiday spirit with a family friendly song and dance presentation. Rock Around The Rink Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. 8-10 p.m.: Flashback to the 1980s with new wave rockin’ nerds The Spazmatics in an outdoor holiday concert. Time to tap your inner Adam Ant and Billy Idol.

by Lauren Camped eLLi, Listings edito r

E

es” is day memori .A. li o h d o o h hild nual L f the 51st an at the the theme o ti Celebra on ay d li o H ty n anized Cou avilion. Org for P r le d an h C Dorothy as a “gift” by the county event prese the citizens, th and dance c ents 24 musi . The , from 3-6 p.m re24 . ec D , ay d groups on Fri ulticultural smorgasbord m tradimulti-genre, e county, from the th f o ty si er iv es; from flects the d hip-hop remix tional carols to nze Handbell Ensemble e Jose Harmonic Bro l de Mexico d to Mariachi So om Jung Im Lee Hernandez; fr ce Academy Korean Dan llywood. to NDM Bo o w n T h e o n ly d get d side is that bu e cuts sliced th show in half fr o m la st year. Then c Center t on the Musi en m n ai rt te en (213) 972ee, including . Grand Ave., N 5 13 t A again, it’s all fr . g at 12:30 p.m Plaza beginnin lebration.org. ayce 3099 or holid

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of photo courtesy

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photo by Brett Chisholm

erds rule! And they rock, too, wh en The Spazmatics perform a holiday concert at the Pershing Square ice ska ting rink on Wednesday, Dec. 22, from 8-10 p.m. Members of ’80s cover band dress the par the t in white button-down shirts with bowties, suspenders, sweatbands on the ir wrists and horn-rimmed gla sses. But they party-hardy new wa ve style, with classic tunes fro m Duran Duran, INXS, Adam Ant, Depeche Mode, Billy Ido l and lots more. Shake in the audien ce of shake it on the ice, it’s up to you. At 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershin gsquare/.

od NDM Bollywo

FILM

wartz photo by Craig Sch

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Club Nokia Corner of Olympic Blvd. and Figueroa St., clubnokia.com. Feb. 8, 7:30 p.m.: British black metal band Cradle of Filth brings a bevy of kittens, balloons and rainbows to Downtown. No wait, they’re here to shock, excite and disgust in equal measure. Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com. Dec. 20, 10 p.m.: Blast off with Phil Alvin and friends. Dec. 21, 10 p.m.: Dirty Ed/Bob Cantu(esdays) with Black Beverly Heels, Barrio Tiger and The Stitched Lips. Stitiched lips sound icky. Dec. 22, 10 p.m.: The Crazy Squeeze with Long Neck Goose, The Blackerby’s and Red Roses. Dec. 23, 10 p.m.: Rosie Flores Band with Danny B Harvy and Karling Abbeygate. Dec. 26, 10 p.m.: Kasio Antaxia, Love of Ivy and The Ambient Light. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., sevengrand.la. Dec. 20, 10 p.m.: Jazzman and bandleader John Daversa with his “Small Band.” Make sure to ask if they have any “big hits.”

calendar@down townnews.com

Alvin reigns very Monday night, Phil ille — and Gr & r Ba over the Redwood . He’s got too s, gue lea he features his col ts-rocker roo n bor eya lot of them. The Down late ’70s when he has been on the scene since the brother Dave. His formed The Blasters with his es, punk, mounblu k, blend of all-American roc illy keeps the crowds tain music, R&B and rockab emed bar. So set coming back to the pirate-th ., and experience for anchor on Dec. 20 at 10 p.m e and eccentricity yourself the charm, exuberanc Second St., (213) of Alvin and friends. At 316 W. om. 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.c

sunday, dec. 26 LAVA Sunday Salons Clifton’s Cafeteria, 648 S. Broadway, lavatransforms.org. Noon-2 p.m.: Los Angeles Visionary Association hosts a loosely structured conversational salon featuring offbeat board games and craft-making with The Ukulady. The highlight is the inimitable Harvey Sid Fisher, who likes to sing about golf, and has an anthem for each sign of the zodiac. Nokia Theatre 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6000 or nokiatheatrelalive.com. 8 p.m.: Comedian/talk show host George Lopez moves from the small screen to the big stage. Remember when he had a sitcom and Antonio was a guest? We do.

IMAX Theater California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 7442019 or californiasciencecenter.org. Through Jan. 27: Featuring nine-time world surfing champion Kelly Slater, The Ultimate Wave Tahiti 3D will immerse audiences in the story of an ocean wave and the lives it impacts and transforms. Hubble 3D takes movie-goers on a journey through distant galaxies to explore the grandeur and mysteries of our celestial surroundings and accompany space-walking astronauts as they attempt the most difficult and important tasks in NASA’s history. Regal Cinema L.A. Live 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (877) 835-5734 or lalive.com. Through Dec. 21: The Fighter (10:30 a.m. and 1:20, 4:10, 7:10 and 10 p.m.); How Do You Know (10:50 a.m. and 1:40, 4:30, 7:20 and 10:10 p.m.); Tron: Legacy 3D (10 a.m. and 12:20, 1, 3:40, 4:20, 7, 7:40, 10:20 and 11 p.m.); Yogi Bear 3D (10:20 a.m. and 12:40, 2:50, 5, 7:10 and 9:20 p.m.). Dec. 22 (partial list): Little Fockers (11:20 a.m. and 2, 4:40, 7:20 and 10 p.m.); True Grit (10:50 a.m. and 1:30, 4:10, 7, and 9:40). Dec. 25 (partial list): Gulliver’s Travels (12:30, 2:50, 5, 7:10 9:20 and 11:30 p.m.).

