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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS

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Plot for sale, a new USC president, and other happenings Around Town.

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The readers have a lot to say about the Downtown Art Walk’s twists and turns.

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

October 11, 2010

Volume 39, Number 41

INSIDE

A Big Leap

For Diners, It’s Seventh Heaven With More Than a Dozen Eating Options, A Key Corridor Becomes Downtown’s Restaurant Row

Urban Scrawl on the governor’s race

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More new Downtown homes.

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Metro’s $95 million bus project.

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PICK THE

PROS Pick football games, win prizes.

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Helping those in need.

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photo by Gary Leonard

Sugarfish is the latest in a slew of restaurants that make up the Seventh Street restaurant row. Co-owner Tom Nozawa was racing last week to prepare for an Oct. 10 opening. by Richard Guzmán city editor

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ast Tuesday around lunchtime, Candice and John Kim paused on the southwest corner of Seventh Street and Grand Avenue. They peered through a large window, watching a construction crew race to finish the 1,800-square-foot sushi restaurant Sugarfish.

In His Own Words, Downtown ‘Poet Broker’ Ed Rosenthal Recounts Six Days in the Joshua Tree Desert staff writer

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18 CALENDAR LISTINGS 21 MAP 22 CLASSIFIEDS

Sushi Nozawa, was scheduled to open Oct. 10 (after Los Angeles Downtown News went to press). Next month the Mexican restaurant Mas Malo will debut a block to the east, and construction is also underway on a Seventh Street outpost of the Mexican-inspired chain Chipotle. All told, nine new restaurants have opened on the stretch of see Restaurants, page 10

‘On Monday Night, I Started to Give Up’ as told to Ryan Vaillancourt

A big Downtown chef is leaving.

“It’s yet another one for us to try,” said Candice, who works at a law firm on Figueroa Street. Her husband often meets her Downtown for lunch. “Knowing us,” she continued, “we’ll spend most of my lunch break trying to decide which place to try.” The Kims’ lunch choice is not getting any easier. Sugarfish, a spin-off of Studio City’s well-known

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ight before I left for Joshua Tree, I brokered two big deals: the sale of the parking lot at Ninth and Hill streets, and Clifton’s Cafeteria. That was after a year with no deals, so I was celebrating. “When I arrived at the trailhead on Friday, Sept. 24, at about 11 a.m., I was in too much of a rush. There’s signage there that says water is available at Station 30, where I parked. I didn’t get the water and I left in the hotel huge bottles of really delicious

refrigerated water, and tomatoes and nectarines. I thought it was going to be a really quick rush job. I’ve done this hike five or six times. It takes maybe two, three hours. Then I was going to come back to the hotel and relax. “When I was on the hike, I saw San Gorgonio, San Jacinto, Palm Springs, the Mojave Desert, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. I had a great lunch at Warren Vista. I brought a soft-boiled egg, dates and healthy wheat bread. And then I just tried to go back and I photo by Gary Leonard lost the trail immediately. “If not for my wife and daughter, I don’t know if I would have survived,” said Ed see Hiker, page 12 Rosenthal of his six days in the desert. “That was the main motivation to stay alive.”

The Voice of Downtown Los Angeles


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October 11, 2010

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AROUNDTOWN Development Reform Effort Focuses on Three Firms

believe the property will trade for north of $30 million,” said Brendan McArthur, a Jones Lang LaSalle vice president. The listing says the parcel is zoned to allow up to 648 residential units and 48,000 square feet of commercial space. The property is owned by Ektornet, a subsidiary of the Stockholmbased Swedbank.

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he Department of Building and Safety has whittled a field of eight firms bidding on a contract to reform the city’s entitlement and permitting process down to three, and a winner is expected to be named shortly. The department began soliciting bids in August, and eight companies — some national, some local — submitted by the Sept. 28 deadline, said Bud Ovrom, Building and Safety general manager. The effort effectively marked the end of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s once-heralded but delay-plagued “12-to-2” development reform plan. Deputy Mayor Austin Beutner has been leading the charge to make the development and permitting process in the city more business friendly. Ovrom would not release the names of the finalists, but said that while the bidders range in specialties, each company has specific experience in development reform. “Every one of them has done a similar study for another city,” he said. A winner will likely be selected in the next week, and contract negotiations should last another six weeks, he said. Work on the reform effort is scheduled to start by Dec. 3.

Take a Seat for Charity

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here will be plenty of open seats at the Medallion on Friday, Oct. 15, but they’ll look far too cool to sit on. As a fundraiser for the Pershing Square Art Squared Gallery, more than 40 Downtown artists are creating chairs, which will be auctioned off to the highest bidder. The seats will be displayed at the Medallion starting Oct. 14. “We decided to feature chairs for the auction because they’re easily accessible and not too large,” said Louise Capone, senior recreation director of the park in the heart of the Financial District. “You can fit them in anywhere, and people love to ask about them.” The auction starts at 9 p.m. Friday at the Medallion, 334 S. Main St. Information about the auction is at laparks. org/pershingsquare.

County Holiday Celebration Cut in Half

Key South Park Parcel Hits the Market

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os Angeles County is still giving a holiday gift to its citizens, though the party will only be half the size of previous years. On Oct. 5, the county Board of Supervisors voted to reduce the scope of the Los Angeles County Holiday Celebration. The event, which takes place at the 2,600-seat Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Dec. 24, has had $150,000 slashed from its budget. The celebration is now budgeted at $322,000. Last year’s event featured 45 performers and ran six hours. This year there will be 22 acts on stage from 3-6 p.m.

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or all the lights, glitz and revelry that packs L.A. Live, the sports and entertainment complex is still somewhat of an island of commercial activity. Just across the street, the action dies in a two-block swatch of parking lots. One of them is slated to be the future home of L.A. Central, a long-delayed mixed-use project. The other hasn’t been tapped for development in the recent past, but it is seeing some movement. Real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle last week announced that the site, which is bounded by Figueroa and Flower streets, just south of 12th Street, is for sale. The news was first reported by Bloomberg. A website created for the listing, 12andfig.com, is pitching the land to developers who might be interested in building a mixed-use project on the 2.7-acre site in the heart of the Los Angeles Sports and Entertainment District. “We

USC Celebrates New President

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he arrival of football coach Lane Kiffin and athletic director Pat Haden have dominated talk at USC this

year. But they are not the biggest changes at the university. On Friday, Oct. 15, USC will install Max Nikias as the 11th president of the university at the southern edge of Downtown. The ceremony takes place at 10 a.m. in Alumni Memorial Park. A picnic, open to the public, will follow in McCarthy Quad. “It’s really rare for an institution with a 130-year history to have so few inaugurations,” said event organizer Jeff Olsen. “That makes this a very special, historic event for the university.” Nikias, 57, succeeds Steven Sample, who is retiring after leading the school since 1991. The events to mark his arrival will begin earlier in the week. On Monday, Oct. 11, radio host Ira Glass will speak at 7 p.m. in Bovard Auditorium. The following day, playwright Anna Deavere Smith will speak and perform at the Ronald Tutor Campus Center. Both events are open to the public. More information at inauguration.usc.edu

Trojan Pride

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SC football fans have an upcoming opportunity to help a kid and get some cheers for the Trojans. The university and the Los Angeles Sports Council Foundation are teaming up for the 18th year of Touchdown for Youth, which provides game tickets to economically disadvantaged children. This year, beneficiaries will attend the USC-Arizona State game at the Coliseum on Nov. 6. A $30 donation covers a ticket and refreshments at the game. Touchdown for Youth, created in 1993 by Sports Council Foundation board member Sheldon Ausman, provided seats for nearly 2,000 kids last year. “Touchdown for Youth can provide a special experience to young people who may never have been on a campus or inside the Coliseum, perhaps inspiring them to one day pursue a college education,” said USC Athletic Director Pat Haden in a statement. Over the course of the program, more than 40,000 children have attended a game. Those interested in supporting Touchdown for Youth can call (213) 482-6333.

Correction The Wooster Group’s upcoming performance of Vieux Carré at REDCAT does not include any footage of Paul Morissey’s films, as was stated in the Oct. 4 article “Mix Master REDCAT.” Instead, the projections the audience will see were inspired by Morissey’s work.

All Fired Up Sparks fly as Burning Man founder Larry Harvey meets ethnographer Lee Gilmore. Wednesday, Oct. 13, 7 p.m. Doheny Memorial Library, Room 240 Admission: Free, with reservation (www.usc.edu/spectrum) (213) 740-2167

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Every summer, 48,000 people gather in the blistering heat of Nevada’s Black Rock Desert for the seven-day celebration of art, experimental community-building and fire known as Burning Man. In Theater in a Crowded Fire: Ritual and Spirituality at Burning Man, published this summer by University of California Press, ethnographer Lee Gilmore reconsiders this grand-scale festival of self-expression through the lens of postmodern religion-seeking. Hear from Gilmore as she engages in a spirited conversation with Burning Man founder Larry Harvey at this special event hosted by USC Spectrum and the Office of Religious Life. A reception and booksigning follow the discussion.

USC your cultural connection

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Be Aggressive, by Annie Weisman Thursday, Oct. 14 - Sunday, Oct. 17 Showtimes vary Laura and Leslie are high school cheerleaders seemingly living the California dream. Only they’re miserable. In addition to the usual pressures of adolescence, Laura’s mother was just killed in a hit-and-run, and Leslie’s dad walked out on the family. Despondent, the girls hit the road in search of the perfect cheer, their adventures receiving tongue-in-cheek commentary from a cheerleading Greek chorus. Los Angelesbased playwright Annie Weisman has been receiving cheers of her own since 2001, when Be Aggressive was selected among the year’s best in the New Playwrights anthology series. Scene Dock Theatre (213) 740-2167 General admission: $10

For more information visit www.usc.edu


October 11, 2010

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EDITORIALS A Make-or-Break Time for Art Walk

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he storm that raged around the Downtown Art Walk for a week appears to have subsided. In its wake is a trail of damage, some of it unfortunate and embarrassing but hopefully leading to a better place, including the possibility of two kinds of art walks (one monthly, one quarterly) run by two different groups. There is plenty to learn from what transpired. There are also numerous decisions to be made about the future of the monthly event, the size of which has increased more than anyone ever anticipated. That extraordinary growth is exciting and heartening — it is also the fuse that lit the recent powder keg. Right now, the people involved with planning the event, including but not limited to the nonprofit’s board of directors and the business leaders who have pledged $200,000 to save it, have to determine what Art Walk should be. In short, they have to decide how much art and how much street party? This is more complex than it sounds. Setting the right tone could pay off for years to come. Conversely, poor planning and decision-making could imperil the event. We believe the board and those who have pledged money truly understand the gravity of the situation, though it might have helped if the donors had been brought to the table earlier. (The most recent management had been trying to make do on an annual budget of $18,000. No wonder trouble arose.) Still, they have a lot to consider, including altering the make-up and size of the board as well as their relationships with entities including business owners, residents, business improvement districts and the police department; the latter two had been burdened by un-reimbursed costs stemming from providing security and clean-up for the monthly event. The Art Walk team needs to think about every aspect of the event, including how to work with dissatisfied gallery owners, who are trying to decide between staying open during the rowdy monthly evening Art Walk or moving to a quarterly, more family friendly daytime version. Perhaps some will find a way to do both. Ongoing, behind-the-scenes trouble became public on Sept. 24, when Jay Lopez, the director of Art Walk for about nine months, posted a message on the organization’s website saying the monthly event was canceled effectively immediately and that it would return in 2011 as a daytime, quarterly affair. This sparked an uproar, including from Art Walk board members who said they never approved such a decision. While board members acknowledged discussing the idea of canceling Art Walk, they maintained it was only one possibility among many, and stressed that the matter never came to a vote. Lopez continued to say that the board had approved the shift

to a quarterly gathering. The board then announced it had terminated Lopez and set up its own website. A week after Lopez’s release, a group of Downtown business people (most of them developers and building owners) put out a statement announc-

Is the community best served by an art-driven walk, one built around people perusing and buying from galleries? Or is there a greater benefit in dropping the art pretense and just organizing a monthly Downtown ‘street scene,’ or some other name for what is essentially a big party?

