Page 1

LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS Volume 40, Number 41

INSIDE

Gilligan’s Island in the 14th District.

6

Million Dollar Movies 16

October 10, 2011

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

READY FOR SCHOOL

More financial trouble at LA Plaza.

7

Big retail changes at Seventh and Spring.

9

photos by Gary Leonard

On Thursday, Oct. 6, the Fred Jordan Mission in Skid Row hosted a free back-to-school giveaway for thousands of children. The mission partnered with Foot Locker, which gave each child a pair of shoes. The children also received backpacks, school supplies and other gear.

A new view of food from Peru.

14

Racism, Sexual Harassment Lawsuits Roil Central Division Shakeup at Downtown Station Follows Allegations Including That One Officer Gave Another a Cake Topped With Watermelon and Fried Chicken

MOCA’s shining ‘Big Black Sun.’

15

17 CALENDAR LISTINGS 20 MAP 21 CLASSIFIEDS

by Ryan Vaillancourt staff writer

T

he Los Angeles Police Department’s Central Division is caught in a tangle of lawsuits alleging a culture of racial and sexual harassment that several officers say has been tolerated by command staff. Four officers and two sergeants ensnared in the allegations have been transferred out of the Downtown police station and suffered a downgrade in rank. The city is fighting three lawsuits, and potentially facing millions of dollars in damages from officers who worked, until recently, in Central’s Community Relations Office. The office is comprised of the division’s senior lead officers, who serve as community liaisons in several Downtown neighborhoods. Complaints filed by senior lead officers Earl

Life happens... it’s what

you do with it that counts!

Introducing the Los Angeles Center for Women’s Health. A comprehensive facility dedicated to women in the prime of their lives. Our world class specialists specialize in you.

Wright and Mike Fernandez and Officer Marie Kardiban paint a picture of the office as a place where inappropriate racial and sexually charged comments and pranks have become embedded in the workplace culture. The suits allege that Sgt. Pete Foster, who supervised the unit until he was transferred last year, and who is awaiting a disciplinary hearing, was the chief culprit. Among a litany of allegations, the lawsuits charge that: n Foster presented Wright, who is African American, with a cake topped with a piece of fried chicken and a slice of watermelon. n Foster sent Fernandez, who is partly of Mexican descent, a text message with an image depicting a stick propping up a box, over a bottle of Mexican beer and the caption: “Mexican Trap: How Arizona Will Catch Their Illegals.”

n When Kardiban and some community volunteers walked past Foster, he held up a dollar bill and said, “Here’s a tip for last night.” n An officer was removed by Foster from a special overtime detail and replaced by Foster’s wife, who is also a police officer. n Central Area Capt. Todd Chamberlain, in discussing an overtime detail on Seventh Street during the holidays, stated that he didn’t want any officers hiding in 7-Eleven drinking watermelon Slurpees, which some perceived as a dig at AfricanAmerican officers. The statement allegedly came in a weekly crime control meeting with several officers, command staffers and community members present. n Capt. Darrell Russell, second in command at Central, initiated a transfer of Foster, but his susee LAPD, page 10

It’s happening downtown. www.lacwh.org

www.facebook.com/lacwh

(213) 742.5784 COMING THIS FALL


2 Downtown News

October October10, 10,2011 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

AROUNDTOWN Work Begins on Spring Street Park

A

work crew last week broke ground on the $8 million Spring Street Park. At about 8 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 6, a backhoe began tearing up the concrete covering the nearly one-acre property, which until this summer functioned as a parking lot. The year-long effort will turn the L-shaped lot between the El Dorado and Rowan lofts into an attraction with walking paths, a plaza, benches, a fountain, dozens of trees and artwork. As crews begin the work, questions remain about how to fund future maintenance of the park. A plan to have community members voluntarily pay for operations recently fell apart. Area stakeholders are now considering alternative funding mechanisms. If no private group is found to operate the park, the city will maintain the facility. No matter who ultimately maintains the park, it is slated to open next fall.

Wilshire Grand Closings Begin

T

he countdown has begun for the closure of the Wilshire Grand Hotel, with one of the building’s signature restaurant’s reducing its hours. This month, lunch service was eliminated at the Italian eatery Cardini Ristorante. The restaurant, which opened in 1989, will close for good on Oct. 28, said hotel spokesman Marc Loge. The closure is part of the plan to shut the hotel by the end of December to make way for a $1.1 billion, two-tower hotel, condominium and office project. Loge said that there are currently no plans to close the hotel’s other eateries, which include the Korean restaurant Seoul Jung, as well as City Grill and Point Moorea, until the end of the year. Cardini will be open

TAKE MY PICTURE GARY LEONARD

for dinner only this month from 5:30-10 p.m. The building at Seventh and Figueroa streets opened in 1952. It will be demolished next year to make room for the new project.

Money and Questions For Art Walk

R

unning the Downtown Art Walk could soon get much more expensive. On Tuesday, Oct. 11, the City Council will consider recommendations presented last week by the Downtown Art Walk Stakeholders Task Force to the city’s Public Works Committee. The recommendations state that the Art Walk should require a special events permit, thereby requiring the organization to pay for all city-related costs, including police, fire and other street services. Joe Moller, executive director of the Art Walk, said it has not been determined what that would cost, but that it could be beyond the event’s means. “To be presented with a bill for several thousand of dollars every month would exceed the few resources we have,” he said. Moller said before a decision is made, he hopes to work with the city and figure out how these expenses could be shared by all who benefit from Art Walk, including operators of food trucks and popup stores. “We may need more time to work together as a community and come up with a solution for the bill,” he said. The next Art Walk takes place Oct. 13.

Ex-Supe Backs Jan Perry

A

nother week, another endorsement for Ninth District City Councilwoman Jan Perry. On Monday, Oct. 3, the mayoral candidate announced that she had secured the backing of former Second District Supervisor

Introducing a New Sunday Brunch

7th Street between Broadway and Spring Fall, 2011

Yvonne Brathwaite Burke. Burke left office in 2008, after 16 years on the job. The language in the statement announcing the endorsement made an appeal for Perry as the choice for female voters; the four-paragraph announcement used the words “woman” or “women” seven times. “I am supporting Jan Perry because she is a true leader for the women of Los Angeles,” said Burke in the statement. “If elected, she will make history by breaking through one more glass ceiling by becoming the first woman to serve as Mayor of Los Angeles.” Perry is not the only woman seeking to replace Antonio Villaraigosa. City Controller Wendy Greuel was the first person to throw her hat into the ring. Also running are businessman and former First Deputy Mayor Austin Beutner, City Council President Eric Garcetti and radio host Kevin James. Perry previously secured the endorsements of former Valley Councilman Greig Smith and

current Eighth District rep Bernard Parks.

Corrections The Oct. 3 story “In Times of Change, There’s Always Art,” contained incorrect contact information for the California African American Museum. The museum is at 600 State Drive. The phone number is (213) 744-7432. The Oct. 3 story “Downtown, in the Key of A Major” contained the wrong date for a concert at the Colburn School featuring works by Igor Stravinsky. The concert, in conjunction with the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time, happens Nov. 14. The Sept. 26 “What’s For Sale” story incorrectly reported that the city had purchased a building at 1130 S. Hope St. The city has authorized staffers to negotiate its purchase, but it is currently owned by BIMHF, LLC.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY FULLY FURNISHED ALLINCLUSIVE TURN-KEY SUITES

UP TO 67% TAX DEDUCTIBLE

VOTED 'BEST ROOFTOP' IN DOWNTOWN LA

at restaurant+lounge+bar

A NEW LIFESTYLE SOLUTION FOR PROFESSIONALS WANTING TO LIVE, WORK, AND PLAY... NO MATTER HOW LONG OR SHORT YOUR STAY.

WWW.1010WILSHIRE.COM 1010 WILSHIRE BLVD., LOS ANGELES, CA 90017 TEL: (877) 338-1010 STAY@1010WILSHIRE.COM

FREE Buy One Entree, Get Second One Free! EntREE Present ad at time of purchase. Second entree must be of equal or lesser value. Offer expires Nov. 30, 2011. reservations made through urbanspoon.com

W NO ING NT RE

brunch hours 10am -3pm 1 1 8 W e s t 5 t h s t r e e t, L o s A n g e L e s , C A 9 0 0 1 3 213-891-1144

K R AS OU T OU -IN AB OVE LS! M CIA E SP

onyxloungela.com

twitter.com/onyxloungela

facebook.com/onyxloungela


October 10, 2011

AUDI OF

DOWNTOWN L.A. 1900 S. Figueroa St. audidtla.com • 888-583-0981

2012 AUDI A3 2.0T per month for 39 months

The Shammas Family Servicing Downtown’s Vehicles since 1955 The Downtown L.A. Auto Group treats the needs of each individual customer with paramount concern. We know that you have high expectations, and as a car dealer we enjoy the challenge of meeting and exceeding those standards each and every time. Allow us to demonstrate our commitment to excellence! Our experienced sales staff is eager to share its knowledge and enthusiasm with you. We encourage you to browse our online inventory, schedule a test drive and investigate financing options. You can also request more information about a vehicle using our online form. We look forward to serving you!

$333 per month plus tax, 39 month closed end lease on approved credit through Audi Financial Services. $2499 down excludes taxes, title, security, 1st month, acquisition fee, other options and dealer fees. Residual $17,855. 25 cents per mile over 10,000 miles/year and a disposition fee of $350 due at lease end. 1 at this price #A12032/ 002723

PORSCHE OF

NISSAN OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

WO Chic k

N

DOWNTOWN L.A. 1900 S. Figueroa St. porschedowntownla.com • 888-685-5426

OF DOWNTOWN L.A. 1900 S. Figueroa St. vwdowntownla.com • 888-781-8102

2012 VW PASSAT

189

$

per month for 36 months

Her n

lym

Ct

pic

Blvd .

DOWNTOWN L.A. MOTORS MBZ

NISSAN OF

LA LIVE

WP ico B lvd.

DOWNTOWN L.A. 635 W. Washington Blvd. downtownnissan.com • 888-838-5089

STAPLES

S Fig

uero

a St .

CONVENTION CENTER Ven ice B lvd.

VOLKSWAGEN OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

10

AUDI OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

W1

8th

Was h

ingt on B

W2

3rd

lvd.

8 110

St.

St.

8 88 8

2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S

Ave .

2011 PORSCHE BOXSTER

VOLKSWAGEN

Plus tax 36 month closed end lease on approved credit. $1999 due at signing excluding title, taxes, options, acquisition fees, dealer fees and first payment. Zero Security Deposit. MSRP $20,765. Purchase option at lease end $12,043.70. .25cents/mile over 30,000 miles. VIN 550882

S Flo wer St.

333

$

Downtown News 3

DowntownNews.com

S Gr and

WA dam

s Blv d.

179

St.

FELIX CHEVROLET

per month for 24 months

Main

499

$

PORSCHE OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

8 USC

WJ

effe

rson

$

Blvd .

On approved credit, 39 month closed end lease, $2999 due at signing plus tax, 1st month payment, acquisition fee, license, doc fee. $0 security deposit. Residual $14,190. 20 cents per mile over 12,000 miles per year. MSRP of $23,650. 1 at this payment #N120167 / CC128599

Plus tax 24 month closed end lease on approved credit. $4950 due at signing excluding title, taxes, options, acquisition fees, dealer fees and first payment. Zero Security Deposit. Purchase option at lease end $42,459.20, .25cents/ mile over 10,000 miles. 1 at this offer. BU710070.

FELIX CHEVROLET 3330 S. Figueroa St. felixchevrolet.com • 888-879-9608

2012 CHEVY MALIBU LS

per month for 39 months

DOWNTOWN L.A. AUTO GROUP 888-I-LOVE-LA (456-8352) W W W . D T L A M O T O R S . C O M

CARSON NISSAN

DOWNTOWN L.A. MOTORS MBZ 1801 S. Figueroa St. mbzla.com • 888-319-8762

2012 MERCEDES C250

1505 E. 223rd St., Carson carsonnnissan.com • 888-845-2267

179

$

per month for 39 months

Plus tax 39 month closed end lease on approved credit. $1660 due at signing excluding title, taxes, options, acquisition fees, dealer fees and first payment. Zero Security Deposit. Purchase option at lease end $11,544.40. .25cents/ mile over 39,000 miles. VIN 112208.

2012 NISSAN SENTRA 2.0

139

$

per month for 39 months

Plus tax 39 month closed end lease on approved credit. $2999 due at signing excluding title, taxes, options, acquisition fees, dealer fees and first payment. Zero Security Deposit. MSRP $20,765. Purchase option at lease end $10,962. 15 cents/mile over 12,000 miles per year. MSRP of $18,270 1 at this payment C120068 / 634331

349

$

per month for 30 months

Plus tax 30 month closed end lease on approved credit. $2865 due at signing excluding title, taxes, options, acquisition fees, dealer fees and first payment. Zero Security Deposit.. Purchase option at lease end $26,722. .25cents/ mile over 10,000 miles per year. All with MSRP of $38,175.


4 Downtown News

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

EDITORIALS An End to Dodger Blues

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis

R

ight now, the players and front office staff of the Los Angeles Dodgers are doing exactly what most baseball fans in the city are doing — watching other teams compete in the playoffs. It’s unfortunate if not unexpected — when the season began back in the spring, the line-up seemed to be lacking, with too many role players and not enough big bats to make the squad stand out. Unfortunately, the proceedings in the coming months once again seem likely to supercede the season that just ended with a whimper rather than a bang. For the third year in a row, the turmoil spawned by the divorce of Frank and Jamie McCourt will draw far more attention than anything related to what happens in free agency or during the rest of the off-season. Once again, the fans who over the years or even decades have given their passions and money to the Dodgers will be treated like chattel by the selfish and greedy McCourts, if the McCourts get a chance. It is time, once and for all, for the McCourts to end this ridiculous war and move on to other pastures. There is very little more disgusting than watching the wildly rich argue about their money, especially when it affects so many others. They’ve done more than enough damage to the team and the brand. Their seven-plus years of ownership has stained more than 40 years of Dodger goodwill. This page has not been alone in urging the McCourts to sell the Dodgers and related team holdings and walk away with a tidy profit. While divorce may be a financial war for them, its impact on the team means it is not just a game for the fans. So much has gone wrong on so many levels The tragic opening day beating of Giants fan Brian Stow simply crystallized a feeling of unease in the stadium that had been growing for years. If there was a bright spot in 2011 beyond the performances of outfielder Matt Kemp and pitcher Clayton Kershaw, it was that the small crowds made the wait for hot dogs and other concessions annoying rather than interminable. At the end of the month, a bankruptcy judge is expected to hold a short hearing that should clarify some matters, including whether the Dodgers can auction off their cable television rights, the life preserver to which McCourt continues to grasp. On the other hand, Major League Baseball officials are hoping the judge will heed their request and order the team sold. Dodgers fans desperately want the latter. Even if McCourt wins in court, he should realize that he’s lost the fan base, whose dollars are the primary revenue stream for any changes the owner hopes to make on the field. The tumbling crowds in Chavez Ravine as the season wore on will surely continue as long as the McCourts maintain ownership. It’s time for the McCourts to do the right thing, to live up to all the promises they made years ago when they first swooped in to town and pledged to be careful stewards of the storied franchise. To make the Dodgers and the Dodger experience better, the McCourts need to go — now more than ever.

Come Clean on LA Plaza’s Financial Problems

T

he April opening of the $27 million LA Plaza de Cultura Y Artes came under a cloud. As officials celebrated the debut of the venue that is part museum and part MexicanAmerican cultural center, a shadow was cast by allegations that the project’s construction should have been delayed after Native American bones and artifacts were discovered on the site. The reasoning for continuing construction on much of the project (only work on the courtyard was halted) never seemed sufficient. It felt as if pressure was applied to finish and open by April, and that the timeline superseded serious cultural questions. The issue of the disrespect of legitimate concerns from another brutalized group seemed quite difficult to understand, much less accept. Now, the feeling of a lack of transparency at LA Plaza continues in a shocking new way. As Los Angeles Downtown News first reported, LA Plaza is ensnared in an economic scandal. Last week, a member of the board acknowledged that the contract of the attraction’s executive director, Miguel Angel Corzo, was not renewed at the end of August because of “financial mismanagement.” It’s extraordinarily rare to hear such blunt talk about the parting of the ways of an institution and its leader. Even without the blunt talk, experience would tell us that having the head of a major cultural organization depart so soon after a heralded opening is no small matter — something very serious must have occurred. The situation is getting worse. This week, Downtown News reports that more than half of the staff of the facility has lost their jobs due to the economic tumult. The original roster of 24 fulltime employees and four part-time workers has been cleaved to just 12 full-timers. It’s a wonder how they can effectively run LA Plaza with that size crew. Additionally, LA Plaza and its builder are the target of more than a dozen lawsuits from various construction entities. The plaintiffs charge that they have not been paid a total of more than $5 million. Right now it seems clear that officials, blunt as they have been, are not telling the whole story. The board member stated that details relating to the nonprofit’s actions are sparse because of the possibility of future litigation, but it may just as well be due to em-

barrassment over how things turned so bad so quickly. The element that ratchets the saga of LA Plaza higher is the role of county government. The facility has long been a dream of First District Supervisor Gloria Molina. In the effort to provide an education and point of view that she and others felt was often missed or underplayed, Molina created an advisory board for LA Plaza. A location on Main Street across from the El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument was found, and a capital campaign was launched. Molina kept a close eye on the project during its gestation, and when it opened she was widely fêted. While a foundation was created to oversee LA Plaza, the county is responsible for its maintenance and operation. In the coming weeks, it is likely that more entities will dig in to what is happening at LA Plaza. Some of these will be media and others could be civic watchdogs. With the scandal now in the public domain, the board and leaders of LA Plaza should come clean. After all, once “financial mismanagement” has been acknowledged, how much do they have to lose by laying it all out for everyone to see? They should tell the public what they know and how and why the “financial mismanagement” occurred. If an investigation or audit is required — and it seems like one or both is necessary — the results should be made public. The officials can make this a short, contained and transparent story, rather than allow elements to drip out over weeks or months. This has been an inauspicious first year for LA Plaza, and it threatens to overshadow the good that the facility can do, the education it can provide. That is why it is important for the people in charge of the institution to lead by example. LA Plaza officials should come forward and explain what happened months ago with the discovery of Native American bones and declare who gave the order to continue the work and why that was appropriate. They should also throw back the curtain on Corzo’s tenure and describe what happened — after all, more than a dozen people have lost their livelihood, and possibly the means to feed their families, because a person in charge messed up or got greedy, it remains to be seen which. Come clean on all aspects of LA Plaza. Only when that happens can this potential jewel of Downtown Los Angeles truly shine.