|

photo by Gary Leonard

SPONSORED LISTINGS Live Church LA Club Nokia, 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 4934329 or livechurchla.com. 10 a.m.: Every Sunday, Live Church L.A. takes over the VIP Lounge at Club Nokia, bringing great music, people and inspiring messages.

family fun Downtown? ooking for some holiday no further than L.A. For free family fun? Look as event. The happening Live’s inaugural Christm at 8 on Wednesday, Dec. 22, Christmas Live! takes place m ic mix of holiday music fro p.m., and brings an eclect son am illi W ve Da mporary. the traditional to the conte stras, musicians and singhe orc al loc conducts a range of Choir, an award-winning ass M . L.A ers, including the group. There will also Los Angeles-based gospel ddy, singer/songwriter be indie rockers Uncle Da ist Jon Hall. Spectaclehis is your Judith Hill and hip-hop art up the show. At 800 last chance filled dance numbers spice m. to check W. Olympic Blvd., lalive.co

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T

out Harps & Angels, the pretty much plot-less (not that it’s a bad thing) piece of musical theater at the Mark Taper Forum. The world premiere is cobbled together from about two dozen personal, political and quirky songs by Randy Newman, and the songwriter shows up on an overhead video screen. The tunes are undertaken by six performers, including a couple vocal powerhouses. Yes, “I Love L.A.” is in the show. Harps & Angels runs through Wednesday, Dec. 22, at 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or centertheatregroup.com.

Send information and possible Don’t Miss Lis t submissions to calenda r@downtownnews.com .


December 20, 2010

Downtown News 15

DowntownNews.com

Dec. 21, 10 p.m.: The Makers groove ensemble. Dec. 22, 10 p.m.: The Louis Van Taylor Quartet shows how it’s done. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. Dec. 23, 9 p.m.: Tommy Santee Klaws comes to town, with Manhattan Murder Mystery, Holy Vessels and Barrie Rose. Yep, someone named a band after a Woody Allen movie. Dec. 26, 9 p.m.: Third Annual Riot Grrrl X-mas Carnival featuring The Splinters, Las Sangronas Y El Cabron, and more. The Varnish 118 E. Sixth St., (213) 622-9999 or thevarnishbar.com Dec. 20, 9 p.m.: Jamie Elman tinkles the keys, jazz-style. Dec. 21, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.: Jazzman Mark Bosserman entertains on the house piano. For the record, it’s a nice piano. Walt Disney Concert Hall 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-4396 or laphil.com. Dec. 20, 8 p.m.: The Blind Boys of Alabama gospel singers perform rousing and spiritual renditions of Christmas carols, hymns and pop standards. Dec. 21, 8 p.m.: The Manhattan Transfer spreads good cheer and pop-bop sounds performing with horns and strings. This is an actual chance to grove in Disney Hall. Dec. 23, 8 p.m.: Electro-violin sensation Eileen Ivers performs traditional Celtic melodies and new twists on classic holiday carols on her fancy fiddle. Note, this not Kevin Garnett/Ray Allen Celtic-style melodies.

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE Bob Baker’s Nutcracker The Bob Baker Marionette Theater, 1345 W. First St., (213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com. Dec. 21-24, 10:30 a.m.; Dec. 26, 2:30 p.m.: The marionette version of the holiday ballet classic returns, featuring every style of puppetry from marionettes to shadow puppets, from Sugarplum Fairies to the Mouse King. Through Jan. 16. Harps and Angels Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. Dec. 21, 8 p.m.; Dec. 22, 2 and 8 p.m.: This is the last chance to catch the music and lyrics of songwriter Randy Newman in a world premiere theatrical event. Michael McKean, Katey Sagal and a girl who was on “Rockstar” are in the cast. Through Dec. 22. Next to Normal Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. Dec. 20-22, 8 p.m.; Dec. 23, 2 and 8 p.m.; Dec. 24, 2 p.m.; Dec. 26, 1 and 6:30 p.m.: With a rock ’n roll score, “Next to Normal” is an emotional powerhouse of a musical about a family trying to take care of themselves and each other. The Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical features original Broadway star Alice Ripley. Get ready for fun, games and electroshock therapy. Through Jan. 2.

MUSEUMS African American Firefighter Museum 1401 S. Central Ave., (213) 744-1730 or aaffmuseum.org. Ongoing: An array of firefighting relics dating to 1924, including a 1940 Pirsch ladder truck, an 1890 hose wagon, uniforms from New York, L.A. County and City of L.A. firefighters, badges, helmets, photographs and other artifacts.