ing the $200,000 in pledges and the decision to hire permanent staff and work with area entities for clean-up and safety. As Los Angeles Downtown News reported last week, this was not a new or sudden issue. Nor was it the first time Art Walk reached a crossroads — in fact, the board was only established about a year ago, after then-intense discussions concerning the direction of Art Walk. That led to the installation of the second leader; once Lopez’s successor is named, it will be the fourth Art Walk head in a little more than a year. Obviously that degree of change creates a climate of instability. Though easy to forget now, Art Walk was founded in 2004 as a small event to draw people to some Historic Core galleries. For several years it fulfilled that mission well. Things changed as Downtown evolved, and for well more than a year, the galleries have been a secondary attraction on the second Thursday of the month. Instead, the majority of the people who flock to the event — crowds are estimated at up to 20,000 — care little about the art in Art Walk. Serious collectors or buyers know to come at other times (or, better,

to make appointments). Members of the Art Walk crowd may amble through a few galleries, but most want the partying, the bar hopping, the food trucks and the lively street scene that only an active urban area can provide. This is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, on many levels it’s great, further enlivening Downtown. A decade ago, the streets where people now revel during Art Walk were pretty much devoid of (positive) street life after dark. The current Art Walk fills the cash registers of many Historic Core businesses, meaning a lot of people have jobs. It also sends a tremendous message about the resurgence of Downtown L.A. The news reports chronicling the recent turmoil may have troubled organizers, but general word-of-mouth and media accounts of Art Walk at its height delivered an important message about the vibrancy of Downtown. That is why the recent conflagration was so distressing to so many. In the big picture, Art Walk is about a lot more than a single night and a well intentioned if now sprawling event. It is the type of activity that can help change a negative perception of a community. People don’t want to lose that opportunity. Nor do they want to relinquish the revenue generator. The question is where those involved go from here. The board needs to find the right full-time director and pay him or her to do the job, but to do that, it must determine whether it is time to dial down the party. Is the community best served by an art-driven walk, one built around people perusing and buying from galleries? Or is there a greater benefit in dropping the art pretense and just organizing a monthly Downtown “street scene,” or some other name for what is essentially a big party? We’re not saying that one path is the way to go, just that organizers need to grasp the situation and decide what they want. If they fold into one gathering, security will have to be greatly improved and perhaps streets should be closed to vehicles. The Art Walk as it exists today can’t take many more visitors. No matter which path is taken on the second Thursday of the month, it is important to bring the gallery owners who founded Art Walk into the conversation. The gathering may no longer be feasible for their aims, and if so, a quarterly weekend option could be a worthy and viable addition. There seems no reason that both cannot exist, and indeed, two separate events could complement each other. It may be difficult to embrace the concept at a time when mistrust is rampant, but those on opposite sides of the Art Walk divide need to keep the greater context and opportunities in mind. Two separate events could work. After all, it’s one Downtown.

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com • email: realpeople@downtownnews.com facebook: L.A. Downtown News

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Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: David Friedman, Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Pamela Albanese, Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, Michael X. Ferraro, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Catherine Holloway, Brenda Stevens, Billy Wright, Lon Wahlberg circulAtioN: Norma Rodas distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

One copy per person.


October 11, 2010

Downtown News 5

Opinion

The Readers Talk Back

LETTERS

Website Comments on the Art Walk

L.A. Needs a City Museum

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os Angeles Downtown News posts comments to stories on our website. Here are some of the most recent responses. Additional comments appear on downtownnews.com. Further responses are welcome. Regarding the articles “Art Walk Saved” and “What the Heck Happened to Art Walk,” by Richard Guzmán, both published online Oct. 1 ow, what a bunch of bumblers. Art Walk was a huge asset that took a long time to build, and just needed some professional management and marketing guidance to blossom into what it truly could become. Even the fact that they were discussing canceling the event shows how clueless they were about what needed to be done. They had done the hard work; getting to legitimacy and corporate dollars was easy from where they were. —posted by CH, Oct. 1, 11:20 a.m.

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hen the dust settles, I hope the Downtown Art Walk board can build a more effective organization that includes some of the businesses and political interests that have benefited from the success of the event. Surely capturing a small percentage of the money that flows into Downtown coffers to pay for sanitation and security can not be too great a challenge for the developers, investors and business leaders who pioneered L.A.’s urban renaissance. After all, the Downtown Art Walk is the most visible symbol of their efforts. —posted by Jonathan Jerald, Oct. 1, 4:17 p.m.

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ust why couldn’t all of this have been done before there was such a hullabaloo? I mean, really! The costs and the various issues surrounding the event certainly were known to the board and the local property owners. And now that [former director] Jay [Lopez is] gone they can come up with a salary? Doesn’t say much for the proactiveness of the people in charge of and surrounding the event, now, does it? —posted by Tobasco Jack Pepper, Oct. 1, 9:41 p.m.

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oney like that should be going to the artists, possibly as grants. I know too many that create so much work and are lucky to sell a couple pieces a year. Don’t get me wrong though, I absolutely love Art Walk and all that it has done to boost the L.A. art community. —posted by LA Art Lover, Oct. 2, 1:12 a.m.

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y feeling is that the event goes from Art Walk to Booze Walk. After 7 p.m. the masses push you through the streets with no chance to stop in front of a gallery and see. If somebody is interested in the art displayed there, come before 7 p.m. —posted by Harald, Oct. 2, 10:17 a.m.

Dear Editor, he new Pico-Garnier Block developer (“El Pueblo Takes First Step to Rehabilitate Pico-Garnier Block,” by Richard Guzmán, Sept. 6) should be aiming to enhance the historic aspect of El Pueblo with a new City of Los Angeles Museum, which is nowhere to be found in our megalopolis. It needs to be in our most historic landmark, El Pueblo. The Pico House would be a prime location for this historic timepiece, which can give multitudes of communities and neighborhoods of the city an honorable place to display the most prominent collection of Los Angeles’ past, present and future experiences. Los Angeles is the second largest city in the nation. Both New York and Chicago have had city museums for decades. San Francisco is completing a project to turn the old United States Mint into the San Francisco Museum and Historical

Society, which will open in 2012. When will Los Angeles have its own museum to tell our story? —Hynda Rudd, Glendale, former Los Angeles City Archivist

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Los Angeles Downtown News encourages letters. They become the property of Los Angeles Downtown News and may be edited. All letters should be typewritten and include an address and telephone number for verification. Please send them to: Letter to the Editor 1264 W. First St., Los Angeles, CA 90026 Fax to: (213) 250-4617 Email to: realpeople@downtownnews.com

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lived Downtown for several years. During that time, Art Walk became a noisy pain in the neck, so I moved. The huge crowd partied late and loud and really deteriorated the quality of life. Quarterly seems more reasonable. —posted by Anthony, Oct. 5, 5:13 p.m.

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Romancing the Blackstone A 1916 Department Store Becomes 82 Upscale Apartments by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

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t first glance, it doesn’t look like there is much going on at the former department store at Ninth Street and Broadway. The seven-story building has only been open a little more than a month, and the management concedes that some final touches are still being applied. The pool is not installed yet, and neither is the dog park. The hotel-like services, a stylish lobby and community rooms also have not been completed. Yet this is a case where looks are deceiving: Despite the list of pieces to come, the 82-apartment complex called the Blackstone is already more than 70% leased. “We’ve had a great response,” said Kerri Moran, the manager of the 1916 building. “It’s been a lot of word of mouth.” The project comes courtesy of Standard Developments, a subsidiary of Neighborhood Efforts, a company that has been in business for 15 years and specializes in historic renovations. It is run by the husband and wife team of Allen Gross and Arax Harutunian. Their previous projects include the Los Altos Apartments, a Mission Revival style building on Wilshire Boulevard, and renovations to the Victor Clothing building in Downtown. The couple purchased the Blackstone two years ago for a price they would not reveal. Their goal, said Gross, was to do something different than many of the other conversions in Downtown. “We saw a lot of historic renovations in Downtown and what we noticed was that most of it was mainly rectangle lofts with concrete floors, exposed systems,” he said. “We thought what we would do instead of the more typical loft was we would go with more higher-end finishes, more urban luxury.” Gross credits the quick occupancy to word of mouth and bus tours organized by the Downtown Center Business Improvement District that introduce potential residents to Downtown living opportunities. Of course, the historical aspect might also play a role.

The building was designed by John Parkinson, whose work includes City Hall, Union Station and the L.A. Coliseum. Today, the exterior looks much like it did when it was the Blackstone Department Store (founded by Nathanial Blackstone, the brother-in-law of J.W. Robinson of the Robinson’s Department Store). The baroque-style building features a glass-walled first floor retail space and in some units, floor-to-ceiling windows cover entire walls. The Big Dig The building opened at 901 S. Broadway, but closed after the Great Depression. It has remained mostly vacant since then, Gross said. After a two-year renovation, the Blackstone includes studio, one- and two-bedroom units ranging from 400-1,300 square feet. Prices are $1,450-$3,200. There is also 8,000 square feet of retail space. The hardest part of the building, said Gross, was a subterranean, two-level parking facility. “We dug underground and retrofitted the entire building because we wanted to have underground parking,” Gross said. “That was a big undertaking. That was almost like working on two separate buildings for us.” However, it has not solved all the parking issues. The garage only has space for 54 cars (one parking space per unit is included in the rent). Thus, the last people to move in will have to park at a lot next door. Inside, the apartments hold hardwood floors, black granite countertops, porcelain sinks and Hansgrohe faucets, which Gross said cost $500 apiece. There are high ceilings and windows that are approximately four-by-eight feet in most units, but no exposed ducts. Residences on the third floor, which is where the main window dressings for the department store were concentrated (there were also displays on the ground floor), have views of the Eastern Columbia Building across the street. The units also include smoked-glass closets and bathroom doors. The original marble floor was maintained in the lobby. Gross said he plans to add a fountain near the entrance.

photo by Gary Leonard

Less than two months after opening, the Blackstone is more than 70% leased. The husband and wife team of Allen Gross (above) and Arax Harutunian turned the 1916 former department store into 82 apartments.

Currently, white, high-backed suede benches and TVs displaying images of a fire greet residents. There is also a courtyard in the center of the building surrounded by about 16 units. Balconies hang over the courtyard. “We wanted to bring in natural light and ventilation. That allowed us to have more open space for the tenants,” Gross said. Coming Up Gross also wants to give his tenants some hotel-like service. He said he has signed leases with a coffee shop, a clothing store, a beauty store, and has garnered some interest in a bar. As part of the lease agreement, the coffee shop will have to supply room service, and tenants will have their own elecsee Blackstone, page 8

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Bill Witte, President, Related California Michael LoGrande, Director of Planning, City of Los Angeles Art Leahy, Chief Executive Officer, Metro Christine Essel, Chief Executive Officer, Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles

10:00am – 11:30am

Moderated by Kevin Ratner, President, Forest City Residential West

Panel PResentation # 2

the downtown experience: Live, work, pLay 2020 Panelists:

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12:00pm – 1:30pm

Chair, Planning & Land Use Committee, Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Moderated by Patrick Spillane, Senior Vice President, IDS Real Estate Group

lunch & FeatuRe Panel PResentation

titans oF downtown: charting the course Opening Remarks by the Honorable Jan Perry,

Los Angeles City Council President Pro Tempore, District 9 Panelists: eli BRoad, Founder, The Broad Foundations Jim thomas, Chairman of the Board, President & CEO, Thomas Properties Group Inc. tim leiWeke, President & CEO, AEG nelson Rising, President & CEO; Director, MPG Office Trust Moderated by Tom Gilmore, Partner, Gilmore Associates

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October 11, 2010

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First Congregational Church of

Los Angeles

Downtown News 7


8 Downtown News

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Big Bus Project Coming to Downtown

Blackstone Continued from page 6

$95 Million Operations and Maintenance Facility to Open in 2013

photo by Gary Leonard

Most of the apartments have high ceilings and large windows. The seven-story building also contains a courtyard.

tronic key and private entrance once the bar opens, Gross said. The retail is slated to open within a few months. Residents have also been promised a rooftop dog park with fountains and trees, and a Jacuzzi or pool, as well as a theater, a gym and a conference center with Wi-Fi. Gross said these amenities should be completed within a year. Jennifer McGinnis noticed the Blackstone building while she was apartment hunting in Downtown. “I looked at a lot of buildings, and I liked the neighborhood. The layout had more structure,” she said. “The apartment’s not just a big empty room and it includes parking, which definitely makes the rent comparable with other buildings.” While she is happy with the building, she said she is looking forward to the promised amenities. “It was a bit of a leap of faith I guess,” she said about moving in before everything comes online. “But they seem to know what they’re doing.” Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

renderings courtesy of Maintenance Design Group and RNL Design

A three-story Metro bus operations and maintenance project got a boost last week from a $47.75 million Federal Transit Administration grant. It would rise on the northeast corner of Cesar Chavez Avenue and Vignes Street. by Jon Regardie executive editor

A

nother major transportation-related project was announced for Downtown Los Angeles last week. Unlike rail efforts that can take a decade or more, this one is slated to come online in less than three years.

