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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS August 31, 2009

Volume 38, Number 35

INSIDE

MOCA’s Party Night 12

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Volleyball comes, pirates busted, and other happenings Around Town.

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Editorials: Unlikely bedfellows in the hotel industry, and a summer sports pay-off.

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

Charlie and the Housing Factory Toy Industry King Plans 320-Unit Project for Arts District by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

Rocking out at the Regent Theatre.

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Urban Scrawl on the Dodgers’ travails.

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Huntington owners face a sale deadline.

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n the recession-dominated economy, most developers are shying away from ambitious new projects. Yet last week Charlie Woo, a well-known Downtown business pioneer and owner of the toy industry titan Megatoys, took a different and decidedly more aggressive approach — he cleared the first hurdle for a 2.9-acre residential project which could reshape part of the Arts District. The city Planning Department on Thursday, Aug. 27, gave its initial approval to construct a six-story, 320-unit project on the site of Woo’s 49,000-square-foot Megatoys

warehouse and an adjacent parking lot. The project with for-sale residences would also include 15,576 square feet of retail space and 766 parking spaces. It would close off Garey Street between First and Second to become a pedestrian-only street flanked by stores. Units would also bridge Garey Street. The project will next go to the city Planning Commission in October. “We are very glad to have taken this first step and we’re moving forward,” Woo said after the hearing. While plans are in the early stage and a budget and financing have not been determined, Woo, who see Housing, page 9

photo by Gary Leonard

Charlie Woo, who made his name in the Downtown toy industry, is jumping into the development game. He hopes to start building a 320-unit condominium complex within two years.

Olvera Street Tenant To Be Evicted

The Central City Synagogue

After 60 Years, Casa De Sousa Ousted for Owing $13,000

Downtown’s New Center of Jewish Life Hits a High Point With Torah Dedication by anna Scott

The latest Health developments.

Staff wRiteR

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From ‘Zero to Infinity’ at Fisher Gallery.

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photo by Gary Leonard

Conchita Sousa, owner of Olvera Street mainstay Casa De Sousa, and her fiancé, Fernando Cruz. The proprietors of the business have fallen behind on their rent numerous times. On Aug. 21, a judge gave an order for their eviction. by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

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Five great entertainment options.

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14 CALENDAR LISTINGS 16 MAP 17 CLASSIFIEDS

fter more than 60 years in business, Casa De Sousa, a coffee shop and gift store on Olvera Street, is facing eviction from its home for non-payment of rent. It would mark only the second eviction in the attraction’s almost 80year history. At an Aug. 21 hearing at the Stanley Mosk Courthouse, Conchita Sousa, whose father Benjamin Antonio Sousa began doing business at Olvera Street in 1932, was given a court order to move out of her store for failing to pay rent on her 2,000-square-foot business. City officials gave Sousa until the end of September to move out. “We’re going to see if we can ap-

peal, if it’s what we can do. We’re not just going to roll over,” said Sousa. The situation has been contentious for years. Robert Andrade, general manager of El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, the city department which oversees Olvera Street, said Casa De Sousa’s owners were six months behind on their $1,900 rent, and after failing to comply with a repayment agreement, owe about $13,000. Nine other Olvera Street merchants are also behind on their rents, said Andrade. The issue of rents has been heated in recent months, following moves to look at raising lease rates for the dozens of merchants who pay below-market rates. see Rent, page 6

he Jewish Community Center-Chabad of Downtown Los Angeles has had its own space for five months, and it served the community’s Jewish population in temporary locations for approximately a year before that. But in September, the proceedings at what its proprietor calls the first new full-time synagogue in Downtown in 60 years will go to a different level. Like other synagogues, the Downtown JCC will celebrate Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New

Year, on Sept. 19 and 20. Services for Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, will follow on Sept. 27-28. Still, Moshe Greenwald, the 27-year-old founder of the temple, which occupies a 1,300-squarefoot space on the second floor of a Jewelry District building, is looking forward to Thursday, Sept. 3. That is when the temple will mark a milestone by dedicating its new Torah. Getting a Torah is more complex than simply ordering one. A special scribe in Israel known as a sofer created the JCC’s Torah especially for see Synagogue, page 8

photo by Gary Leonard

Rabbi Moshe Greenwald with the Jewish Community Center-Chabad of Downtown Los Angeles’ new Torah. The handwritten scroll will be completed during a dedication ceremony on Thursday, Sept. 3.