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 5

Opinion

The Time Has Come for Expediting CEQA Review New Bills Protect Projects Without Weakening Environmental Law by Joel b. Miller

CEQA review on the grounds that they would weaken CEQA. SB 292 applies to Farmers Field, while AB 900 would impact other large projects that create high-wage, highly skilled jobs and do not result in any additional emission of greenhouse

W

ith the state legislature’s approval of AB 900 and SB 292, and Gov. Jerry Brown’s recent signing of the bills at a ceremony in Downtown GUEST OPINION

Los Angeles, the political rhetoric over the California Environmental Quality Act has again been ratcheted up. The passage of laws that will expedite the CEQA review process leads those on the environmental fringe to worry that the state is on a slippery slope that will unwind more than 40 years of environmental good. Most reasonable people — and I include many developers in this group — would acknowledge that the passage of CEQA in 1970 has, for the most part, been a good thing. Before that, both public and private development could move forward with no concern for environmental consequences. CEQA has since served an important function in informing decision-makers and the public of the expected environmental impacts from the implementation of a development proposal. Most reasonable people — and I include many environmentalists in this group — would also acknowledge that CEQA has been abused by those who file lawsuits for the sole purpose of killing a project by delaying it or by people who view a project as a competitive threat. One notable example occurred in Downtown Los Angeles, when the University Gateway development was delayed for years by legal action from a competing student housing provider. The project ultimately opened, but the opposition caused the cost to soar. With this as background, it would be funny if it weren’t so sad to read about those who have attacked laws to expedite

Neither SB 292 (the Farmers Field bill) nor AB 900 compromises CEQA at all. Environmental impact reports will still be required for projects that may have a significant effect on the surrounding area. gases. There are minor differences in these bills, but both require expedited judicial review so that the state can address our significant, protracted unemployment problem. Although AEG’s Farmers Field (for the record, my firm, Psomas, is doing survey mapping for the football stadium project) seems to be the focus of attention, the expedited court review process outlined in AB 900 applies to projects that meet a suite of high environmental standards. The development, for example, must be certified as LEED silver or better by the U.S. Green Building Council, and must achieve specific greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. The bill

also covers clean renewable energy projects that generate electricity exclusively through wind or solar power, and clean energy manufacturing projects. In order to qualify for protection under AB 900, a project must result in a minimum investment of $100 million and must create highly skilled jobs that pay prevailing and living wages, both during construction and after the development is completed. Additionally, the project cannot result in any additional emission of greenhouse gases. We should keep in mind that neither SB 292 (the Farmers Field bill) nor AB 900 compromises CEQA at all. Environmental impact reports will still be required for projects that may have a significant effect on the surrounding area — indeed, developer Anschutz Entertainment Group is currently preparing a full EIR for the South Park project. Also, the public will still have adequate opportunity to review and comment on EIRs, and local agencies must certify the environmental studies. These protections are what earned the bills the backing of leading environmental group the Natural Resources Defense Council. The accomplishments in these bills are particularly meaningful. They mandate that the Court of Appeal will have original jurisdiction (skipping over the superior court) and require that the court issue its decision within 175 days of the filing of the lawsuit. For those concerned about the proverbial slippery slope, it is interesting to note that these bills do not go as far as AB 81, passed in 2009. That legislation shielded Majestic Realty’s EIR for the proposed City of Industry football stadium from a CEQA legal challenge. Neither SB 292 nor AB 900 does this. They merely compel a timely judicial review. The most strident see this as an erosion of CEQA — the beginning of the end. That’s hard to imagine. These bills, which are now laws, just expedite the review process. They don’t kill CEQA. Lastly, if there does remain fear that AB 900 will erode CEQA, people can take comfort in knowing that this important experiment to bring some reasonableness to the process will expire on Jan. 1, 2015. Only then will we be able to evaluate the success or failure of the legislation’s attempt to balance environmental concerns and improvement in the state’s economy. Joel Miller is Vice President of Planning and Entitlements at Psomas, a Downtown-based consulting and engineering firm.

B IG

SA VIN GS !

Lofts from

$199K

quick move-in g r e at fINANCING pROGRAmS

ThE ECKARdT EvENT

$10,000 purchase incentive

SALES CENTER

716 S. LOS ANGELES ST IN SANTEE COURTYARD

LA, CA 90014 213.867.2131 SALES CENTER houRS

m-f 11Am-6pm S-S 12pm-5pm

NOW UNTIL

oCTobER 31

Downtown la los angeles st @ 7th WWW.ECkARDTbLDG.COm The Seller reserves the right to change prices without prior notice or obligation. All units are subject to prior sale or reservation. Kennedy Wilson, A California Real Estate Broker. License #00746768


6 Downtown News

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Gilligan’s Island in the 14th District Huizar-BID Battle Brings the Sitcom Hijinks Back to Downtown by Jon RegaRdie executive editoR

T

here are portions of Los Angeles government that function relatively normally. Then there are aspects that make about as much sense as the scene in Ed Wood’s exquisitely terrible Plan 9 From Outer Space where the camera, for no apparent reason, cuts to and lingers on a radiator. One of those elements was exposed the other week, when 12th District City Councilman Mitch Englander revealed that the tracking number the city dispatcher provides during a 311 call doesn’t actually track anything. Curious happenings are not just the province of 311 calls. Mysteries abound in city government. No one knows quite THE REGARDIE REPORT

how those million trees Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa promised six years ago turned into something like 19 elms and courtside seats to Laker games. Then there’s the matter of how the Grin Goblin managed to steal Bernard Parks’ smile. Will he return it before the Eighth District rep is termed out? Those are important matters, but when it comes to wacky happenings, no area claims as many as the 14th District. In fact, the sector that includes much of the eastern half of Downtown Los Angeles is kind of the “Gilligan’s Island” of L.A. politics. The hijinks that spill here seem the stuff of sitcoms, except that they’re usually more bizarre and, well, real. This is the district where one former councilman, Richard Alatorre, tried to dodge cocaine allegations by claiming that the white powder on his suit was residue from Doritos (seriously, can’t you envision a sitcom where a guy in a suit quips, “It wasn’t cocaine, it was Doritos,” and a laugh track sounds?). It’s the rare area where an incumbent, Nick Pacheco, lost an election. Then the guy who replaced him, Villaraigosa, scampered away the first chance he got, bouncing to the mayor’s office despite promises he’d serve at least one full term. That led to the election of José Huizar, who has splashed repeatedly in the Gilligan lagoon, though not always by choice. He’s endured a series of bizarre, bruising and expensive

elections, none stranger than his recent thumping of Rudy Martinez. There’s also his effort to create a Downtown streetcar, which seems about as easy as grabbing an eel swimming in olive oil. Now Huizar’s in the midst of another conflagration, though like Billy Joel, he didn’t start the fire. Recently, the board of the Historic Downtown Business Improvement District acted like a bunch of intoxicated teens on the Fourth of July who decided it’d be awesome to blow up their entire fireworks collection in the middle of the street. The big bang created turmoil and provoked the ire of Huizar. The result is an ugly, pressure-packed standoff It was all so avoidable. It’s all so silly. It’s all so 14th District. Brown Act No-Nos The situation erupted on Sept. 15. That’s the day, as my colleague Ryan Vaillancourt has reported, that the BID board decided it had had enough of executive director Russell Brown and fired him, replacing him with Roberto Saldaña. Except, it’s probably not the day the board came to that decision. A lot of indicators imply the choice was made well before the panel got together. That’s a no-no under California’s series of open-meeting laws, also known as the Brown Act. Board members have said they moved because they were worried about the BID’s chances for renewal in 2013. However, the Brown Act prevents a large percentage of board members from discussing business outside scheduled meetings. For things to fall as they did, without any collusion, the Downtown business owners would have had to each become so frustrated with Brown that their brains simultaneously came to the meeting ready to fire him. Then, the brains would have to decide to hire, why not, Saldaña, even though no one had ever (theoretically) discussed who’d be a good replacement. Could it all happen? Sure. Right after a ticket of kooky Michelle Bachmann and Strawberry Shortcake wins the presidency. The BID board’s bigger bumble was picking Saldaña, who previously served as legal counsel for Joseph Hellen, a major Historic Core property owner. Huizar and Hellen like each

6 Week Ultimate Challenge AFTER

Train with us and:

1 ! E S LD A PH SO % 60

photo by Gary Leonard

City Councilman José Huizar has found himself in the midst of a fire he didn’t start after a local business improvement district fired its executive director.

other as much as Batman likes the Joker, and no, I’m not comparing either to the pride of Gotham. Since Hellen is frequently in Australia, Saldaña often delivered his boss’ barbs. Landowners certainly have the freedom to choose their BID leader — they need to do what’s right for their business and hopefully the community. However, if someone gave me 2,000 guesses as to who would be the best choice to run the Historic Core BID, Saldaña wouldn’t be among them. I’d guess someone from a neighboring or an out-of-state BID before I’d guess Saldaña. Heck, I’d guess Muammar Qaddafi before Saldaña. This isn’t a dig at Saldaña — he might be great for the job. However, in picking someone whose company Huizar has battled, and someone who has publicly challenged the councilman, the BID board is effectively plunging a stick into the eye of the elected official who still has three-and-a-half years left in his term, and hence a huge amount of power. It’s hard to tell whether the board was brazen or just foolish. At what point did they think this would make everyone hold hands and sing “Kumbaya?” Did they seriously expect that Huizar would see the selection of Saldaña and respond, “Awesome! I’m so glad they chose the guy who said I’m an impediment to improvement and tried to knock me out of my seat. Wunderbar! Fantastic choice guys!” A Lose-Lose Now the situation is descending into severe sitcom-itis, see Gilligan, page 12

Real loft living… …in the downtown Arts District.

lose 2 inches from your waist drop a clothing size • have super energy lose 8lbs of fat • gain muscle 20 TRaining SESSiOnS!

599

$

Limited Time Offer! Reg $1125 Expires 10/31/11 Joe O’Sullivan’s 8 month transformation with Educogym.

BEFORE

We don’t mess around! We guarantee YOU results!

Or WE give YOU your money back! Get Ready...

1. Full analysis (weight, measurements & body fat) 2. Goal Setting (clear target of what you want to achieve) 3. Action Plan (personalized nutrition and exercise plan)

Get Active...

1. Exercise (20 min vigorous session with your trainer 4+ times a week) 2. Change it up (regular consultations to fine tune your progress) 3. Learn (be educated on the perfect exercise, nutrition & food supplements)

Get Results...

1. Results (complete final analysis and and certificate of achievement) 2. Picture (after photos presented with your before photos)

633 W. 5th St., Suite 5750 • 213.617.8229 www.educogym.com • facebook.com/educogym downtownla@educogym.com

Loft condominiums ideally located in LA’s sophisticated Arts District provide a uniquely appealing home at Gallery Lofts. Combining old and new, Gallery Lofts offers the comfort and convenience of state-of-the-art finishes in a historic framework. • Lighted and gated parking with assigned spaces • Granite counters in kitchens and baths • Open and airy mezzanine-style lofts • Stainless steel GE™ appliances • Pre-wired for TV, Internet and telephone • Lush interior courtyard with bamboo and water features • Walking distance to Metro Stop and Dash Bus Stop

From the mid $300s Decorated models open Saturday & Sunday, 10:30 to 5:30

120-130 South Hewitt St., Los Angeles • www.GalleryLoftsLA.com 323-610-7700 Prices, details, specifications and features subject to change without prior notice. Sales exclusively by Home Builders Marketing Services, Inc. DRE #01163523.


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 7

DowntownNews.com

LA Plaza Facing $5.2 Million Lawsuit Legal Action From Construction Firm Comes as Facility Slashes Staff by Richard Guzmán city editor

T

he fallout from the “financial mismanagement” that occurred during the reign of the ousted executive director of the LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes became clearer last week, when the contractor on the Downtown facility sued for $5.2 million, alleging non-payment for work performed. That came as LA Plaza officials revealed more details about the Main Street museum/Mexican-American cultural center’s internal operations. Although a LA Plaza board member initially told Los Angeles Downtown News that the number of layoffs was uncertain, last week a project official said that the original staff of 24 full-time employees and four part-time workers has been reduced to just 12 full-timers. The developments follow the board’s decision at the end of August not to renew the contract of Miguel Angel Corzo. LA Plaza board member Miguel Santana, who is also the city’s chief

finances into alignment. To that end, the Board decided not to renew Miguel Angel Corzo’s contract as President and CEO of LA Plaza,” the letter read. Corzo’s departure appears to have led directly to the staff reductions. Ten employees were laid off, five others did not have their contracts renewed and one was terminated. “At the time there are no more layoffs scheduled,” Muñoz stated. The board has also hired former LACMA President and Chief Operating Officer Melody Kanschat to consult on organizational structure, operations and fundraising.

Molina, who also sits on the board, conceived of and pushed the creation of LA Plaza for nearly two decades. She formed an advisory board, secured funds and created a foundation to run it. The county is responsible for maintenance and operations and is slated to contribute $1 million to LA Plaza’s $4 million annual budget. The board’s Sept. 30 letter also states that a search for a new leader will begin when LA Plaza is “right sized” and has a financing plan in order. The center was mired in controversy before it even opened, following the discovery of Native American bones and artifacts during construction. Several groups protested, demanding that construction be halted. While work on the courtyard where the bones were found stopped, the overall project moved forward. Corzo was previously the CEO of Grand Avenue’s Colburn School. He was there for about a year before leaving. Contact Richard Guzman at richard@downtownnews.com.

s ’ T A h T k N A b A IF YOU WANTArlY everYWhere NeArbY ANd Ne photo by Gary Leonard

borhood h g ei n r u yo in ch n ra b e a new Chas g e A sTeP FOrWArd with 25 to new checkin

Six months after opening, LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes is operating with less than half its original staff.

administrative officer, said in a previous interview that the decision came because of unspecified “financial mismanagement,” and that extensive details were not being revealed because of the possibility of litigation. LA Plaza had opened to fanfare in April. On Sept. 29, Accent Builders, a Los Angeles construction firm hired by the county in 2006 to rehabilitate the Plaza House and Vickery-Brunswig Building, filed the $5.2 million lawsuit against LA Plaza and the county, alleging that they failed to pay for the work. That suit follows 15 other suits filed by subcontractors against Accent as early as February 2010, also claiming lack of payment for construction services. John Hunter, the attorney representing Accent Builders, said he could not provide many details since they are attempting to settle with the county. “We’re working with the county and we’re going to try to get this resolved,” Hunter said. In the lawsuit, the company claims that all of the subcontractors on the project have made claims against Accent for work performed “for which the County have all refused to pay after authorizing and directing the work.” In some instances, according to the complaint, the construction company paid the claims of subcontractors and is trying to recoup that money from the county. Terry Muñoz, who was recently appointed as interim chief operating officer of LA Plaza, said she could not comment on Accent’s suit. “I can confirm that the over expenditures occurred under the leadership of Mr. Corzo. County Counsel has not notified LA Plaza of a pending lawsuit and LA Plaza has not received a summons or notification directly,” she wrote in an email to Downtown News. Early Troubles Concerns about Corzo were initially raised after complaints came to First District County Supervisor Gloria Molina’s office from vendors working on LA Plaza about getting late payments, Santana said previously. Board officials then encountered a number of financial concerns dealing with overall management, accounting for expenditures and how operating funds were being handled, Santana said. Molina’s signature appears on the original contract with Accent Builders. On the document, she is listed as the “Owner” of LA Plaza de Cultura y Artes Foundation. A letter sent to LA Plaza supporters by the board on Sept. 30, two days after Downtown News first reported on the situation, states that as the project moved forward, construction, exhibition installation and opening expenses were much higher than anticipated. “Over the summer we were forced to quickly make several staff changes that we believe will bring our program and our

TAk

are giving $1 e w , g in n e p O d n ra SM nt* and set up u o c ac To celebrate our G g in ck e h lC pen a Chase Tota free access to ith w customers who o r ie as e g n ki 1 SM e’ll make your ban king and Bill an B e lin n direct deposit . W O e as SM E Ch ndly ATMs, FR E lus, rie tF si o p e D e as h time and money. P C r u yo e ag ®2 an m lp e obile to h ionwide and with at n s e Pay, and Chase M ch n ra b 0 0 cess to over 5,3 Chase gives you ac Los Angeles. in n o so g in n e p o more Branch or call e as h C w e n r u o Visit r details. l IA eC 213.488.9480 fo GrANd OPeNING sP

GeT

$125 lImITed TIme OFFer ex

ClUsIvelY AT:

888 W 6th st., los Angeles

11 October 6 - October 20, 20

*Service Fee - Chase Total CheckingSM has no monthly Service Fee when you do any one of the following each statement period: Option #1: Have monthly direct deposits totaling $500 or more made to this account; OR, Option #2: Keep the daily balance in your checking account at or above $1,500; OR, Option #3: Keep an average balance of $5,000 or more in your checking and other types of qualifying Chase accounts. Otherwise a $10 monthly Service Fee will apply. The terms of the account, including any fees or features, may change. For more information, please see a banker or visit chase.com/checking. 1. Bonus/Account Information: Offer not available to existing Chase checking customers, those with fiduciary accounts, and those who have closed an account within 90 days. Offer good 10/6/11-10/20/11, only at the 888 W 6th St., Los Angeles branch. To receive the bonus: 1) open a new Chase Total CheckingSM account, which is subject to approval; 2) deposit $100 or more within 60 days of account opening; AND 3) have your direct deposit made to this account within 60 days of account opening. Your opening deposit cannot be money held by Chase or its affiliates, nor can the bonus be used as the opening deposit. Your direct deposit needs to be an electronic deposit of your paycheck, pension or government benefits (such as Social Security) from your employer or the government. After we receive your first direct deposit, we’ll deposit the bonus in your new account within 10 business days. You can only receive one checking account-related bonus per calendar year. If your checking account is closed within six months, we will deduct the bonus amount at closing. Also, if your account is closed within 90 days, an Account Closing Fee of $25 will apply. Bonus is considered interest and will be reported on IRS Form 1099-INT. 2. Chase Mobile: Message and data rates apply. Such charges include those from your communications service provider. © 2011 JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. Member FDIC

TotalCHK_10_CA_OR_WA_V125.indd 1

9/29/2011 3:10:48 PM


8 Downtown News

Eat It Downtown Hosts a Four-Day Food Festival by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

C

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

hefs, not movie stars, will walk the red carpet. Hungry fans will watch them “perform.” Then everyone

will eat. That’s what’s on the menu at the inaugural Los Angeles Food & Wine, a citywide culinary festival that takes place Oct. 13-16 and is centered heavily in Downtown Los Angeles. The opening night event at L.A. Live’s Nokia Plaza will

feature 30 chefs — among them Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken of Border Grill, John Sedlar of Rivera and Ricardo Zarate of Mo-Chica — and goods from 200 wineries. Throughout the festival, which includes happenings in Santa Monica, Beverly Hills and Hollywood, more than 100 chefs will lead seminars, lunches, dinners and demonstrations. There will also be tastings from more than 300 international wineries. A highlight is the Restaurant Lunch Series on Friday, with Downtown’s Patina hosting chef Jonathan Waxman and WP 24 presenting “Iron Chef” Morimoto. “We really want to showcase L.A. as a culinary destination,” said Dave Bernahl, founder of the festival. “There are phenomenal things going on here. There are so many new restaurants.”