A

Scared

Annette Green Perfume Museum FIDM, second floor, 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 6241200 or fidm.edu. Ongoing: One of a kind, the museum is dedicated to enhancing our understanding the art, culture and science of the olfactory. Originally opened in New York City in 1999, the collection — 2,000 bottles, perfume presentations and documentary ephemera dating from the late 1800s to the present — was donated to FIDM in 2005. Also, “High Style: Perfume and the Haute Couture” features a selection of fragrance bottles and packaging that reflect the many ways that fame inspires design. “Images of Men: A Look Through Fragrance” is a new installation in the Annette Green Fragrance Archive. The bottles and accessories showcased explore how men’s diverse identities and roles are conveyed through the changing designs of the bottles themselves. California African American Museum 600 State Drive, (213) 744-7432 or caamuseum.org. Through Jan. 1, 2011: “How We Roll” features four decades of skateboarding legends starting with the birth of surfing and the influence of roller skating to its evolution into the dynamic sport of today. Ongoing: The multi-functional “Gallery of Discovery” offers visitors the opportunity to connect with the lineage of their own family, engage in artistic workshops, educational tours and other programs of historical discoveries. Hear recordings of actual living slaves from the Library of Congress archives and discover stories from the past. California Science Center 700 State Drive, (323) 724-3623 or californiasciencecenter.org. Ongoing: The Science Center’s permanent exhibits are usually interactive and focus on human innovations and inventions as well as the life processes of living things. The lobby Science Court stays busy with the High Wire Bicycle, a Motion-Based Simulator, the Ecology Cliff Climb and Forty Years of Space Photography. The human body is another big focus: The Life Tunnel aims to show the connections between all life forms, from the single-celled amoeba to the 100-trillion-celled human being. Chinese American Museum 425 N. Los Angeles St., (213) 485-8567 or camla.org. Through May 29, 2011: To commemorate the 100th Anniversary of Angel Island, CAM presents an exhibition to honor the history, legacy and unforgettable stories of Angel Island. “Remembering Angel Island” will showcase historic photographs, a reproduction of a poem carved on the barracks of Angel Island, artifacts and a multi-media station featuring personal stories of those who endured or were profoundly affected by the Angel Island experience. Permanent: Re-creation of the Sun Wing Wo, a Chinese general store and herbal shop, and “Journeys: Stories of Chinese Immigration,” an exhibit exploring Chinese immigration to the United States with an emphasis on community settlement in Los Angeles. The display is outlined into four distinct time periods. Each period is defined by an important immigration law and/or event, accompanied by a brief description and a short personal story about a local Chinese American and their experiences in that particular historical period. El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument 124 Paseo de la Plaza, (213) 485-8372 or elpueblo. lacity.org. Ongoing: The whole of El Pueblo is called a “monument,” and of this monument’s 27 historic buildings, four function as museums: the Avila Adobe, the city’s oldest house; the Sepulveda House,

home to exhibits and the monument’s Visitors Center; the Fire House Museum, which houses late 19th-century fire-fighting equipment; and the Masonic Hall, which boasts Masonic memorabilia. Check its website for a full slate of fiestas, including Cinco de Mayo, Dia De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead) in November and December’s beautiful candlelight procession, Las Posadas. Open daily, though hours at shops and halls vary. Grammy Museum L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. Ongoing: “John Lennon, Songwriter” will cover some of the musician’s early influences; his time with the Quarrymen and transition into the early Beatles period; his songwriting collaborations with Paul McCartney; and his transition from the Beatles to a solo artist/songwriter and his work with Yoko Ono. Artifacts to be featured include: several guitars, his signature round, wire-framed glasses, original drawings, handwritten song lyrics, historic footage and much more. Through Jan. 2011: “Strange Kozmic Experience” will explore the lives and cultural footprints of three of America’s greatest musical icons: Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and The Doors. Through artifacts, films, original art, and photographs, Strange Kozmic Experience will explore the innovations, legacies and continual impact of the artists who defined a generation. Ongoing: “Roland Live” is a permanent installation courtesy of the electronic musical instrument maker, Roland Corporation. The exhibit gives visitors a chance to participate in the music-making process by playing a wide variety of Roland products, from V-Drums and BOSS pedals to VIMA keyboards and the MV-8800 Production Studio. Japanese American National Museum 369 E. First St., (213) 625-0414 or janm.org. Through Apr. 17: “American Tapestry: 25 Stories from the Collection” includes a selection of artifacts, artwork, photographs, oral histories and more from the museum’s collection. Ongoing: “Common Ground: The Heart of Community” chronicles 130 years of Japanese American history, from the early days of the Issei pioneers to the present. The Latino Museum 514 S. Spring St., (213) 626-7600 or thelatinomuseum.com. Ongoing: The Latino Museum holds a unique collection of work from emerging and established contemporary Mexican, Latino and Chicano artists working and living in the United States as well as throughout Latin, Central and South America. Museum of Contemporary Art, Grand Avenue 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2766 or moca.org. Through Jan. 31, 2011: “The Artist’s Museum” showcases the works by over 140 artists who have helped shape the artistic dialogue in Los Angeles since the founding of MOCA over 30 years ago. The exhibition represents the diversity and uniqueness of the L.A. community, and highlights important works from legendary artists alongside those emerging from renowned local art schools, visionary artists associated with various street cultures and subcultures, and crossover artists connected to performance, music, and film. Permanent: Nancy Rubins’ cheekily and comprehensively titled “Chas’ Stainless Steel, Mark Thompson’s Airplane Parts, About 1000 Pounds of Stainless Steel Wire, Gagosian’s Beverly Hills Space, at MOCA (2001-2002)” is a monumental sculpture made out of parts of an airplane.

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BARS & CLUBS The Association 610 S. Main St., (213) 627-7385. Carved out of the area that used to belong to Cole’s, the bar in front, the Association is a dimly-lit, swank little alcove with some serious mixologists behind the bar. Look for a heavy door, a brass knocker, and a long line. Banquette 400 S. Main St., (213) 626-2768. This petite cafe and wine bar with its red and white striped awning has become a popular hangout for casual evenings of drinking wine and meeting up with friends. During monthly Art Walks on the second Thursday of the month, Banquette buzzes with almost every kind of Downtown denizen you could imagine. They have a small but lovely selection of wines by the glass as well as beers. Barbara’s at the Brewery 620 Moulton Ave., No. 110, (323) 221-9204 or bwestcatering.com. On the grounds of the Brewery, this bar and restaurant in an unfinished warehouse is where local residents find their artistic sustenance. Fifteen craft beers on tap, wine list and full bar. Bar 107 107 W. Fourth St., (213) 625-7382 or myspace.com/ bar107. Inside the keyhole-shaped door, tough-as-nails Derby Dolls vie for elbowroom with crusty old bar guys and a steady stream of Old Bank District inhabitants. Velvet señoritas, deer heads with sunglasses, a