Since 1972, an independent, locally owned and edited newspaper, go figure.


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August August31, 31,2009 2009

DowntownNews.com

AROUNDTOWN Progress for New Broadway Standards

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new set of design guidelines for the portion of Broadway between Second Street and Olympic Boulevard could be formalized this week. The Broadway Theater and Entertainment District Design Guide is part of Bringing Back Broadway, an initiative launched by 14th District City Councilman José Huizar to revitalize the street. The measure, aimed at preserving architecturally significant buildings while encouraging pedestrian traffic and new commercial uses, creates new standards for building and storefront renovations, landscaping, parking and other elements along Broadway. It also calls for creating a plan to encourage nightclubs, bars, restaurants and other evening destinations on the street. The City Council voted to approve the Design Guide on Aug. 11, though the process requires one more vote, which is scheduled for Sept. 2.

Volleyball Tourney To Draw Hundreds

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n Labor Day weekend, some solemnly memorialize the deaths of workers during the Pullman Strike in 1894. Others celebrate the holiday by taking it easy, barbecuing and going to the beach. But in Chinatown, thousands will mark the weekend by participating in or watching the 65th annual North American Chinese Invitational Volleyball Tournament. The Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association of Los Angeles is hosting the outdoor event Sept. 5-7 from 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. at Hill between Ord and

Pine streets. The tournament is expected to draw approximately 80 men’s and women’s teams, comprising more than 1,000 players, from Chinese communities from throughout the United States. The game is different than indoor volleyball, with nine players on each team, a lower net and a wider court. The tournament is free to watch and open to the public. More information is at la.nacivt.com.

Dead Weather Gives Regent New Life

photo by Gary Leonard

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t’s been awhile since Main Street’s Regent Theatre drew lines outside, but it happened last week. The old theater space, which is run by Little Radio, was temporarily activated as a record store by rocker Jack White’s indie label Third Man Records. White is known for his bands the White Stripes and The Raconteurs, and for his newest group, The Dead Weather. Fans lined Main Street and hooked east on Los Angeles Street on Wednesday, Aug. 26, waiting to get into a free noon show by The Dead Weather. The performance marked the kickoff of the temporary Third Man residency. At least one eager Dead Weather fan set up shop outside the store Tuesday evening, but most in line arrived early Wednesday morning. The popup store closed Friday, Aug. 28.

DVD Pirates Raided In Fashion District

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entral Area vice detectives raided a pirate DVD operation in the Fashion District on Aug. 21, netting more than 5,000 illegally manufactured discs. They also ar-

metro.net

Rocker Jack White’s newest band, The Dead Weather, played to a packed house at the Regent Theatre at noon last Wednesday. See item this page.

rested four men. Inside a small storefront at 305 E. Ninth St., officers discovered four DVD burning towers, each of which can copy eight discs at once, and seized more than $2,000 in cash. Arrested were Los Angeles residents Ely Lopez, 18; Javier Estrada Osorio, 39; Martin Pena, 19; and Ronald Belvin, 52. Each was charged with a felony, police said. Vendors typically sell the DVDs for about $5; police said it costs about $1 to make each disc. The raid came as Central Area officers continue to combat pirated DVD sales, which they say is often tied to gang activity. It also happened about a week after a local Business Improvement District officer was assaulted by suspected gang members in retaliation for seizing illegal DVDs. “What buyers don’t realize is their money is going toward a local gang, which charges the vendors rent to let them sell on the street,” said Lt. Paul Vernon in a statement. “The gangs use the vendors’ alien status to intimidate them and take advantage. Few victims ever report the extortion.”

Yea for Plácido, Nay for Antonio

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f given a chance to eat lunch with one of four prominent Downtowners, people overwhelmingly would choose L.A. Opera’s Plácido Domingo. At least, respondents to a recent online Los Angeles Downtown News poll did. In the completely un-scientific question that was up at ladowntownnews.com from Aug. 17-28, a whopping 66% of readers said they would most prefer to dine with Plácido. Phil Anschutz, the head of Anschutz Entertainment Group, came in second with 16%, followed by Laker Kobe Bryant with 14%. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa had a distant last-place finish, as only 6% of respondents said they would most want to dine with him. This week, Downtown News asks: When going somewhere Downtown during the day, how are you most likely to get there? Choices are drive, taxi, bicycle, bus, subway or walk. To vote, go to ladowntownnews.com, scroll down and look on the left side of the page.