Bernahl said Downtown’s culinary upswing of the past decade makes it a natural center point for the festival. Other Central City events include “Heat” on Oct. 14 from 10 p.m.-2 a.m. During the happening at L.A. Live, five chefs will present their take on spicy foods. Participants include Sedlar and Bryant Ng of Little Tokyo’s Spice Table. “There are so many new restaurants here in particular, and an amazing quality of chefs,” Bernahl said. “People are going to realize they’ll want to come down here more often.” A portion of the proceeds from the event will go to the Los Angeles Chapter of Meals on Wheels. Tickets and a full schedule are at lafw.com. 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA, 90026 • 213.481.1448 photo by Gary Leonard Contact Richard Guzmán at Downtown chef John Sedlar will take part in the Los richard@downtownnews.com. Angeles Food & Wine festival. 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA, 90026 • 213.481.1448

$75 GiFt certiFicAte

this weekly contest sponsored by

PLuS 2 mOvIE TICKETS & 2 GRAmmY muSEum TICKETS

PICK THE

1264 W. 1st Street, Los Angeles, CA, 90026, • 213.481.1448

PROS

reGister todAy $50 GiFt certiFicAte

PLuS 2 mOvIE TICKETS

WEEKLY

Grand Prize: TriP for Two To hawaii! O

WEEK 4

O

TRIAL $

9 9 . 6 $ FArMHoUse DoUBLe

69

3 One Consultation 3 Three Personal Training Sessions 633 West 5th St., Suite 5750

213.617.8229

Nd Place

FOR SERIOUS ATHLETES *

ONE WEEK

($99 VALUE)

PICKTHEPROS

1 OSCAR mORAn 2 jOHn YAnEZ st Place

Fall in love with your body again.

educo

Just go to...

LAdOWnTOWnnEWS.COm/

PRIZES Last week’s winners

Free • easy • Fun

Bo CL AssiC BUrGeroz. CDroinMk w/ Fries & 22

Offer Expires 11-10-11 No substitutions. Limit one coupon per customer per visit. At Los Angeles location only. Not valid with any other offer.

✔ Free Wi-Fi ✔ Free Parking

✔ Breakfast All Day ✔ Drive-Thru

Open 24 Hours ★ 213-228-8999 • 726 Alameda St. ★

Cross streets: Bay & Alameda

20%

Competitor Online Price Match Welcome! (Plus shipping & handling.)

OFF Sport Supplements Expires 10/16/11

DOWNTOWN GNC LOCATIONS:

Pershing Square, 6th & Olive: 510 W. 6th St., Ph: 213-622-2078 Arco Plaza: 505 S. Flower St., Level B, Ph: 213-489-7732 Macy’s Plaza: 700 S. Flower St., Ph: 213-622-6931 GNC LA CIENEGA PLAZA: 1833 La Cienega Blvd., Ph: 310-733-4144 *Offers may not be combined with any other promotions and or discount: Only one discount per purchase whichever is greater. One coupon per person. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Redeemable only at GNC 510 West 6th Street, Los Angeles,, CA 90014. Void where prohibited, taxed or restricted by law.

The New Guide is Out! Now In Downtown L.A.!

$10.95 LuNCh SpeCIAL

Lunch Served Mon-Fri, 11am-3pm

Custom Shirts • 15 Years Experience

House Salad, Miso Soup, Rice and Choice of two items:

By Rik Ducar, owner of award-winning men’s stores. Recently profiled on TNT, BET, Lifetime and Access Hollywood. In-store Consultations Or Private Appointments at Your Office or Home.

Broad Range of Fit & Fabrics!

323-392-7739 | www.shirtshopla.com

Get It on Your Mobile Device

California Roll, Crunchy Shrimp Roll, Spicy Tuna Roll, Fresh Water Eel & Avocado Roll, Shrimp Tempura Roll, Vegetable Tempura Roll, Salmon Tempura Roll, Calamari Tempura Roll, Chicken Cutlet, Shrimp (1pc) & Vegetable Tempura (3pc), Tempura Udon (Shrimp Tempura 2pc), Salmon Teriyaki, Chicken Teriyaki, Beef Teriyaki

1111 S outh hope Street #100 | 213.749.1900


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 9

DowntownNews.com

Edison, Clifton’s Proprietor Takes Over Bartlett Retail Stakeholders Hope Andrew Meieran’s Acquisition Upgrades Seventh and Spring by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

A

ndrew Meieran, the developer and owner of the Edison nightclub and Clifton’s Cafeteria, has acquired all of the commercial space on the ground floor of the Bartlett Building. His plans for the site could help activate a dim Historic Core corner. Meieran acquired the approximately 40,000-square-foot space at the northwest corner of Seventh and Spring streets in the wake of a settlement of a four-year-old legal battle with the property’s former owner, Bartlett developer Barry Shy. The space is divided into 10 storefronts, most of which are currently occupied. Tenants include a salon, two shoe shops and a perfume store. Shy and Meieran both declined to discuss the settlement because they are bound by a confidentiality agreement. But they said the transfer of the Bartlett space relates to the settlement and the resolution of several business deals. “The fact is, we took control of the space,” said Meieran, who intends “to restore the historic storefronts” and bring in new restaurant, cafe or similar uses in an effort to add nightlife to the corner. The deal comes just as Meieran begins work on a $3 million renovation of Clifton’s. The project, which broke ground on Sept. 26, will add three new bars to the iconic eatery, which at 648 S. Broadway is a block away from the Bartlett. Residents of the Bartlett, who over the years have had a combative relationship with Shy — the building’s homeowners association is currently in a legal dispute with the developer — greeted news of the acquisition with excitement. “Andrew will bring the historical preservation factor along,” said Bartlett resident Jeannine Denholm. We respect him and support him and look forward to working with him to making Seventh and Spring, and our building, a better place.” Denholm is among the residents who recall the retail spaces’ low point. In 2007, one spot was briefly occupied by an adult video store. Angry condo owners complained en

photo by Gary Leonard

Andrew Meieran is taking over the 10 storefronts at the Bartlett Building at Seventh and Spring streets. Preliminary plans call for restaurants, cafes and other uses that will boost the corner’s nightlife.

masse to Shy. Shy said the tenant had not been upfront about his business plan, and the video shop was evicted after one month. Turning a Corner In terms of Downtown retail growth, some stakeholders consider the intersection of Seventh and Spring streets to be an important but somewhat neglected puzzle piece. To the north on Spring Street, the Historic Core has blossomed into a restaurant, bar and boutique-laden strip. To the west, Seventh Street has become an unofficial “Restaurant Row.” “That corner really affects two neighborhoods stretching from the Financial District, all the way into the Old Bank

THE PETROLEUM BUILDING Commercial Office Space for Lease

District,” said broker Derrick Moore, first vice president at CB Richard Ellis. “So it’s critically important, and to have Andrew with all his creativity and his success here, taking over the retail, it’s welcome news.” Moore represents the owners of the Van Nuys Building at the southwest corner of Seventh and Spring streets. The property, which underwent a major renovation in 2008, currently houses a dress shop and a salon. Moore said he is also in final negotiations with a furniture design company to lease the remaining retail space. He expects the company to open within two months. Meieran said he considers the Bartlett an opportunity to bridge a gap between Spring Street revitalization and Broadway, which has largely remained a hub of swap meets even as Spring and Main streets have attracted an array of new businesses. The chief lure on Broadway, he hopes, will be the revamped Clifton’s. That vision is for the future. For the present, the deal marks what seems to be the end of a drawn-out and often bitter legal battle between Meieran and Shy, former business partners on two Downtown developments: the Higgins Building, home of the Edison, and the SB Manhattan, an apartment complex at Sixth and Spring streets. Meieran sold the SB Manhattan to a partnership controlled by Shy, but he retained the basement and corner commercial spaces. Meieran later sued Shy after he claimed the basement — a former bank vault where he planned to build a bar — was destroyed during construction. As part of their various resolutions, Shy took control of the commercial spaces at the SB Manhattan. He too is thinking about upgrades. “We are looking for the best potential improvement,” Shy said of the corner and basement spaces in the building. “It’s kind of sitting like an eyesore on the corner. We might put a restaurant or bar or anything of this nature. It’s a very desirable corner and we’re going to look for tenants to occupy the space.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

BUILDING HIGHLIGHTS Beautiful 236,900 sq. ft. 11 Story Office Building. Parking Available on Premises Conference Room 24 Hour Security $1.55 Interior $1.65 Exterior Per

HU

R

– RY

S

PA

S CE

LE

IN AS

G

S FA

T!

Rentable Sq. Ft.

2 SUITES AVAILABLE Suite 1000 - 7,400 approximate rentable square feet. 8 offices, 1 executive office and large creative space. Access directly off elevators. Suite 1011 - 7,812 approximate rentable square feet.

PROTECT YOUR TOYOTA with service designed by the people who made it.

Large, open creative space with one office.

Suite 1011

Suite 1000

Will consider division and space build-outs.

The

Petroleum Building 714 W. Olympic Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90015 Phone: 213.746.6300 Ext. 1455 Fax: 213.765.1910 ghollis@shammasgroup.com

FREE shuttle service drop-off & pick-up

EVERYDAY LOW PRICES! • Prices competitive with local garages! • $39.95 OIL CHANGE*

• Includes 27-point safety inspection

• Includes CHECK ENGINE LIGHT scan

• Service: M- F 6AM -6PM, Sat 6AM-5PM * And up. Includes up to 5 quarts of oil. Tax and hazardous disposal fees extra. Synthetic oil additional. Toyota vehicles only. Expires 11/30/2011. 51611

Make an appointment today!

1-800-716-1345

110

10

• toyotacentral.com

1600 S. Figueroa (at Venice), LA — 2 blocks south of the Staples Center


10 Downtown News

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

LAPD Continued from page 1 pervisors overruled the decision. Portasha Moore Stallworth, an attorney co-representing Kardiban and Wright, said both officers are pursuing damages in the seven figures. So is Fernandez, according to his attorney. “They’ve done some egregious things that the command staff allowed,” said Moore Stallworth, who in an unrelated matter recently represented LAPD Sgt. Ronald Crump in a sexual harassment case against the department. That resulted in a jury awarding Crump $1.1 million. All three officers claim they took their concerns, which stem from incidents occurring between 2008 and 2010, to Chamberlain, who has been in his captain’s post since January 2010. Fernandez, Wright and Kardiban allege that Chamberlain declined to reprimand Foster. Chamberlain declined to comment on the specific allegations because they deal with personnel issues. But he confirmed that several officers involved in the alleged misconduct have been transferred out of Central, and said the senior lead officers were stripped of their advanced pay grades. The transfers are considered administrative, and while widely perceived as punitive, the department does not consider the moves to be demotions, and they do not trigger the need for a disciplinary hearing. “It’s a long ongoing issue that is resolved now, hopefully,

photo by Gary Leonard

Amid a series of lawsuits, six senior officers at LAPD’s Central Division have been transferred out of Downtown. They include (l to r) officers Tim Nambu and Randall McCain, Sgt. Pete Foster and Off. Ken Lew.

to the best of everyone’s ability and hopefully the employees will realize that that work environment, no matter what grade they are, is not going to be tolerated,” Chamberlain said. Foster, who is currently assigned to Topanga Division, urged caution in considering the charges against him. “Just because people accuse something doesn’t mean it’s true,” Foster said. He declined further comment. One veteran LAPD official with close knowledge of Central

Division, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to comment, maintained that the office is not rife with racism or sexual harassment. “There was no maliciousness,” the official said. “What’s very common within police departments is there’s a kind of a tête-à-tête that goes on between people, and it’s kind of what you would call, not from a racial standpoint, but black humor. There’s a joking, a self-effacing humor that goes on that in many respects is tolerated, and in many effects is tit for tat and recognized as humor.” Action and Reaction In 2007, Fernandez, according to his suit, initiated a new overtime model for paying Central officers who worked extended shifts for special events. He was then assigned to administer the program. He said he was later stripped of this role as retaliation for speaking out against Foster. Fernandez claims he reported an apparent conflict of interest when Foster removed one officer from his role with the Juvenile Impact Program, which works with at-risk youth and comes with overtime pay. The officer was then replaced with Foster’s wife, Irma Foster, who according to the lawsuit changed the name plate on her uniform to her maiden name around the same time in an effort to obfuscate her connection with Foster. “He was retaliated against for identifying misconduct and harassed because of his race, which is totally inappropriate for any employer, especially law enforcement,” said Matthew McNicholas, who is representing Fernandez. McNicholas said he is also seeking a seven-figure award in damages to account for future losses and grief.

Get

Another Successful Scouting Fundraiser Event!

News

Boy Scouts of America Los Angeles Area Council ladowntownnews.com/news

Photos

to all sponsors and participants a big

View

THANK YOU This event raised over $100,000 for Scouting in Los Angeles.

Doug Miller Brian Miller Chris Morales Yvette Moreno Shannon Moriarty Gerry Morton Nate Nusbaum Mark Oertel Jim Parros Charles Pickering Zak Powers Marion Sarmiento Andrew Sisolak Jorge Somoano Gary Steven Allison Trotter Edward Tugade Kathy Turner Wayne Ycedo

Find

L

and more at

LADowntownNews.com

www.otescouts.org_edge.html

How God interacts with humanity – and how we in response should live and relate with everyone around us.

ladowntownnews.com/gallery

ladowntownnews.com/calendar

See photos from the event or to find out more about Scouting in Los Angeles go to

“Everyone is invited Everyone belongs”

CHURCH

LIVE

NEW TEACHING SERIES CHRIST & CULTURE

l

Events

Participants (as of 10/6/11) Angeles Deirdre Evans Shooting Range Lindsay Feller The CRP Group John Fleming Leo Bautista Kacey Forbes Davina Bernal Tri Fritz Graham Bell Bob Gaby Justin Boothe Marisa Gilmore Mike Bryant Annie Goto David A. Burt Andrew Grose Ken Carlson Don Gworek Mike Christensen Pamela Hirneisen Roger Civalleri Rich Jansen James Clark Manuel Jaramillo Jack Cline Jennifer Jirkovsky Remi De La Rocha Keith Jones Annie DeWitt Doug Lasater Edward DeWitt Kimberley Lathrop Bill De Witt Tim Lilligren Scott Dobbins John MacAllister Julia Dring Vik Marovish Eric Dunn David S. Meshulam

l

SUNDAYS 10AM

LA

EVERYONE IS INVITED EVERYONE BELONGS

L.A. LIVE

www.livechurchla.com

Pet Care Inc.

PET STORES

Saturday Vaccination Clinic (Call for Location & Time)

Convenient Parking 25 Years Experience

Solutions To Your Pet Care Needs

1 (888) 711-9622 1901 W. 8th St. • M-Sat. 8am-7pm, Sun 7am-5pm

20% Off

Anything in the Store Must present coupon.1 coupon per person. 1 item per coupon. Expires 11/10/11

la

L


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 11

DowntownNews.com worked the Fashion District for more than 20 years. Kardiban alleged in her suit that McCain was angry that she was complaining about Foster, and that at one point, he removed her office door. McCain countered that he was the sole occupant of that office, and said that he removed the door with permission from a supervisor. The door, he said, was interfering with a nearby desk.

photo by Gary Leonard

The lawsuits allege that Central Area Capt. Todd Chamberlain, who has been in his post since January 2010, did not reprimand those involved in the pranks after other officers complained.

“There’s an inability to promote because once you step out of line you’re not promoteable,” he said. “And generally, he’s now identified as someone who’s not a ‘team player,’ which will make your career miserable.” With the cases of Fernandez, Kardiban and Wright pending, Central has transferred the key personnel caught in the controversy. Kardiban was moved to Southwest Division. Normally, in a so-called administrative transfer, LAPD employees select three divisions to which they’d like to move. Southwest was not among Kardiban’s choices. Her lawyer, Moore Stallworth, believes that shifting her to Southwest was retaliation for suing the department. Senior lead officers Tim Nambu, who worked in the Central Business District, and Ken Lew, who worked in Chinatown, have also been transferred. Nambu was accused by

The Art Program of the Community Redevelopment Agency of the City of Los Angeles (CRA/LA) developed these tours to introduce residents and visitors to their collection of public art created by a broad range of artists, in a variety of forms and neighborhood contexts. The tours available include:

Financial District Historic Core Bunker Hill Little Tokyo

Wright of hanging a poster from the 1970s TV show “Sanford and Son,” likening the program’s African American co-stars to Wright and his partner. However, Downtown sources familiar with Central operations and the personnel shakeup, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to comment on the matter, said that Nambu and Lew were actually among a group of officers who last year reported misconduct in the Community Relations Office to their superiors. They also said that Wright and his partner openly referred to themselves as “Sanford and Son.” Nambu and Lew, who declined to comment, have been assigned to posts in Harbor and Pacific divisions that start at 4 p.m. and end at 2 a.m. Also transferred out of Central was Senior Lead Officer Randall McCain, who had

downtown

PUBLICART

‘It’s like a divorce. Everyone has their side of the story, filing claims and counterclaims.’ —Deputy Chief José Perez

Sgt. Lou Daigle, who according to Kardiban’s suit brought her initial concerns to Chamberlain, was also transferred. LAPD Deputy Chief Jose Perez, who oversees Central Bureau, declined to comment on the specific allegations facing the department. But he said the personnel shift is indeed related to the lawsuits. “It’s like a divorce,” Perez said. “Everyone has their side of the story, filing claims and counterclaims. We had some folks that worked together, there were some issues, and we had to make some moves similar to a divorce — the relationships had soured.” The LAPD and the City Attorney’s office may not yet have felt the full legal impact of

photo by Gary Leonard

Senior Lead Officer Mike Fernandez is one of the three Central Division officers who filed suit.

the Central turmoil. Fernandez’s attorney McNicholas, who specializes in representing officers suing the department, said he is currently preparing a lawsuit on behalf of Daigle, and that he is in touch with several other Central employees who are also considering legal action. In an emailed statement, City Attorney spokesman Frank Mateljan declined to comment on the lawsuits. “We continue to evaluate each of the cases individually and will move forward accordingly with what we believe is the City’s best interests,” Mateljan said. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

Master of Public adMinistration Coming this Spring to downtown Los Angeles California State University, Northridge is proud to offer a Master of Public

walkingtour

Administration degree program at the City of LA Department of Public Works (DPW) building. The MPA is a professional degree for practitioners in the public

PODCASTS

sector or for those who plan to work solving public sector problems.