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Museum of Contemporary Art, The Geffen Contemporary 152 N. Central Ave., (213) 621-2766 or moca.org. Through Jan. 31, 2011: Based on MOCA’s worldrenowned permanent collection, “The Artist’s Museum” showcases the finest contemporary works produced by Los Angeles artists from 1980 to the present day. Museum of Neon Art 136 W. Fourth St., (213) 489-9918 or neonmona.org. The museum is dedicated to the preservation, collection, education and interpretation of the neon arts. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Natural History Museum, 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763–3466 or nhm.org. Ongoing: “Age of Mammals” tells an epic evolutionary story that spans 65 million years. But its theme can be distilled into just six words: Continents move. Climates change. Mammals evolve. Ongoing: The spectacular Humboldt fin whale specimen, “Finwhale Passage,” features the 63-footlong specimen, which weighs more than 7,000 pounds and has been re-articulated to create a more realistic impression of the living animal. An intriguing sound installation and interactive visitor components will accompany the display, which is one of the best and most complete large-whale articulations in the world. Ongoing: The “Dino Lab” is a working paleontological lab, wherein museum preparators will work on a several dinosaur and other fossil creature skeletons for future display at the museum. Wells Fargo History Museum 333 S. Grand Ave., (213) 253-7166 or wellsfargohistory.com. Ongoing: Take in an Old West exhibit including a faux 19th-century Wells Fargo office, a real-life Concord stagecoach that once traversed windy southern Kentucky roads and a gold nugget weighing in at a shocking two pounds.

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16 Downtown News

December 20, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

Listings Continued from previous page wooden Indian and Schlitz paraphernalia plaster the red walls. There’s no shortage of entertainment, with the funky dance room, great DJs and the occasional rock band. In the photo booth, you can capture your mug in old-fashioned black and white. Located just two blocks east of the Pershing Square Metro stop, Bar 107 is open from 3 p.m. to 2 a.m. seven days a week. Big Wang’s 801 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2449 or bigwangs.com. Wings, beer and sports: That’s the winning recipe at this sports bar. The Downtown outpost, the third for the Hollywood-based bar, has everything the other locations have, plus a comfortable patio with outdoor flat screens. Bonaventure Brewing Company 404 S. Figueroa St., (213) 236-0802 or bonaventurebrewing.com. Where can you get a drink, order some decent bar food, sit outdoors and still feel like you’re Downtown? It’s a tall order to fill, but this bar in the Bonaventure Hotel does it admirably. Come by for a taster set of award-winning ales crafted by Head Brewer David Blackwell. Sure, the hotel is vaguely ’80s, and you’ll

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

probably encounter some convention goers tying a few on, but it only adds to the fun. Bona Vista Lounge 404 S. Figueroa St., (213) 624-1000 or thebonaventure.com. Located in the heart of the Financial District in the landmark Westin Bonaventure Hotel, this revolving cocktail lounge offers a 360-degree view of the city. Bordello 901 E. First St., (213) 687-3766 or bordellobar.com. If the name doesn’t clue you in, a sultry voiced “madam” on the answering machine lets you know Bordello isn’t exactly for the buttoned-up crowd. This onetime house of ill repute has shed its most recent life as Little Pedro’s with a gussied up interior oozing sex appeal — lush scarlet velvet, ornate black chandeliers and heart-shaped chairs in hidden alcoves. Bottlerock 1150 S. Flower St., (213) 747-1100 or bottlerock.net. Situated on the groundfloor of the Met Lofts in South Park, this wine bar features a vast range of bottles from around the world and a price range equally as wide. Wines by the glass start at around $8, but if you’re feeling overcome by oenophilia (or just deep-pocketed) there are some first growth Bordeauxs for more than $1,000 for the bottle. And if you don’t get your fill while at the bar, which also features a rotating crop of artisanal beers and a full dinner menu, the bar also sells bottles at retail. Broadway Bar 830 S. Broadway, (213) 614-9909 or broadwaybar.la. Located next to the Orpheum Theatre in the Platt Building, the Broadway Bar’s blue neon sign beckons patrons inside to its 50-foot circular bar. The casualchic spot is based on Jack Dempsey’s New York bar, with low lighting and a dose of ’40s glam. There’s a patio upstairs with nice views, and a jukebox. Caña Rum Bar at the Doheny 714 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 745-7090 or canarumbar.com. In the Caribbean, “caña” is slang for sugarcane. Rum is made from sugarcane. Therefore, Caña Rum Bar at the Doheny serves premium handcrafted rum cocktails in an intimate, elegant environment featuring live Caribbean and tropical Latin music. Casa 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2249 or casadowntown.com. There’s a classy bar inside, from whence you can check out the action in the transparent kitchen and behind the bar, as the bartenders craft their fresh-