On Monday, Oct. 4, local and federal officials announced a $95 million bus operations and maintenance facility near Metro’s headquarters. The lion’s share of the funding comes from a $47.75 million Federal Transit Administration grant, part of its State of Good Repair Bus Initiative. The three-story Division 13 facility,

October 11, 2010

to rise on the northeast corner of Cesar Chavez Avenue and Vignes Street (adjacent to the Twin Towers Correctional facility), will be able to handle and service 200 compressed natural gas buses. It will include a 16,300-square-foot operations administration building and a 500,000-square-foot maintenance structure. It is scheduled to open in spring 2013. “I am grateful for the investment of State of Good Repair federal transit funds in our new bus operations and maintenance facility, which will help us continue to provide first-class bus service throughout Los Angeles County,” said Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa in a statement. Villaraigosa credited Sen. Barbara Boxer with helping direct the money to Metro. Design and entitlement work have already begun for the project that is being designed to meet LEED Gold certification standards. “Metro operates the second largest bus fleet in the nation, and this project will enable Metro to build a critical state-of-the-art facility to maintain its growing fleet of clean air buses,” said Congresswoman Lucille RoybalAllard in a separate statement. “This new facility will replace two aging properties and will bring important new jobs in construction and bus operations to our community.” The schedule calls for the project to go out to bid to contractors in January. Construction could start by June 2011. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.

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October 11, 2010

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Downtown News 9


10 Downtown News

Restaurants Continued from page 1 Seventh between Figueroa and Olive streets in the past two years (see sidebar below). In the fact, the corridor, which some long envisioned as a “restaurant row,” is now living up to the label. Downtown advocates are quick to say that this is no accident. “This was a specific initiative we launched a few years back and we’ve actively recruited a number of different restaurants,” said Carol Schatz, president and CEO of the Central City Association and the Downtown Center Business Improvement District. In 2004, the BID began trying to

recruit restaurants to Seventh Street, recognizing the spine’s central location for workers, residents and visitors in the Financial District, the Historic Core and South Park. “It’s a perfect place to focus hospitality and entertainment and it is paying off and we are delighted,” Schatz said. “We think it’s a good mix in terms of what we envisioned for the area.” Drawn by Crowds Restaurants have been arriving at a steady pace since April 2009, when Bottega Louie opened at Seventh and Grand. Two of the most anticipated are Sugarfish and Mas Malo. The latter is a sister restaurant of the popular Silver Lake spot Malo, partly owned by Mitchell Frank, the owner of Downtown-based concert programmer/nightclub operator Spaceland Productions.

Delicious Street

photo by Gary Leonard

Bottega Louie is credited as being the catalyst for the current vibrant food scene on the street.

The Primary Establishments in the Downtown Restaurant Row Restaurant Bottega Louie Chipotle Dublin’s* It’s a Wrap! Take Two! Mas Malo Octopus Pasta Primavera Qdoba Mexican Grill Sandella’s Flatbread Café Soi 7 Subway Sugarfish The Original Texas Barbecue King Wokcano

October 11, 2010

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Location 700 S. Grand Ave. 601 W. Seventh St. 815 W. Seventh St. 812 W. Seventh St. 515 W. Seventh St. 729 W. Seventh St. 611 W. Seventh St. 655 S. Hope St. 514 W. Seventh St. 518 W. Seventh St. 508 W. Seventh St. 600 W. Seventh St. 525 W. Seventh St. 800 W. Seventh St.

Food Gourmet market and Italian inspired cuisine Mexican Irish Pub Grub Wraps and Asian fare Mexican Japanese fusion Italian Mexican Flatbreads, wraps, paninis Modern Thai Sandwiches Sushi Barbecue Asian with nouveau sushi

Opened April 2009 November** August 2010 Not Available November** 2009 1989 2005 August 2009 November 2009 August 2010 October 2010 August 2008 2007

*Currently closed.

**Scheduled opening

The approximately 275-seat restaurant is set to begin serving in November at 515 W. Seventh St. in the former home of Clifton’s Silver Spoon Cafeteria, under the popular Seven Grand whiskey bar. It will include a banquet room/bar, a main room and mezzanine level. Frank described it as having a “high-octane cantina vibe.” Frank said the location will enable the restaurant to draw Downtown residents, the corporate crowd, theatergoers and shoppers in the Jewelry District. The street’s growing reputation as a restaurant hub played a role in the decision to open there. “The whole point of a restaurant row is to draw more people to the area, because if you can’t get into one then you go into another restaurant,” Frank said. “It’ll draw more people Downtown for food options. Downtown already has incredible food options. This just ups the ante.” Also boosting the pot is Sugarfish. The offshoot of Sushi Nozawa will follow the vibe chef Kazunori Nozawa laid down in his original restaurant: Although there is a menu, custom-

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October 11, 2010

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ers are urged to follow his dining suggestions, which are based on what is fresh. Nozawa has been known to refuse serving people who ask for California Rolls, spicy tuna or other items that veer from a purist sushi aesthetic. “This community is growing and we wanted to be part of it,” said Tom Nozawa, the chef’s son and a partner in Sugarfish. “I think it’s great having all these other restaurants around us.” Sugarfish has two other locations, in Marina del Rey and Brentwood. The Downtown spot at 600 W. Seventh St. will have a similar modern, casual vibe as the other two. Cameron Broumand, also a partner in Sugarfish, said they chose their location partly based on the vibrancy of the Seventh Street corridor. “For a long time Downtown was a place you didn’t go to,” said Broumand. “Bottega Louie across the street really kind of sold this area for us, and from a location standpoint, Seventh and Grand is probably the closest to all the things you want to do Downtown. The more synergy over here, the more people are drawn to the area, the better for us.” The Louie Factor Bottega Louie was not the first restaurant to open on Seventh Street. But it was the one that changed everything. With more than 200 employees and a sprawling,

10,000-square-foot space at 530 W. Seventh St., the upscale market and sit-down eatery is packed day and evening, weekdays and weekends. Its owners, a group of investors known as the Beverly Hills Food Company, settled on the space on the ground floor of the otherwise empty Brockman Building after carefully researching the area. They spent about three months surveying activity and monitoring pedestrian traffic before opening in April 2009. The full house has made it easier for the DCBID and people like Derrick Moore to sell the neighborhood. As vice president of brokerage services at real estate firm CB Richard Ellis, Moore helped pen the deals for Bottega Louie and restaurants including Soi 7, at 518 W. Seventh St., and even the Subway a few doors down. “Bottega Louie has almost been that beacon for Seventh Street, for restaurants and other retailers to say, ‘Look what we’ve done and come and join us,’” he said. He noted that despite the weak economy, there is still a lot of interest in the area. “It’s an ideal place to have all of the retail come together,” he said. “You have the Metro station, foot traffic from the Financial District, L.A. Live, and having restaurants clustered there really does create a critical mass and a focal point for consumers.” The rents have helped. Moore said that after the economy

started to go south, rates along the corridor dropped from about $3.50 to $2.50 per square foot. James Doell is one of those who has reaped the rewards of the street’s culinary evolution. The owner of the Thai restaurant Soi 7 saw his original opening delayed by construction issues. Instead Soi 7 debuted last November and, with crowds already spurred by Bottega Louie, Doell said he sees 300 to 500 customers daily. “The cluster helps,” he said of the restaurant concentration. “This area is a destination.” Of course, not even the best-laid plans and biggest crowds can prevent unforeseen problems. In late summer, a Downtown outpost of the Irish pub and restaurant Dublin’s debuted at 815 W. Seventh St. On Sept. 29, it was shut down by the Los Angeles County Department of Health because some upgrades were done to the kitchen without the proper permits, said Amaka Oranusi, a department official. Oranusi said the owners must submit an application for the upgrades before they can reopen. As of late last week, the phone at Dublin’s was disconnected. Two things are for sure though: Once Dublin’s gets its house in order, it will have an ample Seventh Street dining audience to woo. But it will also have a lot of competition. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

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October 11, 2010

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Hiker Continued from page 1 “This trail is not clearly defined. When I was walking, there was one trail, the West Loop, but that’s a really long hike. And there was no sign of my trail. So for some reason, I don’t know why, I might have felt like I’m James Dean, because I started going into these canyons. I never do that. I thought I was going in the right direction. I kept going through these canyons and I came across bigger drop-offs. You had to go down like 12 feet to get into the next one, and it just got worse and worse. “I was amazed at how big these canyons were — wide and deep. The last one, the drop was like 20 feet, so you had to do it part time: Go over rocks, go down rocks and jump down. After that I said to myself, ‘What the hell am I doing in these canyons?’ I’ve never been here before and they just go on and on. That’s when I went up this hill, a really disgusting hill that it turns out is called Burnt Hill, to escape the canyons and go back, hopefully to the trail. “I did find the trail, but I missed the cutoff, and ended up in this big, white wash, which I walked along for 15-20 miles. You can’t turn

in any direction. You have to go where the wash goes. Friday night, the first night, I slept in this cute baby canyon that was only about 20 feet wide. “Saturday morning, September 25, I got up. It wasn’t so cute. I had to climb rocks to get out of the canyon, and I had no idea how I had gotten in there. I was already out of water by Saturday morning. Those last sips were just delicious. The water was sweet. “I looked for the large white wash again, and walked uphill for several hours, in two different directions. I could not find it. I ended up exhausted in a hot canyon and I could not walk. I hid under a tree all day. At night it was freezing. “Sunday morning I walked downhill because I wanted to be warm at night. I couldn’t go uphill anyway. My legs were finished. It was extremely hot, so I hid under a white boulder for hours. When the sun finally hit me, I cut over to a small canyon of about five acres. I was getting weaker and weaker. I would have died without my hiking stick to raise and lower myself. “But that little five-acre canyon saved my life. I stayed there five days. It always had shade. It turns out I became very friendly with this horsefly. It was my companion there. It slept on me and hung out all day. “Mentally, I was just plotting and con-

LA DOWNTOWN NEWS__08_02_10__5X7.625

All for Warren View Ed. note: Ed Rosenthal submitted this poem based on his experience in Joshua Tree

fires in my pale green canyon of salvation.

by Ed RosEnthal

Evenings began with the gold shimmer of the Southern Cross and on the first dawn the giant Orion came and hovered like a mother over me telling me that I had made it through the night and a new day would come.

Once I took the first scramble into those canyons I could not return upwards and after three I found myself on the side of a big gray hill headed down and held to trees shrubs and boulders to keep from falling till the bottom.

My internal constellations were gone like desert water all poems, historic buildings, downtown development, and dreams of goddesses, only my wife and daughter stood like sentries in grey skirts and blanched faces.

I crossed Burnt Hill to escape and got to the majestic mauve hard rock canyon which rises like jewels from the broad white wash of Joshua Tree and carries you like Charon into the brown Mohave on a one way voyage.

It’s all about them and the rangers and search and rescue people who are angels disguised as old men, twenty somethings, horses and helicopter pilots who succor your family in crisis. They are the heroes not me.

I longed for the Green Lady, the mother of the mountains, to come in the morning and wash my poor worn feet. She didn’t but I had the six antiseptic cloths to fill my arms and legs with faux moisture. The horse fly also liked the pads.

On Wednesday, by leaning on my stick I got up and prayed for rain in Hebrew to YHVH. Before I could lift my knees off the dry escarpment, I saw pink lights and then rain fell. I lay down on my back with my mouth open. Copyright Ed Rosenthal

I signaled day and night three lights flashing blue and yellow on my silver emergency blanket and also blew my orange whistle three bursts in series when I saw a plane. I set two red and gold flare tinuing to move along. I stayed calm and focused. See, I’ve already had a heart attack — it happened 10 years ago, and it was tied to stress over a failed deal involving the Pacific Electric Building in Downtown. So I know not to get excited. “But on Monday night, I started to give up. I started to recite the ‘Shema Yisrael,’ which Jews say when they think they’re going to die. I saw that white tunnel that you’re supposed to see before you die. Then I heard a voice of Downtown Rabbi Moshe Greenwald say, ‘Are you really ready for this?’ And I said, ‘No.’ So then I knew I would just continue my efforts in the canyon. “The experience was very difficult, but it was beautiful out there too. I love the sky, so at night, I could tell time. The night starts out with the Southern Cross and when I would wake up and the giant Orion was there, that was kind of comforting to know you’ve made it through the night. It’s gorgeous out there. “While in the canyon, I signaled a lot. I created shadows on the hill where they could see me. I flashed off my aluminum blanket and I had a whistle, which was very loud, but I didn’t get a response. I lit two fires, and I lit a flare that I tore in two to use twice. It didn’t work because the area is just so huge.