Information Sessions

The Art Program is integral to CRA/LA’s mission to eliminate blight and to revitalize Los Angeles through focused redevelopment activities in designated project areas.

Wednesday, October 19, 2011 Wednesday, November 2, 2011 Noon to 1 p.m. Sub-basement Conference Room 4 City of LA DPW building, Bureau of Sanitation (BOS) 1149 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90015

How It Works

DOWNLOAD FREE AUDIO TOURS

Admission Requirements

• Once you are admitted, enrollment is guaranteed in every class.

• A Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Arts (B.A.) degree from an accredited college or university • Class schedule is already set for the entire • Grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or above program, meeting one night a week. overall or in the last 60 semester units • Classes are presented one at a time in or 90 quarter units an accelerated mode.

to your personal MP3 player and explore the public art of Los Angeles like never before.

• You join with other students as a cohort, and your group progresses through the program as a cohesive and supportive unit.

Printable maps direct you to each stop as you listen to the artists’ stories.

• At least two years of work experience in the public, private or non-profit sector

Start Date: January 3, 2012 For more information:

For more information on the artwork shown here and to download the tours please visit crala.org/art

(818) 677-3217 Patti.Burleson@csun.edu http://TsengCollege.CSUN.edu/mpa


12 Downtown News

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

City Revamps Maguire Gardens Deal New Maintenance Contract Cuts Rates, Saves $100,000 by Ryan VaillancouRt

manages maintenance and the city picks up the tab. MPG uses more than 10 subcontractors to carry out the work, according to the Library Department. A Los Angeles Downtown News analysis in August found that the previously proposed contract for Maguire Gardens amounted to

staff wRiteR

A

fter its maintenance contract for Maguire Gardens came under scrutiny, the city Library Department has renegotiated the deal and now expects to save more than $100,000 over three years. Since 1993, the city has paid property giant MPG Office Trust, which owns the 2.3-acre park at the Central Library, to maintain the gardens. In 2010, the city paid Maguire $246,737 for maintaining the park. Earlier this year, the Library Department board of commissioners and a City Council committee approved a three-year contract renewal that would bump the cost by 2% annually and reach $256,706 by 2013. Over three years, the agreement would have cost the city $755,117. The City Council, however, rejected the contract in August. Ninth District Councilwoman Jan Perry questioned the 2% annual increase and directed the department to reconsider the deal. On Tuesday, the council approved a renegotiated three-year deal that eliminated the 2% hikes and trimmed an additional 10% off the cost. The department estimates that the changes will save the city $101,987 over the life of the contract, said Perry spokeswoman Eva Kandarpa Behrend. Kandarpa Behrend said the funds will go back to the department to support library services, including the po-

Gilligan Continued from page 6 though without the giggles. On Sept. 23, a meeting with area stakeholders turned into a shout-fest, with a Huizar rep laying out her boss’ displeasure and other area stakeholders urging the board to stand their ground. Four days later, the BID board nullified its move and pledged to bring forward a list of three candidates. The names are scheduled to be revealed in a week, and Saldaña will likely be among them. If Huizar does what politicians do in these instances, then his staff is playing hardball trying to, uh, persuade board members to switch their vote and reject Saldaña. If this is done correctly, then staffers won’t ever say the fate of a board mem-

photo by Gary Leonard

Children play near one of seven fountains at Maguire Gardens, where a new maintenance contract is set to save the city about $100,000 over three years.

tential purchase of new books. MPG anticipates managing the 10% reduction by altering some of its third-party contracts and through corporate contributions, according to Perry’s office. MPG spokeswoman Peggy Moretti declined to comment. The arrangement between the city and MPG stems from the development of US Bank Tower, formerly known as Library Tower. As part of the agreement allowing the firm to erect the 75-story edifice, the company had to create a public park. MPG

an annual cost of nearly $100,000 more than the budget for the 2.5-acre Grand Hope Park in South Park, and about $50,000 more than the annual maintenance for the 10.5-acre Vista Hermosa Natural Park in City West. Maguire officials said the higher cost could be attributed to higher use than other nearby parks, as well as the seven fountains and water features near the library. The Library Department estimates that Maguire Gardens sees 7,000 daily visitors. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

ber’s proposed project hangs in the balance, but the message will be clear. It’s a lose-lose for the board. If the panel sticks with Saldaña, it cements an ugly relationship with Huizar and ratchets up conflict with the few board members who support the councilman. If they select a different executive director, then they’ll appear soft the next time a conflict arises. They will lose the backing of stakeholders urging them to fight. It’s nearly as grim for Huizar. A Saldaña selection may hinder his Broadway revival plan and chill progress from some of the few people with the money to do big projects. If another leader comes, Huizar will score a victory, but could be cast as a bad guy for exerting pressure. Even Gilligan never had it this bad. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.

Gourmet LA Bakery Bringing you our best from Guanajuato... to Downtown Los Angeles Bread • Cakes • Sandwiches • Coffee • Ice Cream 213.623.4244 • 548 S. Broadway Ave. LA, CA 90013 • 6:30am - 8pm, M. - Sat. • 7am -7pm, Sun.

Voted Best Dentist 2011!

255 Grand Ave., Suite 204, Los Angeles, CA 90012

213-620-5777 | Find us on Facebook @ www.downtowndentalla.com

ALL AboARd

RESTAURANTS

for a Historic experience on tHe rails!

Conductor Bill calls “All Aboard!” for the

Daylight Vino train!

FIND OUT WHAT TO EAT AND WHERE TO EAT 1-800-539-7245 or www.LARAIL.com ForLAD More InForMatIon. OWNTOWNNEWS.COM

01. PanAmericanLofts.com 02. SkyLofts.com 03. MarketLofts.com 04. FlowerStLofts.com 05. ConcertoLofts.com 06. TheEasternColumbiaLofts.com To Buy, Rent or Sell with Loft Living LA, call:

877-4LA-LOFTS

49

$

@

Cleaning, SPOTLIGHT ON X-Ray & Exam*

HEALTHCARE

$99 Zoom Whitening

Dental Implant Special )HMXSVMEPJSVEHZIVXMWIVWMW $1499 (Excludes Crown) EZEMPEFPIMRXLMWWTIGMEPWIGXMSR Braces $99per month

'EPP  

Digital X-Rays • Se Habla Español

Drew Panico

Keller Williams - Downtown Office is independently owned & operated.

2EAD ON

Friday SpecialNight! Incentive for New Clients!

LA to Santa Barbara. Enjoy the Downtown Urban Wine Trail. Sails monthly!

Looking for the Downtown Loft List?

Armed and Unarmed Security Officers Specializing in: High Rise Buildings, Monday’s News Lofts, Markets, Parking Lots, Gated Communites

Dr. Kathy Maasoumi1264 W. 1st St., LA, CA 90026

*For patients without insurance. New Patients only. (213) 481-1448 (Patients with Insurance: Your insurance might cover your entire treatment.)

• FAX (213) 250-4617

404 S. Figueroa, #207 | LADowntownNews.com 213-486-0006 | www.KathyDDS.net

Premiere Security Group Available on-line @ | 11610 Olympic Blvd. 310-312-8820 LADowntownNews.com

Read Monday’s News on Friday Night! Available on-line @

LADowntownNews.com


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 13

DowntownNews.com

HEALTH Going Nuts for Health Pistachios Offer a Range of Benefits, And Are Flexible in Other Dishes by Sharon naylor

H

ave you “gone green” lately? If you have popped a handful of pistachios into your mouth, then you’ve experienced one of the new superstars of the snack world. According to the Food and Drug Administration, “Eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts, such as pistachios, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.” What are the benefits? To start, says Dr. Oz Garcia of thegreennut.org, there is new research from The Journal of Nutrition. “Pistachios have cardio-protective benefits, meaning they’re heart-healthy,” he said. “We have long known that nuts are good for your heart, but this study showed that eating pistachios raises the level of antioxidants in the blood, reducing the risk of heart disease by lowering the level of oxidized-LDL [bad] cholesterol. Antioxidants are powerhouses that fight the molecules that can cause heart disease and cancer.” He says that pistachios stand out from other snacks, and he recommends that patients snack on them daily for cardiovascular and overall health benefits Pistachios, he added, are “the only nuts that give you significant amounts of certain

important antioxidants like lutein, zeazanthin and gamma tocopherol.” Promising research indicates that eating pistachios may reduce the risk of diabetes and lower the body’s physiological response to stress. On an episode of “The Dr. Oz Show,” Dr. Mehmet Oz discussed how certain food properties remain in the blood vessels to continue to absorb the nutrients hours after eating, which reduces the desire to eat more when stressed. Oz specifically mentioned pistachios’ de-stressing properties, which come about because of the time it takes to open their shells and because they contain stress-reducing plant sterols, which also help to lower cholesterol levels. Oz recommends eating three ounces of pistachios a few times per week to reduce stress levels. According to thegreennut.org, pistachios provide three grams of fiber and six grams of protein in each ounce and are good sources of copper (providing 20% of the recommended daily allowance) and thiamin (15% of the RDA). They do all this while providing only two grams of sugar and 160 calories per ounce. Additional perks per ounce of pistachios include: n 20% RDA of vitamin B-6.

n 15% of phosphorus. n 8% of magnesium. n 4% of folate. There are other healthy facts about pistachios. They include: one serving of pistachios delivers more dietary fiber (12%) than a half-cup of cooked broccoli (10%); one serving offers more potassium (8%) than an orange (7%); and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s food pyramid shows that pistachios’ six grams of protein make them a healthy alternative to beef, poultry and beans. Additionally, pistachios have no cholesterol or trans fats. How Many to Savor The experts on the website thegreennut. org say it only takes 1.5 servings of pistachios, or approximately 74 nuts, to reap numerous heart-health benefits when paired with a healthy diet and regular exercise. One serving of pistachios equals an astounding 49 nuts, which is a greater number than any other nut and certainly makes snackers feel satisfied.

That doesn’t mean pistachios have to become a meal. They can be incorporated into a diet in a number of ways, among them as a pop-in-your-mouth snack. They can also be used to enhance meals and desserts. Suggestions include: n Add a handful of pistachios to your oatmeal at breakfast. n Add pistachios to healthy-recipe baked goods, such as muffins, nut breads and oatmeal cookies. n Top a serving of yogurt or frozen yogurt with pistachios. n Top a fresh garden salad with a handful of pistachios. The website thegreennut.org offers recipes and tips on adding pistachios to appetizers, side dishes and entrees. Some recipes found on the site are grilled salmon and pistachio couscous salad, white bean dip with pistachios and cilantro, and a gluten-free pistachio gelato. Article copyright 2011 creators.com.

coming this faLL

Life happens.... it’s what you do with it that counts! introducing the Los angeles center for Women’s health. a comprehensive facility dedicated to women in the prime of their lives. our world class specialists specialize in you. so you can do what counts in life, whatever happens.

It’s happening downtown.

www.lacwh.org

1513 south grand ave. suite 400 Los angeles, ca 90015 (213) 742.6400

www.facebook.com/lacwh

SPOTLIGHT ON

Redeem this offer at your initial examination and cleaning appointment and receive a FREE whitening kit

HEALTHCARE Editorial for advertisers is available in this special section.

Call (213) 481-1448

Offer expires: 10/31/2011

• Digital x-rays • Oral Cancer and Periodontal screening • Flexible financial options

MAKING QUALITY DENTISTRY COMFORTABLE ANDAND GENTLE MAKING QUALITY DENTISTRY COMFORTABLE GENTLE MAKING QUALITY COMFORTABLE for over 18 years in Downtown LA LA AND GENTLE for DENTISTRY over 18 years in Downtown for over 18 years in Downtown LA Complimentary Whitening WEAND CARE! Complimentary Teeth Whitening WE GENTLE CARE! MAKING QUALITYTeeth DENTISTRY COMFORTABLE Complimentary Teeth Whitening WE CARE! for over 18 years in Downtown LA x State the of artthe sterilization center,center, x of State art sterilization

1264 W. 1st St., LA, CA 90026 x |State ofequipment theGraduate art sterilization Silvia Kasparian, D.D.S. USC | A.D.A., C.D.A. Member with equipment tested weekly tocenter, with tested weekly to Complimentary Teeth Whitening WE CARE! with equipment weekly to ensure your safety. ensure your safety. (213) 481-1448 • FAX (213) 250-4617 601 W. 5th St. , #1110 |tested (213) 892-8172 ©2011 All rights reserved. Essure is a registered trademarks of Conceptus, Inc.

LADowntownNews.com

x

ensure your State of art sterilization x Digital x-rays forsafety. minimal expo- expox the Digital x-rays for center, minimal

xequipment Digital x-rays for minimal MAKING QUALITY COMFORTABLE AND GENTLE withDENTISTRY tested weekly to exposure and feedback. sureimmediate and immediate feedback. sure and immediate feedback. LA ensure safety. x over Oral Cancer and Periodontal xyour Oral Cancer andDowntown Periodontal for 18 years in x x-rays Oral Cancer Periodontal Digital for minimal exposcreening at each examination ap- apscreening atand each examination atfeedback. each sure pointment and screening immediate at no extra charge. pointment at no examination extra charge.appointment at no extra charge. x Oral Cancer Periodontal x We your time, seewe see x respect Weand respect your and time,we and x We respect yourpromptly. time, and screening at each examination ap- we see that you are treated that you are treated promptly. that are treated promptly. pointment at you no extra charge. x Flexible financial options, includ-includx Flexible financial options, x Flexible financialinterest-free options, includx We respect your time, we see ing uping to 12 up months to 12 and months interest-free

x


14 Downtown News

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

RESTAURANTS

A New Peru Revue

Chimu Offers Downtown a Window on South American Cuisine city editoR

W

hen Jason Michaud met Mario Alberto Orellana, he knew that they were kindred spirits. They shared a passion for food, not surprising since Michaud had opened a couple East Side restaurants and Orellana had trained with some of L.A.’s notable young chefs. More importantly, they also shared a desire to bring a nofuss spot with a menu of eclectic international cuisine to the Downtown lunch crowd. Those shared traits led to Chimu, a Peruvian restaurant next to Grand Central Market. The space with the take-out window opened in May and is wowing customers and critics. Named after an ancient civilization in what is now Peru, the menu at Chimu mixes the indigenous ingredients of that nation with Asian, Creole and L.A.-style cuisine. The menu changes daily, with recent offerings including lomo saltado, a dish made of slices of sirloin marinated in soy sauce and served on a bed of thick fries; aji chicken, a creole-influenced curry chicken; and estafo de lenguas, tender beef tongue served with tomatoes and lentils. “My roots are here in Los Angeles and I wanted to do the kind of food that’s true to Peruvian cuisine but also with little touches that reflect Angelenos,” said the 35-year-old chef who was raised in Boyle Heights. Orellana and Michaud decided to work together after being introduced by a mutual friend. At the time, Michaud was chef/owner of Local in Silver Lake, while Orellana had just started as executive sous chef at Josef Centeno’s celebrated Lazy Ox Canteen in Little Tokyo. “It was a good fit,” Michaud said. “He was really passionate about food and I wanted to transfer to more of the business side of the restaurant business.” The pair found a 600-square-foot kitchen next to Grand Central Market with a walk-up window. The daily menu is written on a chalkboard and the food is served in disposable containers. Approximately 70 seats in the patio provide a place for those who want to “dine in.” The Man, the Mentor A former film and photography student, Orellana honed his skills cooking at places like Gjelina in Venice and Lot 1 in Echo Park, where he worked with Centeno. Although he helped Ricardo Zarate open the respected Peruvian restaurant Mo-Chica, Orellana considers Centeno his mentor. “He really showed me how to cook, to really open my mind up, to respect the identity, foundation of why things are done a certain way,” Orellana said. “Then that allows you room to play with it.” Those lessons can be tasted in standout dishes like the seco de cordero, a Peruvian lamb stew. Although it is traditionally cooked with a lamb shank or shoulder, Orellana employs the lamb belly, a cut he feels is underused. The

meat is seared and doused in a rich beer sauce that the chef likens to Mexican mole. His version of the sauce is made with Negra Modelo beer and chicha de jora, a fermented Peruvian corn drink. The dish is served with peas, canary beans and salsa criolla, an onion-based mixture of cilantro, chili and lime juice. The lime-rich onions mix well with the gamey flavor of the meat, while the canary beans and peas combine with the crispy skin to deliver delightfully textured bites. It’s a hearty meal, like meat and potatoes Peruvian style. Also a standout is the chancho, a pork belly plate. Reminiscent of chicharrones, the thick slabs of meat are deepfried, providing a crispy outer layer. The pork inside remains chewy and juicy. It is covered with huacatay, a black mint usually used to make aji, and comes atop a bed of barley and tomato sauce cooked with white wine. “Chicharrones is something very close to my culture and we use the aioli, which is something you don’t see a lot in Peru,” Orellana said. Orellana also puts his personal touch on the trigo mote, a barley-based salad with chopped onions, tomato, lime juice and cilantro. He adds pickled rhubarb, feta and Asian pears in his version. Vegetarians will likely salivate over it, but it’s also useful to carnivores as a side dish, since the grassy, earthy flavors are soothing after a bite of his more aggressive dishes. Orellana’s creations have earned repeat visits from Downtown residents and workers, as well as praise from critics such as Jonathan Gold of the L.A. Weekly. However, perhaps most importantly for the chef, his mentor is also a fan. “Chimu is just the tip of the iceberg for Mario,” said Centeno. “He is really finding himself as a chef and developing his style every day. It is exciting to see a talent at this stage of the game as it is only the beginning.” Meanwhile Michaud, whose only suggestion to Orellana regarding the food at Chimu was to do whatever he wanted in the kitchen, is making moves that will allow the chef even more freedom. Starting this week, Chimu will stay open until 2:30 a.m. Events like live music and catered parties are planned. “My main goal is to do enough catering business and events to let Mario do whatever he wants during the daytime, as wild a food as he can imagine,” Michaud said. When it comes to Peruvian food and enthusiastic chefs like Orellana, the sky’s the limit, Centeno noted. “It’s one of the most important cuisines of South America, now open to interpretation by a younger generation of L.A. chefs like Mario.” Chimu is at 324 S. Hill St., (213) 625-1097 or soulfoodofperu.com. Richard Guzmán is at richard@downtownnews.com.