juiced margaritas. But the place to be is outside, under the stars and high-rises, nestled in one of the patio’s pod “casitas.” Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. With its worn brick staircase, tin ceilings and dark wood decor, it’s easy to see how this neighborhood bar and grill still works its Irish charm. Regulars cozy up to the 60-foot mahogany bar with a pint of Guinness and a plate of bangers and mash. Casey’s has a full menu with six beers on tap and a selection of Belgian ales and microbrews. Cicada Club 617 S. Olive St., (213) 488-9488 or cicadarestaurant.com. Every Sunday, the restaurant is transformed into a vintage, old Hollywood-style dance club, with a big band, swank costumes, dinner and cocktails (visit cicadaclub.com). Club 740 740 S. Broadway, (213) 225-5934 or 740la.com. This 1920s theater has been transformed into a three-level party playground sprawling over 40,000 square feet. Club 740 is a spectacle with ornate gold balconies, go-go dancers and private skybox lounges. Music includes hip-hop, Latin vibe, Top 40 and indie rock. Cole’s 118 E. Sixth St., colesfrenchdip.com. This beloved restaurant saloon has been renovated under new ownership. The great leather booths and dark wood bar of the old spot remain, but now the glasses are clean. Draft beer, historic cocktails, and a short wine list. Corkbar 403 W. 12th St., corkbar.com. If the name didn’t give it away, this South Park establishment is all about the wine, specifically, California wine. Situated on the groundfloor of the Evo condominium building, Corkbar serves up a seasonal food menu of farmer’s market-driven driven creations to go with your Golden State pinots, cabernets and syrahs. The Down and Out 501 S. Spring St., (213) 489-7800 or twitter.com/ thedownandout. This latest offering from the same folks that brought you Bar 107. The 3,000-square-foot space on the ground floor of the Alexandria Hotel features mug shots of celebrities including Frank Sinatra, Hugh Grant, Steve McQueen and Andy Dick. The

owners describe it as a sports bar for local residents who don’t want to mingle with tourists. Eastside Luv 1835 E. First St., (323) 262-7442 or eastsideluv.com. A stone’s throw from Mariachi Plaza and all that Metro Line construction, this tucked-away spot features Mexican movie posters on the wall, good beer on tap, regular sangria, live bands, and different from anything to its west, no attitude. e3rd 734 E. Third St., (213) 680-3003 or eastthird.com. This Asian-style steakhouse with an artsy flavor features a sleek lounge with low, circular tables and a long psychedelic bar that changes colors like a mood ring. There’s a full bar, inventive cocktails (including soju) and a reasonable wine list. DJs spin. Edison 108 W. Second St., (213) 613-0000 or edisondowntown.com. Downtown history has come full circle in this former power plant turned stunning cocktail bar. The Edison is perhaps Downtown’s hottest hotspot and draws an eclectic crowd, including jaded Hollywood types who can’t help but gawk at the preserved bits of machinery, the huge generator and the coal box that now houses the jukebox.

MORE LISTINGS Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

2

Easy ways to submit Your

Event Info

4 WEB: LADowntownNews.com/calendar/submit 4 EMAIL: Calendar@DowntownNews.com

Email: Send a brief description, street address and public phone number. Submissions must be received 10 days prior to publication date to be considered for print.

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18 Downtown News

December 20, 2010

Twitters/DowntownNews

CLASSIFIED

place your ad online at www.ladowntownnews.com

FOR RENT

l.a. downtown news classifieds

call: 213-481-1448 HOLIDAY DEADLINE SCHEDULE

Issue Date Space Reservation Deadline 1/3/2011 ............12/22 at noon

REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL

TheLoftExpertGroup.com

FOR RENT

condos/townhouses

Downtown since 2002

Milano Lofts

rjn Heritage Realty, Inc. Specializing in Downtown condominiums since 1987 213.617.8225 Rob@RobDowntownLA.com RobDowntownLA.com

213.598.7555 real estate services

Buy Sell leaSe

Now LeasiNg! • Gorgeous Layouts • 10-15’ Ceilings • Fitness Center • Wi-Fi Rooftop Lounge • Amazing Views 6th + Grand Ave. • 213.627.1900 milanoloftsla.com

2 UNITS Available. $675/Large Single & $800/1 bdrm.1 ba. 1435 S. Union Ave. High Ceiling, New Paint, New Blinds, Close to Convention Center, USC & 110 Fwy. 818-593-9060 cell or 818716-7297.

LOFT LIVING

Your number 1 source for Loft sales, rentals and development! downtownnews.com

Bestlarealestate.com 323.298.0100

FREE RENT SPECIALS Up to $3500 off select apartment homes! Additional Look + Lease specials may apply. Free parking, free tanning, free wi-fi + biz center avail. Cardio Salon, pool, Spa, steamroom, sauna. Call us today. 866-742-0992.

apartments/unfurnished

ROb NESbItt

Bill Cooper

the loft expert! group

“Be wary of out of area companies. Check with the local Better Business Bureau before you send any money for fees or services. Read and understand any contracts before you sign. Shop around for rates.”

CONSIDERING Foreclosure? Are you late in payments? A short sale may be your solution. Call Lady Rodriguez, Realtor 310-600-7534. Represent both buyers and sellers.

lofts for sale

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

FREE RENT SPECIALS @ the Medici. Penthouse 1 & 2 bdrm apts. Granite kitchens, washer/ dryers, business center, 2 pools, spa! Visit TheMedici.com for a full list of amenities. Call 888886-3731. MOVE IN Special. Spacious 1 bdrm. + 1 bath. Covered parking. New decor. 131 South Caronelet. $775/mo. 310-922-5437.

TM

Downtown since 2002

Available Immediately

Voted Best Downtown Residential Real estate Agent Call us today!

Top floor of 11 story historical building available now! We have approximately 2,868 square feet of contiguous exterior space facing Olympic Blvd. Stunning views of L.A. Two blocks away from the Staples Center and adjacent to the new L.A. Live Complex. The building also has other beautiful contiguous space & some small offices available. This space can be viewed by appointment.