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“I also had a pen with me — it’s a great pen — and I wrote poems and messages to my family. I told my wife and daughter who to rely on for financial advice. I wrote a poem to my brother: A brother like you is all good and true Gideon, kick soccer ass. Aunt Nicole loves you. “It’s really about my nephew who is a soccer player. “By Thursday morning, I could not sit against a rock. I didn’t have the strength. Your saliva turns to sand and rocks. I don’t even know if I did the right thing, but I scraped my mouth out all the time. Your body starts to decompose and you notice you’re using up your muscles to live on. “Finally the helicopter that I had seen for days came into the canyon and the gentleman asked me, ‘Hey, are you that Rosenthal who’s down there?’ It was a miracle. I’ve never been so happy to see anybody. I couldn’t walk, so he carried me. I lost 20 pounds. “I’m going to write a poem about the canyon. It didn’t have a name, so I’ll have to name it. Redemption Canyon, Savior Canyon, Rosenthal Canyon, I don’t know.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

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October 11, 2010

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HEALTH One Last Memory

contributed some $4 million in inkind services, Alpert said. “I know it sounds sort of crass, but we are on the joy, laughter, smile, positive side of late stage cancer,” Alpert said. “We treat the families, not the cancer.” Johnson, her husband and daughby Ryan VaillancouRt cations. There are no relaxing weekends. ter went to Seattle. They had extendstaff wRiteR There is just battling. ed family there, and their daughter bright yellow bag bearing a biohazThat’s where the Jack and Jill Late Stage was aching to meet the members of ard symbol sits on Linda Johnson’s Cancer Foundation comes into play. The her favorite band, the Seattle-based kitchen counter, taunting her family organization recently gave her a “break from Death Cab for Cutie. every day. cancer,” Johnson said. The foundation put the family up Johnson was diagnosed with breast cancer The Atlanta-based nonprofit, which hosted in the W Hotel — “way above our 10 years ago. She had surgery, endured ra- a fundraiser at L.A. Live on Sept. 28, pays for level,” Johnson said — and accomdiation, and the cancer went into remission. families to go on vacation, to give them what modations made them feel like “royThen it came back. Now, she continues to founder Jon Alpert has dubbed a “wow expe- alty,” she told an audience of Los fight, event though the disease has progressed rience.” Angeles business and civic leaders at a to stage four. Her cancer drugs come in that The foundation teams with airlines, in- sunset reception. bright yellow bag. cluding Continental and Southwest, as well Although the Jack and Jill founJohnson knows well that 500,000 people as hospitality companies such as Starwood dation does not medically treat the in the United States die from cancer every Resorts, which provide their services free. In cancer, the stress-relieving effect of year. For those suffering, there are no va- the past three-and-a-half years, donors have the vacations they provide can prove * therapeutic. Johnson said her famrtDowntown of Downtown Los Angeles. Los Angeles. ily’s trip to Seattle preceded a measureles. able drop in the levels of harmful cells in her system. * Her doctors, she said, eles. In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. * photo by Gary Leonard could only point to her boost in hapLinda Johnson, a beneficiary of the Jack and Jill Late Stage piness as a potential reason. Cancer Foundation, appeared at an L.A. Live fundraiser. In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. A former marketing specialist, In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. The Atlanta-based nonprofit sends families on a vacation Alpert founded the Jack and Jill Late before a sick loved one passes away. Stage Cancer Foundation with his wife, Jill, shortly before she passed away from nations make the trips possible). Alpert said breast cancer in 2006. the foundation has three employees. On Grand and Pico. 2 blocks of L.A. On Grand and Pico. Just Just 2 blocks east east of L.A. LIVE!LIVE! On Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocks east of L.A. LIVE! “There are many families who deserve, While the group has received a lot of meOn Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocks east of L.A. LIVE! who are entitled to time, time together,” said dia attention, Alpert pleaded with a gathering the experience of the of Angelenos recently to donate. Grand and Pico. Just Alpert, 2 blockswho east lamented of L.A. LIVE! On Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocksOn east of L.A. LIVE! families that have only stressful, tragic mem“We can’t just raise praise,” he said. “And * 2 blocks *east of L.A. LIVE! * Just ories of their loved one’s last year alive. investors will get rewarded in terms of how On Grand and Pico. The group is currently traversing the coun- tangible the award is.” * * * try, boosting awareness and trying to raise Additional information is at jajf.org. money to fund its vacations, which cost the Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at foundation about $1,100 each (in-kind do- ryan@downtownnews.com.

Foundation Which Helps Those Suffering From Late Stage Cancer Stops in L.A. for Fundraiser

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October 11, 2010

Downtown News 15

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RESTAURANTS

Restaurant Buzz

The County Strikes, Blue Velvet Shuts, and Fun With Fungus by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

N

o Luck for the Irish: Maybe they ran out of lucky charms. Maybe they couldn’t find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Maybe they encountered a surly leprechaun. OK, enough with the jokes: Less than two months after opening at 815 W. Seventh St., Irish pub Dublin’s has been shut down and the phone is disconnected. A sign in the window of the bar last Tuesday, from the County Department of Public Health, said it was closed because of “No Public Health Permit.” According to county officials, the bar did some upgrades to the kitchen without obtaining the proper permits. They were forced to close following an inspection on Sept. 29 and must submit plans and get county approval before they can reopen. It’s unknown at this time if and when that will occur, but Dublin’s green flag is still waving outside the building, so let’s keep our four-leaf clovers crossed. Dublin’s is at 815 W. Seventh St., or dublinsdowntownla.com.

n Blue Velvet Sings the Blues: For a time, it was one of the most heralded restaurants in Downtown Los Angeles. But the chic eatery Blue Velvet closed Sept. 16 and vacated its space at the apartment complex The Flat. “It’s gone and we are looking for another restaurant that’s conducive to our tenants,” said Chris Salayko, the regional property manager of The Flat in City West. The 4-year-old restaurant’s original chef was Kris Morningstar, who garnered quite a following for a menu of Asian-fusion and American cuisine. However, he left in February 2008 (he’s currently at District in Hollywood), the menu changed and things never got back on course. Additionally, it wasn’t too popular with some of the building’s residents, who took to the web to complain about Blue Velvet’s noise and late-night clientele. n Humongous Fungus Among Us: It

is one of the rarest foods in the world, but for the next two months it could be one of the most popular lunch and dinner specials in Downtown. Drago Centro in the Financial District has come across a large trove of truffles, and is offering a white truffle special for $70 per person. That gets you a choice of two dishes served with the hard-to-find fungus: a mushroom risotto or tagliolini pasta. The hefty price stems from how hard the truffles from the Piedmont region of Italy are to harvest: They grow a few inches underground, and must be sniffed out by specially trained pigs and dogs. They are only in season for the next couple of months. Just don’t be a pig yourself and wolf down the whole Downtown supply. Drago Centro is at 525 S. Flower St., (213) 228-8998 or dragocentro.com.

LeFevre attended the Culinary Institute of America and later traveled to France, where he worked at various acclaimed restaurants. He joined Water Grill in 2004, replacing Michael Cimarusti, who departed to found Providence. LeFevre will remain at Water Grill until mid-November. His departure will not be the only change: The restaurant will soon begin some upgrades, although officials are not yet providing details. Water Grill is at 544 S. Grand Ave., (213) 891-0900 or watergrill.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com. Katie Schaufelberger contributed to this report.

n Finger-Licking Fall: After that recent round of scorching days, summer has given way to autumn. To mark the change of seasons, Roy’s Hawaiian Fusion has launched a fall prix-fixe menu for $35.95 per person. Appetizers include “Elaine’s” Kabocha Squash Salad, named for the Facebook fan who suggested the main ingredient, and blackened rock shrimp and red bean soup. Entrees choices include artichoke and goat cheese crusted salmon, cilantro grilled tiger shrimp, Parmesan and Dijon crusted chicken and braised beef short ribs. Desserts options are pumpkin and ginger cheesecake and Roy’s Melting Hot Chocolate Soufflé. Roy’s is at 800 S. Figueroa St., (213) 488-4994 or roysrestaurant.com.

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October 11, 2010

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CALENDAR photo courtesy of Asian American Music Festival

Ukulele legend Jake Shimabukuro performs Saturday at the Asian American Music Festival.

by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

W

Universal Sounds Asian American Music Festival Aims to Please Ears and Expand Minds

sounds and beats to exemplify the theme. “We wanted to show the diversity we have even within one group,” Im said. At the heart of the group is David Liang, a Kansas-born Chinese American who majored in applied mathematics and economics at Harvard. “We’re seeing more Asians entering the arts, and this festival is a great opportunity to get some talented Asian acts together,” he said. Liang, whose music blends the sounds of 1930s Shanghai jazz bands with hip-hop and electronica sounds, will perform a 45-50 minute set along with a DJ and MC. His music will be synchronized with images of Shanghai. The intent is both to spark an interest for those not familiar with the city, and to serve as a nostalgia device for people who have been there. Liang’s secondary goal is to show that talent speaks for itself, regardless of cultural backgrounds. “I think maybe five years ago you didn’t hear about a lot of Asian American artists, but you hear more about them now,” Liang said. On YouTube you see artists [of Asian decent], and that breaks down a lot of barriers. This is a recent change. If you have talent, people in America will respect that.” Liang also expects the show will open the eyes of others to Asian American artists. Im agreed, and said performers such as Liang will attract a non-Asian audience who just want hear their favorite kind of music. “I think that the event is not designed by Asian Americans to be by ourselves listening to our own artists,” Im said. “The show is to show Asian American artists to all audiences, and that we are culturally relevant in America, performing and achieving on the highest level.” The festival will close Oct. 17 with the theme Identity. The final performer is vocalist Charmaine Clamor, a veteran of the jazz scene. Often called the Queen of Jazzipino, she will unleash her signature blend of jazz, blues, soul and Filipino folk music. Clamor performed at the inaugural event last year when the focus was exclusively on jazz. She said she is glad the doors have been opened for other musicians. “It’s a great way to combine all forms of music. It reaffirms the notion that music united everyone,” she said. For her performance, Clamor plans on introducing some sounds from the Philippines, where she was born and began singing at the age of 3. Her career started by entertaining riders on buses heading for Manila. “Music is just so universal,” she said. “It touches all sorts of culture, and what’s exciting about this coming festival is that we’re showing the audience how Asian Americans have contributed to these different genres of music.” The Asian American Music Festival is Oct. 15-17 at the Japanese American National Museum, 369 E. First St. Tickets and additional information are at photo courtesy of Asian American Music Festival asianamericanmusicfestival.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at Hip-hop artist Shing02 kicks of the festival, which runs richard@downtownnews.com. Oct.15-17 at the Japanese American National Museum.

He’s been called the “hi-def Yo-Yo Ma.” The night closes with Shing02, a Japanese rapper who spits lyrics in both English and Japanese while blending reggae and traditional Japanese sounds into his songs. On Saturday afternoon, the festival examines how different generations of artists have influenced each other; the movement is called, fittingly, Generations. The lineup includes Jon Jang, a pianist and composer known for chronicling Chinese American history through his work. He will be joined by classical and jazz pianist Gary Fukushima. Stars of the Islands will be the theme for the Saturday evening performances. Im said he expects this show to sell out thanks to the popularity of ukulele legend Jake Shimabukuro. “He’s a world famous ukulele player and people are coming from all over to see him,” Im said. While the ukulele doesn’t get as much as attention as, say, the guitar, Shimabukuro recently released an album titled Live. It highlights his best performances from shows around the world. Talent Speaks for Itself Sunday afternoon’s shows, performed under the theme of Angles, should also prove popular, thanks to the Shanghai Restoration Project. The group will use hip-hop and electronic

hen Paul Im launched the Asian American Jazz Festival last year, he wanted the three-day event in Downtown Los Angeles to showcase the contributions Asian Americans have made to the genre. That’s not enough for him any more. This year, Im is going global, mixing in more sounds and reinventing the event with hip-hop, world music, pop and electronic acts. The renamed Asian American Musical Festival runs Friday-Sunday, Oct. 1517, at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo. “Asian Americans have a rich history in all kinds of music,” Im said last week, explaining the expansion. “We have rich histories in hip-hop, jazz, world and electronic music. The festival celebrates diversity while focusing on Asian American cultural identity.” The festival will tie the genres together under five “movements.” The first, labeled Urbanism, comes on opening night, with a slate of hiphop artists. It begins with Kero One, a San Francisco-based rapper and DJ who concentrates on the more soulful side of the genre. He’ll be photo courtesy of Scott Mitchell followed by Dana Leong, who fuses Jazz singer Charmaine Clamor closes the festival Oct. 17 hip-hop with jazz and electronica. with her Jazzipino sounds.