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Metro Briefs

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August 31, 2009

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4 Downtown News

August 31, 2009

DowntownNews.com

EDITORIALS Unlikely Bedfellows

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t is rare for companies or businesses that are targeting the same customers to band together. In most cases it does not make economic sense, and even in the instances where cooperation could yield results, a sense of mistrust often prevents competing entities from truly working together. That is partly why the cooperation that appears to be occurring among some of the larger players in the Downtown Los Angeles hospitality industry is both refreshing and smart. Here, a group of businesses seem to recognize that their best chance at long-term profits rests in depending on each other. Last week Los Angeles Downtown News reported on what is happening in the Downtown hospitality industry as the finishing touches are being put on the Convention Center hotel. That 1,001-room establishment is slated to debut Feb. 15, 2010, and once customers start checking in, the Downtown convention industry will be instantly changed. For the first time, the Convention Center

will have the two things meeting planners for major organizations and associations want most: a huge headquarters hotel within easy walking distance of the facility (in the form of an 878-room JW Marriott and as a bonus, the 123-room Ritz-Carlton), and ample restaurants and attractions to entertain conventioneers after the day’s business ends (L.A. Live and the other new Downtown restaurants and nightspots that have arrived in the past few years). It is a victory for a city that for years has been pummeled on the convention front by Anaheim and San Diego. The new hotel stands ready to dominate the local convention industry, and it will almost certainly have higher room rates and a higher occupancy level than other area establishments. But when it comes to “citywide conventions” — the major gatherings that last several days, attract tens of thousands of people and inject millions into the local economy — it alone will not be able to satisfy visitors. It will need the other hotels in

Downtown, which together have thousands of rooms, to pick up the slack. Already there are examples of the various players working together. Recently representatives of the Convention Center, the new hotel and the city’s convention and visitors’ bureau joined with executives from other Downtown hotels to hit up East Coast meeting planners. They sought to convince those who organize and schedule conventions that Downtown circa 2010 is far different than the Downtown they may have known in the past, and that it can give expense-account conventioneers every business bonus and creature comfort. This cooperation actually marks a bit of an evolution. Early in the planning of the Convention Center high-rise, there was opposition from some area hotels, and even the threat of legal action from the proprietors of the Westin Bonaventure, which seemed likely to be displaced as Downtown’s main hotel for convention business. (Technically, opponents protested the waiver of the room tax in the new building, claiming it would create an unfair playing field.) Now, things have changed, and executives of the Bonaventure were among the team

Summer Sports Events Pay Off

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ugust is not basketball season. And it certainly is not hockey season. Still, Downtown was alive this month with separate festivals dedicated to the two sports. Both the Lakers 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament and the L.A. Kings Hockey Fest were unexpected and unprecedented. The former brought thousands of people into a vast public space on an otherwise dead weekend, and the latter appeared to be on pace to do the same (the Aug. 28-30 Hockey Fest began after Los Angeles Downtown News, which was a sponsor of the event, went to press). In the process, they provided a boost for area restaurants and businesses, sent a wave of energy across Downtown, and proved that a big development company is living up to its promise to connect with the community. The inaugural basketball tournament, which took its cues from a 20-year-old competition in Spokane, Wash., filled

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis

L.A. Live on Aug. 14-16. During the event, which was free to watch, 483 teams participated, turning this portion of South Park into a basketball mecca, with 50 outdoor half courts and a hive of activity. Celebrity and mascot games were on the bill, and organizers paid as much attention to the spectators’ experience as they did the competition. Like the basketball tournament, Hockey Fest was not about filling the coffers of either a local sports franchise or Anschutz Entertainment Group, the developer of Staples Center and L.A. Live. With tickets at $60 for a three-day pass, it was more an attempt to generate a bit of momentum six weeks before the pro hockey season begins and perhaps woo some new fans. While the events may mean less to sports fans than, say, a Lakers championship or a Kings playoff appearance (granted, a rarity), they both delivered for the community. In particular

traveling east to win future business. Privately they and others may rue the arrival of a hotel Goliath, but they recognize that in business survival often depends on the ability to adapt, and that in this case, the road to profit is recognizing the power in a unified front. This is not to imply that competition has ended. There will still be a battle for leisure travelers and tourists, and one assumes that while the new building boasts its amenities and location, the existing hotels will try to win on price. There also will still be convention business competition, though it is more likely to be seen in the form of the current crop of Downtown hotels battling each other for the remaining visitors after the Ritz/Marriott fills up. As a precursor to this, several local establishments have conducted or are now working on multi-million dollar upgrades. Competition is good for the marketplace and the consumer. But it is nice to see that, even as they will battle on some fronts, operators of the hotels know that their best chance to secure their bottom line is by depending on each other and selling the whole of Downtown. In this case, both competition and cooperation will yield benefits.