Bill Cooper • 213.598.7555 • TheLoftExpertGroup.com

CENTRALLY LOCATED • Secured prime development site • Ideal for office or retail • 3,420 sq. ft. office building with ample parking • 1 blk from USC and Harbor Freeway • Immediate access to use 3111 S. Flower Street, Los Angeles

MOVE IN Special. Totally remodeled. Spacious 2 bdrms + 1 bath. 5451 Blackwelder St. Gated parking. $950 per month. 310-922-5437. ORSINI III - Now open for immediate Occupancy. Never Lived in, Brand New Luxury Apartment Homes, Free Parking, Karaoke Room, Free Wi-Fi, Indoor Basketball, Uncomparable Amenity Package. Call today to schedule a tour - 866-479-1764. loft/unfurnished

old Bank District The original Live/Work Lofts from $1,100 Cafes, Bars, Shops, Galleries, Parking adjacent. Pets no charge call 213.253.4777 laloft.com

REAL ARTIST LOFTS High ceilings, hardwood/concrete floors, kitchen, fireplace, pool/spa, gated parking, laundry, sorry no dogs. Open House Sundays 12-3pm. Leasing office @1250 Long Beach Ave. & 14th St. 213-629-5539

condominiums/unfurnished PROMENADE Luxury Condo across from Music Center, Disney Hall: 2BR 2BA, 2 balconies, 2 parking; microwave, dishwasher, fully equipped gym, pool, spa, 24/7 security, heat, air, paid cable, AVAILABLE NOW. 818-728-2250

EMPLOYMENT drivers ASAP! NEW PAY Increase! 34-40 cpm. Excellent Benefits. Need CDL-A & 3 months recent OTR. 1-877-258-8782. www. MeltonTruck.com. (Cal-SCAN) COMPANY DRIVERS (Solos & Hazmat Teams) * Great Pay * Great Miles * CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated & regional positions available. Call 866-789-8947. Swift. (CalSCAN) DRIVER - SINGLE Source Dispatch. Lots of Freight. Daily or Weekly Pay. Flexible schedule. Newer Equipment. Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A, 6 months recent experience. 1-800-4149569. www.DriveKnight.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS - COMPANY Sponsored Class A training & a Job! No credit checks. 1-800-7812778. (Cal-SCAN)

MILANO LOFTS Now Leasing! • Gorgeous Layouts • 10-15’ Ceilings • Fitness Center • Wi-Fi Rooftop Lounge • Amazing Views

Information available to qualified prospective tenants.

REGIONAL CDL Drivers Needed! Gordon Trucking, Inc. Sign on bonus in some areas! Current Openings on our NCA Fleet. Home weekly available! Consistent Miles & Time off! Full Benefits, 401k. We have lots of Freight! www.TeamGTI. com 1-888-832-6484 EOE. (CalSCAN) UP TO $0.36 Per Mile - Company Drivers! Regional West Coast. Class A CDL. 1 year OTR required. Steady freight. Great Benefits. Apply 1.888.619.6845 or www.NationalCarriers.com. (Cal-SCAN)

ABLE TO TRAVEL. Hiring 8 people. No experience necessary. Transportation & lodging furnished. Paid training. Work and travel entire USA. Start today. www.ProtekChemical.com 1-208-590-0365. (Cal-SCAN) office/clerical JOBS NATIONWIDE! Admin., HR, Clerical, Accounting, Mgmt., Tech., etc. - www.Jobs444.com and www.JobsBloom.com. schools/instruction ATTEND COLLEGE Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www. Centura.us.com. (Cal-SCAN)

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

industrial SUPERVISES WORK; plans sequence of operation; inspects workplace $56,202/yr 9am-6pm MF GEMINI MFG 1020 E Vernon Anaheim 92805 888-2423180 sales RECESSION PROOF Career Opportunity. Work 3 days per week, earnings $100,000 or more after training. Visit www. whittenburgoldamerican.com for complete information and to schedule an interview. (CalSCAN)

Business opportunities ALL CASH VENDING Route! Be Your Own Boss! 25 Machines + Candy All for $9995. Vend3. 1877-915-8222. All major credit cards accepted! (Cal-SCAN) BE YOUR OWN Boss - Start Today! Own a Red Hot - Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox or Discount Party Store from $51,900 worldwide! 100% Turnkey. 1-800-5183064. www.DRSS4.com. (CalSCAN)

SERVICES

General HELP WANTED Movie Extras. Earn up to $150/day. People needed for background in a major film production. Exp. not required. 888-366-0843

securitY SWITCH NOW! OLD Alarm Clunkers API SECURITY SERVICE www.apisecurityservices.com 310-492-5457

hollYwood Nails & Spa

Professional Nail Care & Waxing for Ladies & Gentlemen 323.662.2718 • 4335 W. Sunset Blvd.

Email request to ghollis@shammasgroup.com or call (213) 746-6300 x1455

Call now 213-746-6300 x1455

DRIVERS/CDL TRAINING - Career Central. We Train and EMPLOY You. Company Drivers up to 40K First Year. New Team Pay! Up to 48c/mile Class A CDL Training Regional Locations! 1-877-369-7091 www.CentralDrivingJobs.net. (Cal-SCAN)

Walk-in Welcome • GIft Certificate Available

6th+Grand Ave. • milanoloftsla.com • 213.627.1900

M.-F. 9:30am - 7:30pm Sat. 9am - 7:30pm • Sun. 10am - 7pm

Do you have something to sell?

Ad Copy: _________________________________________

Ad Prices

________________________________________________

(Marketplace and Automotive Categories ONLY) • Items under $300 • Items $301 to $500 • Items $501 to $1200 • Items $1201 to $2000 • Items $2001+…

Name: Address: City Phone: Cash $ Credit card #: Exp. Date:

FREE! $11.50 $14.00 $16.50 $19.00

12 words, 2 weeks 15 words 15 words 15 words 15 words

All ads run for 2 weeks. Ads may be renewed after two weeks for 50% off the original price of the ad.

With a circulation of State Check $

Zip Credit Card $

47,000,

our classifieds get results!

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

Restrictions: Offer good on private party ads only. Ads must be pre-paid by cash, check or credit card. Certain classifications excluded. Deadline: Thursday at noon for next issue.


