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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS Volume 39, Number 46

13

2

Mayoral moves, a big club bust, and other happenings Around Town.

5

Downtown gets Lucky, as jeans maker trades Vernon for the Arts District.

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

November 15, 2010

INSIDE

Nelson Rising leaves MPG Office Trust.

2

PICK THE

PROS Pick football games, win prizes.

6

photo by Gary Leonard

The backbone of the jewelry biz.

7

Return of the L.A. Auto Show.

12

On Wednesday, Nov. 10, civic leaders and YWCA of Greater Los Angeles officials celebrated the “topping out” of the organization’s $73 million Job Corps Urban Campus at 1020 S. Olive St. The ceremony, which marked the end of vertical construction, involved officials signing a beam that will be placed at the high point of the seven-story edifice slated to open in 2012. The tree is meant to symbolize growth and bring life to the building.

Fiat-Chrysler to Put Its Flag on Figueroa

The Fifth and Flower Fumble

Carmaker to Open Dealership in Early 2010

Loss of Key Regional Connector Station Raises Worries in Downtown by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

T

he Downtown Regional Connector, a two-mile underground track that transit experts say is the lynchpin to a betterperforming regional light-rail system, took a big step forward last month. Metro’s board of directors on Oct. 28 approved one of four potential routes for final study, initiating the last major planning phase

Downtown is full of new classical music.

16

needed before the $1.36 billion project can be built. While the move earned praise from mass transit advocates, another vote that day sparked concern among some key Downtown stakeholders. In a cost-cutting measure, the board also nixed a proposed station at Fifth and Flower streets. In doing so, they likely killed the chance of building a new node to see Fifth and Flower, page 8

photo by Gary Leonard

Chrysler plans to open a West Coast flagship dealership on Figueroa Street early next year. The company built the structure in 2004, then shelved it amid a sour economy.

Reviewing ‘Crimes of the Heart.’

17

18 CALENDAR LISTINGS 21 MAP 22 CLASSIFIEDS

by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

D

etroit carmaker Chrysler and its Italian partner Fiat are set to open a new fivebrand dealership early next year, activating a Figueroa Street structure that Chrysler built, and then abandoned, six years ago. The opening of the three-story glass and stone edifice that Chrysler built in 2004 comes as the company strives to rebound from a tumultuous bankruptcy turn last year. Part

of that turnaround involves Chrysler and its partner setting their sights on the Downtown market. “We will be putting a dealership there with all our brands, opening some time in the first quarter next year,” said Ralph Kisiel, a spokesman for the Chrysler Group. Kisiel declined to provide details about the dealership in advance of a Nov. 16 announcement, planned for two days before the start of the L.A. Auto Show. Fiat, which is set see Dealership, page 10

rendering courtesy of Metro

The $1.36 billion Regional Connector is moving forward, but likely without a station at Fifth and Flower streets. The Metro board said it could still be studied, but only if the private sector comes up with $2 million.

The Voice of Downtown Los Angeles


2 Downtown News

Y

et another Downtown residential project is going to auction, though this time there’s a twist, as the sales event involves a building that opened seven years ago. The Little Tokyo Lofts, which came online in 2003 as 161 apartment and later converted to for-sale status, will be holding an auction for its remaining 23 units on Sunday, Nov. 21. The condos, which range from about 800-2,000 square feet, were originally priced between the mid $200,000s and $1 million. Starting bids for units in the property at 420 S. San Pedro St., on the edge of Skid Row, will range from $75,000-$240,000. New York-based Sheldon Good & Company is running the auction. Open house hours are Wednesday-Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Auction registration is at lacondoauction. com.

Padilla ‘Definitely Looking’ at Running for Mayor

C

ount State Senator Alex Padilla among the politicians considering running for mayor of Los Angeles in 2013. Padilla, who before moving to the state served on the City Council for seven and a half years, including four and a half years as Council president, last week acknowledged that he is contemplating getting in the race to succeed Antonio Villaraigosa. He made his comments at a luncheon on Wednesday, Nov. 10, hosted by the Los Angeles Current Affairs Forum. “I’m definitely looking at it,” Padilla, whose 20th senate district covers much of the San Fernando Valley, said during the event at the

Wilshire Grand Hotel. “This is home. I love the city. After seven and a half years I know City Hall fairly well.” Padilla was elected to the City Council in 1999 at the age of 26 and became council president two years later. He moved to the state senate in 2006 and was re-elected this month. Others who have been widely speculated to be considering running for mayor after Villaraigosa is termed out include current Council President Eric Garcetti, Ninth District Councilwoman Jan Perry, County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, City Controller Wendy Greuel and developer Rick Caruso.

Dozens Arrested in Hostess Club Bust

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olice arrested 81 women and seven men in a Nov. 5 raid of Club 907, a hostess club at 907 S. Hill St. that investigators believe has become a hot spot for prostitution. Most of the suspects were charged with using fake identification for purposes of employment, a felony and a violation of the club’s conditional use permit, said Lt. Paul Vernon. Police also filed conspiracy to commit prostitution charges against several suspects, including the men who were arrested, Vernon said. The arrests came during a raid that culminated a two-month investigation by the Central Area vice unit. Hostess clubs, also known as taxidance clubs because they charge clients for the time they spend with the women, do not sell alcohol. The false identification charges are considered serious because they often go hand-in-hand with human trafficking, Vernon said. “It’s often a symptom of that see Around Town, page 9

Why does this little burger stand attract over a million people a year?

Nelson Rising Resigns From MPG Office Trust by Ryan Vaillancourt

photo by Gary Leonard

AROUNDTOWN More Auction Action

November 15, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

staff writer

I

n a sudden and surprising move, veteran Los Angeles real estate executive Nelson Rising is resigning from his post as president and CEO of commercial real estate giant MPG Office Trust, Inc. The company announced on Thursday, Nov. 11, that it has accepted Rising’s resignation from the firm formerly known as Maguire Properties. In a letter to the company, Rising wrote: “I believe the board of directors and I do not share a common vision for the strategic direction of the company and a capital structure necessary to achieve it.” The move came as MPG announced plans to sell the Westin Pasadena Hotel, and foreshadowed a strategic direction that will focus on reducing leverage and extending debt tied to its core properties in Downtown. Paul Watson, a former vice chairman of Wells Fargo and the chair of the MPG board, will serve as interim CEO when Rising’s resignation takes effect on Nov. 15, and until the company hires a replacement. “The six independent directors of MPG Office Trust are fully committed to maximizing value for MPG Office stockholders and intend to do so by continuing to implement the company’s strategic plan,” Watson said in a statement. MPG Office Trust is the largest upscale office landlord in Downtown. Its holdings include US Bank Tower, Wells Fargo

Tower and California Plaza. In recent years, the firm has been plagued by debt, forcing it to stop making payments on seven Orange County properties and to sell nine others. The poor condition of the company led to the ouster in May 2008 of founder Robert F. Maguire. He was replaced by Rising. Rising had repeatedly stressed a commitment to the Downtown market, which the firm has long considered its core interest. The Thursday statement from the company said that its next strategic plan focuses on the company’s Downtown holdings and involves working with lenders to reduce its leverage, extend debt maturities and raise money for capital expenditures at core properties. The Westin sale is considered a “first step” in that plan. “We are focused on optimizing value and proactively solving future risks at our trophy assets,” Watson said. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

University of Southern California

Opera, Family Style

Two one-acts explore dysfunctional kin.

Gianni Schicchi

Three Decembers

by Giacomo Puccini

by Jake Heggie

Wednesday and Friday, Nov. 17 and 19, 8 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21, 2 p.m. Bing Theatre General admission: $18 (213) 740-2167

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When the family patriarch leaves everything to a monastery, the greedy relatives look to a con man to posthumously rewrite his will. And when the adult children of a Broadway diva pine for the father they hardly knew, cherished illusions grow dark. USC Thornton Opera presents two very different one-act operas exploring families in crisis. Based on an unpublished play by Terrence McNally, composer Jake Heggie’s Three Decembers, which premiered in 2008, has already broken hearts from San Francisco to Chicago. And Puccini’s comic masterpiece, Gianni Schicchi, first heard in 1918, continues to beguile audiences – most recently in 2008 when Woody Allen directed it as part of Puccini’s Il Trittico for the Los Angeles Opera. Bring the whole family and enjoy a family-sized portion of operatic therapy.

USC your cultural connection

AlSo AT USC

Cabaret Music by John Kander lyrics by Fred Ebb Thursday through Sunday, Nov. 18-21 Showtimes vary “What good is sitting alone in your room? Come hear the music play. Life is a cabaret, old chum. Come to the cabaret.” Let Sally Bowles and the Master of Ceremonies sing your troubles away in this revival of the 1966 Broadway show loosely based on Christopher Isherwood’s Goodbye to Berlin. With such great tunes as Willkommen, Don’t Tell Mama and the rousing title song, Cabaret, pre-war Berlin lives again in the intimacy of USC’s Scene Dock Theatre. Scene Dock Theatre General admission: $12 (213) 740-2167

For more information visit www.usc.edu


November 15, 2010

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4 Downtown News

November 15, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

EDITORIALS Football and the Future

T

he proposed Downtown football stadium that Anschutz Entertainment Group President and CEO Tim Leiweke has been trotting out recently reminds us of the old adage: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. In most cases, that would make us extremely skeptical of the $1 billion South Park stadium plan. But there is a caveat here: AEG has already been involved in two projects that at their outset may have appeared too good to be true. Yet in those instances — Staples Center and L.A. Live — the projects materialized and Downtown benefited immensely. It’s good to ask questions and not blindly embrace the proposal yet, but AEG’s track record means the company deserves the chance to further develop its plans in concert with the city. There is a lot at play here. Leiweke’s vision, which Los Angeles Downtown News wrote about last week, involves a 78,000-seat building with a retractable roof, and would rise on the current site of the Convention Center’s West Hall (which would be razed and replaced). It would host about 10 professional football games a year and up to 40 other events, including NCAA Final Fours and conventions that place a floor over the stadium’s playing field. The positives Leiweke is broaching are enticing. He promises the building would

be privately financed, and that AEG would back the $300 million worth of bonds the city would need to issue to fund an expansion of the Convention Center; he says there would be no risk to the beleaguered city’s general fund. He also predicts the project would spur the creation of up to five new hotels and 25,000 jobs. These are things any city — especially one being pummeled by a brutal economy — would salivate over. It’s also what brings up the concept of “too good to be true.” That is where AEG’s past work comes into play. It’s impressive, and one need only compare the South Park of today to the community just over a decade ago. Before Phil Anschutz and Ed Roski opened Staples Center (in 1999) on what had previously been the site of the Convention Center’s North Hall, the area was full of gas stations and rundown motels. Conventioneers who bothered to come to town in most cases had to take shuttle buses from the building to wherever they were staying, which was often on the Westside. The economic, cultural, residential and restaurant life in the district today would shock anyone who last saw the area in the late 1990s. Staples Center began the momentum and was followed by the $2.5 billion L.A. Live, which came online in phases between late 2007 and early this year. Both were built

with union labor. Not only did AEG succeed with the arena and L.A. Live, it did so with limited public financial input. Staples required only a Community Redevelopment Agency loan. The most significant municipal outlay for L.A. Live was a waiver of the bed tax for the Ritz/Marriott hotel. That is certainly large, with an anticipated value of $246 million over 25 years, but the building is already changing L.A.’s status in the convention industry, allowing Downtown to attract gatherings it would otherwise never get. If the football stadium plan moves forward, AEG will likely want a few things. The most significant would probably concern the Convention Center itself, and already there has been talk of turning over the operations of the city-owned facility to a private entity, on the grounds that running a convention center is not what local government does best. Indeed, Leiweke recently told Downtown News that if the center goes the privatization route, AEG would bid on it. He noted that many conventions already utilize an L.A. Live facility such as the hotel or a theater, and the company would be interested in running it and taking “risks” to book more events. There is a long way to go in any football plan. As anyone who follows the National Football League knows, the primary focus

right now is on addressing a labor dispute, and few expect that to be resolved for at least a year. That means AEG could be deep into the entitlements phase (it hopes to begin those in January) of the proposed superstructure before there are any indications of a team even coming to L.A. There is also the NFL’s distasteful track record in Los Angeles. Ever since the Raiders and Rams left following the 1994 season, the league has sought to foment competition between stadium proponents, encouraging them to bid against each other in the effort to create a sweeter deal. That could happen again as Roski pushes his own stadium plan in the City of Industry. Many have tired of the game and are no longer inclined to deal with the league. In other words, there is a lot beyond just the stadium that makes Leiweke’s plan a huge endeavor. That is worth weighing, but so is the fact that AEG succeeded and lived up to its promises with Staples and L.A. Live. The developer enjoyed the economic benefits, and so has the rest of Los Angeles. More could come with a football team, a stadium and multiple Downtown Super Bowls. That is why it is worth treating this football plan seriously. Even if Leiweke’s concept sounds too good to be true, it would be unwise at this phase to say it can’t get done. AEG deserves a shot.