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Downtown News 17

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Sweet Talk in Sweetwater Ahmanson Sets Up a Big, Rollicking Tent With Leap of Faith by Jeff favre contributing writer

B

asing a big-budget musical on a 1992 movie that has been largely forgotten begs an obvious question: Why? The answer, or at least the one director Rob Ashford could provide, is “Have a little faith.” He would be correct. That’s because after all of the readings and workshops, the change in director from Taylor Hackford to Ashford (who already was serving as the show’s choreographer) and two weeks of previews that led to more alterations, the world premiere of Leap of Faith that opened last week at the Ahmanson Theatre is a Broadway-worthy musical. More than that, Leap of Faith proves that composer and Disney hit-maker Alan Menken (The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast) has the skill — as does his current collaborator, lyricist Glenn Slater — to create an increasingly rare, old-fashioned musical. Filled with catchy melodies, interesting characters and a storyline that can appeal to a wide audience without relying on broad humor and over-the-top melodrama, Leap of Faith earns the overused “feel good” moniker. Unlike the Menken-Slater misstep Sister Act, which was a pale imitation of the movie, Leap of Faith transcends the original, which lacked true heart and soul, despite starring Steve Martin and Debra Winger. Here, a fusion of wonderful songs, and a wealth of powerful, honest performances, equals a twoand-a-half-hour tent revival that gets crowds clapping in their seats. Ashford, who impressed last year directing and choreographing Parade at the Mark

photo by Craig Schwartz

Sister and bother Sam (left, Kendra Kassebaum) and Jonas (Raúl Esparza) are out to separate some smalltown Kansas folk from their money in Leap of Faith. It plays at the Ahmanson Theatre through Oct. 24.

Taper Forum, sells the show from the moment the curtain rises. The people of Sweetwater, Kan., dressed in faded pastels and bathed in pale orange light, wearily stand in front of withering cornstalks and a nonfunctioning water drill — a portrait of despair. The locals, watching the never-ceasing sun, bow and bend in a series of sweeping dance steps. Their routine contrasts sharply with a band of arriving outsiders. An evangelical choir, and preacher Jonas Nightingale (Raúl Esparza), a conman with a gift for raising hopes and passing the offering basket, has been stranded after their bus breaks. So they opt to make some dough off the hard-luck town already ravaged by drought and unemployment.

Jonas and his sister Sam (Kendra Kassebaum) are experienced scammers. With a wireless microphone system, she feeds private information about the townsfolk to her brother. The siblings have a serious track record of separating believers (and those who want to believe) from their money. Of course, there’s a hitch. Jonas’ way of thinking is tested by the widowed Marva (Brooke Shields) and her son Boyd (Nicholas Barasch). Jonas and his crew also must face Sheriff Will Braverman (Jarrod Emick), who wants to protect the residents from the scam and keep them focused on paying for the drill that he hopes will eventually strike water. Leap of Faith tells much of its story through

song, and most of Menken’s score is based in gospel and country. There are numerous highlights, though the standouts are the three tent revival numbers performed by Jonas and his choir, led by Ida Mae (Kecia Lewis-Evans, whose booming vocals are spine-tingling). A shortcoming in many musicals is the dialogue, but this book (by Slater and Janus Cercone) rarely feels forced. Ashford elicits a natural conversational style from his cast, which adds to the story’s authenticity. Still, with all Leap of Faith has going for it, a strong rudder is needed. Fortunately, Esparza is more than capable of steering the production. He is masterful in every aspect, a considerable feat with a role so new. His swagger and charisma as Jonas is infectious and he has enough charm to make it seem believable that Marva might fall for him. Shields, though not a vocal powerhouse, holds her own as the strong-willed mother who fiercely loves and protects her son. Barasch, as Boyd, displays an angelic voice and a can-do attitude that makes him a modern Tiny Tim. It’s clear from the few changes in the program’s song lineup that Ashford kept tinkering with the show throughout previews. The alterations appear to have strengthened the whole, and his choreography is seamlessly integrated into each scene, as if it springs directly from the music. The technical aspects are also in harmony, in particular Robin Wagner’s beautiful and functional scenic design, and Donald Holder’s breathtaking lighting. Ashford may keep tweaking Leap of Faith throughout this Downtown run, though it is already in great shape. If the show doesn’t eventually become a Broadway hit, that would be a shame. We’ll just have to have a little faith. Leap of Faith runs through Oct. 24 at the Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or centertheatregroup.com.

asiaN ameriCaN mUsiC FesTival October 15–17, 2010 Tateuchi Democracy Forum NaTiONal CeNTer FOr The PreservaTiON OF DemOCraCy Purchase tickets online at asianamericanmusicfestival.com FriDay (10/15) 8:30 Pm movement 1: urbanisms kero one milk & jade by dana leong shing02

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18 Downtown News

October 11, 2010

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Monday, oct. 11 Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. 6 p.m.: Know your Godzilla from your Bridezilla? Wild Bunch from Brady Bunch? The Knack from the Knicks? Join Casey’s every Monday night. Match wits and win prizes playing Team Trivia. No entry fee. Wednesday, oct. 13 SCI-Arc Lecture Series W. M. Keck Lecture Hall, 960 E. Third St., (213) 3565328 or sciarc.edu. 7 p.m.: Geoff Manaugh, author of Bldgblog and The Bldgblog Book, will talk. thursday, oct. 14 Downtown L.A. Art Walk Info and map at artwalkla.org. Noon-9 p.m.: It’s still on: The self-guided tour that showcases the many art exhibition venues in Downtown — galleries, museums and nonprofit art venues — as well as plenty of musical entertainment and food trucks is back to pack in the crowds. Town Hall Los Angeles Wilshire Grand Hotel, 930 Wilshire Blvd.,(213) 6288141 or townhall-la.org. Noon: Phil Angelides, the former state treasurer and the second place finisher in the 2006 California gubernatorial race, comes to talk. These days he’s got a gig as chair of the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission; he’ll give Downtown a preview of his findings in advance of his December report to Congress. Drink and Draw at Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. Oct. 14, 8 p.m.: Do you like drawing? Do you occasionally like an adult beverage? Then this group is for you. The Original Drink and Draw Social Club meets every Thursday. Friday, oct. 15 CHAIR-ity Auction Event The Medallion, 334 S. Main St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. 7 p.m.: The Pershing Square Art Squared Gallery holds a fundraiser. More than 40 Downtown artists have created hand-painted and handcrafted pieces of functional art for the event. You see ’em, you like ’em, you buy ’em. Friday Night Fright Flicks Pershing Square, 532 South Olive Street, 213-8474970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. 8-10 p.m.: Zombie horror, zombie comedy, Shaun of the Dead. Free with lawn seating. Bring a blanket and snacks. Free popcorn, too. Fresh brains not included. saturday, oct. 16 CERT Awareness & Training Pershing Square, 532 South Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. 8 a.m.-4 p.m.: A Community Emergency Response Team will present a free day of earthquake preparedness as part of The Great California ShakeOut drill, which takes place statewide on Oct. 21. Learn the “Drop, Cover and Hold” exercise. And, to use an old “South Park” joke, this doesn’t work for lava flows from volcanoes. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-DINO or visit nhm.org. 11 a.m.: Museum staff presents some of its live animals, with explanations on where they come from, what they eat and more. World City Walt Disney Concert Hall, 135 N. Grand Ave., musiccenter.org. 11 a.m. and noon: The Oyu Oro dance ensemble performs traditional forms from Cuba, Haiti and Af-

‘Don’t Miss’ list Feel the Dance, Fear the PuPPet by Lauren CampedeLLi, Listings editor calendar@downtownnews.com

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ometimes words just aren’t enough to express the scope of a concept or experience. Sometimes the visceral expression of dance can say more. Sometimes you’ve just got to feel it. Choreographer Tere O’Connor creates a choreographic essay on the nature of human consciousness in the West Coast premiere of Wrought Iron Fog, opening Thursday, Oct. 14, at 8:30 p.m. at REDCAT. O’Connor and his troupe explore the ideologies of contemporary culture through contemporary dance. We’re not quite sure what that means, but we think they jump and bounce around and move, you know, nicely. There are four performances through Oct. 17 at 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org.

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he Los Angeles Philharmonic season is underway, and in week two there’s already a highlight. Gustavo Dudamel (shown here) leads the orchestra this week in four performances (Oct. 14-17) of Messiaen’s Turangalila-symphonie a 10-movement, 80-minute “love phonie, song” inspired by the story of Tristan and Isolde. A major part for solo piano will feature keyboardist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, who just happened to be inducted into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame this past summer. Adding to the romantic wonder of Messiaen’s work is a part for the ondes martenot to be performed by Cynthia Millar. One of the earliest electronic instruments, it was invented in 1928 and its eerie, wavering sounds are produced by oscillating vacuum tubes. But don’t try that with your Hoover. At Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil.org.

photo by Anna Hult photo © Bob Baker Marionette Theater

SPONSORED LISTING Asian American Music Festival Japanese American National Museum, 369 E. First St., (213) 625-0414 or janm.org. Oct. 15-17: The Asian American Music Festival features Kero One, Milk and Jade by Dana Leong and Shing02 on Friday starting at 8:30 p.m.; On Saturday at 1:30 p.m. the lineup features the Gary Fukushima GF3 Trio, Jon Jang and the Pan-Asian Arkestra with Taikoproject. At 8:30 p.m., it’s Abe Lagrimas Jr. and Noel Okimoto Quartet, and ukulele wizard Jake Shimabukuro. On Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Emi Meyer and the Shanghai Restoration Project are featured. Then at 6:30 p.m., the festival closes with the Sachal Vasandani Quartet and Charmaine Clamor and her Killin’ Sweethearts.

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f you’re looking for a kind and gentle bit of Halloween entertainment, try Bob Baker’s Halloween HoopDee-Do revue, which is playing all month at kid-friendly times. The Bob Baker Marionette Theater continues its 50th anniversary season with this seasonal fave that features more than 100 puppets, from the Purple People Eater to the Invisible Man (wonder how they do that?) to Roaring ’20s skeletons shaking their tailbones. Hang out after the HoopDee-Do for some refreshments with the puppeteers in the Party Room. It runs through Oct. 31 at 1345 W. First St., (213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com.

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he World City performance series brings the world’s cultures to the Music Center’s outdoor Keck Amphitheatre at Disney Hall. For the next six months or so, international artists will share their heritage through music, dance, song and storytelling in free, family-oriented performances. The globe-skipping begins Saturday, Oct. 16, from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., with Oyu Oro Afro-Cuban Dance Ensemble exploring the influences of Cuban culture including the rumba, conga and son as well as West African and Haitian influences. After the shows, kids can participate in art-making workshops (that’s free, too). At 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-4396 or musiccenter.org.

e don’t get a lot of Ukrainian interaction in Downtown Los AnW geles. That changes this week when Gogol

Bordello comes to Club Nokia. On Wednesday, Oct. 13, the gypsy punk cabaret act dispenses its blend of music, theatre, debauchery, humor, chaos, sorcery and explosive energy. You never know quite what you’ll get when front-man Eugene Hutz (he’s the Ukrainian) and the other band members take the stage. The show is at 9 p.m. at 800 W. Olympic Blvd., clubnokia.com.

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Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.

photo by Danny North

EVENTS

photo by Ryutaro Mishima

LISTINGS


October 11, 2010

DowntownNews.com

rica. For this free, family-oriented event at the Keck Amphitheatre, tickets are distributed starting at 10 a.m. for the 11 a.m. show, and at 11 a.m. for the noon installment. Readings at Metropolis Metropolis Books, 440 S. Main St., (213) 612-0174 or metropolisbooksla.com. 4 p.m.: Meet Elizabeth Barrial and D.H. Altair (the vampire nom de plume of Del Howison), the authors of Vampires Don’t Sleep Alone: Your Guide to Meeting, Dating and Seducing a Vampire and When Werewolves Attack: A Field Guide to Dispatching Ravenous Flesh-Ripping Beasts. The titles say it all. Sunday, Oct. 17 L.A. Beer Week Beer Festival Union Station, 800 N. Alameda St., labeerweek.com. Noon-4 p.m.: The Beer Festival will feature more than 70 local, regional, national and international craft and artisan breweries, including some rare beers. Yes, there really are rare beers. California African American Museum 600 State Drive, (213) 744-2024 or caamuseum.org. 1 p.m.: The museum joins Ryman Arts to create a huge continuous drawing in Exposition Park. The event ties in with the museum’s participation in Big Draw L.A., a regional project encouraging people to draw in fun and imaginative ways. More info at the bigdrawla.org. Cole’s Red Car Bar 118 E. Sixth St., (213) 622-4090 or colesfrenchdip.com. 10 p.m.: Cole’s embraces the “Mad Men” craze with viewings of all the new episodes, with very appropriate whiskey drink specials. Feel like Don and order a Makers straight up. Then totally lie about your past.