with the outdoor basketball tournament, it was a chance to bring people into L.A. Live and to make the sprawling campus a place for Downtowners and other Angelenos to congregate and share an experience. These kinds of events were not what most observers had in mind when Staples and L.A. Live opened. Yet they are exactly what is needed for the attractions to be more than buildings plopped into the urban center. The basketball tournament and Hockey Fest are nice examples of how a large space can function as a public place. We look forward to seeing what comes next.

How to reach us Main office: (213) 481-1448 MAIL your Letter Letters to the Editor • L.A. Downtown News 1264 W. First Street • Los Angeles, CA 90026 Email your Letter realpeople@downtownnews.com FAX your Letter (213) 250-4617 Read Us on the Web DowntownNews.com

Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writErs: Anna Scott, Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: David Friedman, Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Jay Berman, Jeff Favre, Michael X. Ferraro, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins ProductioN AssistANt / EvENt coordiNAtor: Claudia Hernandez PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard AccouNtiNG: Ashley Vandervort AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Robert Dutcher, Steve Epstein, Catherine Holloway, Tam Nguyen, Kelley Smith circulAtioN: Norma Rodas distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles. It is also distributed to the extended urban communities of Glendale, Hollywood, Wilshire Center, Los Feliz, Silver Lake & Larchmont Village.

One copy per person.


August 31, 2009

LETTERS Schools and the Future Dear Editor, read “School’s Not in Session” (Aug. 17, by Richard Guzmán) and was struck by a strong sense of déjà vu. I moved Downtown in 1997. Got married in 2003 and we promptly had three kids. Late last year, with regret, my family moved out of Downtown. We left for a variety of reasons. But the key reason was, “Where were our kids going to go to school?” Yes, as others have pointed out, the options for parents living Downtown are limited. Sure, if money is no limit there are some private school options. There are some parochial school options, too. But the public school options are inadequate, to be charitable, for those with ordinary middle-class aspirations. So we moved to a typical suburb with an excellent neighborhood public school. It is great for my daughter, who just completed kindergarten. Yes, we miss Downtown a lot. Heck, I lived there for nearly 11 years. However, we also made some happy discoveries about suburban living. It is nice to have a park three doors down. My kids now simply announce they are going to the park and wander over. In Downtown, this was not possible, and such trips to the park had to be family outings. It is wonderful for my kids to be able to ride their bikes in the street. Yeah, the pace of suburban living is a tad slower, and here it is a good thing. There tends not to be much traffic anyways. But, you get a critical mass of neighborhood kids and any cars that do come by have to slow down to navigate. As a parent, these are pretty compelling factors — quality schools, better park options, more social options for the kids. Basically it is a more kid-friendly place. When our children were infants and toddlers in strollers, Downtown was great for us. Family life was pretty small and confined, so loft living worked. But as the kids age, they have different needs. Needs which Downtown urban living can’t meet. As a responsible parent, it is hard

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Downtown News 5

Opinion and, I’d dare say selfish, not to change your lifestyle to accommodate your children. It is not the way I figured things would have worked out. But, now that we are in the midst of suburban living, its merits are pretty obvious and compelling. Are we the coolest and hippest parents? Nah. But, as parents, we really couldn’t care less. —David Kennedy, San Diego Dear Editor, e read with great interest and a degree of dismay the article “School’s Not in Session,” portraying the justified concerns of parents such as Alisa Rivera and Susana Benavidez. While the Downtown population grows, many families fail to discover viable elementary school options for their children. We are here to remind all Downtowners of the Immaculate Conception School on Eighth Street, just a few blocks west of Staples Center and L.A. Live, which has been a beacon of academic excellence for 90 years. The private Catholic school, which welcomes children of all faiths, has an outstanding faculty and dedicated leadership which provide an exceptional education in the development of the whole child via a rigorous and complete curriculum. Nearly 100% of our graduates advance to private high schools, and our tracking proves over 90% matriculate to colleges and universities. We work with every family on financial aid assistance, too. —John McKenna, director of marketing and development, Immaculate Conception School