Finally Hitting the Target

R

ecently, Minneapolis-based mega-retailer Target and Downtown landowner Brookfield Properties finally announced what many in the local real estate community had long been anticipating: the signing of a lease that will bring a store to the 7+Fig shopping mall. The only question: What took them so long? We recognize that lease transactions are tricky things, and that when more than 100,000 square feet are at stake, as is the case here, every little i has to be dotted and each t crossed.

Yet, Downtown is a growing community with impressive demographics. With a household median income of around $100,000, and approximately 40,000 full-time residents (and more people coming), this is precisely the type of neighborhood that will patronize a Target or another “mid-level” store. This type of corporate reluctance to take a bold step is familiar but probably unnecessary, given the area’s track record. The brass at Ralphs moved as slow as molasses in the

years leading up to the summer 2007 opening of the chain’s South Park location. It was a hit from day one, as locals embraced the opportunity to buy groceries without getting into their cars. We expect it will be the same with Target, even if the company plans to follow the molasses-speed route, and will not open until the fall of 2012. The community will likely throng the store — unless another retailer recognizes the opportunity and swoops in before them. Trader Joe’s, are you listening?

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com • email: realpeople@downtownnews.com facebook: L.A. Downtown News

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Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: David Friedman, Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Pamela Albanese, Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, Michael X. Ferraro, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Catherine Holloway, Brenda Stevens, Billy Wright, Lon Wahlberg circulAtioN: Norma Rodas distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

One copy per person.


November 15, 2010

Downtown News 5

DowntownNews.com

Downtown Getting Lucky Business Sector Launches Jeans Maker to Leave Vernon for Arts District, Homelessness Plan Open $15 Million Facility by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

V

ernon based Lucky Brand Jeans will be moving its headquarters to Downtown Los Angeles, company and city officials announced last week. Construction of a $15 million facility being built by CEG Construction is set to begin Dec. 10 for the headquarters at 540 S. Santa Fe Ave. A statement from Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s office said that various business incentives are being offered to Lucky Brand, including Department of Water and Power rate discounts and State Enterprise Zone tax credits. The 46,000-square-foot facility will open by the end of 2011, and will relocate more than 200 jobs from the mostly industrial city to Downtown’s Arts District. That marks a change from the more frequent trend of clothing and manufacturing companies heading to Vernon and nearby cities that offer lower business taxes. “Los Angeles offers access to a strong labor force, world class design talent, and cutting edge technology, as well as a thriving entrepreneurial culture,” said Lucky Brand CEO Dave Demattei in a statement. “Making the decision to move our headquarters to the City of L.A. [is] a natural fit.” The company, a subsidiary of Liz Claiborne Inc., designs and produces

L.A. Chamber Partners With United Way On Extensive Effort

denim, sportswear, T-shirts and active wear. Its goods are sold at more than 110 company-owned stores nationwide and three international locations. Estela Lopez, executive director of the Central City East Association, which operates the Arts District BID, said the area is a good fit for the company, since the district has a history of clothing design and manufacture. “I think it’s another sign of the economic viability of a district that is sometimes not quite on the radar for the rest of Downtown,” she said. “But I think this helps Downtown as a whole. It adds to Downtown as a hub of clothing and artistic design and fabrication.” Kent Smith, executive director of the Fashion District Business Improvement District, said having a well-known name like Lucky Brand is key to boosting Downtown’s reputation as a fashion hub. “It’s a major brand coming here. It says Los Angeles is a fashion capital and we’re on the rise,” he said. In addition to the thriving Fashion District, Downtown is home to numerous jeans and denim companies, with several headquartered in the Arts District. This summer, San Francisco-based The Gap announced that it would open a 5,400-square-foot creative design office in a building at Olive Street and Pico Boulevard. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

T

here may be no silver bullet for homelessness, but a group anchored by local business leaders says it has a five-year plan to end the problem that is pervasive in Downtown. The United Way of Greater Los Angeles partnered with the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce in February 2009, pledging to work together to combat homelessness in L.A. They teamed up last summer on a lobbying trip to Washington, D.C., and sent delegations to New York and Denver to study how other cities have drastically reduced chronic homelessness in recent years. Last week, the United Way/Chamber team unveiled its blueprint to end chronic homelessness. “Home for Good” is their four-point approach that emphasizes better coordination among public agencies, an aggressive emphasis on permanent supportive housing and a more efficient data collection system to assess need and track progress. Jerry Neuman, co-chair of the chamber’s task force on homelessness, said the plan comes at a time when the stars are more closely aligned to fight the problem than they ever have been. “You have the engagement of a business community that hasn’t been there, an admin-

photo by Gary Leonard

Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce head Gary Toebben and Elise Buik of the United Way last week released a plan describing how they hope to eradicate chronic homelessness in Los Angeles by 2016.

istration that put out a federal plan that highlights the need for the types of coordination we’re talking about and that will ultimately link funding to that coordination,” Neuman said. “And you have a number of people in office and on staff levels that have come to realize that without that level of coordination, we see Homelessness, page 10

L I A S R K R O E W E R H T O N I M

metro.net/works

Both the Regional Connector and Westside Subway Extension projects are entering the >nal environmental review and preliminary engineering stage.

Long B each

subway westside rridor

ansit co

The Metro Board of Directors approved a two-mile, fully underground light rail line for the route of the Regional Connector Transit Corridor connecting the Metro Gold Line, Metro Blue Line, and future Expo Line through Downtown LA. > The route would connect with the Metro Blue and Expo lines at 7th Street/Metro Center Station and with the Metro Gold Line at Alameda Street. > The Regional Connector will save approximately 20 minutes of travel time by eliminating transfers through Downtown. > It is estimated to serve 90,000 passengers daily, including 17,000 new transit riders by 2035. > Under the 30/10 Initiative leveraging Measure R funding with federal dollars, construction could begin in 2014 and be completed by 2019. For more information, visit metro.net/regionalconnector.

The Metro Board of Directors approved an extension of the Metro Purple Line running between the Wilshire/Western Station and Westwood/VA Hospital, a distance of approximately nine miles, for the route of the Westside Subway Extension. > The $4.2 billion project will extend the subway to Beverly Hills, Century City and Westwood. > A one-way trip between Union Station in Downtown LA and Westwood will take approximately 25 minutes. > By 2035, it is estimated to attract nearly 53,000 riders boarding at the new stations along the extension. > Under the 30/10 Initiative leveraging Measure R funding with federal dollars, construction could begin in 2013, with completion of the subway to the Westwood area by 2022. For more information, visit metro.net/westside.

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6 Downtown News

November 15, 2010

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November 15, 2010

Downtown News 7

DowntownNews.com

Behind the Bling Tool Suppliers Are the Backbone of the Downtown Jewelry Industry by Richard Guzmán city editor

W

hen Sarkis Poyrazian walks by window displays in the Downtown Jewelry District, he admires what most people don’t see. While he enjoys looking at shiny rings, bracelets, necklaces and more, he also thinks of the pliers it took to manipulate the shape of the piece. He envisions the melting pot used to

“Every year they let me know about new technology,” said Beylerian, who has been coming to A to Z since 1994 and considers Poyrazian and his store an essential part of his business. “If a new tool comes out they’ve already got it.” May Vincent, another regular customer, whose father owns a jewelry manufacturing business in Downtown, usually purchases the wax her dad uses to carve and sculpt rings and pendants. “This is one of the most complete shops. They have everything here all the time,” she said. While Poyrazian keeps busy making sure his customers have the supplies they need, he said he misses the other side

of the business. “When I walk around the storefronts and I see something, I also think that I would like to make that for myself or for somebody I know,” he said. “But you need to invest a lot of time, and that’s the one thing I don’t have.” Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

photos by Gary Leonard

With more than 3,000 tools, Sarkis Poyrazian of A to Z Jewelry Tools & Supplies keeps his customers stocked.

fabricate gold. He pictures the burs used to grind and file silver, platinum and other precious metals. Poyrazian is one of the many behind-the-scenes players in Downtown’s jewelry industry. Although most visitors to the area focus on the glitter and bling in vast jewelry malls, there is a less glamorous backbone of the field. Poyrazian runs A to Z Jewelry Tools & Supplies Inc. A former diamond setter who went into his family’s jewelry business, the 37-year-old said he likes to play a part in his customers’ designs. “I’m satisfied in knowing I’m helping a person create something,” he said. “Whether they’re a seasoned professional or a beginner, everyone needs some help sometime.” Stuart Benjamin, president of the California Jewelers Association, which represents about 600 retailers in Southern California and about 140 tool suppliers, said a good supplier is crucial in the industry. “They help manufacturers find that right tool. If they don’t have it they help them get it, and if they need it they help train them on how to use it,” he said. Located at 414 W. Sixth St., A to Z is one of a handful of tool suppliers in Downtown that work with the local jewelry industry and, through Internet sales, with clients throughout the world. Other area companies in the field include A&A Jewelry Supply at 319 W. Hill St., Noravian Jewelry Tools and Supplies at 452 S. Hill St., Progress Machine and Tool Corporation at 645 S. Olive St. and Sassounian Tools Inc. at 716 S. Olive St. From Wax to Wear A to Z has been in business in Downtown for about 30 years, and has been based in its current 6,000-square-foot location for about 20 years. In Downtown they have hundreds of customers and also sell to manufacturers in Brazil, Korea and throughout Europe. They carry about 3,000 types of tools, including dapping blocks, which are round metal balls for shaping gold; polishing sets to shine the metal; rolling mills to reshape dense metals; ovens for casting; an assortment of pliers for bending metals; work benches; and even tools for closing watch bends. Poyrazian said one of his biggest sellers is jeweler’s wax, which customers use to create molds for casting precious metals. Also popular are the burs, which look like dentist drills and come in various shapes that define their purpose. Some are used to clean, and others cut gold or other metals for setting stones. “With these tools you can do anything, from the wax design all the way to the storefront,” Poyrazian said. Benjamin said one of the major roles suppliers like Poyrazian play is staying up to date with new tools and keeping their clients informed. That claim is borne out by Jack Beylerian of Downtown’s Constantine Diamonds, who said he depends on A to Z to keep him aware of new advances.

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Fifth and Flower Continued from page 1 better serve the densest employment hub in the city. The elimination of the Fifth and Flower station is expected to save the project about $185 million, which planners say is crucial considering they expect to come up about $200 million short on the connector budget after cobbling together local dollars, Measure R transit tax revenues and a major federal grant. The underground route had included four proposed stops, but Metro staffers tagged the Fifth and Flower hub for elimination in part because it is closest to an existing station at Seventh and Flower streets. Critics of the decision to cut Fifth and Flower see the move as shortsighted since the study would only require up to $2

million, and it may be possible to come up with the funds to build it down the road. “I think that the general perception is, from an urban planning perspective, it’s a huge loss of an opportunity to have a stop in the Central Business District across from the Central Library,” said Ayahlushim Hammond, senior vice president at Thomas Properties Group, which owns the office and shopping complex City National Plaza at 555 S. Flower St. Bart Reed, executive director of the nonprofit Transit Coalition, said the decision reflects a lack of on-the-ground understanding of the Metro infrastructure Downtown. The Fifth and Flower station was eliminated in part because it is three blocks from Seventh Street Metro Center. But without the Fifth and Flower stop, the heart of Bunker Hill misses the connector. There is a planned station at Second and Hope streets, but that requires a three-to-four block walk — one of them uphill — to reach the corporate nerve

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Richard Katz, one of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s appointees to the Metro board, said the agency doesn’t have the money to build the station, and that studying it would be a waste.

center around California Plaza and Wells Fargo Center. “The politicians look at a map and see it’s two blocks away,” Reed said. “They don’t look at topography, or the challenge of, is a woman or man in business attire going to want to make a two or three block jaunt?” Early Vote Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has been a cheerleader for the Regional Connector and several city department heads, including Rita Robinson of the Transportation Department and Planning Department Director Michael LoGrande, urged Metro to keep the Fifth and Flower station in an Oct. 18 letter. Although Villaraigosa attended part of the Oct. 28 Metro board meeting and voted in favor of a Westside subway extension, he left before the regional connector came up. His three appointees voted for the underground route, but all abstained from an earlier vote that would have kept the Fifth and Flower station in the study. The motion, which came suddenly from Sup. Mark Ridley-Thomas and before public speakers were allowed to comment, fell three votes shy of the seven needed to pass. County Supervisors Don Knabe, Ridley-Thomas and Mike Antonovich and board member John Fasana voted in favor. Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky and board members Pam O’Connor and Ara Najarian voted against it. Villaraigosa had left the room, and Sup. Gloria Molina and board member Diane DuBois were absent. Villaraigosa appointees Richard Katz, Robinson and Councilman Tom Labonge (filling in for Councilman José Huizar) abstained. Katz, Villaraigosa’s top transportation advisor, said the mayor supports the station in theory. But he maintains it would be wasteful to spend $2 million to study the station when it is clear the agency doesn’t have the $185 million to build it. “The reason we didn’t vote no is because if we could we’d love to keep the station,” Katz said. “In an ideal world, the mayor and his staff and his appointees all want to build the station. We just don’t know that we’re living in that world yet.” Community Input This is not the first time the connector’s alignment has riled a Downtown community faction. Little Tokyo stakeholders fiercely protested the routes originally included in a draft environmental study that included at-grade tracks or a station near First and Alameda streets. Community and cultural groups already struggling in a fragile economy feared that a street-level alignment would present insurmountable hurdles for area businesses during construction. Metro added the fully underground route as a response to Little Tokyo’s early opposition to the other alternatives. Financial District players, who generally support the connector and back a Fifth and Flower station, were less engaged in the planning process than their Little Tokyo counterparts, said Russell Brown, executive director of the Historic Downtown Business Improvement District. “There was not an organized constituency that mobilized to include that station and got involved early in the process the same way that the residents got involved or Little Tokyo Continued on next page