20%OFF Your Catering Order!

with this ad

We cater events as small as 2 or as large as 2,000, each with the same focus of satisfaction and culinary perfection. We prepare food that satisfies more than the palate - it satisfies the soul. We prepare our food with LOVE and precision!

We Cater Los Angeles! 3300 N. Broadway, Los Angeles CA 90031 | (866) 676-0732 | maracascafe1963.com

VOT.A. Downtown by L

Sushi Counter in LA! Featuring

sashimi, yakitori, Tempura, different kinds of sushi open 7 days a week, 11 am - 10 pm 120 Japanese Village plaza (Little Tokyo)

(213) 680-0567

Validated Parking (Enter on Central Ave.) or use DASH Route A–Bus



Since 1963

I SUSeH T ers Original Revolving d S a E R ED B News

photos by Gary Leonard

Mario Alberto Orellana is bringing Peruvian home cooking to Downtown at Chimu. His standout dishes include (middle) chanco, a pork belly plate, and (bottom) seco de cordero, a Peruvian lamb stew.

 Suim nner m i D ch and D Lun 

by RichaRd Guzmán

An Extensive Seafood Menu including Dim Sum at Moderate Prices Relaxed Dining in an Elegant Ambiance Live Lobster Tank

Free Parking Next to Restaurant

700 N. Spring Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012 | Tel: 213.617.2323

Go to DowntownNews.com We want to hear from YOU ✓ comment on stories

✓ submit your own news

✓ submit your own events ✓ post your own photos

✓ place an ad in classifieds



Regent China Inn Authentic Chinese Cuisine in Chinatown

✤ Delivery, Minimum Order $15 ✤ Party Tray Available ✤ Lunch Special $4.95 M-F 11-5, Sat.-Sun. 11-3 739-747 N. Main St., Los Angeles, 90012 213.680.3333 • Regentchinainn.com FREE PARKING

Why Cook? 10 PieCe sPeCiAL

Now Accepting Credit Cards

thighs & Legs

We Deliver

with Tortillas & Salsa

Party Paks Available

$9.99

With minimum order of $10. Only when available. Limited area & hours.

onLy

+ TAX

2 Downtown Locations Corner of BroADWAy & 3rd 260 S. Broadway

L.A., CA 90012 (213) 626-7975 • (213) 626-8235

Tel/Fx:

(213) 626-4572

FAshion DistriCt 226 E. 9th St.

at corner 9th/Santee (213) 623-5091 • (213) 327-0645

Tel/Fx:

(213) 623-9405


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 15

DowntownNews.com

CALENDAR

photos courtesy MOCA

The MOCA show Under the Big Black Sun explores California art during a particularly heady time, just after the L.A. art explosion of the ’60s. The exhibition is at the Geffen Contemporary in Little Tokyo through Feb. 13. Pieces on display include (clockwise from left) “Rejection Quintet” by Judy Chicago, a Black Flag flyer by Raymond Pettibon, “My Shadow” by Robert Colescott, “Human Rights Day” by Rupert Garcia and “Three Weeks in May” by Suzanne Lacy.

HereComestheBigBlackSun

MOCA Show Reveals a Vibrant Period in California Art by KirK SilSbee

O

ne of the first pieces that greets visitors to MOCA’s new show, Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974-1981, is a wall-size work by the late, gifted trompe l’oeil painter Terry Schoonhoven. In it, he depicted a fantastic scene: the Downtown Los Angeles cityscape — entirely under water. The library’s obelisk, the Bank of California and California Federal buildings and environs sit pickled with marine life swimming around them. Like all of his grand opus murals (among them “Venice in the Snow” and “Isle of California,” showing a ravaged freeway overpass after an earthquake), it’s an absurdly apocalyptic scenario. But Schoonhoven’s paintings were so lifelike, viewers can’t help but ask themselves, “Yeah, but what if?” Ennui, apocalyptic fears and a general sense of loathing hang over this vast, sprawling exhibition like smog over the L.A. basin on a hot day with no air movement. If the 1960s were all about joyous possibilities, California’s art of ’74-’81 (Nixon’s resignation to Reagan’s inauguration) reflected a grim set of realities that included inflation, a depressed economy, diminished American standing in the world, gas shortages, environmental alarmism, the beginnings of Islamic jihad and Jimmy Carter’s malaise. The exhibit is at the Geffen Contemporary in Little Tokyo ntownNews om/L.A.Dow through Feb. 13, 2012. Facebook.c L.A.’s art explosion of the ’60s caught the New York art establishment by surprise. A pool of hungry experimentation gestated here, undisturbed by the disapproving East Coast cultural elite. Wallace Berman’s assemblages, Ed Kienholz’s savage tableaux, Ed Rusha’s word/image icons, Robert Irwin’s light installations, Bill Al Bengston’s lacquered chevrons and other idiosyncratic expression flourished in anonymity; nobody told them they couldn’t do it. They made art because they had to, and they had fun doing it.

OCT 3

an! F a e m o c e B

Fan Downtown News on Facebook & Be Entered to Win Movie Tickets!

Ruscha’s two Hollywood sign sunsets and Bengston’s on tatami mats. hanging floral banners represent the old guard at MOCA. Self-indulgence — in the name of exploring personal idenLike their contemporaries, affection for SoCal — however tity — permeates so much of the work represented, and the jaundiced — is discernible. There’s very little joy associated practice of obtaining government money for art took off in with the work in Big Black Sun. those years. A room-size video and photo installation of Paul Michael McMillan and Betye Saar gracefully extended the McCarthy playing with his genitals is the worst culprit. Ilene ’60s assemblage aesthetic: he with a miniature room viewed Segalove’s clothes closet inventory was probably only of interthrough a peephole, and she with a mystically evocative tab- est to her. A photo of a waitress in repose is barely noted, but leaux made of everyday objects. Vija Celmins rethought the who knew in 1975 that Karen Finley — staring blankly in the precious object by displaying polished stones and bronze portrait — would go on to be one of the biggest abusers of fragments under glass. Carole Caroompas’ brilliant collage/ NEA grants in the ’80s? paintings compel through their suggested narrative qualiIt’s no accident that so much self-absorbed work coties. George Kaltenbach’s painting of the face of a dying incided with the rise of identity politics. Women, blacks, man with ghostly decorative motifs superimposed is subtly Chicanos, Asians and gays grabbed for their respective powerful. shares of the political pie and that clutching is reflected in Conceptualism, process and post-studio work were all the the art. An undercurrent — if not occasionally blatant plea rage in the ’70s. Drawing, painting, pictorialism and the pre- — of sympathy is part of much of the personal “documencious object were pronounced obsolete. The idea was para- tation,” initiating classes of victims. Subjects like Chicano mount. artist Gronk stare out of photos and seem to ask: Do you see A large room of different pieces grapples with the issue how hard it is to be me? of nuclear annihilation. A platform covered in 50,000 nickNo cultural measure of the era could leave out punk rock els (the number of NATO tanks said to sit on the Eastern and, thankfully, Big Black Sun (from a song by L.A.’s X) covEuropean borders) with match heads on each one was Chris ers it. Videos of West Coast bands like the Plugz blast across Burden’s view. Jim Pomeroy’s canvas with warships looks like a large screen. Garish black and white photos of the legendwallpaper, which was the point. ary Masque club and Mabuhay Gardens and lots of savage Still, a fair amount of drawn and painted work sits in this graphics by Raymond Pettibon remind us that there was an survey. Schoonhoven’s pal Vic Henderson exquisitelyStarts ren- Oct. explosive 7 counter-action to all of the dull, boring video art dered realist drawing study of watermelon seeds scattered and ice-melting processes that were so rampant in art instituon linoleum is among the best. Judy Chicago’s suite of floral/ tions. One look at the headbangers with blood in their eyes in vaginal meditations in Prismacolor pencil shows her fine front of Black Flag or the Screamers and you know it was a design sense, although the accompanying text, cataloging her heck of a time to be alive. rejections, no longer wears well (all adults have to process reUnder the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974-1981 runs jection and failure, and artists more so than most). A characthrough Feb. 13, 2012, at MOCA’s Geffen Contemporary, 152 N. Check Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com teristically sublime Masami Teraoka watercolor speaks in the Central Ave., (213) 626-6222 or moca.org. Open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. ancient woodblock vernacular, but of McDonald’s wrappings Mon.-Fri.: 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Thurs.; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.-Sun.

OCT 10

! s w e N E r o ✔ Sign Up f

E-NEWS SIGN UP

or nNews.com at Downtow hand corner maillist ht rig r pe s/ e up symbol in th ntownnews.com/form Look for this www.ladow

Sign Up for Our E-News Blasts & Be Entered to Win Movie Tickets!

Starts Oct. 14

Check Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com


16 Downtown News

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

The Million Dollar Series Broadway Theater Brings Back Weekly Film Events

photos by Gary Leonard

Million Dollar Theater operator Robert Voskanian hopes a three-month film series will lead to a permanent movie night in Downtown. Crowds in the venue this week will see a double feature of David Cronenberg’s The Fly and Videodrome. by Richard Guzmán city editor

W

hen Robert Voskanian saw his 2,000-seat Million Dollar Theater filled with movie fans during the summer as part of the Last Remaining Seats series, he thought not only of the night, but of the future. The crowd in the venue at 307 S. Broadway made Voskanian wonder if audiences would show up consistently to take in films in the former movie palace that had been renovated in 2007. Now, he has the chance to find out. Voskanian has partnered with the UCLA Film & Television Archive to present a weekly movie series at the venue designed by Albert C. Martin and often compared to a Spanish cathedral. The Wednesday evening events began last week and run through Dec. 21.

“People love to see classic movies on the big screen, so we’re going to see what Downtown people really like,” said Voskanian, the managing operator who is leasing the theater from property owner The Yellin Company, which also owns Grand Central Market. If crowds come, he said, it will lead to something not seen in Downtown Los Angeles for the better part of a decade — a consistent film presence on the street once filled with ornate movie palaces. “These first three months are going to be a trial,” he said. “If Downtown people support it, we’ll go on once a week. My goal is to make Wednesday night classic film night at the Million Dollar Theater.” Most of the events are double features. Each night highlights a different theme, whether films by the same director,

sci-fi flicks or movies about local writers. The Oct. 12 double feature is a tribute to director David Cronenberg, with a screening of 1986’s The Fly and 1983’s Videodrome. The following week is reserved for “on the road” films, with the motorcycle classic Easy Rider and 1971’s TwoLane Blacktop. Other highlights include George Hamilton’s vampire comedy Love at First Bite and Mel Brooks’ Young Frankenstein on Oct. 26. The only two solo film nights of the series are Nov. 16 with the epic Lawrence of Arabia, and the 1978 version of Superman starring Christopher Reeve, screening Dec. 7. All events start at 7:30 p.m. The partnership was launched when Voskanian was introduced to members of the UCLA organization through a mutual friend. He noted that the relationship allows the Million Dollar access to films it could not otherwise secure the rights to show. Jan-Christopher Horak, director of the UCLA Film & Television Archive, was out of the country and did not respond to a request for comment. In a blog he penned on the organization’s website, Horak recalled seeing 1935’s Captain Blood at the theater during this summer’s Last Remaining Seats, the series by the Los Angeles Conservancy that, for six weeks, pairs classic films with various Broadway venues. “I guess I saw that film, as well as The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), Essex and Elisabeth (1939), and The Sea Hawk (1940), at least 20 times on television before I knew even what a film buff was, but seeing the film in a big theatre is an amazing see Film, page 24

URJ-LADowntown_5x7.625:Layout 1 9/19/11 4:09 PM Page 1

Judaism…

more than just a bagel

A TASTE OF JUDAISM… ™ ARE YOU CURIOUS? Three FREE weekly class sessions in locations across Greater Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, beginning October 16, 18, 26 and November 2 All are welcome, Jewish or not

310.800.1161 curiousaboutjudaismLA@urj.org

Photo courtesy of istockphoto.com

To register go to:

www.curiousaboutjudaism.org/la


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 17

DowntownNews.com

LISTINGS EVENTS

Wednesday, OcTOber 12 Ariel Dorfman at Aloud Mark Taper Auditorium-Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org. 7 p.m.: Ariel Dorfman, who penned Feeding on Dreams: Confessions of An Unrepentant Exile, is in conversation with Marc Cooper, a journalist who happens to be the former translator to Salvador Allende. They’ll have plenty to talk about. Odile Decq: Beyond Horizons at SCI-Arc SCI-Arc, 960 E. Third St., (213) 613-2200 or sciarc. edu. 7 p.m.: To celebrate the opening of the exhibition Anisotropy/Anisotropie, firm partner Odile Decq drops by to pontificate on the meaning of amorphous sight lines in architecture and space. saTurday, OcTOber 15 Revolucion! at Aloud Mark Taper Auditorium-Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org. 3:30 p.m.: An event titled “Revolucion! An Internationalist Homage to the Mexican Revolution” is a musical and artistic collaboration initiated by Chola Con Cello. ‘An Artful Evening’ at CAAM California African American Museum, 600 Exposition Drive, (213) 744-7432 or caamuseum.org. 6 p.m.: The California African American Museum holds its annual October gala. Herbie Hancock, dancer and choreographer Donald McKayle and artist Betye Saar will be presented with Lifetime Achievement Awards. sunday, OcTOber 16 Ugly Feelings REDCAT, 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. Oct. 16, 7 p.m.: Jack Halberstam, Wayne Koestenbaum and Maggie Nelson are cultural critics who come together for an event involving critical inquiry and tragic comedy.

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Bootleg Bar 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.org. Oct. 10, 9 p.m.: Harmonic halcyon folk from the land down under when Boy & Bear take over the joint.

Mirrors, Spiders and French Champagne

one

F

or the first time since 1986, the Scottish Ballet is touring the United States. The highly touted company from Glasgow is bringing its mixed repertoire of classical and contemporary ballet to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Friday-Sunday, Oct. 14-16. Known for their technical prowess, these pirouetting Scots will present Kenneth Macmillan’s Song of the Earth and Jorma Elo’s Kings 2 Ends. If that means nothing to you, know that it’s a reprise of the program the troupe brought to this year’s Edinburgh International Festival. At 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-7211 or musiccenter.org. photo © Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

2 Parisian architecture firm Odile Decq Benoit Cornette made its name with a collection of asymmetrical structures that employ glassy facades and interiors in a patchwork of angular spaces. From Friday, Oct. 14 through Dec. 4, the Southern California Institute of Architecture will host the firm’s Anisotropy/ Anisotropie exhibit. The collection of amorphous mirrors positioned in intersecting lines is a micro-testament to the firm’s structural tendencies and concepts. Meant to challenge perceptions of space and distort the visual faculties of the visitor, the exhibit opening features a discussion with partner Odile Decq and SCI-Arc boss Eric Owen Moss. It’s at 7 p.m. at 960 E. Third St., (213) 613-2200 or sciarc.edu.

3

The return of the Spider Pavilion at the Natural History Museum is a fantastic opportunity either to observe the creatures in a large natural environment, or to overcome your paralyzing arachnophobia. No matter what, the inhabitants of this creepy crawly exhibit are eagerly spinning webs in the public eye until Nov. 6. Tickets for this treasure on the lawn in front of the museum are sold in half-hour increments throughout the day until 4:30 p.m. On Oct. 21 and 28, guests can partake in special nighttime tours to witness these eight legged rock stars spin their webby gossamer bug catchers under the calm serenity of a night sky. At 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-3466 or nhm.org.

FOUR

The unique intimacy of Le Salon de Musiques at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion draws on a legacy of informality and music without barriers, one established by Marie Antoinette in the late 18th century. Most famous in contemporary consciousness for the loss of her head, the late queen also fostered the remarkable idea that chamber music should be less about formality and etiquette and more about discourse. Each third Sunday of the month beginning Oct. 16, the building’s fifth floor will play host to chamber musicians and audience members undistinguished by the separation of the stage. After the 4 p.m. performance, attendees are invited to share ideas, sip on French champagne and indulge in a buffet from Patina. At 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-7211 or musiccenter.org.

5

The Company of Angels’ Friday performance of Blu, by Virginia Grise, marks the play’s opening night at the Alexandria Hotel. Set in the fictional everytown Barrio, USA, Grise’s commentary on queer issues, incarceration and family ties in the Chicano community garnered awards from Yale University and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. That’s nice and all, but it’s even better that Blu is in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles. The play runs from Oct.14-Nov. 13 (there’s also an Oct. 13 preview). At 501 S. Spring St., third floor, (213) 489-3703 or companyofangels.org.

Continued on next page

Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.

photo by Andrew Ross

by Dan Johnson, listings eDitor calendar@downtownnews.com

image by Odile Decq Benoit Cornette

Tuesday, OcTOber 11 Anne Enright at Aloud Mark Taper Auditorium-Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org. 7 p.m.: Anne Enright, author of The Forgotten Waltz, speaks with Brighde Mullins, director of the Master of Professional Writing Program at USC. Do Trojans waltz? ‘A Day at the Beach’ Lecture Natural History Museum, 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-3466 or nhm.org. 5-8 p.m.: The scenic California landscape we enjoy today is much different from the coastline of the distant past. Join the NHM staff in a discussion on “Dinosaurs and Other Life in the Western Interior Seaway.”