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Los Angeles Downtown News encourages letters. They become the property of Los Angeles Downtown News and may be edited. All letters should be typewritten and include an address and telephone number for verification. Please send them to: Letter to the Editor 1264 W. First St. Los Angeles, CA 90026 Fax to: (213) 250-4617 Email to: realpeople@downtownnews.com

Come back and check out our NEW MENU and priCEs! All draft beer $6.00

The Readers Take Over Website Comments on Elementary School and Graffiti Vandals Los Angeles Downtown News posts comments to stories on our website. Here are some of the most recent responses. Additional comments appear on downtownnews. com (comments follow individual articles). Further responses are welcome. Regarding the Aug. 24 editorial “Make Downtown Schools a Priority” hame on the Downtown Center Business Improvement District, and actually, shame on you. More choices? It’s so American wrong to think more is better when what you have is there... and should be made better. In fact, it must be made better for all our kids. Thankfully this message is getting out throughout the U.S. The economy is pushing families back into the public schools, and caring parents can and will put pressure on the schools to improve. America is only as good as its public education system. Schools react to parental pressure. Get a group of committed parents and aim them at a public elementary school. It can change

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and all the kids can benefit. —posted by Judith Cheerful, Aug. 24, 8:55 a.m.

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agree with your editorial. I have two 4-year olds and have been trying to find a school for fall 2010. Even though 9th St. Elementary is only a 10-minute walk away, education, environment, other students and parents are more important. I looked at charter schools, but admissions are lottery based. Private school is not an option, as the expenses are too high for me. I recently started looking for apartments outside of Downtown and plan to lease out my condo if something good comes up. —posted by Jason M. Li, Aug. 24, 9:18 a.m. Regarding the Aug. 24 story “Targeting Taggers,” by Ryan Vaillancourt

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hy don’t they stake out the mini-mall on Union Avenue and 12th Place? That is tagged on a weekly basis! —posted by The Gatekeeper, Aug. 22, 4:40 a.m.

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6 Downtown News

DowntownNews.com

Rent Continued from page 1 In the past, merchants who fell behind on their rent often benefited from lax oversight, said El Pueblo officials. Now, they are more likely to face consequences. “The ability for the general manger to evict tenants that could not pay rent has not been there for a long time,� said David Louie, a member of El Pueblo’s Board of Commissioners. The board must approve payment plans for delinquent tenants as well as any potential eviction. “There’s a long history of El Pueblo not being attentive and doing what would normally be considered standard protocols for managing a property and holding their tenants to compliance,� he added. Eight tenants, whose rents range from $169-$2,000, are at least a month behind on their rents, owing the city a total of $8,500, said Andrade. Another tenant is four months behind and has negotiated a repayment agreement for the $2,000 he owes.

Andrade said his goal is not to evict people, but to get tenants behind on rent back on track. “Sometimes miraculously, they come through with the money. That’s happened on more than one occasion with Casa De Sousa,â€? he said. History of Problems Benjamin Sousa opened Casa De Sousa in 1949. Fernando Cruz, managing partner of the business and Conchita Sousa’s fiancĂŠ, said that problems began around 1996, when Benjamin got sick, leading to $140,000 in rent owed. They were given five years to repay that amount, but Cruz said they repaid it in two months. Then they fell behind again, this time due to slow sales. Deputy City Attorney Annette Bogna said Los Angeles officials have been working with Casa De Sousa for years. “They have a consistent pattern of not paying rent on time or making only partial payments,â€? she said. Cruz maintains they met their payment plan. He said that in April he went to El Pueblo management to make his monthly

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payment and to ask for a reduction in the repayment plan, but instead was told to pay for two months. “They declined to accept that rent payment. They asked me for double the amount,� he said. Cruz and Sousa, who have a month-tomonth lease for Casa De Sousa, said they feel they are being targeted by management, possibly due to the department wanting to get a new tenant in their spot to pay a higher rent. Andrade said that the issue comes down to properly running a city department. “We represent the city of Los Angeles, the mayor and the taxpayers and we owe it to them to run a department the way it should run,� he said. Falling Behind Bogna and Andrade said that they recall only one only other tenant being evicted from Olvera Street. That came in April 2008, after a glass blowing business that had been there for 34 years stopped paying rent. The issue is raising concern for many in the area. Jesus Hernandez, whose family owns a “puesto,� one of the small center-