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Continued from previous page got involved,” Brown said. Still, Ninth District Councilwoman Jan Perry said that community input, or a lack thereof, shouldn’t doom a station that seems to make sense from a mass transit perspective. “I don’t know that you should rule by squeaky wheels get the grease,” Perry said. “You should do it by the direction the city is going. Why would we waste that opportunity as long as we don’t do it at the expense of someone else?” Perry was one of many who spoke at the October board meeting in favor of the station. But because Ridley-Thomas’ motion to keep the station in the study came before public comment, Perry’s and others’ testimony couldn’t play a role in swaying the board’s decision. The late pro-station comments had one effect: The Metro board ultimately voted to leave the door open to adding the Fifth and Flower stop back to the study — if the private sector pays for the $2 million expenditure. There’s one catch: There is no indication that property owners are remotely interested in paying up. “I don’t think they have any commitments,” said Perry, who lobbied the board to keep the station in the study, but urged them not to pit it against other stations along the route, especially the Little Tokyo station at Second Street and Central Avenue. Los Angeles Downtown News contacted several property owners and stakeholders in the area around Fifth and Flower. None expressed interest in paying for even a portion of the study or the construction cost. “We’d love to help but given the current economic conditions I don’t think that that’s an option,” said Hammond of Thomas Properties Group. Michael Czarcinski, managing director of the Westin Bonaventure Hotel, said the hotel supports the station and urged the board to keep it in the study. But paying for the study or the station, Czarcinski said, “is just outside of our parameters.” Hines, the Houston-based owner of Citigroup Center, the office tower at 444 S. Flower St., did not return calls for comment. A Hines representative told Downtown News in September that the company was not closely following the conversation about the station or the connector because it was too early in the process. A representative for the California Club declined to comment. Election Wrench The Westside subway and Regional Connector are perhaps the most visible and potentially transformative components of Villaraigosa’s ambitious 30/10 plan to build 12 Measure R mass transit projects in 10 years instead of 30. Katz said the board could not risk submitting its Regional Connector funding application to the Federal Transit Administration without clearly showing how the agency will pay for the entire project. Keeping the Fifth and Flower station in the final study, he said, would send a mixed message to the federal government, potentially jeopardizing the

Around Town Continued from page 2 — between some of them being illegal and perhaps being placed in a position to work off some indentured servitude,” Vernon said. Club management did not respond to a request for comment.

Downtown News 9

DowntownNews.com New Starts grant that could cover up to 60% of the project cost. The fate of the 30/10 plan may be in jeopardy following the Republican capture of the House of Representatives in the Nov. 2 elections. Even when the Democrats controlled the House, making 30/10 happen was going to require some complex lawmaking in Washington. It is unclear whether Villaraigosa will be able to sway the Republican hierarchy to advance the plan. While there is no formal proposal to re-insert the Fifth and Flower station into the Regional Connector study, Metro is looking at other mitigation measures to soften the blow of losing the stop, said Robin Blair, Metro’s central area planning director. For one, the agency will explore adding a new northern portal to Seventh Street Metro Center, so riders could access the station or the Financial District via a new entrance at Sixth Street or Wilshire Boulevard. That would shorten

the walk to Fifth and Flower, and reduce congestion at the busiest station in the Metro rail system. Funding for such a study and potential project already exist, Blair said, because it would be considered part of a necessary expansion of current systems. Blair and other Metro staffers are slated to meet with Financial District property owners on Nov. 22. Agency staff is expected to report back to the board in December on the possibility of tapping private dollars to fund the Fifth and Flower station study. “I think there’s a very viable possibility that the property owners will look at [a new portal for Seventh Street Metro Center] or other options that mitigate the loss of the station,” Blair said. “We’re working pretty fast to come up with a solution. “But there’s limited money…. We can’t have cost overruns and we can’t promise things we can’t deliver.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

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Twitter/DowntownNews ship will also fill a void in the foreign carmaker-dominated Downtown auto district, said Jack Kyser, chief economic advisor for the Southern California Association of Governments. The Shammas Group’s iconic Felix Chevrolet and Cadillac shop at Figueroa Street and Jefferson Boulevard is the lone American carmaker along a stretch that includes Volkswagen, Volvo, Porsche, Mercedes-Benz, Nissan and Audi. Times have been tough for American automakers, with two of Detroit’s Big Three — Chrysler and General Motors — navigating bankruptcy last year. Chrysler’s reorganization included Fiat taking a 20% ownership stake, a move characterized as an opportunity for the Italian company to access the American market. “You need representation in this market, just visibility,” Kyser said. “We know more people are going to be coming Downtown and you have a residential base and a business base so it would make sense to have some exposure.” It was during the company’s reorganization process last year that Chrysler management renewed its interest in the Figueroa Street building, said Jenny Scanlin, project manager for the Community Redevelopment Agency. “They were reassessing all their real estate and they looked at this project and said, ‘Oh my God, this is a very expensive rehabilitation of a building,’” said Scanlin, who oversees the CRA’s efforts in the Figueroa Corridor. “Then they flew out and saw the property and realized, ‘We need to make this a priority property.’” In advance of the Nov. 16 announcement, Chrysler officials declined to provide detailed information about the plan, including the number of jobs that will be created. But area stakeholders are already buzzing. “I think it helps us solidify the viability of the district over the long haul,” Scanlin said. “It just is exciting, because we feel it really does validate the place that the Downtown auto district holds in its importance to the industry.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

Dealership Continued from page 1 to unveil its new Fiat 500 at the show, does not yet have a dealership in North America. The Fiat 500 is a compact car expected to compete with the likes of BMW’s Mini brand and appeal largely to urban drivers looking for small autos with high fuel efficiency. Sources familiar with the dealership plan say the facility will function as Fiat and Chrysler’s most notable West Coast location, and that the Chrysler Group will maintain ownership of the store. Most dealerships are operated by private owners. After building the structure, Chrysler put it on the back burner when they couldn’t find a dealer to take it over, a company official told Los Angeles Downtown News last year. Now it appears they’ll run it themselves. “They’re going to make this their flagship store for the West Coast and the factory is going to own the store,” said Darryl Holter, chief administrative officer of the Shammas Group, which owns seven auto dealerships on the Figueroa Corridor, including the Porsche outlet across from the future Chrysler shop. Holter, who also chairs the Figueroa Corridor Business Improvement District, has spearheaded the development of the burgeoning auto center in the area loosely bounded by the Santa Monica (10) Freeway and USC. Adding five new brands is a shot in the arm for that vision, he said. “It is a big deal because for one thing it conforms to the original plans to take some of the lessons we’ve seen from auto malls in suburban areas and put that into a densely populated urban environment, and try to learn from some of that but adapt it in our own way,” Holter said. New Names The Chrysler presence means five new brands for the Figueroa Corridor: Chrysler, Jeep, Ram Truck, Dodge and Fiat, Kisiel said. With four new flags for American brands, the dealer-

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12 Downtown News

November 15, 2010

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Back Behind the Wheel L.A. Auto Show Returns to Downtown Amidst Optimism in the Industry

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Also making a comeback, although after a much longer absence, is Fiat. The Italian automaker has skipped the Auto Show for 27 years but this year will debut its new Fiat 500. That comes as the company, now a partner in Chrysler, gets set to open a Figueroa Street dealership (see story page 1). Other debuts at the show include Land Rover’s five-door Range Rover Evoque, Saab’s only crossover, the 9-4X, the Chevrolet Camaro convertible and the redesigned Volkswagen Eos. Concept cars are always popular at the show. This year’s flock features more than 15 futuristic vehicles including Jaguar’s C-X75, which is described as an electric “super car,” and KIA’s POP electric concept, with its “spaceship-like” cabin. The L.A. Auto Show runs Nov. 19-28 at the Los Angeles Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa St. More information at laautoshow.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

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tion cars to concept creations. “It truly is the arrival of the modern electric car,” Flynn said. Toyota’s RAV4 EV will make its debut and highlight its use of battery technology developed with Tesla (it is scheduled to hit the market in 2012). Other electric vehicles at the show include luxury sports cars such as the Fisker Karma, and economy sedans like the debut vehicle from Coda Automotive. Additional green vehicles on display include electric, hybrid and alternative fuel models. Viewers can glimpse the Audi A3 TDI, BMW’s ActiveHybrid 7, the MercedesBenz B-Series F-Cell, the MINI E, the Volvo C30 Electric and VW’s Golf TDI. Back on Track Last year, Infinity and Nissan pulled out of the show, citing the cost and slow sales. This year, both are back, and Nissan will debut its redesigned Quest minivan, the Murano Cross Cabriolet crossover convertible concept, and a sedan concept called the Ellure.

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fter a dismal period in which sales slumped and dealerships closed, things look a little better for the auto industry in 2010, with the three top U.S. automakers all posting profits in the beginning of the year. So it’s perhaps fitting that the L.A. Auto Show returns to Downtown this week with a record number of debuts and the comeback of a couple of companies that dropped out last year due to the economy. “We’re definitely seeing some increased optimism from automakers as sales start to improve,” said Brendan Flynn, director of communications for the Auto Show. “This year we’ll see larger exhibits, more elaborate exhibits, more interactive [elements].” About 1 million people are expected to attend the show that runs Nov. 19-28. It will fill the entire Convention Center, with more than 900 vehicles on display from about 40 manufacturers. The event attracts a diverse crowd, from families with kids to teens daydreaming about their first ride to hardcore enthusiasts. While car companies don’t make sales, the Convention Center reaps the rewards of people’s love of cars. Pouria Abbassi, general manager and CEO of the Convention Center, said the Auto Show is the most popular, and

profitable, event at the venue. “We host about 400 events a year. This one show, from a financial basis, is 20% of our revenue base,” he said. “That says a lot about the affinity people feel toward cars.” Attendees get to ogle and check out the cars up close. In increasing instances, they can even try the vehicles. This year, Ford and Land Rover will offer daily test drives and an off-road course where people can try the rugged SUV. On the weekends, Buick, Chevrolet, GMC and Toyota will let drivers test several new models. “The auto show is a unique experience and automakers like to take advantage of that person-to-person interaction,” Flynn said. Electric Companies While electric vehicles have been popular at the auto show for a few years, the 2010 event comes as mass-production electric vehicles have gone from concept to reality, Flynn said. Auto industry observers expect Los Angeles to be one of the biggest markets for electric cars, as well as one of the first cities to sell the mass production models. Thus, electric cars like the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf, which are set to appear in showrooms later this year, are anticipated to be popular attractions at the show. Altogether, more than a dozen electric vehicles will be displayed, from mass produc-

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November 15, 2010

Downtown News 13

DowntownNews.com

An Easy Feast Slaving Away in the Kitchen Isn’t Mandatory in Downtown on Thanksgiving by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

N

ot everyone has the time to cook a Thanksgiving dinner. Even fewer people possess the desire. With the bird, sides and dessert, it can be a day or more in the kitchen. Then there’s the clean-up. Oy vey! Luckily, Downtown Los Angeles boasts a healthy handful of restaurants ready, willing and able to serve a Thanksgiving meal to you and your family and friends. From upscale establishments to places where reservations are not required, the community has plenty of places where you can have your turkey and eat it too. Here are some of the restaurants to consider if you just can’t stand the heat in your own kitchen. Steak, Meet Bird: OK, we know there is a slight disconnect in having a Thanksgiving turkey in a place with “steakhouse” in its name. But it’s worth getting over that for the meal being served at Nick & Stef’s Steakhouse. The Nov. 25 dinner servings at the Bunker Hill spot begin at 3 p.m. and include a classic turkey dinner with all the trimmings for $39 per person and $15.95 for children under 12. The menu offers a hand-carved turkey with brioche stuffing, mashed potatoes, candied squash, cranberry sauce and orange marmalade and gravy. Dessert is apple pie and a pumpkin cake. You probably could go off the menu and ask for a New York strip, but why? At 330 S. Hope St., (213) 680-0330 or patinagroup.com/nickstef. Dine on a Dime: Well, it’ll cost a little more than a dime to have a Thanksgiving meal at Clifton’s Cafeteria, but at $11.99, the diner’s popular turkey dinner (which is available throughout the year) is still a great deal. A plate of turkey, cranberry sauce and whipped potatoes is included, as is the unique scenery at the restaurant. It’s patterned after a lodge, with trees and streams that make you feel like you’re in a mountain setting, so you can pretend to be an actual Pilgrim as you munch away. At 648 S. Broadway or (213) 627-1673. Market Meal: If you told people you were going to have Thanksgiving dinner at the market, they would probably feel sorry for you, envisioning you picking up a frozen Hungry Man dinner. But that melancholy will turn to envy when you explain you’re heading to the L.A. Market at the JW Marriott hotel. The L.A. Live hotel’s four-course Thanksgiving dinner will be served from 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; it’s $47 per adult and $18 per child. The feast will offer roast turkey with gravy, garlic mashed potatoes and cornbread. Or you can go a different route with a Scottish salmon or slow roasted prime rib. For dessert, choices include pumpkin or apple pie. At 900 W. Olympic Blvd. or (213) 765-8600.