THE DON’T MISS LIST

photos by Carole Sternichat

SPONSORED LISTINGS Friday Night Flicks Pershing Square 532 S. Olive, or laparks.org/ pershingsquare. Oct. 14, Sunset: M. Night Shyamalan’s first blockbuster The Sixth Sense reminds us that the dead walk among us, an especially pertinent commentary given the strange cast of characters that inhabit Downtown. No need to ruin the surprise, but hint: Haley Joel Osment is not a robot. La Muerte Vive Million Dollar Theatre, 307 S. Broadway, lamuertevive.com. 7-11 p.m., Nov. 2: This special event is part celebration of Dia de los Muertos, which includes large paper maché puppets, and part Latin cabaret. Doors open at 3 p.m. Tickets are $10-$45. Free Downtown Audio Walking Tours Various Locations, crala.org/art. Free audio walking tours and maps are available for download at crala.org/art. Explore Downtown’s Bunker Hill, Financial District, Historic Core and Little Tokyo neighborhoods by discovering public art and places developed through the CRA/LA Art Program.


18 Downtown News

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Bronfman and Dudamel

Listings

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

photo courtesy LA Philharmonic Association

Oct. 10, 10:30 p.m.: Mind the Gap returns to blow minds as part of their October residency. Oct. 11, 9 p.m.: Holy elaborate concept. Radical Face takes the narrative of an 1800s family and traces it through musical evolution into our own time. He’ll be appearing with Easterly Singers and the Walking Sleep. Oct. 12, 9 p.m.: Pitchfork tells me to like Papa so I will. But seriously, electro underpinnings with some nice stringy guitar on top sounds fantastic, so check out their album release show with The Franks and Races. Oct. 13, 9 p.m.: Vintage style rock from Family of the Year is the big draw tonight. In fact, the first 100 through the door get a copy of their new EP. Arrive early for free discage and openers Maniac and Black Flamingo. Oct. 14, 8 p.m.: There will be singer-songwriters by the truckload when Katie Herzig plays with Butterfly Boucher and Amy Kuney. Oct. 15, 9 p.m.: Irreverent geekcore punk when The Inevitable Backlash opens for Kozmonaut. Oct. 16, 8:30 p.m.: It’s an orgy of synaptical

dreamscapes and spacy ambient noise when Walls takes the stage. They’ll be joined by The Urxed and David Scott Stone of LCD Soundsystem/Melvins fame. Capping off the night is E.S.P. Broadway Bar 830 S. Broadway, (213) 614-9909 or broadwaybar.la. Oct. 11: It’s premium space music at Galaktica, a gathering of nerds, alcoholics, Don Froth and Xolair. Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. Oct. 14, 11 p.m.: Judson McKinney plays another night of his residency. Club Nokia 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-7000 or clubnokia.com. Oct. 12, 8 p.m.: The Australian Pink Floyd Show. Look for the Australian flying pig and offer it a shrimp from the barbie. Oct. 15, 9 p.m.: Friendly Fires with Theophilus Londong. Oct. 16, 8:30 p.m.: Aussie electro dream pop darlings Empire of the Sun get funky with Mayer Hawthorne & The County. Grammy Museum 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or

T

wo classical music heavyweights team up for three concerts on Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 13-15, of robust piano music. At the keyboard is the acclaimed Yefim Bronfman. Gustavo Dudamel will be giving the cues on Claude Vivier’s Orion, Bartók’s Third Piano Concerto and Tchaikovsky’s passionate Fifth Symphony. All shows are at 8 p.m. at Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 8502000 or laphil.com.

Continued from previous page

grammymuseum.org. Oct. 12, 7 p.m.: An evening with Edgar Winter. Nokia Theater 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6020 or nokiatheatrelalive.com. Oct. 14 & 15, 8 p.m.: Mexico City’s Caifanes presents Los Angeles with two nights of their Revention Edicion 2011 Especial. Redwood Bar and Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 652-4444 or theredwoodbar.com. Oct. 13: Public decency laws have changed quite a bit since Ground Zero History opened its doors in ’43. The Birthday Suits are playing. Oct. 14: Ironically, Ralph Carney’s Serious Jass Project has a promo photo of someone in a trench coat exposing himself to the band. These pervs will join Morris Tepper, Frank Fairfield and the Cottontails. Oct. 15: The Dogs are rock, Detroit style. No, not Kid Rock. Actual rock, like overdrive pedals. The Neurotics, Rough Kids and Handsome Jack will all be on hand to help The Dogs slip into their tight black jeans. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., (213) 614-0737 or sevengrand.la.

Oct. 11: A lot of history up at Seven Grand. Rumor has it when the Makers came to town, they built that bar on an Indian burial ground. Ever since, they’ve been cursed to play improvisational jazz every Tuesday until the souls of those poor Indians receive justice. Yep, a lot of history up at that bar. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. Oct. 10: The Renderers, Sore Eros, Cosmonauts and Kim Free. Oct. 13: Japanther, Joyce Manor, Fidlar and Tinylittle. Oct. 14: Narrows, Helms Alee and Aeges. Oct. 15: On strength of band names alone, this night is a don’t miss: So Many Wizards, Body Parts, Writer and Gold and Soil. The Varnish 118 E. Sixth St., (213) 622-9999 or thevarnishbar.com. Oct. 11, 10 p.m.: Jamie Elman tickles the ivories.

FILM Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 19

DowntownNews.com

We Got Games Kings On the Road, Big Boxing at Staples Los Angeles Kings Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., 1 (888) KINGS-LA or kngs.nhl.com Your Los Angelllllllles Kiiiiiiiings kicked off their season last week, with overseas matches in Sweden and Germany (danke schoen). Now they’re back, and hope to improve upon last year’s pleasantly surprising season, which ended with a playoff appearance. The purple and black have puck enthusiasts optimistic, as they’re anchored by newly resigned defenseman Drew Doughty and co-captain Anze Kopitar, plus a few key free agent additions. They open the North American portion of the campaign by heading to Jersey to take on the Devils (Oct. 13). Let’s hope the Devils have been inspired by Jersey’s latest (and best since Bruce

downtownindependent.com. Oct. 10, 5 p.m.; Oct. 11-12, 5 p.m.; Oct 13, 3 p.m.: The world fell in love with Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová when their songwriting collaboration in the film Once culminated in an Oscar. But behind the scenes, a grueling 2-year world tour threatens to fracture their fated bond. The black and white, music-filled documentary is an intimate look at turmoil, love and fame. Through Oct. 13, 7 p.m.: How I Got Lost. On Sept. 11, Jake and Andrew got drunk. After they tried to give blood. After they called their parents. A year later, the hangover still lingers. But now Andrew has a plan: Ditch New York. Hit the road, going nowhere. And Jake follows along, as he always has. Flagship Theatres University Village 3323 S. Hoover St., (213) 748-6321 or flagshipmovies.com. Through Oct. 13: Real Steel (11 a.m. and 1:45, 4:30, 7:15 and 10 p.m.); Dream House (1, 3:20, 5:40, 8 and 10:20 p.m.); Dolphin Tale 3D (12, 2:30, 5, 7:30 and 10 p.m.). Oct. 14 (Partial): The Thing. Friday Night Flicks Pershing Square 532 S. Olive, or laparks.org/ pershingsquare. Oct. 14, Sunset: M. Night Shyamalan’s first blockbuster The Sixth Sense reminds us that the dead walk among us, an especially pertinent commentary given the strange cast of characters that inhabit Downtown. No need to ruin the surprise, but hint: Haley Joel Osment is not a robot. IMAX Theater California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 7442019 or californiasciencecenter.org. Through Dec. 31: Soar over primordial earth in Flying Monsters 3D. About 220 million years ago dinosaurs were beginning their domination of Earth. But another group of reptiles was about to make an extraordinary leap: Pterosaurs were taking control of the skies. The story of how and why these mysterious creatures took to the air is more fantastical than any fiction. Million Dollar Theatre 307 S. Broadway, (213) 617-3600 or milliondollartheater.com. Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m.: Two works from Director David Cronenberg in this 25th anniversary double feature: The Fly with Jeff Goldblum and dystopic animated bit Videodrome. REDCAT

Springsteen) cultural export, “Jersey Shore,” and spent the off-season tanning and being foolish. Then, it’s on to Philly to eat cheese steaks, check out the “Rocky” statue and take on the Flyers (Oct. 15). We still have to wait a week for the home opener. Hopkins vs. Dawkins: Boxing at Staples Center 1111 S. Figueroa St., staplescenter.com. Oct. 15, 2:30 p.m.: Boxing is back at Staples Center, as Bernard “the Executioner” Hopkins takes on “Bad” Chad Dawson in a light heavyweight championship bout. It’s a case of savvy, prison-scarred and -schooled veteran versus quick, audacious youngster. Hopkins is 46, and for a time after getting out of the pokey was arguably boxing’s best pound-for-pound fighter. Dawson is only 29. Both boast some serious ring credentials. Hopkins is 52-5-2 with 32 knockouts. Dawson has had fewer fights, at 31, but he only lost one of them. Seventeen of his 30 wins were by knockout. The card also features a WBC lightweight title bout between Jorge Linares and Antonio Demarco. The first bout, with people you’ve never heard of, is at 2:30 p.m. The main event is hours later. —Ryan Vaillancourt

631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. Oct. 10, 8:30 p.m.: Animation of the Unconsciousness peers into the imagination of CalArts animation pioneer Jules Engel. The film considers his techniques, influence on the craft and his thoughts about art and the human condition. Oct. 14, 8:30 p.m.: Werner Schroeter: Der Tod der Maria Malibran (The Death of Maria Malibran), 1972. Oct. 15, 6 p.m.: Elfi Mikesch: Mondo Lux-Die Bilderwelten Des Werner Schroeter (Mondo LuxThe Visual Worlds of Werner Schroeter) followed by Schroeter’s Deux. Regal Cinema L.A. Live 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (877) 835-5734 or lalive.com. Through Oct. 13: The Ides of March (11:30 a.m. and 12:30, 2, 3, 4:30, 5:30, 7:10, 8, 10 and 10:50 p.m.); Real Steel (12:30, 1:30, 3:40, 4:40, 7, 7:50, 10 and 11 p.m.); 50/50 (12, 1:10, 2:30, 3:50, 5, 6:40, 7:40, 9:30 and 10:30 p.m.); Dream House (11:50 a.m. and 2:30, 4:50, 7:20 and 9:40 p.m.); What’s Your Number? (1:40, 4:20, 6:50 and 9:30 p.m.); Dolphin Tale (1:20 p.m.); Dolphin Tale 3D (4 and 9:30 p.m.); Killer Elite (1:20 and 4:30 p.m.); Moneyball (1, 4:10, 7:20 and 10:30 p.m.); Drive (12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40 and 10:10 p.m.); The Lion King 3D (11:40 a.m. and 1:50, 4:20, 6:50 and 9:20 p.m.); Contagion (11:30 a.m. and 2, 4:50, 7:30 and 10:20 p.m.). Oct. 14 (Partial): Footloose (11:30 a.m. and 2:10, 5, 7:50 and 10:40 p.m.).

CLASSICAL MUSIC Tuesday, OcTOber 11 Baroque Variations Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand, (980) 5757099 or laphil.org. Oct. 11, 8 p.m.: Harry Bicket does double duty as conductor/harpsichordist and Andreas Scholl sings countertenor in a night of Baroque Variations from Biber, Purcell and Muffat. Thursday, OcTOber 13 Los Angeles Philharmonic Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand, (980) 5757099 or laphil.org. 8 p.m. Dudamel with Yefim Bronfman on Piano play Viver’s Orion, Bartok’s Piano Concerto No. 3 and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5. Also on Oct. 14 and 15 at 8 p.m.

Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin

A A A

ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada

Scared ScaredScared Scared

Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 8 p.m.: The Colburn School’s Brass Ensemble gives a concert. sunday OcT. 16 Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 3 p.m.: Colburn faculty John and Mina Perry give a recital.

ART SPACES Angel City Brewing 216 S. Alameda (off Traction) or angelcitybrewing.com. Ongoing: Street Brewed: An Exhibition of Contemporary Street Art features about 25 internationally known artists. Bert Green Fine Art 451 S. Main St. #1206, (213) 842-8574 or bgfa.us. Through Oct. 29: Bert Green Fine Art hosts returning acrylic hero Eduardo Villacis and his transmuted, visceral takes on history. Buchanon Gallery 204 W. Sixth St., (323) 823-1922 or byronbuchanan.com. Ongoing: Pop paintings by Bryon Buchanan. CB1 Gallery 207 W. Fifth St., (213) 806-7889 or cb1gallery.com. Through Oct. 22: Amy Yoes’s first project in Los Angeles, Light Lab, expands the scope and scale of her previous site-specific installations. The cathedral-like space of CB1 Gallery, a former bank lobby, becomes host to a geometric structure built along a quasi-organic logic. Charlie James Gallery 975 Chung King Road, (213) 687-0488 or cjamesgallery.com. Through Oct. 29: Charlie James Gallery presents artist Richard Kraft’s first solo show in Los Angeles, entitled “Something With Birds In It.” A site-specific installation composed of four elements, the show invokes the friction and fluidity between familiar polarities — between the sacred and profane, sense and nonsense, play and violence, reflection and action. Chinese Historical Society of Southern California 411 Bernard St., (323) 222-0856 or chssc.org. Ongoing: An exhibition about the history of immigration from China to the United States. The Company 946 Yale St., (213) 221-7082 or thecompanyart.com. Through Nov. 5: Sigrid Sandtrom’s acrylic paintings. Downtown Art Center Gallery 828 S. Main St., (213) 627-7374 or dacgallery.com. Oct. 13-30: Scratching the Surface, a group show. Gallery Lofts 120 S. Hewitt Street or galleryloftsla.com Ongoing: Gallery Installations, an exhibit of

of missing sales A Angeles Downtown News of missing sales Los opportunities? of missing sales opportunities? 1264 W.opportunities? First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 of missing sales opportunities? of missing sales opportunities? phone: 213-481-1448 •projects, fax: 213-250-4617 We’ve got got the the solution. Juggling too manytoo We’ve got the solution. Juggling too many projects, deadlines and vendors? Letsales We’ve solution. Juggling many projects,opportunities? deadlines and vendors? Let of missing sales opportunities? of missing Art dirEctor: Brian Allison deadlines and vendors? Let PIP manage the creation and web: DowntownNews.com PIP manage the creation and re-ordering of all of the yourcreation business PIP manage andcommunire-ordering of all of your business communi-

Scared

got the solution. Juggling too many projects, and vendors? Let We’ve got solution. Juggling too many re-ordering of allthe ofdeadlines your business In projects, deadlines and vendors? Let AssistANt ArtWe’ve dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa email: realpeople@downtownnews.com cations. one location, your PIP bring together allcommuni-cations. the resources cations. Inthe location, your PIP bring togetherand all the resources We’ve gotInthe solution. Juggling tooconsultants many We’ve projects, deadlines solution. and Juggling vendors? tooconsultants many Let vendors? Let one location, your PIP consultants bring together all the projects, PIPGrAPhics: manage the creation and re-ordering ofgot all ofone your business communiPIP manage the creation and re-ordering of all ofdeadlines your business communiProductioN ANd Alexis Rawlins you need, including: you need, including: resources you need, including: PIP manage thelocation, creationyour and PIP re-ordering PIP manage of all of the your creation business and communire-ordering of all of your business communications. In one consultants bring together all the resources cations. In one location, your PIP consultants bring together all the resources • Printing • Signs, posters and banners • Printing • Signs, posters and banners facebook: PhotoGrAPhEr: Leonard cations. Inincluding: one location, your PIP consultants cations. bring Inincluding: one location, allyour the resources PIPprinting consultants all the resources youGary need, you need, • Copying • Digital printing • Copying bring together • Digital printing Printing • Copying • together Graphic design • Digital L.A. Downtown News •• Printing •• Signs, posters and banners • Printing •• Signs, you need, including: you need, including: Graphic design Online Online posters orderingand banners Signs, posters and bannersordering • Online ordering• Graphic design Copying Digital posters printing Copying Digital posters printing and banners • Signs, and banners • Printing • Signs, AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt 700 Wilshire Blvd. • Printing 700 Wilshire Blvd. Graphic design Online printing ordering Graphic design Online printing ordering • Copying • Digital • Copying • Digital twitter: ph: 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 ph: 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 700Steve Wilshire 700 Blvd. • Graphic design designWilshire • Online ordering • Online ordering AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Nakutin Blvd. • Graphic DowntownNews Wilshire Blvd. Wilshire Blvd. piparco@sbcglobal.net piparco@sbcglobal.net clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway ph:700 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 ph:700 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 700 Wilshire Blvd. | 213-489-2333 | piparco@sbcglobal.net ph: 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 ph: 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Kim Brown, Catherine Holloway, piparco@sbcglobal.net piparco@sbcglobal.net The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read Brenda Stevens piparco@sbcglobal.net piparco@sbcglobal.net circulAtioN: Norma Rodas distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla

B B B

photo by Gary Leonard

Anze Kopitar and the Kings are back from Europe, but still on the road as the season begins.

newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

work by locally based design groups Arcbureau and Archeffect, is in the atrium courtyard. Gary Leonard 860 S. Broadway, takemypicture.com. Take My Picture is a gallery dedicated to Gary Leonard’s photographs, documenting the public and private culture of Los Angeles with significant guest collections. Hive Gallery & Studios 729 S. Spring St., (213) 955-9051 or thehivegallery.com. Through Oct.: The macabre and grotesque come to the forefront in this apropos Oct. group show featuring Jeff Christensen, Cody Seekins, Larkin, Macsorro, 3RDi and Jamie Johnson. Hold Up Art 358 E. Second St., (213) 221-4585 or holdupart.com. Ongoing: Individual pieces by Gosha, Sam Flores, Kraken, Nick D’attomo, Mear One, Tony Hong and more. LA Artcore at Union Center for the Arts 120 Judge John Aiso St., (213) 617-3274 or laartcore.org. Through Oct. 30: Distorted geometrics spanning mediums by Robert Walker, Toyoko Katsumata and Matthew Thomas. LA Artcore at the Brewery Annex 650 A South Avenue 21, (323) 276-9320 or laartcore.org. Through Oct. 30: Jon Nguyen exhibits his recent work. L2kontemporary 990 N. Hill St. #205, (626) 319-3661 or l2kontemporary.com. Through Oct. 22: Solo show by Gronk entitled “Empty Lines.”

MoRE LISTInGS Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

2

B

EvEnT Info

4 wEb: LADowntownNews.com/calendar/submit 4 EMAIL: Calendar@DowntownNews.com

Email: Send a brief description, street address and public phone number. Submissions must be received 10 days prior to publication date to be considered for print.

of missing sales opportunities?

We’ve got the solution. Juggling too many projects, deadlines and vendors? Let PIP manage the creation and re-ordering of all of your business communications. In one location, your PIP consultants bring together all the resources you need, including: 700 Wilshire Blvd.