ROCK, POP & JAZZ

night with bands in between. Oct. 15, 10 p.m.: Pure Country Gold, with Sawyer Family. Oct. 16, 10 p.m.: Bar That Sucks presents Calavera, Woolly Bandits, Surf Rats and Inazuma. Oct. 17, 10 p.m.: Million Kids, Scream and Brainspoon. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., sevengrand.la. Oct. 11, 10 p.m.: Katisse Buckingham Quintet, featuring Buckingham on an assortment of reeds and winds. Oct. 12, 10 p.m.: House band The Makers lay down a jazzy, bluesy groove. Oct. 13, 10 p.m.: The Lovely Band. Decide if they’re really lovely. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. Oct. 15, 9 p.m.: Malaikat dan Singa, Foot Village, Neverever and Dunes. Oct. 16, 9 p.m.: Palm Reader, Plasma Centre, Peter Pants and ParallaxScroll. The Varnish 118 E. Sixth St., (213) 622-9999 or thevarnishbar.com Oct. 12, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.: Jazzman Mark Bosserman entertains on the house piano every Tuesday.

FILM Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. Oct. 11, 7 p.m.: Takedowns and Falls is a documentary about a group of Pennsylvania teens and their relationships with a high school wrestling team on a journey to win a state championship. Flagship Theatres University Village 3323 S. Hoover St., (213) 748-6321 or flagshipmovies.com. Visit website for current schedule. IMAX Theater California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 7442019 or californiasciencecenter.org. Through Nov. 28: Featuring nine-time world surfing champion Kelly Slater, The Ultimate Wave Tahiti 3D will immerse audiences in the story of an ocean wave and the lives it impacts and transforms. Hubble 3D takes movie-goers on a journey through distant galaxies to explore the grandeur and mysteries of our celestial surroundings and accompany spacewalking astronauts as they attempt the most difficult and important tasks in NASA’s history. Mummies 3D: Secrets of the Pharaohs lets you journey to the royal tombs of Egypt and explore the history of ancient Egyptian society as told through the mummies of the past. REDCAT 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. Oct. 11, 8:30 p.m.: Master collagist Lewis Klahr returns with a new series, Prolix Satori. Regal Cinema L.A. Live 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (877) 835-5734 or lalive.com. Through Oct. 14: It’s Kind of a Funny Story (1:30, 4:20, 7 and 9:30 p.m.); Life As We Know It (1:10, 1:50, 4, 4:40, 6:50, 7:30, 9:40 and 10:20 p.m.); My Soul to Take (12, 2:40, 5:20, 8 and 10:50 p.m.); Secretariat (1.20, 4:10, 7 and 9:50 p.m.); Case 39 (1, 3:50, 6:30 and 9:10 p.m.); Let Me In (12:50, 3:50, 6:40 and 9:20 p.m.); The Social Network (12:40, 1:10, 1:40, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40, 6:40, 7:10, 7:40, 9:40 and 10:30 p.m.); Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole 3D (1:40, 4:30, 6:50 and 9:20 p.m.); Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (1, 4:20, 7:20 and 10:40 p.m.); Easy A (12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10 and 9:30 p.m.); The Town (1:30, 4:50, 7:50 and 11 p.m.); Resident Evil: Afterlife 3D (10 p.m.). Oct. 15 (partial list): Red (1:20, 4:10, 7 and 9:50 p.m.).

Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. Oct. 15, 10 p.m.: Drew Andrews of the The Album Leaf. Oct. 16, 10 p.m.: The Mormons, in residency every Saturday in October, won’t knock on your door and preach, but they will rock out. With Le Switch and friends. Club Nokia Corner of Olympic Blvd. and Figueroa St., clubnokia.com. Oct. 13, 8 p.m.: Gogol Bordello lays down its gypsy punk Brechtian cabaret. The lead singer has a big mustache—you don’t see a lot of those in rock. Oct. 14, 8:30 p.m.: Mike Snow, the band; with Mark Ronson and The Business Intl and MNDR. Oct. 15, 9 p.m.: Austrian trip-hop duo Kruder and Dorfmeister. Oct. 16, 8 p.m.: Armenian sensation Andre. He’s so big he doesn’t need a last name. Conga Room L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic, (213) 749-0445 or congaroom.com. Oct. 14, 8 p.m.: Milly Quezada, the queen of merengue. Dubquake: A Rhythm and Culture Festival Los Angeles State Historic Park, 1245 N. Spring St., dubquake.com. Oct. 17, 2 p.m.: Ya mon! This all-ages festival presents originators in reggae, as well as new groups. There will be craft vendors, food trucks, some specializing in Jamaican cuisine, a main stage for reggae, a side stage for world music and a DJ tent. If you smell something funny, donít tell anyone. Grammy Museum L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. Oct. 12, 8 p.m.: Platinum-seller and six-time Grammy nominee Dave Koz talks with Scott Goldman about his new album Hello Tomorrow. Sax-man the solution. Juggling too many projects, deadlines and vendors? Let Koz will discuss how changesWe’ve in hisgot career influenced, PIP manage the creation and re-ordering of all of your business communiinspired and encouraged him throughout the process cations. In one location, your PIP consultants bring together all the resources of creating and recording theyou record. also play a need, He’ll including: • Printing Tuesday, • Signs, posters Oct. 12 and banners few songs. • Copying • Digital printing Los Angeles Philharmonic Redwood Bar & Grill • Graphic design • Online ordering Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 South Grand Ave. 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or Wilshire Blvd. 700 (323) 850-2000 or laphil.org. theredwoodbar.com. ph: 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 Oct. 12, 8 p.m.: Dave Travis from Carnage Asada 8 p.m.: Jean-Yves Thibaudet and members of the piparco@sbcglobal.net made the documentary “A History Lesson Part 1,” L.A. Phil present a program of chamber music: Rathabout the Los Angeles punk scene in 1984, featur- bun’s Suite for Oboe and English Horn; Milhaud’s ing the Minutemen, Meat Puppets, Redd Kross and Suite for Clarinet, Violin and Piano; and Messiaen’s Twisted Roots. Doc screens at both 8 p.m. and mid- Quartet for the End of Time.

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Wednesday, Oct. 13 Los Angeles Philharmonic Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 South Grand Ave. (323) 850-2000 or laphil.org. 8 p.m.: Andras Schiff in recital, with a program replete with Schumann. Thursday, Oct. 14 Los Angeles Philharmonic Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 South Grand Ave. (323) 850-2000 or laphil.org. 8 p.m.; Oct. 15-16, 8 p.m.; Oct. 17, 2 p.m.: Gustavo Dudamel conducts Messiaen’s Turangalila-symphonie with Jean-Yves Thibaudet on piano. Friday, Oct. 15 Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 8 p.m.: Friday Night Recitals feature student performances in Mayman Hall. Concerts are free. Sunday, Oct. 17 The Da Camera Society Doheny Mansion, Pompeian Room, 8 Chester Pl., (213) 477-2929 or dacamera.org. 3:30 p.m.: Ensemble 415, led by Swiss violin virtuoso Chiara Banchini, presents a program of baroque sonatas and concerti by Bach, Vivaldi, Albinoni, Muffat and Albicastro. The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels 555 W. Temple St., (213) 680-5205 or olacathedral.org. 4 p.m.: Organist Adam Brakel will perform works by composers from the 16th to the 20th century including Tunder, Bach, Rogg, Nanney, Bonnet, Demessieux, Bovet and Fletcher. The Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 8 p.m.: The Colburn Chamber Music Society presents the Tokyo String Quartet.

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE Anton’s Uncles Bootleg Theater, 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.com. Oct. 16, 8 p.m.; Oct. 17, 2 p.m.: In this physical deconstruction of Chekhov’s “Uncle Vanya,” only the men are left to wrestle with their desires. Through Oct. 24. Bob Baker’s Halloween Hoop-Dee-Do The Bob Baker Marionette Theater, 1345 W. First St., (213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com.         Oct. 12-15, 10:30 a.m.; Oct. 16-17, 2:30 p.m.: A fantastical cast includes more than 100 Halloween themed puppets, from the Purple People Eater and the Invisible Man to a gaggle of skeletons dancing the night away. Through Oct. 31. The Glass Menagerie Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. Oct. 12-15, 8 p.m.; Oct. 16, 2:30 and 8 p.m.; Oct. 17, 1 and 6:30 p.m.: Tennessee Williams’ classic stars two-time Tony Award winner Judith Ivey as Amanda Wingfield. Through Oct. 17. Il Postino Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-8001 or losangelesopera.org. Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m.: Based on the popular 1994 Italian film, this world premiere by Daniel Catán stars Plácido Domingo as the poet Pablo Neruda. Also starring Amanda Squitieri, Cristina GallardoDomâs and Nancy Fabiola-Herrera. Grant Gershon conducts. Through Oct. 16. La Victima          Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. Oct. 14-16, 8 p.m.; Oct. 17, 3 p.m.: The story of a family in search of a better life, separated by borders, lost dreams and lost identity, also features plenty of live music and dancing. Through Oct. 31. Leap of Faith Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. Oct. 12-15, 8 p.m.; Oct. 16, 2 and 8 p.m.; Oct. 17, 1 and 6:30 p.m.: Conman Jonas Nightingale brings his gospel-charged tent revival to rain-starved Kansas in this world premiere musical. Raul Esparza dominates and Brooke Shields holds her own. See review on p. 17. Through Oct. 24. The Marriage of Figaro Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-8001 or losangelesopera.org. Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 17, 2 p.m.: Plácido Domingo conducts one of opera’s greatest comic masterpieces that turns convention upside down when the wily Figaro (Daniel Okulitch) outwits his master, Count Almaviva (Bo Skovhus). Martina Serafin takes the part of the Countess. Rebekah Camm and Marlis Petersen share the role of Susanna. Through Oct. 17. Prince of Puddles Bootleg Theater, 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.com. Oct. 16, noon: A family-friendly, comic adaptation of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Through Oct. 30. The Reckoning

Downtown News 19 Los Angeles Theatre Center, 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. Oct. 14-16, 8 p.m.; Oct. 17, 3 p.m.: A Louisiana crawfish farm owned by an affluent AfricanAmerican family was once a sugar plantation worked by slaves, and is consequently filled with all manner of secrets and treacheries. Presented by the Robey Theatre Company. Through Oct. 24. What Happened at Mayville? LoLa Downtown, 929 E. 2nd St. Studio 105, (213) 680-0392 or loftensemble.com. Oct. 15-16, 9 p.m.: Timed with the Halloween season and not for the faint of heart, the LOFT Ensemble presents a theatrical experience that visits a small town — then everything takes a sudden and unexpected turn. Mature audiences only. Through Nov. 13. The Wiggle Room Alexandria Hotel, 501 S. Spring St., (213) 489-3703 or companyofangels.org. Oct. 14-16, 8 p.m.; Oct. 17, 7 p.m.: In a moment of economic shutdown, a question of ownership comes between two people: Who owns what, and is it worth it? Through Oct. 24. Wrought Iron Fog REDCAT, 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. Oct. 14-16, 8:30 p.m.; Oct. 17, 7 p.m.: Tere O’Connor’s layered choreography highlights unexpected shifts in rhythm and mood while building complex relationships.