Always Open: If there’s one thing you can count on at The Original Pantry Café, it’s that the restaurant is always open, no matter what time of day or what day of the year. In other words, whether you show up at 11 p.m. or 11 a.m. on Nov. 25, the venerable establishment owned by former Mayor Richard Riordan will be ready to serve you an old-fashioned turkey dinner with all the trimmings for $15.95 per plate. If they run out of turkey, don’t worry — the all night menu will still be available and includes steaks, chops, burgers, sandwiches and breakfast. Just remember to bring cash, because they don’t take plastic. At 877 S. Figueroa St., (213) 972-9279 or pantrycafe.com. Annual Feast: Some people like tradition at Thanksgiving. If any place in Downtown knows tradition, it’s the Millennium Biltmore hotel. The stately establishment is continuing its Thanksgiving tradition with a meal at its Smeraldi’s restaurant. The three-course dinner is $45 per person and will include roasted turkey with sage butter, or other choices like a grilled filet mignon and roasted halibut. Desserts will include a choice of cheesecake, apple cranberry torte or an assortment of California cheeses. At 506 S. Grand Ave., (213) 612-1562 or millenniumhotels. com.

photo by Gary Leonard

Trader Vic’s offers an island-style Thanksgiving dinner. It’s built around a turkey marinated in rum.

Drunk Turkey: If you want to try something completely different, head to Trader Vic’s at L.A. Live, where the turkey will be marinated in rum. The South Park restaurant’s $45 per person special will be served from 4-10 p.m. It will start with a lobster stuffed shrimp, but the pièce de résistance is the Stuffed Drunken Turkey, baked in the restaurant’s Chinese oven and served with pineapple cranberry compote. Or you can try the Trio of Squash, a stir-fry mix of spaghetti squash, stuffed acorn squash and butternut squash fried rice. At 800 W. Olympic Blvd, (213) 785-3330 or tradervicsla.com. Italian Style: If you want more than just turkey, Zucca Ristorante is offering a bit of everything, from pork to fish, for their Thanksgiving dinner. But traditionalists can rest assured, the South Park establishment has turkey too. The fourcourse menu at the Italian eatery is $39 per person and $15.95 for children under 12. The dinner includes main courses such as oven roasted pork shank, grilled Scottish salmon filet, grilled beef tenderloin and the oven-roasted turkey breast. At 801 S. Figueroa St., (213) 614 7800 or patinagroup.com/ zuccaristorante. Lucky Louie: The popular Seventh Street restaurant Bottega Louie is always packed, so it’ll likely be a popular spot for Thanksgiving too. The cavernous and amazingly loud eatery

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Smeraldi’s, one of the restaurants in the stately Biltmore Hotel, will again offer an upscale Thanksgiving meal.

will keep its doors open during the holiday and serve a $40 Thanksgiving meal featuring a free-range turkey dinner. Or go with other choices like a pineapple ham or grilled Alaskan salmon. The sides include roasted vegetables, mashed potatoes, stuffing, brown sugar yams and cranberry sauce. If you’re still hungry, there are desserts like a whole apple pie for $35, or a pumpkin pie for $30. At 700 S. Grand Ave., (213) 802-1470 or bottegalouie.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

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14 Downtown News

November 15, 2010

Thanksgiving

Turkey Tips Thanksgiving Advice From Downtown’s Expert Chefs by Katie Schaufelberger

T

he turkey is a holiday staple that everyone sitting at the Thanksgiving table loves and everyone in the kitchen stresses over. Like Uncle Ernie when he has one too many drinks, and other difficult family members, it has to be dealt with delicately, with lots of attention and careful planning. Downtown Los Angeles chefs have their own strategies for handling the traditional Thanksgiving meal. Alex Moreno, executive chef of the California Plaza Mexican restaurant Casa, has a strategy for addressing perhaps the most daunting issue that comes with cooking a Thanksgiving bird: making sure it doesn’t dry out. Moreno recommends leaving the turkey in a cooler filled with a salt brine overnight, and using a digital thermometer and ice packs to make sure it stays below 40 degrees. He says those doing the cooking should mix garlic and habanero chiles into the brine for flavor. “You want about two gallons of water, and don’t skimp on the salt,” he said. “It’s a heavy brine.” When it comes time to stick the bird into the oven, Moreno says to roast the turkey at 400 degrees for 30 minutes before turning the heat down to around 275 to 300 degrees for the rest of the cooking time. “You just want to take it slow and easy,” he said, “and don’t be shy about basting it.” There is something even more important, and it has nothing to do with cooking time or ingredients: Moreno says never let your dinner guests see your fear. “Have fun and don’t stress,” Moreno advises. “Remember that whatever happens,

everyone will love it because you made it for them.” Focus on the Season One of the best things about chefs is that each has his or her own way of doing things. Thus, there are always new tips and tricks to try. Joe Panarello, executive chef at First & Hope, says it is important to focus Thanksgiving dinner around the season. He likes to interpret classic ingredients in new ways. “I love the fall flavors,” Panarello said. “Use pumpkin in things besides pie. Dice it up in the stuffing with pecans and mushrooms.” Panarello suggests experimenting with foods that are in season, such as grapefruit, and trying less common dishes. He cited pumpkin panna cotta, a cold, creamy Italian dessert, as a fun spin to offer guests. One of his favorite Thanksgiving dishes is a side on First & Hope’s menu: a spaghetti squash hash he serves with corned beef. It may seem unusual, but there’s a reason it works for him. “Cook from your heart,” Panarello said. “If you screw up, you can just eat the evidence.” In fact, there are plenty of unusual opportunities on Nov. 25. One of the most adventurous comes from Oz Ramuco, executive chef of South Park’s J Restaurant & Lounge. He recommends eschewing turkey altogether, on the basis that it’s just too hard for most people to cook right. “I hate it,” he said. “It always comes out dry.” Ramuco said the dryness is not anyone’s fault, but is due to a problem inherent in the bird: The dark meat, he said, cooks slower

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Joe Panarello, executive chef at First & Hope, says it is important to focus Thanksgiving dinner around the season. He suggests experimenting with foods such as grapefruit, and trying less common dishes.

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Oz Ramuco of J Restaurant & Lounge has a radical Thanksgiving trick: He recommends skipping turkey altogether, since it can be so difficult to cook right. He likes to serve lamb instead.

than the rest of it, causing the white meat to be overcooked. Thus Ramuco goes the radical route, and suggests that those daunted by the challenge or frustrated by past failures serve lamb instead. He maintains that it is an appropriate choice — at least for him, considering his menu is a fusion spin on Mediterranean food, mixing cuisines from Italy, Greece and Southern France. Surprising Sides There are other things to keep in mind, say the chefs. One of the most important is that it is not the turkey that will make the dinner

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November 15, 2010

Downtown News 15

Thanksgiving

A Little Help in the Kitchen Borrow These Top Chef Recipes to Earn Thanksgiving Praise by Katie Schaufelberger

T

here is a lot of pressure to perform in the kitchen on Thanksgiving. Fortunately, some Downtown chefs are here to help you wow your guests. The following dishes all mix the traditional Thanksgiving elements of fall flavors and comfort foods with unexpected style. They’ll update your holiday menu while impressing your friends and family. The best part is, you get to keep the leftovers. Chef: Joe Panarello Restaurant: First & Hope Dish: Gorgonzola-Stuffed Figs Wrapped in Bacon and Frisée Salad (serves 4) Panarello remembers his grandmother making stuffed figs for Thanksgiving each year. He presented this modern take on his family’s home cooking.

1/2 cup granulated sugar 1/4 cup water 1 pinch of salt Directions: Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. 1. Dissolve and boil the sugar, water and salt in a saucepan. 2. Add pecans, allowing them to cook for about 20 minutes over low heat. 3. Strain the pecans, then put them on a baking pan lined with parchment paper.

4. Roast the nuts for 40 minutes. 5. Remove from oven and let them cool. Ingredients for white balsamic vinaigrette on salad: 1 teaspoon minced shallots 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 1/2 tablespoon organic honey 1/2 cup white Balsamic de Modena 1 1/2-2 cups extra virgin olive oil Greens and sliced peaches Salt and pepper to taste Directions: 1. Mix all the dressing ingredients except for the olive oil together in a non-reactive bowl. 2. Whisk the oil into the mixture in a steady but thin stream until well emulsified. 3. Toss with greens and sliced peaches.

Ingredients: 8 whole fresh Turkish brown figs or black mission figs (cut an “x” 3/4 way down from the top) 6 ounces gorgonzola cheese 16 very thin slices of non-smoked bacon or turkey bacon 4 ounces extra virgin olive oil 1 finely diced shallot 1.5 ounces citrus vinegar 2 heads baby frisée (cleaned, dry and only the white and yellow) Directions: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. 1. Stuff the figs with the gorgonzola cheese, gently shaping them to maintain their original shape. 2. Wrap the bacon around each fig. 3. Bake the figs in the oven for 10 minutes. 4. Dress the frisée salad with the vinegar, shallots and oil. 5. Arrange the figs on a plate with the salad.

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Chef: Oz Ramuco Restaurant: J Restaurant & Lounge Dish: Organic Greens Salad With Peaches and Candied Pecans Ramuco advises Thanksgiving cooks not to be afraid to try something new. Still, he’s still a fan of tradition, with a twist. “Follow up this dinner with your grandma’s favorite pumpkin pie recipe,” he says. Ingredients for the candied pecans: 2 cups pecan halves

Tips Continued from previous page while cooking the meal. Moreno bakes his stuffing wrapped in aluminum foil, or on a sheet pan, to create one “big fat log” of stuffing. That way he can add a slice of it to turkey sandwiches later on. It has the extra benefit of making the stuffing come out crunchier. Moreno, Panarello and Ramuco all emphasize something else that isn’t surprising coming from top chefs: the quality of the ingredients. They say that it is worth paying a little more, and that the results will be borne out in the taste. At home, Moreno always invests in a Nieman Ranch bird for the big day. “It’s more expensive, but as soon as you take the first bite, you know where your extra money went,” he said. Ramuco’s ingredient spin comes in the form of the side dishes. He suggests making an organic greens salad with peaches and candied pecans, as well as a macaroni and cheese recipe with black truffles. “Don’t be afraid to try something new,” Ramuco advises. Then he added the prime directive of a turkey takeaway. “The most important ingredient is love,” he said. “If you add enough of that, something lovely will be the final result.” Casa is at 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2249 or casadowntown.com; First and Hope is at 710 W. First St., (213) 617-8555 or firstandhope.com; J Lounge is at 1119 S. Olive St., (213) 746-7746 or jloungela.com.

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16 Downtown News

November 15, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

CALENDAR

photo courtesy of L.A. Phil

Renowned composer and conductor John Adams heads up the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Green Umbrella series of contemporary classical compositions.