August 31, 2009

aisle shops, and the famous donkey where children take pictures in sombreros at the top of Olvera Street, is four months behind on his rent. However, he said he does not plan on being the next person to make dubious history, and worked out a repayment plan with El Pueblo officials. “The economy is bad so yes, I’m behind four months,â€? he said. “It’s not my first time falling behind and I’ll catch up‌. It’s what you have to do. I’m not going to lose my business. That would just be stupid.â€? Meanwhile, Sousa said she is looking into the possibility of appealing the decision “It’s not fair; a family that’s been on Olvera Street for over 60 years to have this sort of treatment is just not right,â€? Sousa said. An appeal may be an uphill battle, as Bogna noted that the court ruling gives El Pueblo officials the authority to have the Sheriff’s Department remove Sousa from the premises if she does not go voluntarily. “We don’t foresee [an appeal] having any sort of effect on our intent to proceed,â€? said Bogna. Contact Richard GuzmĂĄn at richard@downtownnews.com.


August 31, 2009

Downtown News 7

DowntownNews.com

Hotel Owner Must Sell This Week Huntington Landlord Faces $6 Million Fine if Deal Does Not Close by Anna Scott staff writer

T

he owner of the Huntington Hotel, a low-income apartment building on the edge of the Jewelry District, must sell the property by this Thursday or pay approximately $6 million in city fines. It marks the latest problem for a long-troubled building. The owner, Landmark Equity Management, has been trying to find a buyer, something local officials hope will lead to a turnaround of the bedraggled property where more than 50% of the rooms are unoccupied, with some of them boarded up. Although Landmark has been involved in talks to sell the building at 752 S. Main St. to a local nonprofit group, there were mixed signals last week as to whether any sale would happen by the deadline. If the Huntington does not close escrow by Sept. 3, the city could seize the building within several months and force its sale, said deputy city attorney Janet Karkanen. The deadline stems from a previous legal ruling against Landmark. “The property’s going to get sold one way or another in the next year, and I’m hoping it will end up in the hands of a nonprofit,” Karkanen said. Landmark president Darren Stern, also known as Henry Shalom, declined to comment for this article. His attorney, Stacy Spodick of Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP, did not return multiple phone calls. Karkanen said last week that Landmark appeared close to completing a deal with the Downtown-based Communities Actively Living Independent and Free, which provides services for low-income, disabled clients. CALIF, Karkanen said, would partner with low-income housing developer the Single Room Occupancy Housing Corporation and the Community Redevelopment Agency to turn the Huntington into an affordable housing complex for disabled tenants. However, CALIF Executive Director Lillibeth Navarro said last week that negotiations are still in the very early stage. Officials with the CRA and SRO Housing Corp. said they were aware of the potential sale but denied any involvement in the project. Whether or not a sale goes through, the future is uncertain for the approximately 93 residents of the 196-unit, four-story building. “It’s a fact that no one really knows what their time limit is here in the hotel or what’s going on,” said Cynthia Johnson, 48, who has lived at the Huntington on and off for five years. Troubled History The trouble is nothing new for the 1910 hotel. In 2005, the Huntington was enrolled in the city Housing Department’s Rent Escrow Account Program due to poor living conditions. REAP allows tenants to pay just half of their rent, with the money going into an account controlled by the city Housing Department until the owner brings the building up to code. In 2006, former City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo filed a civil suit against Landmark, accusing the company of trying to force low-income tenants out of more than 800 apartments in dozens of buildings throughout the city. Landmark was ultimately ordered to pay $9 million in tenant restitution, was barred from buying any new rental properties in Los Angeles for four and a half years and was ordered to sell all of its L.A. properties. Stern was also sentenced to 210 days in jail (he served 30) for more than 30 criminal code violations, such as vermin infestation and sewage leaks, at three Los Angeles buildings, including the Huntington. Stern has since brought all of his Los Angeles properties up to code except the Huntington, Karkanen said. She said he has “spent a great deal of money to make improvements” to the building but has been undermined by vandalism. Johnson confirmed that broken windows and similar incidents are not unusual at the Huntington. “There are still some people here that are doing things that are not legal,” said Johnson, who pays $140 a month into the REAP fund for her fourth-floor unit. Improvements, she said, have been sporadic. “They’ve done odd work here and there. They put toilets in every room. But there are rooms boarded up on every floor. ” Navarro said that CALIF’s board of directors is studying the Huntington’s legal issues, as well as a new conflict over REAP funds, before moving forward with a purchase. The Housing Department recently released approximately $87,000 in Huntington REAP money to fund Landmark’s $9 million tenant restitution fund. The move, one of several stipulations in a court order, prompted an appeal from Legal Aid. “This is the debt [Stern] agreed to take on, and yet he wants to fund it with the rent money from the poorest tenants in the one building that was never brought up to code,” said Legal Aid attorney Barbara Schultz.