ART SPACES 118 Winston 118 Winston St., Second Fl., (310) 422-5402 or 118winston.com. Opening Oct. 11: Alden Marin’s “All the Angels of the City.” ADC Contemporary Art Gallery Factory Art Place Complex, 1330 Factory Place, (323) 839-5786 or adccontemporaryartgallery.com. Opening Oct. 16: Chiyomi Taneike Longo’s “The Silence Between Lines.” Art Squared Gallery Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. Ongoing: Pershing Square Art Squared Gallery is an outdoor cityscape venue. The gallery has six 8’ x 8’ wall openings that display digital reproductions of artist works. Arty 634 S. Main St., (213) 213-7829 or artyla.com. Contemporary art gallery featuring West Coast artists. Bert Green Fine Art 102 W. Fifth St., (213) 624-6212 or bgfa.us. Through Oct. 30: Jeff Gillette’s international slumscapes evoke a cacophony of shapes and colors revealing themselves as artifacts of the human spirit. Scott Horsley’s drawings look at issues of masculinity in relation to technology, sex, consumerism and the anti-social paranoia of the security-obsessed state. Buchanon Gallery 204 W. Sixth St., (323) 823-1922 or byronbuchanan.com. Ongoing: Pop paintings by Bryon Buchanan. CB1 Gallery 207 W. Fifth St., (213) 806-7889 or cb1gallery.com. Opening Oct. 14: Two solo shows-for-one at CB1 gets you Martin Durazo’s “Plata O Plomo” and Chris Oatey’s “Animate Objects.” Through Nov. 14. Charlie James Gallery 975 Chung King Road, (213) 687-0488 or cjamesgallery.com. Through Oct. 16: “Indelible Whispers of the Sun” is comprised of new work by Bay Area artist Ala Ebtekar. Chinese Historical Society of Southern California 411 Bernard St., (323) 222-0856 or chssc.org. Ongoing: An exhibition about the history of immigration from China to the United States. Cirrus Gallery 542 S. Alameda St., (213) 680-3473 or cirrusgallery.com. Through Nov. 6: Retrospective exhibition of works on paper by Craig Kauffman, spanning the years 1958-2000. The Company 946 Yale St., (213) 221-7082 or thecompanyart.com. Through Oct. 16: Jen DeNike’s “The Scrying Trilogy” incorporates video, sculpture and a performance/sculpture installation in pieces that expand on the ballet Scrying, which was developed in Santa Monica. Crewest 110 Winston St., (213) 627-8272, crewest.com or thelabellab.com. Through Oct. 31: “Faces of Skid Row” is a group photography show. Downtown Art Gallery 1611 S. Hope St., (213) 255-2067 or downtownag.com. DAG exhibits the works of emerging and midcareer painters and print-makers. Edgar Varela Fine Arts 102 W. Fifth St., (213) 604-3634 or edgarvarelafinearts.com. Through Oct. 30: Ivan Limas’ “Free to Behave.”

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20 Downtown News

October 11, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

Listings Continued from previous page Gary Leonard 860 S. Broadway, takemypicture.com. Take My Picture is a gallery dedicated to Gary Leonard’s photographs, documenting the public and private culture of Los Angeles with significant guest collections. Hive Gallery & Studios 729 S. Spring St., (213) 955-9051 or thehivegallery.com. Through Oct. 30: “Hell vs. The Monster Mash” is a group show. Human Resources 510 Bernard St., humanresourcesla.com. Through Oct. 19: “Encounters I May Or May Not Have Had With Peter Berlin,” a 16mm installation by Mariah Garnett. L2kontemporary 990 N. Hill St. #205, (626) 319-3661 or l2kontemporary.com. Opening Oct. 16: “Echoes and Fractures” is a show of paintings by Thomas Trivitt. Through Nov. 13. The Latino Museum

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

514 S. Spring St., (213) 626-7600 or thelatinomuseum.com. Ongoing: The Latino Museum holds a unique collection of work from emerging and established contemporary Mexican, Latino and Chicano artists working and living in the United States as well as throughout Latin, Central and South America. LA Artcore at Union Center for the Arts 120 Judge John Aiso St., (213) 617-3274 or laartcore.org. Through Oct. 31: Matthew Thomas and Ehja Kang. Los Angeles Public Library Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7500 or lapl. org/events. Ongoing: The Annenberg Gallery displays some of the extraordinary materials collected by the Los Angeles Public Library since its founding in 1872. The inaugural exhibit, “Treasures of Los Angeles,” features items from the Hollywood collection, including vintage film posters, publicity photographs, postcards and other promotional items such as photo advertisements from Mexican films of the 1950s and 1960s.

MORE LISTINGS Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

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Easy ways to submit Your

Event Info

4 WEB: LADowntownNews.com/calendar/submit 4 EMAIL: Calendar@DowntownNews.com

Email: Send a brief description, street address and public phone number. Submissions must be received 10 days prior to publication date to be considered for print.

We Got Games Kings Home Opener and the NBA Preseason USC Trojans Football L.A. Coliseum, 3911 S Figueroa St., (213) 747-7111 or usctrojans.com. Oct. 16, 12:30 p.m.: Following a heartbreaking loss to the Washington Huskies and another tough matchup against Stanford, the Trojans host Cal. This may be one of the easier opponents of the season, so USC will be looking to slay the Golden Bears. Los Angeles Lakers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/lakers. Oct. 16-17, 7:30 p.m.: The Lake Show is back, and looking for a three-peat. The team didn’t make any major offseason moves, opting instead for some tweaks by adding defensive stalwart (and occasional hot head) Matt Barnes. Jordan Farmar is gone, but Shannon Browne is back, and maybe in a heightened role. The Lakers return from Europe this week to host the Denver Nuggets in preseason action, then on Sunday will play the Clippers or the Jazz (TBD). Don’t expect to see much of Kobe Bryant, who is recovering from off-season knee surgery, or Andrew Bynum, who is out until at least late November. Los Angeles Clippers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St.,

(213) 742-7100 or nba.com/clippers. Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 16, 4:30 p.m.; Oct. 17, time TBD: The Clippers have a new look. Literally. The team has some sleek new uniforms. Maybe the threads will be the difference this year? The team, again, looks formidable — on paper. Blake Griffin is healthy. Chris Kaman is coming off an All-Star berth. Eric Gordon played serious minutes on the Team USA squad that just won gold on the international stage. New coach Vinny Del Negro has wasted no time setting a tough tone, publicly declaring Baron Davis out-of-shape on day one of training camp. They put the new formula to the test in home pre-season games this week, hosting Denver and then Utah. A third pre-season game is against either the Lakers or Denver again. Los Angeles Kings Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., 1 (888) KINGS-LA or kings.nhl.com. Oct. 12, 15 and 20, 7:30 p.m.: Get ready for the purple flood at Staples Center. The Kings have their home opener against the Thrashers. The Canucks come to town too, and then the Hurricanes. —Ryan Vaillancourt

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22 Downtown News

October 11, 2010

Twitters/DowntownNews

CLASSIFIED

place your ad online at www.ladowntownnews.com

FOR RENT

L.A. Downtown News Classifieds Call: 213-481-1448 Classified Display & Line ads Deadlines: Thursday 12 pm REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

“Be wary of out of area companies. Check with the local Better Business Bureau before you send any money for fees or services. Read and understand any contracts before you sign. Shop around for rates.”

Real Estate Services

condos/townhouses

CONSIDERING Foreclosure? Are you late in payments? A short sale may be your solution. Call Lady Rodriguez, Realtor 310-600-7534. Represent both buyers and sellers.

Promenade WestCorporate Lease

lofts for sale

Fully furnished 2 bed, 2 1/2 bath. Immaculate, model unit. Townhouse style. Quality upgrades. Large patio. 2 PKG. $2,750 month.

Buying, Leasing or Selling a Loft?

TheLoftGuys.net

rjn Heritage Realty, Inc. Specializing in Downtown condominiums since 1987 213.617.8225 Rob@RobDowntownLA.com RobDowntownLA.com

TheLoftExpertGroup.com Downtown since 2002

213.598.7555 Real Estate Services

Buy Sell Lease

BestLARealEstate.com 323.298.0100

SELL/RENT YOUR Timeshare for cash!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for CASH! Over $78 Million Dollars offered in 2009! www.SellaTimeshare. com (877) 554-2098.

Rob Nesbitt

LA’s #1 Loft Site

Call 213-625-1313

Bill Cooper

Timeshare/Resorts

Call 213.680.1720

ARIZONA DISTRESSED Property Sale- 36 to 70 acres, $19,900 to $29,900. Great recreational areas. Call for details and locations. Offered by AZLR. 1-888-690-8271. IT’S HERE!! ELK Hunters/ Investors. Montana Land Sale. 160 Acres Mussellshell Area $99,900. 640 Acres Elk Paradise $599,900. 3000 Acres of Elk Preserve. Call for prices. 888-361-3006 www.WesternSkiesLand.com.

Office space lease/sale

CONDOMINIUMS/UNFURNISHED

Downtown LA High Rise Office Space for Lease

Promenade Luxury Condo across from Music Center, Disney Hall: 2BR 2BA, 2 balconies, 2 parking; microwave, dishwasher, fully equipped gym, pool, spa, 24/7 security, heat, air, paid cable, available now. 818-522-7838.

Below market Rates Walking distance to Metro Station, Social Security Office, Immigration Office, and Jewelry District. Close to 110 &101 Fwy. On site security guard.

213-892-0088

FOR RENT

Loft/Unfurnished

Old Bank District The original Live/Work Lofts from $1,100 Cafes, Bars, Shops, Galleries, Parking adjacent. Pets no charge

Apartments/Unfurnished

Luxury Rooms in Downtown

MOVE IN Special. Spacious 1 bdrm. + 1 bath. Covered parking. New decor. 131 South Caronelet. $775/mo. 310-922-5437.

Monthly Rents Start at $780 1 & 2 Rooms Available • Fully Furnished • 100% Utilities Paid • • Refrigerator, Microwave & TV In Each Room • • Wireless Access Throughout Bldg. • Gym • • Close to USC & Loyola Law School • • Presidential Suite with Kitchen • Parking Available Onsite

FREE RENT SPECIALS Up to $3500 off select apartment homes! Additional Look + Lease specials may apply. Free parking, free tanning, free wi-fi + biz center avail. Cardio Salon, pool, Spa, steamroom, sauna. Call us today. 866-742-0992. MOVE IN Special. Totally remodeled. Spacious 2 bdrms. + 1 bath. Near culver city. Gated parking. $1000 per month. 310922-5437.

REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

Out of State

Free ReNT SPECIALS @ the Medici. Penthouse 1 & 2 bdrm apts. Granite kitchens, washer/ dryers, business center, 2 pools, spa! Visit TheMedici.com for a full list of amenities. Call 888886-3731.

Call 213.253.4777 LAloft.com

REAL ARTIST LOFTS 15001946 sq.ft. $1,775-2,200. High ceilings hardwood/concrete floors, kitchen, pool/spa, gated parking, laundry, sorry no dogs. Open house Sundays 12-3pm. Leasing office @ 1250 Long Beach Ave. 213-629-5539.

Help Wanted

Town Houses

THR & ASSOCIATES, the world’s largest traveling road show, is seeking Buyers, Assistant Managers, managers and District Managers. Experience with antiques, collectibles, coins, precious metals and sales are highly desired. Must be willing to travel and potentially relocate. Earn 35K-125K. To apply go to www.THRAssociates.com/ careers.

TOWNHOUSE STYLE 2 bdrm. 2 bath. $1100. 15 minutes from Downtown. Near South Pasadena 323-254-0763.

EMPLOYMENT restaurant/hotel

Fuddruckers Hiring

Cooks, Cashiers, Shift Leaders!

Apply 2-4 p.m. Daily 10250 Santa Monica Blvd. 221 North San Fernando

Great Oppty’s!

General HELP WANTED Movie Extras. Earn up to $150/day. People needed for background in a major film production. Exp. not required. 888-366-0843. Office/Clerical JOBS NATIONWIDE! Admin., HR, Clerical, Accounting, Mgmt., Tech., etc. - www.Jobs444.com and www.JobsBloom.com.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Business Opportunities BUSINESS FOR Sale!! Established for 3 years. Will Train. Nets 100k. Can operate from anywhere. $3800 down. Call Jerry 1-800-418-8250.

ATTN: COMPUTER Work. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/ mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-888-304-2847.

DRIVERS: COMPANY Drivers (Solos & Hazmat Teams) *Great Pay *Great Miles *CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated & regional positions available. Call: 866-448-1055 SWIFT. REEFER DRIVERS Needed! Experienced drivers and Class A commercial students welcome! Our Incredible Freight network offers plenty of miles! Call Prime today!1-800-277-0212. www. PrimeInc.com. DRIVERS - 100% Tuition paid CDL Training. Start your New Career. No Credit Check. No Experience required! Call: 888417-7564. Crst Expedited www. JoinCRST.com.

SERVICES

Drivers 20 DRIVERS Needed - For Dedicated Run. CDL-A, Experienced. 11 Western States. Stable Family Owned - Andrus Transportation. Good Pay, Routes, People! 1-800-888-5838 or 1-866-8065119 x1402. NATIONAL CARRIERS needs O/Os, Lease Purchase, Company Drivers for its Regional Operations in California. Generous Hometime & Outstanding Pay Package. CDL-A Required. 1-888-707-7729. www.NationalCarriers.com. DRIVERS - Become an Owner Operator or Trade-in your old truck for a 2008 Freightliner. Easy and Affordable with zero down payment. Call Comtrak at 866-338-2958, or apply online at www.ComtrakLogistics.com. DRIVERS/CDL Training - Career Central. We Train and EMPLOY You. Company Drivers up to 40K First Year. New Team Pay! Up to 48c/mile Class A CDL Training Regional Locations! 1-877-3697091 www.CentralDrivingJobs. net.

massage therapy

Thai massage Med. & Physical Therapist Downtown • Improves Circulation • Promotes Healing

(818) 399-5087

Arthritis, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Early Bird $35 (9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) attorneys

ABOGADO DE IMMIGRACION! Family, Criminal, P.I. for more than 20 yrs! Child Support / Custody Necesita Permiso de trabajo? Tagalog / Español / Korean

Get your GREEN CARD or CITIZENSHIP Law Office of H. Douglas Daniel Esq., (213) 689-1710

Business Services ADVERTISE YOUR Home, property or business for sale in 240 California newspapers. Reach over 6 million readers for ONLY $550! Call this newspaper or visit: www.CAL-SCAN.com.