Notes From the Cutting EdgE Downtown’s Contemporary Music Scene Is Thriving by Jim Farber

A

half century ago, the Monday Evening Concerts were the only game in town when it came to presenting cutting-edge contemporary classical music in Los Angeles, observes Justin Urcis, the series’ current executive artistic director. “Fortunately,” Urcis adds, “Los Angeles has grown culturally and now there are many more opportunities for audience members and musicians to hear and perform new music.” That is particularly true when it comes to new music Downtown. Urcis’ claim is borne out in particular this week, with two prominent new music events. On Nov. 15 at 8ew p.m., Monday ntownNat sthe Colburn .A.Dowseason /L Evening Concerts begins its 2010-2011 m o .c k o o Faceb School’s Zipper Hall, featuring pianist Alexei Lubimov. The program will blend old and new, from the Fantasia in F-sharp minor by C.P.E Bach and Prelude in C-sharp minor by Frederic Chopin, to “In a Landscape” by John Cage, “Für Alina” by Arvo Pärt and “Der Bote” (The Messenger) by Valentin Silvestro. On Tuesday, Nov. 16, at 8 p.m., the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Green Umbrella series presents its second concert of the year at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, with a program entirely devoted to the music of Grammy and Pulitzer Prize for Music winner George Crumb. It will feature the composer’s “River of Life (Songs of Joy and Sorrow)-American Songbook No. 1” and “Ancient Voices of Children.” Although that will be it for the series this year, they both return next spring. Monday Evening Concerts will take place in s.com or January, February, March and April, while Green Umbrella wntownNew corner at Do t nd ha ht rig r llis ai resumes Smonthly frommMarch through May. s/m pe bol in the up s.com/form for this sy E-NEW wntownnew Lookto ww.ladoseries, wtwo In addition these REDCAT presents ocP U N IG S casional new music concerts. The next event will be “Iannis Xenakis: Now and Tomorrow,” on Jan. 28-29, 2011. While “new” is the key word in new music, Los Angeles has a decades-long tradition of presenting cutting-edge performances of contemporary classical music. In fact, it dates all the way back to 1939, when Peter Yates and his wife, concert pianist Frances Mullen, began inviting a small group of musicians, friends and aficionados to their Silver Lake home to take part in a series of chamber music concerts that would come to be known as Evenings on the Roof. As reported in the Oct. 8, 1951, issue of Time magazine,

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Adams’ first involvement with the New Music Group came in 1987, he says, when he conducted a program of excerpts from his opera Nixon in China. But, he adds, it was during the extended tenure of Phil Music Director Esa-Pekka Salonen that his bond with the orchestra really solidified. There was, and continues to be, a special relationship. “I know of no other program in the U.S. that’s comparable to the Green Umbrella,” says Adams. “The Disney Hall audiences are so enthusiastic and sophisticated. We don’t feel we have to be nervous or stoop to conquer, which some orchestras do when it comes to programming anything progressive.” Of course, like everything else related to classical music in Los Angeles, things changed with the arrival of Salonen’s successor, Gustavo Dudamel. Adams notes that the wunderkind, now in his second year at the Phil, is extremely busy, and it is hard to get time alone with him. But when they do find the chance to converse, Adams says he comes away impressed, especially when Dudamel recently brought up contemporary Italian composer Luigi Nono. “Dudamel’s background is extremely traditional. He sees the masters as his central repertoire,” said Adams. “He may not be as committed to a composer like Stockhausen, but he can do it, he has the chops. I’ve seen how brilliant and subtle his rhythmic mind is. The other day he mentioned a score that he was interested in by Luigi Nono and we were all a little amazed. ” Adams, whose composition “City Noir” received its world premiere as part of Dudamel’s Los Angeles Disney Hall gala, maintains that the performance of new music is essential. “If orchestras program nothing but Beethoven and Bruckner and ‘The Rite of Spring’ over and over, which is what a lot of orchestras do, you convey the impression that classical music is an art form from another era,” Adams said. “We want to present programs that make it clear that musical culture is still alive and growing.” In Downtown, there is plenty of proof that it is doing just that. Monday Evening Concerts are at the Colburn School’s Zipper Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 260-1632 or mondayeveningconcerts.org. Green Umbrella concerts are at Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil.com.

“The musicians try to schedule at least one Los Angeles ‘first’ for every concert. This sometime leads them into fairly deep musical waters (e.g. unfamiliar works by Arnold Schoenberg, Paul Hindemith, Anton von Webern). They do not give a hoot for the critics.” Evenings on the Roof continued until 1954, at which point the role of guiding light shifted to composer/arranger/critic Lawrence Morton, a great supporter of new music who also founded the Ojai Music Festival. It was at this point that the name of the series was changed to the Monday Evening Concerts and a long-term affiliation was begun with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. In Starts 1984, Morton was succeeded by composer Dorrance Stalvey, November 5 who carried on the tradition until LACMA cancelled its involvement at the end of the 2005-2006 season. Now the flame has been passed to Urcis. “In all my years of concert going,” Urcis says, “I found the Monday Evening Concert series offered something others didn’t in terms of programming, performers and the presentation of visiting composers. MEC has evolved over the years, but its goal is still to present modern, and more familiar muOur Website sic,Check in an unusual context.” for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com Salonen to Dudamel The Monday Evening Concerts got a sibling in 1981, with the debut of the L.A. Phil’s New Music Group. Under the direction of company General Manager Ernest Fleischmann and composer William Craft, its mandate was to present contemporary music concerts that incorporated the stellar musicians of the Starts Philharmonic. Six years later, the series adopted its current (and November 12 clearly hipper) moniker, Green Umbrella. The current artistic director is renowned composer/conductor John Adams. “There was a period in the 1980s,” Adams recalls, speaking from his home in San Francisco, “when there was a nationally funded program called ‘Meet the Composer.’ A group of six or eight composers were placed with major orchestras and William ‘Bill’ Craft was in residence with the L.A. Phil. Most of the orchestras developed new music series, but they nearly all died out.”Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com Check The New Music Group did not die out, due in large part to photo by Francois Sechet the leadership of Fleischmann and Craft, as well as continued The Monday Evening Concerts, which now take place in the Colburn support from Los Angeles’s greatest new-music patron, the School, date back to 1939. This week, there is a program featuring pianist Alexei Lubimov. late Betty Freeman.

Starts November 19

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November 15, 2010

Downtown News 17

DowntownNews.com photo by Michael Lamont

Impressive Crimes East West Players Revival Rides Three Solid Sisterly Performances by Jeff favre contributing writer

D

ark comedies featuring wacky families are common in the theater world. Last year, audiences at the Ahmanson Theatre raved over August: Osage County, which pushes melodrama to its limits. The modern era standard-bearer for this popular genre is 1979’s Crimes of the Heart, Beth Henley’s first — and still most famous — produced play. Revived and slightly reloaded last week by Little Tokyo’s East West Players, the show seems as fresh and vibrant as ever. It continues through Dec. 5. Directed with a steady hand by Leslie Ishii, and infused with subtle Asian American undertones, this production elicits big laughs at subjects usually reserved for tragedies. While Henley deserves much of the credit for tapping into universal themes and creating timeless dialogue, Crimes of the Heart is no slam-dunk to interpret. Thanks to honest and captivating performances by Elizabeth Liang, Kimiko Gelman and Maya Erskine, the play reaches moments of wild absurdity without losing a sense of reality. The actresses portray the Magrath sisters, all of whom are having a whopper of a bad day in the tiny Mississippi town of Hazlehurst. It’s the fall of 1974 and Lenny (Liang), the oldest sibling, has no one to help her celebrate her 30th birthday, except for a quick visit by her nosy, obnoxious cousin Chick (Hiwa Bourne). The lonely day changes quickly when her sister Babe (Erskine) shoots her husband because, “I didn’t like his looks,” and then comes home to wait to see if her crime will result in hard time. The triumvirate is completed when Meg (Gelman), a struggling singer in Hollywood, returns home to help Babe, though her presence shakes up matters with an old flame, the married Doc Porter (Tim Chiou). Babe’s hope to escape her predicament rests with a young attorney, Barnette Lloyd (Jason Sino), who has a personal vendetta against Babe’s husband. Barnette wants to use a trial to expose him as a crooked politician and businessman. Ishii displays trust in both the material and her cast as she sets a leisurely pace in the opening scene, as Lenny celebrates her birthday by trying to push a candle into a cookie. Gradually, as comic and tragic storylines take shape, the action quickens, until a wonderfully wild confrontation between Lenny and cousin Chick. This shows the sisters, despite their disagreements, finding strength in each other as they adopt an us-against-the-world attitude. As Lenny, Liang is a rock solid anchor. She displays a level of discomfort that alternates between funny and difficult to watch. Lenny’s mostly quiet frustration while talking to her sisters informs a sad life spent in their shadows, but her actions — forever cleaning up the kitchen, dealing with an ailing grandfather — show that Lenny is actually the strong one. Meg, often over-played because of the character’s flair for the dramatic, receives a measured portrayal by Gelman. She accentuates Meg’s interest in her sisters’ well-being to balance her self-absorbed behavior. The result is that this Meg comes off as likable. Erskine, meanwhile, exudes a playfulness as Babe that keeps her seemingly innocent and lost, instead of crazy and dangerous. Ishii attempts to add subtext surrounding the characters’ heritage, in part by placing a historical timeline chart of Asian Americans in the South in the lobby. Also, there are a few props and costumes, including a wok on the stove and a paper shade on the overhead kitchen light. These alterations are mostly cosmetic, as this remains a story about Southern women who happen to be Asian American, and not vice versa. The charm of an idealized Southern life is shown through Shigeru Yaji’s set, a simple, no-frills kitchen centered around a table, and a backyard filled with autumn leaves, as well as with the rich, deep fall color palette displayed in Lonnie Rafael Alcaraz’s lighting design. True, this Southern family is anything but ideal, but an overall sense of gentility and innocence makes laughing at potentially sad occurrences feel appropriate. Best of all, because the actresses find motivation for all of their characters’ actions, nothing feels forced or phony. Henley may never again equal the success of Crimes of the Heart, but the impressive East West Players revival is ample proof that this is one of theater’s most enduring comedies. Crimes of the Heart runs through Dec. 5 at East West Players, 120 Judge John Aiso St., (213) 625-7000 or eastwestplayers.org.

Meg (Kimiko Gelman, top) comforts her upset younger sister Babe (Maya Erskine) in a revival of the 1979 dark comedy Crimes of the Heart.

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LISTINGS EVENTS

the ‘don’t miss’ list

SPONSORED LISTINGS Help Provide Thanksgiving Meals for the Homeless Union Rescue Mission, urm.org/meals. Ongoing: Help provide a Thanksgiving meal complete with turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans and pumpkin pie heaped with ice cream. The Union Rescue Mission is taking donations online at urm. org/meals to support its meal services for the homeless. On average Union Rescue Mission serves more than 3,000 meals a day. Live Church LA Club Nokia, 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 4934329 or livechurchla.com. 10 a.m.: Every Sunday, Live Church L.A. takes over the VIP Lounge at Club Nokia, bringing great music, people and inspiring messages.

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Tuesday, Nov. 16 National Novel Writing Month Workshop Central Library, Meeting Room A, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org. 12:15 - 1:15 pm: Support and tips for your brilliant writing. ALOUD at the Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org. 7 p.m.: Stacy Schiff is in conversation with screenwriter Robin Swicord about Cleopatra: A Life, in which Schiff strives to separate fact from fiction regarding the Egyptian legend.

The World City performance series brings the globe’s cultures to the outdoor Keck Amphitheatre at Walt Disney Concert Hall. On Saturday, Nov. 20, at 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., Red Thunder celebrates the Plains Indians. Decked out in authentic Native American regalia of feathers, beadwork, jewelry and headdresses, the ensemble tells stories that have been passed down for generations through music, song and dance. Tickets are dispensed, for free, an hour before the first show and 90 minutes before the second, but don’t dally, because they go quickly. After the shows, kids can participate in art-making workshops. At 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-4396 or musiccenter.org.

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Sweet. That applies to the sounds of Schubert and the scones of Patina restaurant, both of which will be served at Le Salon de Musiques on Sunday, Nov. 21, from 4-6 p.m. The opening season of the salon series features some of the city’s most renowned classical musicians performing a one-hour chamber music concert in the intimate fifth floor of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion — no stage — followed by an hour of “le conversation,” in which the audience can mix and mingle with the artists while imbibing tea, treats and French champagne. Magnifique. At 135 N. Grand Ave., (310) 498-0257 or lesalondemusiques.com.

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photo by Gary Leonard

Were there fashionistas in 1840? If so, what were they wearing? The FIDM Museum and Galleries’ current exhibition, Re-Designing History, is pulled from the FIDM Museum Study Collection of more than 2,000 objects of fashion-ation, including garments, accessories, footwear and textiles. Thirty fully dressed mannequins (I should hope so) represent 150 years of fashion, complete with accessories and related ephemera. A speakers’ series offers talks-witha-tour on select Saturdays. The show runs through Dec. 17 at 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 6241200 or fidm.edu.

photos by Carole Sternichat

Thursday, Nov. 18 Thursdays @ Central Meeting Room A, Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org. 12:15-1 p.m.: In “A Journey With Maps: Following the Great African Explorers But in Far Greater Comfort,” Mark Weitz recounts his adventures visiting 23 African nations as he traced the overland route of 18th and 19th century European explorers. ALOUD at the Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org. 7 p.m.: Aloud curator Louise Steinman probes soldier-poet Brian Turner in this evening focused on Turner’s experiences as a soldier — seven years in the US Army, including a year as infantry team leader in Iraq — and his poems.

saTurday, Nov. 20 Central Library Rotunda, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org. 10 a.m.-noon: Used book sale features hundreds of bargain books, LPs, videos and more. CityRace (310) 360-6950 or racela.com. 10 a.m.-1 p.m.: “LA Metro Art Adventure” is a subterranean CityRace hunt that will send you on a quest through L.A.’s subway system, solving clues and racing against other teams to be first to the finish with the most correct answers. The Great Los Angeles Walk 2010 Starts at Pershing Square, 532 S. Hill St., (323) 3562536 or greatlawalk.com. 10 a.m.: In the free annual event that dispels the myth that nobody walks in L.A., participants will walk 15.6 miles from Downtown to Santa Monica via Wilshire Blvd. through Koreatown, the Miracle

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photo courtesy of © 2010 FIDM Museum and Library.