Karkanen said that releasing the money “isn’t going to deplete the REAP account.” If the property — which one local developer who did not want to be publicly associated with the building said has been appraised at about $8 million — is not sold by Sept. 3, Karkanen said, the city could auction it off after 120 days. The minimum bid would be roughly $3 million, enough to cover the mortgage on the property. “My preference would be that they close escrow,” she said. “If I force sale, who knows what’s going to happen in the next 120 days.” Contact Anna Scott at anna@downtownnews.com.

photo by Gary Leonard

As a result of legal proceedings stemming from conditions in rundown buildings, Landmark Equity Management, owner of the Huntington Hotel at 752 S. Main St., must sell the property by Sept. 3. By the middle of last week no deal was in place.

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8 Downtown News

August 31, 2009

DowntownNews.com

Synagogue Continued from page 1 the Downtown synagogue. The scribe spent a year transcribing each of the Torah’s approximately 350,000 Hebrew letters onto a 19-inch scroll made of parchment paper, for a cost of approximately $30,000. This week’s ceremony will mark the completion of the Torah scroll. During the dedication, the scribe who penned the rest of the Torah will be in Downtown to ink its final letters. After that, synagogue members will march the Torah through the streets under a chuppah, a traditional Jewish canopy. “We already have our police permits,” said Greenwald. “One of the greatest joys of the Jewish community is getting a new Torah. It is the glue that keeps the Jewish people together.” In this case, it also marks a coming-of-age for a new community gathering point, one that already has about 100 local residents and workers attending services each week. Family Business The Downtown JCC is on the second floor

of the Haas Building, an apartment complex at 219 W. Seventh St. The space boasts an exposed brick ceiling, original concrete floors and a row of windows that look onto Broadway. The location is a far different world from Long Beach, where Greenwald grew up and where his father serves as a rabbi. During his late teens, Greenwald traveled on Chabad outreach missions to places such as New York, London, Israel, Hungary and Ukraine. The photo albums he keeps in a closet in the JCC space chronicle those years: snapshots show a towering pile of fish on a kitchen counter, part of the preparations for a 400-person Passover dinner in Ukraine; a 1,000-person menorah lighting in Budapest; a visit to the bunkers that were once part of the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz. The trips and the family background had a not surprising effect on Greenwald — he was ordained as a rabbi when he was 20. He married his wife, Brooklyn native Rivky, 25, in 2005 and lived with her in New York for two years before moving to Downtown L.A. in 2007. While he had no reservations about heading west, he said, “Other people had fear for us. People told

me, ‘You’ll be the rabbi of Skid Row.’” Greenwald began his work here in Downtown by running Torah classes, lectures and other programs out of his home at the Library Court lofts. He also works as a rabbi for the LAPD and local hospitals. While Greenwald is an Orthodox Jew, the Downtown JCC is one of more than 2,500 branches of Chabad, an international organization that serves all Jews regardless of affiliation. His past services have included

‘One of the greatest joys of the Jewish community is getting a new Torah. It is the glue that keeps the Jewish people together.’ —Moshe Greenwald

ample portions in English to ensure that all worshippers can understand the proceedings. Greenwald met Haas Building owner Zuri Barnes not long after arriving in Los Angeles through one of Barnes’ sons-in-law. Serendipitously, Barnes was privately funding the $10 million conversion of the 12-story, 1915 building into 68 residences, and he was looking to house a Chabad synagogue in the project. “My father was a rabbi,” said the Israeliborn Barnes, who donates the JCC space rentfree. “Where we used to live in [Israel], on the second floor there was a synagogue. So I grew up in that environment, and it makes me feel good to come back to that environment.” Filling a Need Downtown is home to numerous religious institutions, the most well known being the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels on Temple Street, the mother church for the Los Angeles Archdiocese. The area also has Buddhist temples in Little Tokyo, the First