December 20, 2010

Downtown News 19

DowntownNews.com

Attorneys

ABOGADO DE IMMIGRACION! Family, Criminal, P.I. for more than 20 yrs! Child Support / Custody Necesita Permiso de trabajo? Tagalog / Español / Korean

DISPLAY ADVERTISING in 140 Cal-SDAN newspapers statewide for $1,550! Reach over 3 million Californians! Free email brochure. Call (916) 288-6019. www.Cal-SDAN.com. (CalSCAN)

Business Attorney All Litigation Matters Transactions & Contracts 20 Years Experience Ivy League Background

Paul Bloom, Esq. (805) 984-8375 ATTORNEY JOHN BENSON Your Local Downtown Attorney Wills Trusts Estates Bankruptcy and Divorce best rates in town www.attorneyjohnrbenson.com (213) 905-9364 Business services ADVERTISE YOUR HOME, property or business for sale in 240 California newspapers. Reach over 6 million readers for only $550! Call this newspaper or visit: www.CAL-SCAN.com. (Cal-SCAN) ADVERTISE YOUR JOB Opening in 240 California newspapers. Reach over 6 million readers for only $550! Call this newspaper or visit: www.Cal-SCAN.com. (Cal-SCAN)

2008 PORSCHE 911 TARGA 4 Tiptronic, Bose, Navigation, only 27K miles, certified, #745077. $72,988. Call 888-685-5426.

Pre-oWned

doWntoWn l.A. Auto grouP

get your green cArd or citiZensHiP Law Office of H. Douglas Daniel Esq., (213) 689-1710

AUTOS

cleAning CAL CLEANING SERVICES Cleaning Office & Apartment/Loft buildings. Single apartments/ Lofts. Monthly/Weekly/Daily services. Painting & light repairs as well. (323) 708-1189 CONCEPTO’S CLEANING Crew. Professional, experienced, cleans apartments, homes, offices and restaurants. Call for a quote. 323-459-3067 or 818-409-9183. educAtion HIGH SCHOOL Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www.SouthEasternHS.com. (Cal-SCAN) HeAltH NOT FEELING any joy? Overwhelmed by stress and emotional overload? Professional counseling helps! www.drannewarman. vpweb.com, Downtown Wilshire Office, reasonable rates, insurance accepted, 310-281-9797.

Porsche Volkswagen audi Mercedes-Benz nissan cheVrolet cadillac

2005 BMW 330CIC Convertible, Low Mileage, White/Black stk # uc459-1/PL52952 $17,887 Call 888-879-9608. 2007 AUDI A6 Low miles. Loaded! Manager special. # 151076 vin ZA9770 $28,830 Call 888583-0981 2007 MERCEDES BENZ C230 Stock CU0298P vin 926270 Extra clean! $20,883 call 888-2032967. 2007 MERCEDES BENZ ML350 Pewter/Black, 3.5 Liter, leather, $28,999 4JGBB86E77A260898 Call 888-319-8762. 2007 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE 2.5 Automatic, Air, low miles, Gray/Gray. #ZV1002/ 516243. $13,258. Call 888-781-8102.

2009 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S Certified, air with power pkg # NI3609 / 9N487053 $14,999, call 888-838-5089.

For a complete list of our pre-owned inventory, go to www.DTLAMOTORS.com Autos WAnted DONATE YOUR CAR: Children’s Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child’s Life Through Research & Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy & Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. (CalSCAN)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

LEGAL

notices

Fictitious Business nAme

WANTED DIABETIC Test Strips. Cash Paid. Unopened, Unexpired Boxes Only. All Brands Considered. Help others, don’t throw boxes away. For more information, Call 888-491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

Fictitious Business name statement File no. 20101677916 The following person is doing business as: SAVIOR WINES, 600 W. Ninth Street, Suite #1102, Los Angeles CA 90015, are hereby registered by the following registrant: STEPHANIE BADEN, 600 W. Ninth Street, Suite #1102, Los Angeles CA 90015. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed

cHurcHes THE BRIDGE / Little Tokyo: Contemporary worship, 4:00pm Sundays, 401 E Third St. www. thebridgewired.org.

The Downtown Renaissance Collection

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE! Receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, NonRunners Accepted, 1-888-4685964. (Cal-SCAN)

Be Inspired...

We've got what you're searching for! DowntownNews.com

Best Downtown Locations!

I c o n I c B e au t y

Elegant World Class Resort Apartment Homes

Orsini

S e e k S S t y l i S h M at e

550 NORTH FIGUEROA ST.

877-231-9362

WWW.THEORSINI.COM

On Spring St.

Medici

Premiere Towers:

2 bdrm/2 bath, $1600/mo • Rooftop garden terrace/ GYM w/city view • 24 hr. doorman • Free (1) parking

City Lofts: noW leAsing

$1,400’s/mo. Free Parking ROOFTOP GARDEN RETREAT WITH BBQ AND LOUNGE GRAND LOBBY • FITNESS CENTER • SPA MODERN KITCHEN w/CAESAR COUNTERTOPS HIGH SPEED INTERNET DESIGNER LIVING SPACES • PET FRIENDLY • DRAMATIC VIEWS WALKING DISTANCE TO RALPHS SUPERMARKET

756 S. Broadway • Downtown Los Angeles 213-892-9100 • chapmanf lats.com

1000 sqft, 16ft ceilings, $1950/mo. w/2nd level bedroom • Stainless steel appliances/refrigerator etc. • Pet friendly We are located in a prime area in Downtown LA nice neighborhood w/ salon, market, café etc. Wired for high speed internet & cable, central heat & A/C

Please call 213.627.6913 www.cityloftsquare.com

Pricing subject to change without notice.