WedNesday, Nov. 17 Town Hall Los Angeles Millennium Biltmore Hotel, 506 S. Grand Ave., (213) 628-8141 or townhall-la.org. Noon: A healthcare talk with Benjamin K. Chu, president, Southern California region, of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc.

Friday, Nov. 19 A Greener City Through Better Land Use: Part 7 AC Martin Partners, Inc., 444 S. Flower St., Suite 1200, (213) 639-0777 or aialosangeles.org. 8-9:30 a.m.: The breakfast reception with Zev Yaroslavsky will conclude the series of discussions with civic officials about how we can build and operate a more environmentally and economically sustainable city by making better land-use decisions. SCI-Arc Lecture Series W. M. Keck Lecture Hall, 960 E. Third St., (213) 3565328 or sciarc.edu. 7 p.m.: SCI-Arc director Eric Owen Moss and architect Coy Howard discuss the two-part exhibition in the SCI-Arc Gallery: Howard’s From Hand to Mouse, From Furniture to Architecture and Whispers and Echoes.

by Lauren CampedeLLi, Listings editor calendar@downtownnews.com

photo courtesy of Red Thunder

thunder strikes, Clothing history and the iCe returns

Three With the sun or stars above you, the ice beneath you and the cityscape surrounding you, you must be gliding on blades at Downtown On Ice. The traditional holiday happening opens on Thursday, Nov. 18, when Pershing Square flaunts an outdoor ice skating rink, giving us a little taste of the North Pole while we tan. To up the sunny quotient, some of the famous Rockettes will be there. The rink stays up through Jan. 17, and the park will offer lots of free events throughout the season, including a concert series, a Winter Holiday Festival and more. At 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare.

Want a sneak peak at what Los Angeles will look like in the future? Then check out Looking Up, Moving Forward, an architectural showcase displaying models of upcoming buildings and the latest in design for both residential and commercial properties. The program at noon on Thursday, Nov. 18, at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel, is hosted by the Central City Association. A panel discussion features a “Who’s Who” of architects with projects in Downtown, including Michael Maltzan, Mia Lehrer and Robert Hale. At 506 S. Grand Ave., (213) 624-1213 or ccala.org. Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.


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Listings Continued from previous page Mile, Beverly Hills and Westwood. Eyes on the Middle East USC Eileen Norris Cinema Theater, (213) 740-0483 or usc.edu/visionsandvoices. 2:30 and 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 21, 12:15 and 6:30 p.m.: Filmmakers on both sides of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict express a variety of perspectives about struggles in the Middle East and the quest for peace. The two-day event includes discussions with filmmakers. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-DINO or visit nhm.org. 3 p.m.: Museum staff presents some of its live animals, with explanations on where they come from, what they eat and more. Club Nokia 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-7000 or clubnokia.com. 8 and 10:30 p.m.: Lisa Lampanelli, comedy’s lovable Queen of Mean. Sunday, nov. 21 Japanese American Cultural & Community Center JACCC Plaza or Aratani/Japan America Theatre, 244 S. San Pedro St., (213) 628-3700 or jaccc.org. 1-3 p.m.: “On the Veranda: Traditional Japanese Printmaking Ukiyo-e” presents three master printers from the Adachi Institute in Tokyo conducting a woodblock print workshop, recreating the imagery of historic Japanese artworks employing the same skills, techniques and materials that were used by the original woodcut printmakers of the 18th and 19th centuries.

FILM Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. Nov. 19-25, various showtimes: Four Lions tells the story of a group of British jihadists who push their abstract dreams of glory to the breaking point. Nov. 20, 11 p.m.: Live in London is the first live recording and concert film from acclaimed performer Regina Spektor. IMAX Theater California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 7442019 or californiasciencecenter.org. Through Nov. 28: Featuring nine-time world surfing champion Kelly Slater, The Ultimate Wave Tahiti 3D will immerse audiences in the story of an ocean wave and the lives it impacts and transforms. Hubble 3D takes movie-goers on a journey through distant galaxies to explore the grandeur and mysteries of our celestial surroundings and accompany space-walking astronauts as they attempt the most difficult and important tasks in NASA’s history. Journey to the royal tombs of Egypt and explore the history of ancient Egyptian society as told through the mummies of the past in Mummies 3D: Secrets of the Pharaohs. Regal Cinema L.A. Live 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (877) 835-5734 or lalive.com. Through Nov. 18: Skyline (11:30 a.m. and 12:20, 2, 2:50, 4:30, 5:20, 7, 7:50, 9:30 and 10:20 p.m.); Unstoppable (11 and 11:40 a.m. and 1:40, 2:20, 4:20, 5:10, 7:10, 8, 9:50 and 10:50 p.m.); Morning Glory (11:20 a.m. and 1:50, 4:40, 7:20 and 10 p.m.); Due Date (11:10 a.m. and 12, 1:40, 2:30, 4:10, 5, 6:50, 7:40, 9:20 and 10:10 p.m.); For Colored Girls (12:10, 1, 3:30, 4:20, 6:40, 7:30, 9:50 and 10:40 p.m.); Megamind (11:30 a.m. and 2, 4:30, 7:10 and 9:40 p.m.);

Megamind 3D (11 a.m. and 12, 1:30, 2:30, 4, 5, 6:40, 7:40 and 9:10 p.m.); Saw 3D: The Final Chapter (11:50 a.m. and 2:10 p.m.); Paranormal Activity 2 (11:20 a.m. and 4:50 and 10:30 p.m.); Jackass 3D (10:10 p.m.); The Social Network (1:50 and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 19 (partial list): Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (10 and 11 a.m. and 1:20, 3:20, 4:30, 7, 8, 10:40 and 11:40 p.m.).

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Café Metropol 923 E. Third St., (213) 613-1537 or cafemetropol.com. Nov. 19, 8-10 p.m.: Big band vocalist and pianist Amanda Carr and her band. Nov. 20, 8-10 p.m.: Vocalist Dheepa Chari and her band. Nov. 21, 12-2 p.m.: The Joel Forrestor/Philip Johnston Duo on piano/soprano sax. Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. Nov. 18, 10 p.m.: The Stevenson Ranch Davidians — rockin’ and way cooler than the Branch Davidians. Nov. 19, 10 p.m.: All the way from Diamond Bar, the indie band Goldenboy. Nov. 20, 10 p.m.: In residency all month, Darren Rademaker of Tyde gets eclectic. Club Nokia 800 W. Olympic Blvd., clubnokia.com. Nov. 16, 8 p.m.: Japanese super pop star Jin Akanishi rocks his “Yellow Gold Tour.” Nov. 17, 8 p.m.: Sweden’s Robyn, with Maluca and Natalia Kills. Nov. 19, 9 p.m.: Grammy-nominated singer/ songwriter Kelis headlines. Conga Room L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic, (213) 749-0445 or congaroom.com. Nov. 17, 8 p.m.: Brazil’s samba soul star Jair Oliveira makes his Los Angeles debut. Nov. 19, 9 p.m.: Brazil’s Luisa Maita fuses classic bossa nova and eclectic samba. Grammy Museum L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m.: The socially-conscious Nicaraguan singer-songwriter Perrozompopo will field questions, in Spanish, about his recording career and songwriting process, and perform several of his songs live. Nov. 19, 7:30 p.m.: A special screening of the acclaimed documentary, Who is Harry Nilsson (And Why Is Everybody Talkin’ About Him)? It will be followed by a discussion with director/writer/producer John Scheinfeld and other special guests. Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com. Nov. 15, 10 p.m.: Phil Alvin and Friends. Nov. 16, 10 p.m.: Dirty Ed Tuesdays with Symbol Six, Thirsty Livers and Brainspoon. Nov. 17, 10 p.m.: The Street and Babe Shadow, Astra Heights and Amando Jo Williams. Nov. 18, 10 p.m.: Deathsquad Demongods, Lust Killer Acoustic and Miss Beaverton Oregon Nude Runner Up. Nov. 19, 10 p.m.: 13 Guitar Rumble, Slacktone and 3 Balls of Fire. Nov. 20, 10 p.m.: Red Roses, The Crazy Squeeze and The Commotions. Nov. 21, 10 p.m.: Richard Ramirez Beatdown, Lightnin’ Woodcock, Fantastica Bastidas and Sassafras. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., sevengrand.la.

Nov. 15, 10 p.m.: John Daversa Small Band. Nov. 16, 10 p.m.: The Makers. Nov. 17, 10 p.m.: Artwork Jamal featuring Deacon Jones. Nov. 22, 10 p.m.: Katisse Buckingham Quintet. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. Nov. 19, 9 p.m: Black Elephant, Cosmonauts, Devon Williams and Dahga Bloom. Nov. 20, 9 p.m.: Pizza!, Alak, Mountshout, Voice On Tape and Chelsea Wolfe. Nov. 21, 9 p.m.: Zs, Arrington de Dionyso, Moe! Staiano and Hiking. Staples Center 1201 S. Figueroa St., staplescenter.com. Nov. 18, 7:30 p.m.: Dance move master Usher. The Varnish 118 E. Sixth St., (213) 622-9999 or thevarnishbar.com. Nov. 16, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.: Jazzman Mark Bosserman entertains on the house piano every Tuesday. World City W.M. Keck Amphitheatre, Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-4396 or musiccenter.org. Nov. 20, 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.: Red Thunder celebrates the heritage of the Plains Indians through music, song and traditional dance while re-telling the stories that have been passed through generations. Free to the public including post-performance art workshops.

Philharmonic’s New Music Group pays tribute to experimentalist George Crumb with performances of his Ancient Voices of Children and others.

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Sunday, nov. 21 Le Salon de Musiques Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Fifth Floor, 135 N. Grand Ave., (310) 498-0257 or lesalondemusiques.com.

Walt Disney Concert Hall 111 S. Grand Ave., musiccenter.org. 8 p.m.: In this Green Umbrella concert, the L.A.

ThurSday, nov. 18 The Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 8 p.m.: Brass Ensemble Concert in Zipper Hall. Free, no ticket required. Friday, nov. 19 Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 11 a.m.: The Chamber Forum features facultyselected conservatory student chamber ensembles playing in Thayer Hall. Free, no ticket required. 7 p.m.: Friday Night Recital features various student performances in Mayman Hall. Concerts are free. Walt Disney Concert Hall 111 S. Grand Ave., musiccenter.org. 8 p.m.; Nov. 20, 8 p.m.; Nov. 21, 2 p.m.: Green Umbrella continues with Esa-Pekka Salonen conducting a program of Bartok’s Bluebeard’s Castle and, in a U.S. premiere, Lindberg’s Graffitti. SaTurday, nov. 20 The Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 7:30 p.m.: Colburn Chamber Orchestra performs in Zipper Hall. Free, no ticket required.

Continued on next page

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November 15, 2010

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Listings Continued from previous page 4-6 p.m.: Schubert’s String Quintet Opus Posthume 163 In C Major is on the program in the one-hour chamber music concert followed by a one-hour interactive discussion between the musicians and the audience while enjoying champagne and afternoon tea with scones and sandwiches. The Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 7 p.m.: Orchestra Da Camera performs in Zipper Hall. Free, no ticket required. Walt Disney Concert Hall 111 S. Grand Ave., musiccenter.org. 7:30 p.m.: Midori stops in to play a program that features her masterful violin playing, including Mozart’s Sonata for Piano and Violin No. 1 (with Robert McDonald on keyboard) and George Crumb’s Four Nocturnes.