Casaloma L.A. Apartments

the loft expert! group

Clean unfurnished bachelor rooms with shared bath at $550/mo. with private bath at $695/mo.

TM

Sec. Deposit Special @$100

Special STUDENT RATE!

Downtown since 2002

$690 1 Person

Voted Best Downtown Residential Real Estate Agent

Mayfair Hotel 1256 West 7th Street

Call us today!

(213) 484-9789

Bill Cooper • 213.598.7555 • TheLoftExpertGroup.com

Includes utilities, basic cable channels, laundry room on site. Gated building in a good area. 208 W. 14th St. at Hill St. Downtown LA

For English Call Pierre or Terri 213.744.9911 For Spanish Call Susana 213.749.0306

Take us home ADOPT (OR FOSTER) your forever friend from Bark Avenue Foundation. Beautiful, healthy puppies, dogs, cats and kittens available at Downtown’s largest private adoption facility. Call Dawn at 213-840-0153 or email Dawn@BarkAveLA.com or visit www.Bark Avenue Foundation.org.

Do you have something to sell?

Ad Copy: _________________________________________

Ad Prices

________________________________________________

(Marketplace and Automotive Categories ONLY) • Items under $300 • Items $301 to $500 • Items $501 to $1200 • Items $1201 to $2000 • Items $2001+…

Name: Address: City Phone: Cash $ Credit card #: Exp. Date:

FREE! $11.50 $14.00 $16.50 $19.00

12 words, 2 weeks 15 words 15 words 15 words 15 words

All ads run for 2 weeks. Ads may be renewed after two weeks for 50% off the original price of the ad.

With a circulation of State Check $

Zip Credit Card $

47,000,

our classifieds get results!

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

Restrictions: Offer good on private party ads only. Ads must be pre-paid by cash, check or credit card. Certain classifications excluded. Deadline: Thursday at noon for next issue.


October 11, 2010

Downtown News 23

DowntownNews.com

ADVERTISE YOUR Job Opening in 240 California newspapers. Reach over 6 million readers for only $550! Call this newspaper or visit: www.Cal-SCAN.com. DISPLAY ADVERTISING in 140 Cal-SDAN newspapers statewide for $1,550! Reach over 3 million Californians! Free email brochure. Call (916) 288-6019. www.Cal-SDAN.com. Cleaning CONCEPTO’S CLEANING Crew. Professional, experienced, cleans apartments, homes, offices and restaurants. Call for a quote. 323-459-3067 or 818-409-9183. eduCation ATTEND COLLEGE Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.Centura.us.com.

$10__YOGA! Mark Blanchard 304PowerYoga (Olympic/ Olive) **Power-Hour__ classes** 6:30am&12pm. www.304poweryoga.com 213488-0820. PERSONAL TRAINER Cardio, Strength, Flexibility, Training At your home, office, or personal gym Mobility/Motivational problems our specialty Call Jill Maroney 213 353 9492 ldanzgr8@ aol.com. legal BUSINESS ATTORNEY All litigation matters, transactions and contracts 26 Years experience Ivy League background Paul Bloom, ESQ. (805) 984-8375. MiSC. ServiCeS

HIGH SCHOOL Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www.SouthEasternHS.com.

HERNIA REPAIR? Did You Receive A Composix Kugel Mesh Patch Between 1999-2007? If patch was removed due to complications of bowel perforation, abdominal wall tears, puncture of abdominal organs or intestinal fistulae, you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727.

FinanCial ServiCeS

PHotograPHy

BANKRUPTCY 310-428-4043.

MOTIVATED Photographer for your most important features (people, pets, places) and events (celebrations, anniversaries, receptions) at your location 310-686-1390

IT’S YOUR Money! Lump sums paid for structured settlement or fixed annuity payments. Rapid, high payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-294-8772. A+ Better Business Bureau rating.

AUTOS

HealtH & FitneSS

2009 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S Certified, air with power pkg # NI3609 / 9N487053 $15,499, call 888-838-5089

Pre-oWned

doWntoWn l.a. auto grouP Porsche Volkswagen audi Mercedes-Benz nissan cheVrolet cadillac

2005 MERCEDES BENZ SLK350 Certified, leather C101383-1 vin 045832, only $21,896, call 888-203-2967. 2006 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT 2.0T Value Edition, Turbo, auto, only 31k miles. #ZV980/ 141587. $16,410. 888-781-8102. 2007 AUDI A4 premium pkg., black/black, certified, (ZA9755/ vin7A273041), $21,888. Call 888-583-0981. 2008 BMW 328I Mint condition, white/tan, stk C01055D1-2/ L53028 $23,387. 888-879-9608. 2008 MERCEDES BENZ CLK350 CONVERTIBLE Certified, low miles, nav, leather, #243042 $34,999 Call 888-3198762.

2009 PORSCHE 911 TURBO Cabriolet Basalt, Blk/Blk, Certified, Only 6k miles, Tiptronic, Loaded vin773136, $119,988, 888-685-5426.

For a complete list of our pre-owned inventory, go to www.DTLAMOTORS.com autoS Wanted DONATE YOUR CAR: Children’s Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child’s Life Through Research & Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy & Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. DONATE YOUR VEHICLE! Receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, NonRunners Accepted, 1-888-4685964.

We've got what you're searching for! DowntownNews.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS notiCeS IDEAS FOR LOFT LIVING in Downtown? I’ve got plenty. Visit me at www.nestingmodern.com. Live wonderfully! 1-530-6378464.

Furniture JAPANESE ANTIQUES Warehouse Show!! Oct. 16,17 9:00am - 3:00pm Oct. 18-21 12:00pm - 6:00 pm Check Yelp Los Angeles for “Itchy Knee Japanese Antiques” for detailed info. 323447-3071.

CHurCHeS THE BRIDGE / Little Tokyo: Contemporary worship, 4:00pm Sundays, 401 E Third St. www. thebridgewired.org.

ITEMS FOR SALE laWn & garden/FarM equiP NEW NORWOOD SawmillsLumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cyclesawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-661-7746 ext. 300N. MiSC. iteMS

PETS/ANIMALS adoPt a Pet ADOPT (OR FOSTER) your forever friend from Bark Avenue Foundation. Beautiful, healthy puppies, dogs, cats and kittens available at Downtown’s largest private adoption facility. Call Dawn at 213-840-0153 or email Dawn@BarkAveLA.com or visit www.Bark Avenue Foundation. org.

LEGAL FiCtitiouS BuSineSS naMe

BOXING GLOVES 16oz. red Everlast $20. Roger 323-6667892.

Fictitious Business name statement

The Downtown Renaissance Collection

Be Inspired...

On Spring St.

Premiere Towers:

I c o n I c B e au t y S e e k S S t y l i S h M at e

File no. 20101331593 The following person is doing business as: HEAT TRANSFER SOLUTIONS, INC., 3291 E. La Palma Avenue, Suite F, Anaheim CA 92807, Orange County, are hereby registered by the following registrant: S.R & B BOILERS, INC., 3291 E. La Palma Avenue, Suite F, Anaheim CA 92807. This business is conducted by a corporation. Registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein on 9/10/2010. This statement was filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on September 20.2010. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2010

Best Downtown Locations!

2 bdrm/2 bath, $1600/mo • Rooftop garden terrace/ GYM w/city view • 24 hr. doorman • Free (1) parking

City Lofts:

1000 sqft, 16ft ceilings, $1950/mo. w/2nd level bedroom • Stainless steel appliances/refrigerator etc. • Pet friendly

Spring Tower Lofts:

2000 sqft, 3 bdrm/1bath/washer/dryer • Concrete floors/ brick walls/exposed ceilings • 1 indoor parking

noW leaSing

$1,400’s/Mo. Free Parking ROOFTOP GARDEN RETREAT WITH BBQ AND LOUNGE GRAND LOBBY • FITNESS CENTER • SPA MODERN KITCHEN w/CAESAR COUNTERTOPS HIGH SPEED INTERNET DESIGNER LIVING SPACES • PET FRIENDLY • DRAMATIC VIEWS WALKING DISTANCE TO RALPHS SUPERMARKET

We are located in a prime area in Downtown LA nice neighborhood w/ salon, market, café etc. Wired for high speed internet & cable.

Please call 213.627.6913 www.cityloftsquare.com

Orsini 550 NORTH FIGUEROA ST.

877-231-9362

WWW.THEORSINI.COM

Medici

756 S. Broadway • Downtown Los Angeles 213-892-9100 • chapmanf lats.com

725 SOUTH BIXEL ST.

877-239-8256

Pricing subject to change without notice.

WWW.THEMEDICI.COM

Monthly from $595 utilities paid. (213) 627-1151

Fully furnished with TV, telephone, microwave, refrigerator. Full bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly maid service.

LOFT LIVING

Your number 1 source for Loft sales, rentals and development! downtownnews.com

madison hotel Clean furnished single rooms. 24-hour desk clerk service. •Daily, $25.00 •Weekly, $99.00 •Monthly, $295.00 (213) 622-1508 423 East 7th St.

(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.)

• School problems? • Conflict at home or with friends?

adolescent support group now forming ages 13-17 low fee Call Marney Stofflet, lCSW

(323) 662-9797

4344 Fountain ave. (at Sunset), Suite a los angeles, Ca 90029

Piero 616 ST. PAUL AVE.

877-235-6012

WWW.THEPIERO.COM

Visconti 1221 WEST THIRD ST.

866-690-2888

WWW.THEVISCONTI.COM

FREE Rent Specials On Select Floor Plans Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills

Beautiful Fully Furnished Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Beautiful Fully FurnishedAvailable Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Available Services Include:

Reception y Mail y Fiber Optic Internet y TelephoneServices & Voice Include: Mail y West Law y Reception y& Mail Optic Internet y Photocopy FaxyyFiber Video Conferencing Telephone & Voice Mail y West Law y Photocopy & Fax y Video Conferencing

Additional Features: Kitchen Additional Facilities, Mail/Copy Features: Room, Conference Rooms, Mail/Copy Spectacular Views, Kitchen Facilities, Room, Fully Trained Staff Views, Conference Rooms, Spectacular Fully Trained Staff

is your teen experiencing:

Elegant World Class Resort Apartment Homes

JENNY AHN JENNY AHN (213) 996-8301

(213) 996-8301

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

laleads@regentbc.com

laleads@regentbc.com

www.regentbc.com

www.regentbc.com

Monthly from $550 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

• Free Resident/Guest Parking in Gated Garage • Private Library, Business Center & Conference Rooms • Free Wi-Fi & DSL Computer Use • Resident Karaoke Lounge • Directors Screening Room • Lavish Fountains & Sculptures • On-Site Private Resident Park with Sand Volleyball, BBQ’s and Jogging Track • Night Light Tennis Courts • Indoor Basketball

• Brunswick Four-Lane Virtual Bowling • Full Swing Virtual Golf • 3100 Square Foot Cybex Fitness Facility • Free Tanning Rooms • Massage Room, Sauna & Steam Room • Rooftop Pools with Dressing Rooms • Concierge Service • 24-Hour Doorman • 24/7 On-Site Management • Magnificent City Views *Amenities vary among communities

Version 2

Children’s Performing Group

Sunshine Generation Singing, dancing, performing and fun! For boys & girls ages 3 and up!

Client: Publication: Size/Color:

Real Estate Specialist of SanAssociates Gabriel Valley G.H. Palmer LADT News Proudly serving the communities of Alhambra, Monterey 4.3125” x San 8” Gabriel, 4C

Park, Montebello and El Monte.

Cal Best Realty Design by: apluscreative@yahoo.com Ph: 323.474.4668

SunshineGenerationLA.com 909-861-4433

Emi Terauchi Realtor / Notary • Lic.No.00810238

English/Japanes/Chinese speaking emiterauchi@yahoo.com • (626) 786-9086


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October 11, 2010


10-11-10