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

Monthly from $550 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills

Beautiful Fully Furnished Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Beautiful Fully FurnishedAvailable Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Available Services Include:

Reception y Mail y Fiber Optic Internet y TelephoneServices & Voice Include: Mail y West Law y Reception y& Mail Optic Internet y Photocopy FaxyyFiber Video Conferencing

Featuring a more robust local search powered by Yellow Pages.

877-239-8256

WWW.THEMEDICI.COM

• Free Resident/Guest Parking in Gated Garage • Private Library, Business Center & Conference Rooms • Free Wi-Fi & DSL Computer Use • Resident Karaoke Lounge • Directors Screening Room • Lavish Fountains & Sculptures • On-Site Private Resident Park with Sand Volleyball, BBQ’s and Jogging Track • Night Light Tennis Courts • Indoor Basketball

Clean unfurnished bachelor rooms with shared bath at $550/mo. Client: with private bath at $695/mo.

(213) 996-8301

Fully furnished with TV, telephone, microwave, refrigerator. Full bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly maid service.

www.regentbc.com

www.regentbc.com

Monthly from $595 utilities paid. (213) 627-1151

877-235-6012

WWW.THEPIERO.COM

Visconti 1221 WEST THIRD ST.

866-690-2888

WWW.THEVISCONTI.COM

• Brunswick Four-Lane Virtual Bowling • Full Swing Virtual Golf • 3100 Square Foot Cybex Fitness Facility • Free Tanning Rooms • Massage Room, Sauna & Steam Room • Rooftop Pools with Dressing Rooms • Concierge Service • 24-Hour Doorman • 24/7 On-Site Management • Magnificent City Views *Amenities vary among communities

is your teen experiencing:

• School problems? • Conflict at home or with friends?

G.H. Palmer Associates

sec. deposit special @$100

support Publication:Adolescent LADT News Includes utilities, basic cable group now forming channels, laundry room Size/Color: on site. 4.3125” x 8” Ages 13-17 Gated building in a good area. low fee 208 W. 14th St. at Hill St. Downtown LA

Children’s Performing Group

laleads@regentbc.com

616 ST. PAUL AVE.

Version Casaloma1 L.A. Apartments

Fully Trained Staff

laleads@regentbc.com

Piero

FREE Rent Specials On Select Floor Plans

Telephone & Voice Mail y West Law y Photocopy & Fax y Video Conferencing

JENNY AHN JENNY AHN (213) 996-8301 Now ed at u p d i ly a d

725 SOUTH BIXEL ST.

For English Call Pierre Design or Terri 213.744.9911 For Spanish Call Susana 213.749.0306

Additional Features: Kitchen Additional Facilities, Mail/Copy Features: Room, Conference Rooms, Mail/Copy Spectacular Views, Kitchen Facilities, Room, Fully Trained Staff Views, Conference Rooms, Spectacular

herein on November 15, 2010. This statement was filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on November 19, 2010. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 12/6, 12/13, 12/20, 12/27/10

Sunshine Generation Singing, dancing, performing and fun! For boys & girls ages 3 and up!

SunshineGenerationLA.com 909-861-4433

4C

call marney stofflet, lcsW

by: apluscreative@yahoo.com (323) 662-9797 Ph: 323.474.4668 4344 Fountain Ave. (at sunset), suite A los Angeles, cA 90029

Real Estate Specialist of San Gabriel Valley Proudly serving the communities of San Gabriel, Alhambra, Monterey Park, Montebello and El Monte.

Cal Best Realty Emi Terauchi

madison hotel Clean furnished single rooms. 24-hour desk clerk service. •Daily, $30.00 •Weekly, $109.00 •Monthly, $310.00 (213) 622-1508 423 East 7th St.

(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.) Starting Jan. 1, 2011

Realtor / Notary

Lic.No.00810238 English/Japanes/Chinese speaking emiterauchi@yahoo.com (626) 786-9086

downtownnews.com


20 Downtown News

December 20, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

We Got Games It’s Christmas Time at Staples Los Angeles Lakers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/lakers. Dec. 21, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 25, 2 p.m.: Somewhere a television network executive is drooling. For the first time in the Lebron era, the Miami Heat come to Los Angeles to tangle with Kobe and the Lakers on Christmas day. Although they stumbled early in the season, King James, Dwyane Wade and the Heat are on a 10-game win streak (as of press time) and they’ve been dismantling opponents with ease. Miami will take on a Lakers team bolstered by the return of big man Andrew Bynum. Wait, there’s another game this week? Oh yeah, the Milwaukee Bucks come to town on Dec. 21. Los Angeles Clippers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/clippers.

Dec. 20 and 22, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 26, noon: Blake Griffin looks to spread Christmas cheer throughout Clipper nation in three home games. The Clippers are still downright awful, at least according to their record. Heck, even team owner Donald “The Grinch” Sterling has been reportedly heckling his own players. The Clippers look to melt the Grinch’s cold heart with wins this week against Minnesota, Houston and Phoenix. Los Angeles Kings Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., 1 (888) KINGS-LA or kings.nhl.com. Dec. 23, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 26, 6 p.m.: Hockey and Christmas go together like mistletoe and awkward kisses. Think about it: there’s lots of ice, which is like snow; there’s the song “All I Want for Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth,” which hockey players can relate to; and this year, the players of the Kings are like Santa Claus, handing out gifts to all the good fans of Los Angeles. Wrapped in purple and gold, those gifts are in the form of wins, this in an era when fans have come to expect nothing but coal. After a trip to Colorado (Dec. 21), the Kings return home to host the Oilers and the Ducks. —Ryan Vaillancourt

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM

12-20-10  

Los Angeles Downtown News is a free weekly newspaper distributed in and around downtown Los Angeles.

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