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE Bob Baker’s Nutcracker The Bob Baker Marionette Theater, 1345 W. First St.,

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

(213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com.         Nov. 16-19, 10:30 a.m.; Nov. 20-21, 2:30 p.m.: The marionette version of the holiday ballet classic returns, featuring every style of puppetry from marionettes to shadow puppets, from Sugarplum Fairies to the Mouse King. Through Jan. 16, 2011. Calligraphy Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. Nov. 18-20, 8 p.m.; Nov. 21, 3 p.m.: Playwrights Arena and the Latino Theater Company present the world premiere about two cousins — one in L.A. and one in Tokyo. They’re confronted with an aging mother and fragile family relationships, separated not only by the vast Pacific Ocean, but also by jealousy, discrimination and betrayal. Through Dec. 12. Crimes of the Heart David Henry Hwang Theater, 120 Judge John Aiso St., (213) 625-7000 or eastwestplayers.org. Nov. 17-20, 8 p.m.; Nov. 21, 2 p.m.: East West Players presents Beth Henley’s classic Southern comedy about three dysfunctional sisters, with an all-Asian cast. Through Dec. 5. Harps and Angels Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. Nov. 17-20, 8 p.m.; Nov. 20, 2:30 p.m.; Nov. 21, 7 p.m.: The music and lyrics of songwriter Randy Newman are featured in this world premiere in which the personal and the socio-political entwine in a story about life America. Through Dec. 22. La Razón Blindada 24th Street Theatre, 1117 West 24th St., 213-745-6516 or 24thstreet.org. Nov. 20, 8 p.m.: Argentine playwright/director Aristides Vargas infuses Cervantes’ classic novel El Quijote with Franz Kafka’s The Truth About Sancho Panza and testimonies by Chicho Vargas and other political prisoners held in the 1970s during Argentina’s dictatorship. Two political prisoners, oppressed by physical and emotional abuse, find solace in meeting every Sunday at dusk to tell the story of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza. Through Dec. 12. Latina On The Loose! Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. Opening Nov. 19, 8:30 p.m.; Nov. 20, 8:30 p.m.: Mina Olivera’s comedy returns about the colorful globe-trotting adventures of a beautiful young Brazilian woman as she hops from Brazil to

Switzerland to El Salvador to America. Through Nov. 20. Looking For Paul REDCAT, 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. Nov. 17-20, 8:30 p.m.: The daring Dutch theater ensemble Wunderbaum returns to premiere a new work created while in residence at REDCAT. Salin Lahi — Pass It On Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. Nov. 20, 2 and 7 p.m.: Kayamanan Ng Lahi Philippine Folk Arts commemorates its 20th anniversary with a two-act offering of dance, music and rituals that punctuate and mark the Filipino life cycle, as well as the group’s own choreographic contributions that reflect the Filipino American aesthetic. The Vault Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. Nov. 18-20, 8 p.m.: The Latino Theater Company presents a genre-bending blend of performance art, music and sketch comedy that comments on pop culture, politics, technology, and local and global happenings. Through Nov. 20.

a new installation in the Annette Green Fragrance Archive. The bottles and accessories showcased explore how men’s diverse identities and roles are conveyed through the changing designs of the bottles themselves. California African American Museum 600 State Drive, (213) 744-7432 or caamuseum.org. Through Dec. 12: “Our Love of John T. Scott” examines the New Orleans artist’s life, artwork, journey and private reflections and the people he influenced. The exhibition includes lyrical sculptures, paintings and four-by-six-foot woodcut blocks used to make large-scale prints. Through Jan. 1, 2011: “How We Roll” features four decades of skateboarding legends starting with the birth of surfing and the influence of roller skating to its evolution into the dynamic sport of today. Ongoing: The multi-functional “Gallery of Discovery” offers visitors the opportunity to connect with the lineage of their own family, engage in artistic workshops, educational tours and other programs of historical discoveries. Hear recordings of actual living slaves from the Library of Congress archives and discover stories from the past.

MUSEUMS

MORE LISTINGS

African American Firefighter Museum 1401 S. Central Ave., (213) 744-1730 or aaffmuseum.org. Ongoing: An array of firefighting relics dating to 1924, including a 1940 Pirsch ladder truck, an 1890 hose wagon, uniforms from New York, L.A. County and City of L.A. firefighters, badges, helmets, photographs and other artifacts. Annette Green Perfume Museum FIDM, second floor, 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 6241200 or fidm.edu. Ongoing: One of a kind, the museum is dedicated to enhancing our understanding the art, culture and science of the olfactory. Originally opened in New York City in 1999, the collection — 2,000 bottles, perfume presentations and documentary ephemera dating from the late 1800s to the present — was donated to FIDM in 2005. Also, “High Style: Perfume and the Haute Couture” features a selection of fragrance bottles and packaging that reflect the many ways that fame inspires design. “Images of Men: A Look Through Fragrance” is

Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

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22 Downtown News

November 15, 2010

Twitters/DowntownNews

CLASSIFIED

place your ad online at www.ladowntownnews.com

FOR RENT

L.A. Downtown News Classifieds Call: 213-481-1448

“Be wary of out of area companies. Check with the local Better Business Bureau before you send any money for fees or services. Read and understand any contracts before you sign. Shop around for rates.”

Classified Display & Line ads Deadlines: Thursday 12 pm REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL

Homes for sale

condos/townhouses

70+ CALIFORNIA bank-owned homes selling by auction November 29th - December 4th. Don’t miss this sale! Get all the details at www.CaHouseAuction.com or call 1-866-504-0811. (Cal-SCAN)

Promenade WestCorporate Lease

lofts for sale

Fully furnished 2 bed, 2 1/2 bath. Immaculate, model unit. Townhouse style. Quality upgrades. Large patio. 2 PKG. $2,750 month.

Buying, Leasing or Selling a Loft?

TheLoftGuys.net TheLoftExpertGroup.com Downtown since 2002

Bill Cooper

213.598.7555

CONSIDERING FORECLOSURE? Are you late in payments? A short sale may be your solution. Call Lady Rodriguez, Realtor 310-600-7534. Represent both buyers and sellers.

FOR RENT

Out of State

Call 213.680.1720

LA’s #1 Loft Site

Call 213-625-1313

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Timeshare/Resorts SELL/RENT YOUR Timeshare For Cash!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for Cash! Over $78 Million Dollars offered in 2009! www.SellaTimeshare. com (877) 554-2098. (CalSCAN)

20 ACRE RANCHES Only $99/ month. $0 Down, $12,900. Great Deal! Near El Paso, Texas. Owner financing, No Credit Checks. Money Back Guarantee. Map/ Pictures. 1-800-343-9444. (CalSCAN)

Buy Sell Lease

Call 213.253.4777 LAloft.com

CONDOMINIUMS/UNFURNISHED

323.298.0100

• Gorgeous Layouts • 10-15’ Ceilings • Fitness Center • Wi-Fi Rooftop Lounge • Amazing Views

Casaloma L.A. Apartments Clean unfurnished bachelor rooms with shared bath at $550/mo. with private bath at $695/mo. Sec. Deposit Special @$100

6th+Grand Ave. • milanoloftsla.com • 213.627.1900

Includes utilities, basic cable channels, laundry room on site. Gated building in a good area. 208 W. 14th St. at Hill St. Downtown LA

Beautiful West Torrance 2 Story

20403 Madison St., Torrance, CA 90503 • Offer at: $729,000

For English Call Pierre or Terri 213.744.9911 For Spanish Call Susana 213.749.0306

• 2 Story, 4 Bdrms, 2 1/2 Baths • 2,108 sqft. Living Space, 6,000 sqft. Lot Size • Beautiful Spacious Open Flr. Plan • Totally Renovated in 2005 w/ All Permits • Formal Dining Rm & Breakfast Nook • Private Backyard w/Large Covered Patio • Elegant Drought Resistant Landscaping w/ Fish Pond

madison hotel Clean furnished single rooms. 24-hour desk clerk service. •Daily, $25.00 •Weekly, $99.00 •Monthly, $295.00 (213) 622-1508 423 East 7th St.

Cal Best Realty • Emi Terauchi • Realtor / Notary • Lic.No.00810238 English/Japanes/Chinese speaking • emiterauchi@yahoo.com • (626) 786-9086

Old Bank District The original Live/Work Lofts from $1,100 Cafes, Bars, Shops, Galleries, Parking adjacent. Pets no charge

Real Estate Services

BestLARealEstate.com

MILANO LOFTS Now Leasing!

lofts/Unfurnished

(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.)

PROMENADE LUXURY CONDO across from Music Center, Disney Hall: 2BR 2BA, 2 balconies, 2 parking; microwave, dishwasher, fully equipped gym, pool, spa, 24/7 security, heat, air, paid cable, AVAILABLE NOW. 818-522-7838. Apartments/Unfurnished MOVE IN Special. Totally remodeled. Spacious 2 bdrms + 1 bath. 5451 Blackwelder St. Gated parking. $975 per month. 310-922-5437.

Milano Lofts Now Leasing! • Gorgeous Layouts • 10-15’ Ceilings • Fitness Center • Wi-Fi Rooftop Lounge • Amazing Views 6th + Grand Ave. • 213.627.1900 milanoloftsla.com

$675/LARGE Single, 1435 S. Union Ave. High Ceiling, New Paint, New Blinds, Close to Convention Center, USC & 110 Fwy. 818-716-7297 or 818-593-9060 cell. Free ReNT SPECIALS @ the Medici. Penthouse 1 & 2 bdrm apts. Granite kitchens, washer/ dryers, business center, 2 pools, spa! Visit TheMedici.com for a full list of amenities. Call 888886-3731. LITTLE TOKYO Big 1br/1bath, 840 sq. ft. 2 parking 213-8044153 $1485/mo. FREE RENT SPECIALS Up to $3500 off select apartment homes! Additional Look + Lease specials may apply. Free parking, free tanning, free wi-fi + biz center avail. Cardio Salon, pool, Spa, steamroom, sauna. Call us today. 866-742-0992. ORSINI III - Now open for immediate Occupancy. Never Lived in, Brand New Luxury Apartment Homes, Free Parking, Karaoke Room, Free Wi-Fi, Indoor Basketball, Uncomparable Amenity Package. Call today to schedule a tour - 866-479-1764.

CENTRALLY LOCATED • Secured prime development site • Ideal for office or retail • 3,420 sq. ft. office building with ample parking • 1 blk from USC and Harbor Freeway • Immediate access to use 3111 S. Flower Street, Los Angeles

Call now 213-746-6300 x1455

MOVE IN Special. Spacious 1 bdrm. + 1 bath. Covered parking. New decor. 131 South Caronelet. $775/mo. 310-922-5437.

COMPANY DRIVERS (Solos & Hazmat Teams) * Great Pay * Great Miles * CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated & regional positions available. Call 866789-8947. Swift. (Cal-SCAN)

JOBS WANTED

COMPANY DRIVERS (Solos & Hazmat Teams) *Great Pay *Great Miles *CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated & regional positions available. Call: 866-448-1055 Swift. (CalSCAN)

Jobs Wanted MANAGER Purchases truck parts; prepares shipment; locates vendors. $65,541/yr 9-6pm MF, United SKD, 1900 Fullerton, #109, Rowland Hts 91748 (626) 810-9945

DRIVER - Steady Miles. New Pay Package! Single source dispatch. Daily or Weekly Pay. Dry Van and Refrigerated. Great Benefits! CDL-A, 6 months recent experience. 1-888-6990599. www.DriveKnight.com. (Cal-SCAN)

MANAGER-AUTO Repair/ Detailing. Supervises daily operations/production; oversees supplies;assigns tasks. $56,202/ yr, 7-3:30pm MF, Staffease, Inc. 420 Apollo St., Brea 92821 (714) 256-6780

DRIVERS - 100% Tuition paid CDL Training. Start your New Career. No Credit Check. No Experience required! Call: 888417-7564. Crst Expedited www. JoinCRST.com. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT professional

DRIVERS - Become an Owner Operator or Trade-in your old truck for a 2008 Freightliner. Easy and Affordable with zero down payment. Call Comtrak at 866-338-2958, or apply online at www.ComtrakLogistics.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Music Director Overflowing Church Send resume to: 14706 S. Pioneer Blvd. Norwalk, CA 90650

DRIVERS/CDL Training - Career Central. We Train and Employ You. Company Drivers up to 40K First Year. New Team Pay! Up to 48c/mile Class A CDL Training Regional Locations! 1-877-3697091 www.CentralDrivingJobs. net. (Cal-SCAN)

Drivers 20 DRIVERS NEEDED - CDLA, Experienced. 11 Western States. Stable Family Owned - Andrus Transportation. Good Pay, Routes, People! 1-800-8885838 or 1-866-806-5119 x1402. (Cal-SCAN)

REGIONAL CDL Drivers Needed! Gordon Trucking, Inc. Sign on bonus in some areas! Current Openings on our NCA Fleet. Home weekly available! Consistent Miles & Time off! Full Benefits, 401k. We have lots of Freight! www.TeamGTI.com 1-888-8326484 EOE. (Cal-SCAN)

ASAP! NEW Pay Increase! 34-40 cpm. Excellent Benefits. Need CDL-A & 3 months recent OTR. 1-877-258-8782. www. MeltonTruck.com. (Cal-SCAN)

the loft expert! group

TM

Downtown since 2002

Voted Best Downtown Residential Real Estate Agent Call us today! Bill Cooper • 213.598.7555 • TheLoftExpertGroup.com

Do you have something to sell?