• Printing • Copying • Graphic design

ph: 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 piparco@sbcglobal.net

One copy per person.

EASy wAyS To SUbMIT yoUR

• Signs, posters and banners • Digital printing • Online ordering


1

8

P

10

RD

FW

Y

13

M WAY

DE SA PA

ST

NS T MAI

AY ADW BRO

HOMEBOY INDUSTRIES

www.cartifact.com

VE EZ A

NR

SIO MIS D

A

101

AN

AN

Y

S LE S RI VE

T

ST H 4T

ST TH 5

VE LA

Y

T

RA

NT

AS ED

AM

4TH ST

CE

ST

FW

ST

AL

RO

BOR

PED

HAR

O

TO

6

ST

ET

M

L PA

SEAFOOD DISTRICT PARA LOS NINOS

WEINGART CLINIC 6TH ST

MIDNIGHT MISSION

H

6T

ST

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT SKID ROW HOUSING TRUST

MAPLE AVE

SANTEE

GELE S LOS A N

ST

ST

ST MAIN

INNER CITY ARTS

7

Map sponsored by:

At your door within 15 minutes! 8

THE MAYAN BELASCO THEATRE

11TH ST

EY SANTEE ALL

SOUTH PARK

AT&T CENTER 12TH ST

PICO STATION

$46.50 Flat Rate From Downtown to LAX

PICO BLVD

14TH PL

17TH ST

SANTEE ST

MAIN ST

BROADWAY

HILL ST

AVE

OLIVE ST

GRAND

T

HOPE S

R ST

FLOWE

OA ST

VENICE BLVD FRIEDMAN OCCUPATIONAL CENTER

LOS ANGELES ST

14TH ST

B

PATRIOTIC HALL

C

15TH ST

www.taxi4u.com

Lic.#173654

L.A.’S #1 TAXI COMPANY FOR OVER 30 YEARS!

10

D

SAN PEDRO STATION

LV GTON B WASHIN

D

9

(800) LA1-TAXI

14TH ST

MAPLE AVE

CALIFORNIA HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER

FIGUER

110

IN

FASHION DISTRICT

18TH ST

10

OL

CALIFORNIA MARKET CENTER

CA FWY S A N TA M O N I

A

SAN

LOS ANGELES ST

SPRING ST

BROADWAY

Y ST

10

M

LUXE CITY CENTER

D PICO BLV

PICO UNION

ORPHEUM THEATER

OLYMPIC BLVD

GILBERT LINDSAY PLAZA

SOUTH EXHIBIT HALL

4TH ST

5

STAY HOTEL

FLOWER MARKET

UNITED ARTISTS THEATRE

FIGUEROA HOTEL

CONVENTION CENTER

SPRING ST

BROADWAY

HILL ST

OLIVE ST

GRAND AVE

HOPE ST

FLOWER ST

GRAND HOPE FIDM PARK

WEST EXHIBIT HALL

CHERR

T 12TH S

RALPHS

STILLWELL HOTEL

STAPLES CENTER ARENA

110

9

FIGUEROA ST

D AVE

FRANCISCO ST

N GARLA

T

11TH S

GRAND AVE

AVE LUCAS BLVD

OLYMPIC

CENTRAL CITY EAST

MACY'S PLAZA FIDM ANNEX

ART SHARE 4TH PL

7TH ST

8TH ST

SCI-ARC

ST

LITTLE TOKYO GALLERIA MALL

UNION RESCUE MISSION

6TH ST

VERIZON SHERATON HOTEL

RITZ MILNER O HOTEL

D

3R

5TH ST

LAPD CENTRAL DIVISION

MERCANTILE ARCADE

JEWELRY LAAC DISTRICT

D 2N TRACTION AVE

DOWNTOWN WOMEN’S CENTER

LA MISSION

HISTORIC CORE

9TH ST

JW MARRIOTT & RITZ L.A. LIVE CARLTON REGAL NOKIA CINEPLEX PLAZA NOKIA THEATRE WEST RN EA GARAGE KH CHIC

TOY DISTRICT

NEW LATC

BILTMORE HOTEL PERSHING SQUARE

ST

ARATANI NOGUCHI THEATER PLAZA JACCC

OLD BANK DISTRICT & GALLERY ROW

5TH ST

ARTS DISTRICT

JAPANESE VILLAGE PLAZA 2ND ST

7TH ST

777

GARLAND BUILDING

GAS CO TOWER

WILSHIRE BLVD

FIG at 7TH

LOYOLA LAW SCHOOL

US BANK TOWER

MUSEUM OF NEON ART

PERSHING SQUARE STATION

T

TS

1S

3RD ST

BRADBURY RONALD BLDG. REAGAN BIDDY STATE MASON BLDG PARK

4TH ST

LITTLE TOKYO/ ARTS DISTRICT STATION

LITTLE TOKYO

LITTLE VIBIANA TOKYO LIBRARY

DOWNTOWN INDEPENDENT THEATER

WATER COURT ANGELS GRAND CENTRAL CALIFORNIA FLIGHT MARKET PLAZA

7TH ST / METRO CENTER STATION

725

JAM

HOPE ST

WILSHIR

2ND ST

3RD ST

MELLON BANK

LAPD HQ

FINANCIAL DISTRICT

WILSHIRE GRAND HOTEL

E BLVD

8

FLOWER ST

FIGUEROA AT WILSHIRE

D OOD BLV ES M W

WELLS FARGO CENTER

MAGUIRE CITY GDNS NATIONAL JONATHAN PLAZA CALIF. CLUB CLUB THE STANDARD

GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL

7TH ST

BA PLAZA

WESTIN YMCA UNION BONAVENTURE HOTEL BANK CITIGROUP PLAZA CENTER

CITY WEST

7

FIGUEROA ST

LOS ANGELES CENTER STUDIOS

MARRIOTT DOWNTOWN

MOCA OMNI 3RD ST TUNNEL HOTEL

OLIVE ST

2ND STREET TUNNEL COLBURN SCHOOL OF PERF. ARTS

KYOTO CALTRANS GRAND HQ HOTEL

WALL ST

FWY HARBOR

BUNKER HILL

BEAUDRY AVE

T 3RD S CHAMBER OF COMMERCE T 4TH S

6

R

LOS ANGELES TIMES

CROWN HILL

MIGUEL CONTRERAS LEARNING COMPLEX

CITY HALL SOUTH

1ST ST

T

LAUSD HQ

CIVIC CENTER STATION

L. A. COUNTY COURTHOUSE

GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY @ MOCA UNION JAPANESE CENTER AMERICAN FOR THE NATIONAL ARTS MUSEUM

LOS ANGELES CITY HALL

E AV

2ND S

DOROTHY CHANDLER

CITY HALL EAST

CIVIC CENTER

CIVIC CENTER PARK

EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER

4

FE

SHAKESPEARE LA

TEMPLE ST HALL OF CRIMINAL RECORDS COURTHOUSE

HALL OF ADMINISTRATION

FEDERAL BLDG ROYBAL FEDERAL BLDG

LOS ANGELES MALL

A NT

DEPT. OF WATER & POWER

DEPT. OF BUILDING & SAFETY

FEDERAL COURTHOUSE

SA

1ST ST

L.A. DOWNTOWN NEWS

AHMANSON THEATER MARK TAPER FORUM

110

EDWARD R. ROYBAL LEARNING CENTER

VISTA HERMOSA PARK

5

CATHEDRAL OF OUR LADY OF THE ANGELS

TEMPLE BEAUDRY

BOYLE HEIGHTS

GE

A NT

FW

DOWNTOWN SLO

4

2

C. ERWIN PIPER TECHNICAL CENTER

LO

SA

MWD

10

SAN BERNARDINO SPLIT

AV

. CH

T SS

UNION STATION

DE LA SERRA PLAZA PARK

RAMON C. CORTINES SCHOOL OF VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

BUSINESS MAGNET HIGH SCHOOL

Map © 2011 Cartifact

NE

4-LEVEL INTERCHANGE

Gas Stations

VIG

EL PUEBLO

EZ AVE CESAR E. CHAV

OLVERA ST

LE ST

ST

101

TEMP

CHINATOWN GATEWAY

HQ

ST ING

CHINATOWN LIBRARY

ST

H O L LY W O O D F W Y

ST

HIGH

EVANS ADULT SCHOOL

Metro Red & Purple Lines

T

ORD

ROA FIGUE

HIST

66

Free Parking w/validation

CES

SPR

ALPINE HILL

ANGELINO HEIGHTS

Metro Blue Line

AS ED AM

BL VD

Metro Rail Station Access

AR E

CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT HQ

Contact Cartifact for the full-color, every-building version of this map . Available in print, web and mobile media.

Metro Gold Line

AL

CHINATOWN

NEW

3

ST

E ST

NS

ET

CHINATOWN STATION

ALPIN

SU

700 S. Flower St, # 1940 Los Angeles, CA 90017 213.327.0200 maps�cartifact.com

DYNASTY CENTER

ST

CASTELLAR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

EG

COLL

EGE

COLL

HILL

VICTOR HEIGHTS

KAISER MENTAL HEALTH CENTER E ST

CENTRAL PLAZA

PACIFIC ALLIANCE MEDICAL CENTER

Los Angeles

MISSION JUNCTION

BAMBOO PLAZA

WEST PLAZA

NA

14

1

ANN STREET ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

CHINESE HISTORICAL SOCIETY ST ARD BERN

LAFD TRAINING CENTER

STADIU

Downtown

66

CHAVEZ RAVINE

11

LOS ANGELES STATE HISTORIC PARK

HIST

RD ING NG K

N

CASA ITALIANA

CHU

K

R PA

K

O

12

ELYSIAN PARK

CATHEDRAL HIGH SCHOOL

N OR

B A

IA

WY

N F

110

F

E

NOR TH

M C

2

2

L

D

YS EL

STADIUM

E

1

J

DODGER STADIUM

D

NORT HB

3

C

ELYSIAN PARK

TH S PRIN G

B

ROAD WAY

A

E

F

10


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 21

DowntownNews.com

CLASSIFIED

pLACe your AD oNLiNe AT www.LADowNTowNNews.Com

FOR RENT

l.a. downtown news classifieds Call: 213-481-1448 Classified Display & Line ad Deadlines: Thursday 12 pm

MONTANA RANCHLANDS Must Sell 20 Acres w/ Utilities Was $49,900 — Now $19,900 170 Acres -Borders BLM Was $299,900 Now $89,900 More property under $1,000/acre Close to Roundup, Billings & Lewiston. The best elk and deer country! Call 888-361-3006. (Cal-SCAN)

“Be wary of out of area companies. Check with the local Better Business Bureau before you send any money for fees or services. Read and understand any contracts before you sign. Shop around for rates.”

FOR RENT

REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL lofts for sale

TheLoftExpertGroup.com Downtown since 2002

Vacation Homes

out of state

ADVERTISE YOUR Vacation Property in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $550. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (CalSCAN)

COLORADO OWNER Must Sell. Beautiful New Mountain Cabin Was $450,000—Now $350,000. 40 Acres w/ Full Utilities. Close to Telluride & Montrose Trophy elk area. Direct access to Areas 61 & 62 & Uncompahgre Nat’l Forest. Fully furnished w/ ATVeverything goes! Call 315-2717757. (Cal-SCAN)

bill Cooper

213.598.7555

loft/unfurnisHed

old Bank District The original Live/Work Lofts from $1,100 Cafes, Bars, Shops, Galleries, Parking adjacent. Pets no charge

LOFT LIVING Your number 1 source for Loft sales, rentals and development! LADowntownNews.com

Beautiful EstD 1912

Historic beauty. Modern refinement. Eclectic elegance.

apartments/unfurnisHed BRAND NEW Luxury Apartments Homes. Orsini III. Now open for immediate Occupancy. Call for Specials. Never Lived in, Free Parking, Karaoke Room, Free Wi-Fi, Indoor Basketball, Uncomparable Amenity Package. Call today to schedule a tour - 866-479-1764. CALL FOR SPECIALS @ the Medici. Penthouse 1 & 2 bdrm apts. Granite kitchens, washer/ dryers, business center, 2 pools, spa! Visit TheMedici.com for a full list of amenities. Call 888886-3731. SENIOR APARTMENTS 62 + Studio $700 1 Bedroom $864 Balcony, Full Kitchen, A/C, Clubhouse, BBQ, Resource room, Laundry, SEC 8 O.K. Visit GSLSANLUCAS.com 213-6232010.

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

CALL FOR SPECIALS @ The Visconti. Free parking, free tanning, free wi-fi + biz center avail. Cardio Salon, pool, Spa, steamroom, sauna. Call us today. 866742-0992. Homes/unfurnisHed DOWNTOWN HOME $2500/ month. 3 bdrm. 2 bath, Family room, Fireplace, Laundry room. Gated pkg. for 6 cars. On hill with city views. Large fenced property at end of the road. Trees & squirrels. Call 213-623-8167.

ECHO PARK back house 4 rent $1,200/mo. 1 month deposit. Centralized w/ parking, no section8, 2BD/1BA 213-413-2283. Leave Message MT. WASHINGTON $2500/mo - 3bd/1.5ba Home - 10 min to Downtown LA. Gold line close. Newly updated home features hardwood floors, washer/dryer, dishwasher, balcony, garage & fenced backyard. (213) 7182453 KatcoMgmt@gmail.com. Continued on next page

Call 213.253.4777 LAloft.com

The Downtown Renaissance Collection

bankruptcy Court authorized sale Downtown Los Angeles SRO Hotel Portfolio Three buildings, 415 Rooms + 17,202 SF of ground floor retail.

ue s d/11 r fe 8 of10/1

Be Inspired... Best Downtown Locations!

noW leasinG $1,400’s/mo.

ROOFTOP GARDEN RETREAT WITH BBQ AND LOUNGE GRAND LOBBY • FITNESS CENTER • SPA MODERN KITCHEN w/CAESAR COUNTERTOPS PET FRIENDLY • DRAMATIC VIEWS MARKET, KELLY’S COFFEE, DRY CLEANING, MAC AND CHEEZA and LA BREWERY on Ground Floor

Contact Madison Partners, exclusive advisor to the Bankruptcy court appointed Trustee: Bob Safai - Lic. #00978067 Matt Case - Lic. #01331084 310.820.5959 ext. 227

Completely Renovated 2 bed/2 baths 1047 SqFt turnkey unit • $284,900 756 S. Broadway, Los Angeles 213-892-9100 | chapmanf lats.com

Minutes from DWTN & Pasadena Granite & Custom Cabinetry throughout Elegant & lofty feel at affordable price Open floor plan is great for entertaining GE Stainless Steel Appliances in Kitchen

Pricing subject to change without notice.

Call Lee Markus for private viewing 626.991.2300 Pics available at: www.photobucket.com/4499ViaMarisol208

the loft expert! group

TM

Downtown since 2002

Voted Best Downtown Residential Real estate Agent Call us today! Bill Cooper • 213.598.7555 • TheLoftExpertGroup.com

rosslYn Hotel Studio 280 sqft. Full Bathroom Apartment

3bd/2ba Bungalow For rent Bike or Expo line 2.1 miles to USC. 3bd/2ba CA Bungalow Recently remodeled. A/C all new appliances stv., side by side washer dryer microwave; auto gate large yards $2500+2500 dep. (213) 683-5333

$600 mo. to mo. $580 on 6 mo. Lease No Application Fee! - Sec. Dep. $175 Free Utilities, 24 hr. laundry, Around the Clock Courtesy Patrol

112 W 5th St., Los Angeles, CA 90013 213.624.3311 • Rosslyn@SROhousing.com

Orsini 550 NORTH FIGUEROA ST.

877-231-9362

WWW.THEORSINI.COM

Medici 725 SOUTH BIXEL ST.

877-239-8256

WWW.THEMEDICI.COM

Elegant World Class Resort Apartment Homes

Piero 616 ST. PAUL AVE.

877-235-6012

WWW.THEPIERO.COM

Visconti 1221 WEST THIRD ST.

866-690-2888

WWW.THEVISCONTI.COM

FREE Rent Specials On Select Floor Plans • Free Resident/Guest Parking in Gated Garage • Private Library, Business Center & Conference Rooms • Free Wi-Fi & DSL Computer Use • Resident Karaoke Lounge • Directors Screening Room • Lavish Fountains & Sculptures • On-Site Private Resident Park with Sand Volleyball, BBQ’s and Jogging Track • Night Light Tennis Courts • Indoor Basketball

Version 1

• Brunswick Four-Lane Virtual Bowling • Full Swing Virtual Golf • 3100 Square Foot Cybex Fitness Facility • Free Tanning Rooms • Massage Room, Sauna & Steam Room • Rooftop Pools with Dressing Rooms • Concierge Service • 24-Hour Doorman • 24/7 On-Site Management • Magnificent City Views *Amenities vary among communities

Charles Dunn Orange PersOnal COurier serviCe

Client: G.H. Palmer Associates $25 samedaY Publication: LADT News special 1636 Wilshire Blvd.Size/Color: - REO 1521 W. 3rd St. - 3,612 sf 4C (Includes 30-Miles One-Way) 4.3125” x 8”

PRICE REDUCTIONS! ♦ Downtown Office Bldgs.

Investor/user, 16,866 sf Built 1982, 33% leased

User bldg. on 10,890 sf lot Only 6 blocks from Downtown

Call Us Today

Special Ends 12/31/2011

$2,795,000 Design by: $750,000 apluscreative@yahoo.comWWW.MYOPCS.COM Ph: 323.474.4668 C. Runyen (213) 534-3235 • crunyen@charlesdunn.com

(323)788-5802 Restrictions Apply


22 Downtown News

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews Continued from previous page

helP wanted

BUNGALOW ECHO PARK bungalow 1 bdrm. 1 bath. Refrigerator stove and A/C. Starting at $850 a month. 213-250-4810 leave message.

EMPLOYMENT SALeS

Advertising Account executive

L.A. Downtown News is looking for a enthusiastic self-starter who is well-organized and has the ability to sell advertising over the phone AND in person, with 3+ years in sales experience, preferably in advertising/media with a proven track record in prospecting and closing new business. The ideal candidate will have exceptional communication and selling skills, a strong work ethic and a great attitude. Compensation includes a base salary plus commissions and bonuses. This is a full-time position with benefits, including health insurance, vacation, private health club, and a 401(K) retirement plan. Candidate must possess own vehicle and valid driver's license and insurance. If you are interested in applying for this position, please send your cover letter, resume, and salary requirements via e-mail to: jobs@downtownnews.com. Use subject line: Account Executive 2011

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT Executive L.A. Downtown News is looking for a enthusiastic selfstarter who is well-organized and has the ability to sell advertising over the phone AND in person, with 3+ years in sales experience, preferably in advertising/media with a proven track record in prospecting and closing new business. The ideal candidate will have exceptional communication and selling skills, a strong work ethic and a great attitude. Compensation includes a base salary plus commissions and bonuses. This is a full-time position with benefits, including health insurance, vacation, private health club, and a 401(K) retirement plan. Candidate must possess own vehicle and valid driver’s license and insurance. If you are interested in applying for this position, please send your cover letter, resume, and salary requirements via e-mail to: jobs@downtownnews.com. Use subject line: Account Executive 2011

A FEW PRO Drivers Needed. Top Pay & 401K. 2 Months CDL Class A Driving Experience. 1-877-258-8782. www.MeltonTruck.com (Cal-SCAN) DRIVER - $2000 Sign-on Bonus. Start a New Career! 100% Paid CDL Training! No Experience Required. CRST EXPEDITED. 1-800-326-2778. www. JoinCRST.com (Cal-SCAN)

Professional

GOLf iNStrUctiON for all at Arroyo Seco GC. Ten minutes from downtown. I have seventeen years teaching experience.

six lessons for the price of five.

(310) 384-0258 BUSiNeSS ServiceS

GeNerAL WEB DEVELOPERAPPLICATIONS: Design, develop, test, implement & support cross-platform web-based software & applications using the LAMP (Linux,Apache,MySQL,PHP/ Perl) stack. Send resumes: Attn: CEO, Urban Insight, Inc., 3700 Wilshire Blvd. Ste. 570, Los Angeles, CA 90010.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY BUSiNeSS OppOrtUNitieS THINK CHRISTMAS - Start Now! Own a Red Hot - Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox or Discount Party Store from $51,900 worldwide! 100% Turnkey. 1-800-518-3064. www.DRSS25.com (Cal-SCAN)

SERVICES

DriverS DRIVERS/CDL Training - Career Central. No MONEY Down. CDL Training. Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k 1-877-3697091. www.CentralDrivingJobs. net (Cal-SCAN)

GOLf

AttOrNeyS

ABOGADO DE IMMIGRACION! Family, Criminal, P.I. for more than 20 yrs! Child Support / Custody Necesita Permiso de trabajo? Tagalog / Español / Korean

Get your GreeN cArD or citiZeNSHip Law Office of H. Douglas Daniel Esq., (213) 689-1710

ADVERTISE Your Truck Driver Jobs in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $550. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) ADVERTISE A display Business Card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost of $1,550. Your display 3.75x2” ad reaches over 3 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (CalSCAN) REACH CALIFORNIANS With a classified in almost every county! Experience the power of classifieds! Combo~California Daily and Weekly Networks. One order. One payment. Free Brochures. maria@cnpa.com or (916)288-6010. (Cal-SCAN) eDUcAtiON ALLIED HEALTH Career training - Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409. www.CenturaOnline.com (Cal-SCAN) SWIM LESSONS from Brian Nassau. 16 years experience. Children and adults. Learn in a positive environment. Call Brian at 818-307-9153.

ATTEND COLLEGE Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.Centura.us.com (Cal-SCAN)

ATTENTION SLEEP Apnea Sufferers with Medicare. Get Free CPAP Replacement Supplies at No Cost, plus Free home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888-379-7871. (Cal-SCAN)

HIGH SCHOOL Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www.SouthEasternHS.com (Cal-SCAN)

VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!! 40 Pills 4 Free for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement, Discreet Shipping. Only $2.70/ pill. Buy the Blue Pill Now! 1-888904-6658 (Cal-SCAN)

cLeANiNG CONCEPTO’S CLEANING Crew. Professional, experienced, cleans apartments, homes, offices and restaurants. Call for a quote. 323-459-3067 or 818-409-9183. fiNANciAL ServiceS $$ I’M A CPA & don’t do taxes. I Get 6% Tax Free Return, No Stock Market Risk. $6K & Up Annually. No Form 1099. Tazeen Khan, CPA 1-877-535-4866. Web# 25065375 http://www.AfterRetire.com (Cal-SCAN)

LeGAL SOCIAL SECURITY Disability Benefits. You Win or Pay Us Nothing. Contact Disability Group, Inc. Today! BBB Accredited. Call For Your Free Book & Consultation. 877-4906596. (Cal-SCAN)

AUTOS pre-OWNeD

HeALtH PSYCHOTHERAPIST INDIVIDUAL & couples, ages 12+. Joining with you on your search for meaning and depth in these stressful times. Discrete Silverlake office. Lunchtimes, early AM appointments. Mario Prietto, LCSW. 323-799-1177. HeALtH & fitNeSS ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a Free Talking Meter and diabetic testing supplies at No Cost, plus Free home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 877-792-3424. (Cal-SCAN)

Leasing $

499

DOWNtOWN L.A. AUtO GrOUp Porsche Volkswagen audi Mercedes-Benz nissan cheVrolet cadillac

2007 MERCEDES ML350 3.5L, V6, Low miles, Rear Seat Ent., Navigation, Black/Black #5358C / A432886 $35,991 Call 888319-8762. 2007 NISSAN 350Z TOURING Certified, Carfax, 1 owner, multi-disc CD, leather, premium wheels, Black NI3822 / M552797 $20,499 call 888-838-5089

00 . & up

Monthly Rental Rate • Utilities Included

213.627.2542

More info: Managerconnect@gmail.com

huntingtonaptsla.com 752 S. Main St., Los Angeles 90014 Located on Artwalk path


October 10, 2011

Downtown News 23

DowntownNews.com

2007 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5 Certified,3.5L V6, Only 27k Miles, Auto, ABS and much more!! N111041-1/7C823560 $20,499 call 888-838-5089 2008 CHEVY TAHOE 4 DOOR 5.3L, V8, Low Miles, Dual Zone AC, Rear Split Bench #UC782/ R160804 $26,995 Call 888-8799608 2008 CHEVY TAHOE 4 DOOR 5.3L, V8, Low Miles, Dual Zone AC, Rear Split Bench #UC782/ R160804 $26,995 Call 888-8799608 2008 PORSCHE BOXSTER CONV. Certified, 2.7L V6, Meteor Gray/Black, Only 25k Miles, Alloys, spoiler ZP1347/8U711448 $39,785 Call 888-685-5426.

2008 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S Carfax, 1 owner, only 48K miles, Auto, CD, White N120068-1 / C155663 call 888-838-5089

Autos WAnted DONATE YOUR Car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-9026851. (Cal-SCAN)

2009 VW PASSAT KOMFORT 2.0L, 4-Cyl Turbo, Only 21K Miles, 31 mpg highway, Gray/ Blue V111147-1 / P001654 $19,890 Call 888-781-8102.

DONATE YOUR Car: Children’s Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child’s Life Through Research & Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy & Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. (CalSCAN)

2009 VW PASSAT KOMFORT 2.0L, 4-Cyl Turbo, Only 21K Miles, 31 mpg highway, Gray/ Blue V111147-1 / P001654 $19,890 Call 888-781-8102. 2008 AUDI TT 2.0L, 4-Cyl Turbo, Only 21K Miles, 31 mpg highway, Gray/Blue ZA/9954 / 1044026 $27,993 Call 888-583-0981

DONATE YOUR Vehicle! Receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, NonRunners Accepted, 1-888-4448217. (Cal-SCAN)

For a complete list of our pre-owned inventory, go to www.DTLAMOTORS.com

888-838-5089 635 W. Washington Blvd. • downtownnissan.com

$12,995

N111532-1/BL393605

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Only 3000 miles, Won’t last, Hurry!

$14,999 2009 Nissan Murano ......................................... $21,999 Certified, 3.5L V6, White, 23k miles. NI3844/9W026161 2009 Nissan 370Z Coupe .................................. $28,999 Certified, 3.7L 24V, Only 14k miles. N111496-1/9M406789 2010 Nissan Sentra 2.0S ................................... Certified, auto, AC, Silver, 31mpg. NI3849/AL654892

AUDI OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

BICYCLE TREK 700 hybrid. Like new $250 firm 323-229-1956.

Volunteer opportunities HELPING KIDS heal. Free Arts for Abused Children is looking for volunteers to integrate the healing power of the arts into the lives of abused and at-risk children and their families. Today is the day to get involved! Contact Annie at volunteers@freearts. org or 310-313-4278 for more information.

downtownnews.com

Furniture

ADVERTISE YOUR Auction in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $550. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)2886019. (Cal-SCAN)

KING SIZE HEADBOARD wood and cane—antique $295 323665-3588 tV/eleCtroniCs/Computers 32” Philips Flat Screen Dolby Remote $295 27” JVC Remote $45 25” RCA XL Remote X Stereo $45 323-665-3588

ATTENTION AUCTIONEERS! California State Auctioneers Association 43rd Annual Convention, October 20-23, San Diego. Auction professionals and companies are invited to join us www.CAAuctioneers.org Call 626-59-IM-BID (626-594-6243). (Cal-SCAN)

L.A. AUTO GROUP OVER 500 PREOWNED CARS, TRUCKS, SUV’s & VANS IN STOCK!

misC. items TRACK LIGHTS With 75 Watt Bulbs 5 For $20 323-665-3588

READERS & MUSIC Lovers! 100 Greatest Novels (audio books) Only $99.00 (plus S/H.) Includes MP3 Player & Accessories. Bonus: 50 Classical Music Works & Money Back Guarantee. Call Today! 1-877-360-6916. (Cal-SCAN)

PETS/ANIMALS Adopt A pet ADOPT (OR FOSTER) your forever friend from Bark Avenue Foundation. Beautiful, healthy puppies, dogs, cats and kittens available at Downtown’s largest private adoption facility. Call Dawn at 213-840-0153 or email Dawn@BarkAveLA.com or visit www.Bark Avenue Foundation. org.

FELIX CHEVROLET

888-879-9608 330 S. Figueroa St. • felixchevrolet.com

$12,995

2009 CHEVY AVEO HATCBACK F11147D2-1/B612278

4 Door, Auto, AC, Only 15k miles.

$12,995 2008 Chevy Impala LT....................................... $13,995 3.5L, V6, White/Tan, Low miles, CD and more. UC850R / 9253081 2009 Chevy Tahoe Hybrid ................................ $39,995 Loaded, Blk/Blk, Great mileage. UC849-1/R105495 2010 Chevy Cobalt LT ....................................... 4 Door, auto, 37 mpg, AC, CD. UC886R/7175189

888-I-LOVE-LA DTLAMOTORS.COM

DOWNTOWN L.A. MOTORS MBZ 888-319-8762 1801 S. Figueroa St. • mbzla.com

$17,610

DOWNTOWN L.A. AUTO GROUP 888-I-LOVE-LA (456-8352) W W W . D T L A M O T O R S . C O M

Auto, Black/Black, 31 MPG Must See

ZA10050 / 8A86906

$24,980 2008 Audi A6 ...................................................... $26,980 Certified, Prem package, Nav System. ZA10013/8N059466 2011 Audi Q5 ...................................................... $35,678 Special APR available must see. ZA10052/BA005531 2008 Audi TT Cabriolet ..................................... Certified, Auto, Low miles. ZA9984 /J81027729

Automatic, very clean, must see.

V120209-1/6T615547

$18,527 2009 VW Tiguan ................................................ $19,888 Certified, low miles must see. ZV1413/9W500688 2010 VW CC Sport .............................................. $25,688 Certified, Special APR Available. ZV1399/AE531794 2009 VW GTI 2D Hatchback ............................. Certified, Only 38k miles, auto, turbo, black. ZV1426/ 9W002649

EASY AS

Certified, Low Miles, 7 Speed, Auto, Silver, Moonroof.

$28,991 2009 Mercedes ML 350 ...................................... $35,991 Certified, P1 pkg, Alpine Rain, Navigation. 5390C/ A442253 2008 Mercedes S550V AMG ............................. $53,991 Sport Pkg, P3 Pkg, 19” wheels Silver/gray. 5508C/ A215372 2007 Mercedes E350 Sedan..............................

CARSON NISSAN

Certfied, 24 Valve-3.5L, V6, Pewter, Sport Pkg. 5382C / B104255

888-845-2267 1505 E. 223rd St., Carson carsonnissan.com

$12,485

888-781-8102 1900 S. Figueroa St. • vwdowntownla.com

$13,495

$26,991

2009 MERCEDES C300 SPORT 111766-1/R065710

2008 NISSAN VERSA SL

VOLKSWAGEN OF DOWNTOWN L.A. 2006 MINI COOPER CONVERTIBLE

sports/exerC. equipment

AuCtion

888-583-0981 1900 S. Figueroa St. • audidtla.com

2008 AUDI A4 2.0 TURBO

ITEMS FOR SALE

VOLUNTEER OPPORT.: Program Assistant for Adult Education. Saturdays 11am-3pm. Near Avalon & Vernon. May lead to full time work. email: arborval@ aol.com.

DOWNTOWN

NISSAN OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

2011 NISSAN VERSA

CASH FOR Cars Paying cash for all cars and trucks running or not! Fast , free pick up. Call now, instant offer. Desert View Auto 855-343-6184. (Cal-SCAN)

Auto, Loaded with options, low miles. C120039-1 / 401750

2008 Nissan Sentra 2.0S .......... Certified, Auto, AC, Full Power. C110934-1 / 613550

$13,995

PORSCHE OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

888-685-5426 1900 S. Figueroa St. • porschedowntownla.com

$45,891

2008 PORSCHE CAYMAN S

Certified, Grey/Black, 1 owner, Navigation, Like New

ZP1410 / 8U781143

$48,795 2009 Porsche 911 Carrera ........................... $64,796 Certified, Blk/Blk, Bose Bluetooth, Low miles . P11544-1 / 9S707193 2009 Nissan 370 Z Coupe ......... $27,493 2009 Porsche Cayenne Turbo ........................... Certified, Auto, Sport Pkg., $71,786 Low miles. C110557-1 / 411146 Certified, Twin Turbo, Blk/Blk, Only 17k miles, 32V-V8. ZP1370 / A82999 2010 Nissan Rogue S ................ Certified, Auto, Very nicely equipped. CU0473R / 606482

madison hotel Clean furnished single rooms. 24-hour desk clerk service. •Daily, $30.00 •Weekly, $109.00 •Monthly, $310.00 (213) 622-1508 423 East 7th St.

$18,998

2009 Porsche Cayenne S .............................. Certified, Grey/Grey 32V 4.8L V8 Low miles. P11547-1 / 9LA40203

Premiere Towers

7000 sqft. Basement Space ✦ set up for Gallery/Office space

Call For PriCe

• w/Gallery Lights • Wide Private (Spring St.) Entrance • Ideal for Art Gallery, SPA, Office Space • Wired for internet service/telephone outlets • Prime Location in Downtown (Gallery row, residential area, wine bar, café, market)

213.627.6913 | cityloftsquare.com

(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.) Starting Jan. 1, 2011

Is your teen experiencing • School problems? • Conflict at home or with friends?

DowntownNews.com makesplacing a classified ad in the L.A. Downtown News is easier than ever. Your ad will appear online and in our publication in a couple of easy steps. • Online ads will appear immediately after they are approved. • Print ads must be received before Thursday at noon PST to be processed for the following Monday's edition. Deadlines subject to change for special issues and holidays.

For legal notices please call 213-481-1448

Adolescent support group now forming Ages 13-17 low fee

Call marney stofflet, lCsW

(323) 662-9797

4344 Fountain Ave. (at sunset), suite A los Angeles, CA 90029

Fully furnished with TV, telephone, microwave, refrigerator. Full bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly maid service.

Monthly from $595 utilities paid. (213) 627-1151

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

Monthly from $550 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

downtownnews.com

Mexican American Legal Defnse and Educational Fund

oFFiCe & eVeNT sPACe For LeAse! Beautiful, historic Banks Huntley building located in Gallery Row district of Downtown LA offering office space close to Federal Court House and City Hall with numerous restaurants and light rail for commuters. Ideal for non-profits, but for-profit organizations are also welcome. We have very reasonable rates with Full Service Gross. Ground-floor event and conference space also available in gorgeous art-deco setting, perfect for private functions, weddings, business meetings, etc. For further information, please contact Frank Kim at 213-629-2512 ext. 110 (fkim@maldef.org) or Carlito Manasan at ext. 117 (cmanasan@maldef.org).


24 Downtown News

October 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Film Continued from page 16 experience,” he wrote. Built for Films Built by Sid Grauman in 1918, the theater was a vaudeville hub in its heyday. In later years it served as the headquarters for the Metropolitan Water District and then two different churches. Voskanian’s 2007 upgrade came with the intent to reactivate the venue for film and stage productions. Improvements included new paint and carpeting as well as a new lighting system. For members of the Conservancy, who have been running their film series for 25 years, a new movie event in Downtown is welcome news. “We’re thrilled at the L.A. Conservancy that another organization is coming to Broadway and is doing programming,”

said Executive Director Linda Dishman. “The Million Dollar and all the theaters on Broadway started out showing movies. This is their original intent.” While the Million Dollar held many red carpet events during its glory years, when stars like Charlie Chaplin frequented the venue, Voskanian isn’t dreaming of a re-creation of the old days. He just wants to prove there’s an audience. “We have more than 2,000 seats,” he said. “If we get about 700 people coming to the shows, I’ll consider that a good response.” Voskanian will try to tap into a Downtown audience that has shown a willingness to check out more than megaplex fare. During the summer, Downtown hosts three outdoor film series. The Downtown Independent on Main Street continually draws crowds for non-Hollywood offerings. Hillsman Wright, executive director of the Los Angeles Historic Theatre

Foundation, thinks the audience will come to a weekly movie night at the theater. “I think it’ll take a while to catch on as any new event does. But it has the real potential to be a gathering place and a rallying point,” he said. “There’s now dining all around. People can walk anywhere. It’s great news for Broadway.” Meanwhile, Voskanian, a film school graduate who in 1977 directed a horror film called The Child, said as a movie fan, he’s looking forward to seeing classic films like Easy Rider and The Fly on the big screen. It’s unlikely, however that his own film, with the tagline “Let’s play hide and go kill…” will ever make it to the Million Dollar screen. “I’m not sure it would fit into our program,” he said. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

NOW OPEN

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM

10-10-11  

Los Angeles Downtown News is a free weekly newspaper distributed in and around downtown Los Angeles.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you