Ad Copy: _________________________________________

Ad Prices

________________________________________________

(Marketplace and Automotive Categories ONLY) • Items under $300 • Items $301 to $500 • Items $501 to $1200 • Items $1201 to $2000 • Items $2001+…

Name: Address: City Phone: Cash $ Credit card #: Exp. Date:

FREE! $11.50 $14.00 $16.50 $19.00

12 words, 2 weeks 15 words 15 words 15 words 15 words

All ads run for 2 weeks. Ads may be renewed after two weeks for 50% off the original price of the ad.

With a circulation of State Check $

Zip Credit Card $

47,000,

our classifieds get results!

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

Restrictions: Offer good on private party ads only. Ads must be pre-paid by cash, check or credit card. Certain classifications excluded. Deadline: Thursday at noon for next issue.


November 15, 2010

Downtown News 23

DowntownNews.com

REGIONAL WEST Coast - Up to $0.36 Per Mile - Company Drivers! Consistent freight. Benefits. Respect. Class A CDL. 1 year OTR required. Apply 1.888.619.6845 or www.NationalCarriers.com. (Cal-SCAN) Office/clerical JOBS NATIONWIDE! Admin., HR, Clerical, Accounting, Mgmt., Tech., etc. - www.Jobs444.com and www.JobsBloom.com.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Help Wanted ATTN: COMPUTER Work. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/ mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-888-304-2847. (Cal-SCAN) EVALUATORS NEEDED for market research projects. Bare International licensed 23 years. Fees start at $10/hr. Contact: NewEval@bareinternational. com or call 703-995-3106 or 800-296-6699 ext 3106. (CalSCAN)

SERVICES

Business services

cleaning

ADVERTISE YOUR Home, property or business for sale in 240 California newspapers. Reach over 6 million readers for ONLY $550! Call this newspaper or visit: www.CAL-SCAN.com. (Cal-SCAN)

CONCEPTO’S CLEANING Crew. Professional, experienced, cleans apartments, homes, offices and restaurants. Call for a quote. 323-459-3067 or 818-409-9183.

ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opening in 240 California newspapers. Reach over 6 million readers for ONLY $550! Call this newspaper or visit: www.Cal-SCAN.com. (Cal-SCAN) DISPLAY ADVERTISING in 140 Cal-SDAN newspapers statewide for $1,550! Reach over 3 million Californians! Free email brochure. Call (916) 288-6019. www.Cal-SDAN.com. (CalSCAN)

HealtH DEPRESSED? Anxious? Relationship Issues? Experienced clinician provides supportive therapy. Individuals, couples, groups. Wilshire Blvd., near Good Samaritan. Info: www.drannewarman.vpweb. com (310) 281-9797.

AUTOS pre-OWned

educatiOn ATTEND COLLEGE Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.Centura.us.com. (Cal-SCAN) HIGH SCHOOL Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www.SouthEasternHS.com. (Cal-SCAN)

dOWntOWn l.a. autO grOup Porsche Volkswagen audi Mercedes-Benz nissan cheVrolet cadillac

2004 NISSAN 350Z Stock C101351-1 vin 103990 Extra clean! $17,474 Manager Special call 888-203-2967.

2005 AUDI A4 S 1.8 last 8 vin # 5A028244 $12,460 Call 888583-0981 2005 BMW 330CIC Convertible, Low Mileage, White/Black stk # uc459-1/PL52952 $19,887 Call 888-879-9608. 2007 MERCEDES BENZ ML350 Pewter/Black, 3.5 Liter, leather, $28,999 4JGBB86E77A260898 Call 888-319-8762. 2009 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S Certified, air with power pkg # NI3609 / 9N487053 $14,999, call 888-838-5089. 2009 PORSCHE 911 TURBO CABRIOLET Basalt, Blk/Blk, Certified, Only 6k miles, Tiptronic, Loaded vin773136, $115,988 Call 888-685-5426.

DONATE YOUR Car: Children’s Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child’s Life Through Research & Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy & Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. (CalSCAN) DONATE YOUR Vehicle! Receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, NonRunners Accepted, 1-888-4685964. (Cal-SCAN)

get your green card or citiZensHip Law Office of H. Douglas Daniel Esq., (213) 689-1710

Your number 1 source for Loft sales, rentals and development! downtownnews.com

Be Inspired... Best Downtown Locations!

CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (CalSCAN)

WWW.THEORSINI.COM

S e e k S S t y l i S h M at e

Premiere Towers:

2 bdrm/2 bath, $1600/mo • Rooftop garden terrace/ GYM w/city view • 24 hr. doorman • Free (1) parking 1000 sqft, 16ft ceilings, $1950/mo. w/2nd level bedroom • Stainless steel appliances/refrigerator etc. • Pet friendly We are located in a prime area in Downtown LA nice neighborhood w/ salon, market, café etc. Wired for high speed internet & cable, central heat & A/C

Please call 213.627.6913 www.cityloftsquare.com

$1,400’s/mo. free parking ROOFTOP GARDEN RETREAT WITH BBQ AND LOUNGE GRAND LOBBY • FITNESS CENTER • SPA MODERN KITCHEN w/CAESAR COUNTERTOPS HIGH SPEED INTERNET DESIGNER LIVING SPACES • PET FRIENDLY • DRAMATIC VIEWS WALKING DISTANCE TO RALPHS SUPERMARKET

756 S. Broadway • Downtown Los Angeles 213-892-9100 • chapmanf lats.com Pricing subject to change without notice.

Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills

Available Immediately Top floor of 11 story historical building available now! We have approximately 2,868 square feet of contiguous exterior space facing Olympic Blvd. Stunning views of L.A. Two blocks away from the Staples Center and adjacent to the new L.A. Live Complex. The building also has other beautiful contiguous space & some small offices available. This space can be viewed by appointment. Information available to qualified prospective tenants. Email request to ghollis@shammasgroup.com or call (213) 746-6300 x1455

Monthly from $595 utilities paid. (213) 627-1151

725 SOUTH BIXEL ST.

877-239-8256

City Lofts:

nOW leasing

Medici

Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills

WWW.THEMEDICI.COM

• Free Resident/Guest Parking in Gated Garage • Private Library, Business Center & Conference Rooms • Free Wi-Fi & DSL Computer Use • Resident Karaoke Lounge • Directors Screening Room • Lavish Fountains & Sculptures • On-Site Private Resident Park with Sand Volleyball, BBQ’s and Jogging Track • Night Light Tennis Courts • Indoor Basketball

Version 2

Beautiful Fully Furnished Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Beautiful Fully FurnishedAvailable Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Available Services Include:

Reception y Mail y Fiber Optic Internet y TelephoneServices & Voice Include: Mail y West Law y Reception y& Mail Optic Internet y Photocopy FaxyyFiber Video Conferencing Telephone & Voice Mail y West Law y Photocopy & Fax y Video Conferencing

Additional Features: Kitchen Additional Facilities, Mail/Copy Features: Room, Conference Rooms, Mail/Copy Spectacular Views, Kitchen Facilities, Room, Fully Trained Staff Views, Conference Rooms, Spectacular Fully Trained Staff

JENNY AHN JENNY AHN (213) 996-8301

(213) 996-8301

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

laleads@regentbc.com

laleads@regentbc.com

www.regentbc.com

www.regentbc.com

Monthly from $550 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

Elegant World Class Resort Apartment Homes

Piero 616 ST. PAUL AVE.

877-235-6012

WWW.THEPIERO.COM

Visconti 1221 WEST THIRD ST.

866-690-2888

WWW.THEVISCONTI.COM

FREE Rent Specials On Select Floor Plans • Brunswick Four-Lane Virtual Bowling • Full Swing Virtual Golf • 3100 Square Foot Cybex Fitness Facility • Free Tanning Rooms • Massage Room, Sauna & Steam Room • Rooftop Pools with Dressing Rooms • Concierge Service • 24-Hour Doorman • 24/7 On-Site Management • Magnificent City Views *Amenities vary among communities

eat 3 Gr els Mod e! e to S

Luxury Condominium Residences Starting Client: G.H. Palmer Associates at 289K Publication: LADT News Size/Color: OWN

for 4.3125” as littlex 8”as4C$1,856 per month

NEW OPEN HOUSE Design by: apluscreative@yahoo.com

Darren Gooden

|

VIP Room Available. The Best Way For Business Meetings & Entertainment

is your teen experiencing:

Professional massage for men & women. Services include Thai Massage, Shiatsu Massage, Swedish Oil Massage, Foot Massage, Sauna, Steam, and more. Lounge area.

• School problems? • Conflict at home or with friends?

adolescent support group now forming ages 13-17 low fee

HealtH Dept. rank a for 7 ConseCutive Years

saKura HealtH gym & sauna, inc. 111 N. Atlantic Blvd. Ste #231-233 Monterey Park, CA 91754 (626) 458-1919 [Corner of Garvey Ave.]

HBODY

MASSAGEH

First Professionally Licensed Massage Shop in L.A. County.

Ph: 323.474.4668

323.314.4117

THAI MASSAGE SPECIALIST

3386766 0119

I c o n I c B e au t y

Fully furnished with TV, telephone, microwave, refrigerator. Full bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly maid service.

THE BRIDGE / Little Tokyo: Contemporary worship, 4:00pm Sundays, 401 E Third St. www. thebridgewired.org.

Call 213-481-1448

On Spring St.

SunshineGenerationLA.com 909-861-4433

LOFT LIVING

cHurcHes

Sell Your Car!

877-231-9362

Singing, dancing, performing and fun! For boys & girls ages 3 and up!

NEW NORWOOD SawmillsLumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cyclesawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-661-7746 ext. 300N. (Cal-SCAN)

Expose your auto to Downtown Los Angeles. With one of the fastest growing residential areas Los Angeles Downtown News gets results.

550 NORTH FIGUEROA ST.

Sunshine Generation

BECOME DIETARY Manager (average annual salary $40,374) in eight months in online program offered by Tennessee Technology Center at Elizabethton. Details www.TTCElizabethton. edu, 1-888-986-2368 or email: patricia.roark@ttcelizabethton. edu. (Cal-SCAN)

For a complete list of our pre-owned inventory, go to www.DTLAMOTORS.com

Orsini

n Childre ’s Performing Group

laWn & garden/farm equip

The Downtown Renaissance Collection

financial services Family, Criminal, P.I. for more than 20 yrs! Child Support / Custody Necesita Permiso de trabajo? Tagalog / Español / Korean

ITEMS FOR SALE

nOtices

2009 VOLKSWAGEN ROUTAN S Certified low miles. Stk # ZV1013 vin # 9R608189 $18,845 call 888-781-8102.

attOrneys

ABOGADO DE IMMIGRACION!

ANNOUNCEMENTS

autOs Wanted

call marney stofflet, lcsW

(323) 662-9797

4344 fountain ave. (at sunset), suite a los angeles, ca 90029


24 Downtown News

November 15, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

We Got Games Lakers Win a Lot! Kings Win a Lot! Clippers, Not So Much Los Angeles Lakers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/lakers. Nov. 21, 6:30 p.m.: The Lake show hits the road for most of the week, swinging through Milwaukee to take on the young Bucks (Nov. 16), the woeful Detroit Pistons (Nov. 17) and the Minnesota Timberwolves (Nov. 19), who last week gave the Lakers a run for their money at Staples Center. Back at home on Sunday, Kobe and friends face Stephen Curry, Monta Ellis and the high-powered Golden State Warriors. Los Angeles Clippers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/clippers. Nov. 15 and 20, 7:30 p.m.: Did you fall for it again? That preseason excitement hovering over the promising young Clippers? We Got Games is guilty. We pegged the Clippers to snag a playoff spot. Not looking so good now, as the squad

USC Trojans Football L.A. Coliseum, 3911 S Figueroa St., (213) 747-7111 or usctrojans.com. The Trojans head to Oregon State (Nov. 20) to take on the Beavers. At this point, only the diehards will be watching. —Ryan Vaillancourt

has only managed one win this season (as of press time). They look to right the ship this week with home contests against the New Jersey Nets and the new-look New York Knicks. In between those games, the Clippers play in Minnesota (Nov. 17) and Indiana (Nov. 18). Los Angeles Kings Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., 1 (888) KINGS-LA or kings.nhl.com. Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m.: The Kings are the best team in the Western Conference. It bears repeating: The Kings are the best team in the Western Conference. Winger Justin Williams has helped the squad stay undefeated at home, leading the team in goals and points. Even more impressive, the Kings haven’t allowed a single power play goal on their home ice (as of press time). The Kings have a busy week, playing in San Jose (Nov. 15), at home against the Blue Jackets on Wednesday, in Buffalo (Nov. 19) and at Boston (Nov. 20).

photo by Gary Leonard

Winger Justin Williams is leading the Western Conference-leading L.A. Kings in points.

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM


11-15-10