United Methodist Church in South Park and several centers of Christian worship. Gaining a full-time Jewish synagogue is a significant addition to Downtown’s religious landscape, said Rabbi Chaim Cunin of the Westside-based Chabad of California. “At some point in time the Jewish community was very well-represented in the Boyle Heights area, but not in Downtown,” said Cunin. The JCC, he said, “speaks volumes for Downtown Los Angeles and how far Downtown has come. It’s not just developing in a material way but also in a spiritual way.” Camille Goldsmith, 67, knows all about the previous lack of Jewish services in Downtown. She moved to the area in 2002 and had trouble finding a local synagogue. “I saw in the Yellow Pages that there was a Chabad on Fifth and Olive,” she said. But when she went to check it out, “It was shuttered up, and in the daytime it was a little storefront.” Until Greenwald opened the JCC in March, Goldsmith said, she walked nearly six miles every Saturday to a synagogue in Los Feliz. In addition to the convenience of a Downtown synagogue, Goldsmith and others also appreciate Greenwald’s traditional yet forward-thinking approach. “He comes from an ultra-orthodox background, but I find him to be extremely progressive,” said attorney and Los Feliz resident Jonathan Kaplan, who helped raise funds for the JCC’s Torah. “He really accepts people as they are. He’s not trying to change anybody.” Downtown resident Barrett Morse, 30, agrees. “I was never hugely religious, but [the JCC] is convenient and full of Downtown people like myself,” said Morse. “There’s no pretense. Everyone goes to dinner afterwards, people go to each other’s houses. If you told me two years ago that there would be a debate about where to go Downtown for Shabbat dinner, that would have been like a stand-up joke. Last week there were three different Shabbat dinners going on.” The Torah dedication is Thursday, Sept. 3, at 3 p.m. at the Jewish Community CenterChabad of Downtown Los Angeles, 219 W. Seventh St., Suite 206, (213) 488-1543 or downtownjcc.com. RSVPs are requested. Contact Anna Scott at anna@downtownnews.com.

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August 31, 2009

Housing Continued from page 1 many consider a visionary for his various endeavors in Downtown, said groundbreaking could occur within two years. This would mark his first residential project. “I’m very optimistic about our project and this area,” Woo said. “Our development would really add to this area. It would become a center of activity and a gateway between the Arts District and Little Tokyo.” Megatoys is a toy manufacturing, import, export and wholesale company based at 905 E. Second St. Woo also has offices in Hong Kong, and manufacturing facilities in Shenzhen, China, and the City of Commerce. The Megatoys building would be demolished for the project and moved to a bigger facility, possibly still in Downtown, he said. Woo is clearly cognizant of the state of the economy. In fact, considering how long it will take the market to cycle out of its downturn, he thinks he is embarking at a good time. “Right now the economy is bad and people are pessimistic, but I think in a year or two’s time the situation will change,” Woo said. “I think our timing is just right and the real estate market will be in an upswing soon. I think the recession actually provides us with the opportunity to do a more efficient, better project at slightly lower costs.” Visionary Roots Woo started his business career in Downtown in 1979 with ABC Toys. He now owns more than 10 buildings in Downtown, mostly distribution warehouses in the Toy District. He helped create the bustling neighborhood by aiding others in starting toy distribution companies. Woo serves as chairman emeritus of the Central City East Association, which operates the business improvement district in the Toy District. He also recently ended a two-year term as a member of the governing board of directors for L.A. Inc., and in 2001 was chair of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. In Downtown business circles he is known as a savvy businessman with a sharp acumen and a long vision for the future. “The Downtown Toy District would not be in place today if Charlie had followed conventional wisdom,” said Estela Lopez, executive director of the Central City East Association, in an email. “Charlie understands the long-term viability of Downtown and, in this case, the Arts District.” Woo said he wanted to jump into the development arena due to the growth he has seen in the Arts District. His project would follow other market-rate residential efforts in the area including the $47 million Artisan

Downtown News 9

DowntownNews.com on Second, which has 118 units; the 303-condominum Savoy on Alameda Street; Mura, a 190-condominium complex on Traction Avenue; and the Kor Group’s Barker Block, which transformed part of the district with its 297 lofts and retail outlets such as Urth Caffé and Loft Appeal. Gary Toebben, president and CEO of the L.A. Area Chamber of Commerce, said Woo’s project could have a similar effect in his area to that of the Barker Block in its neighborhood. “He’s going to be taking an area in need of redevelopment and make a significant invest-

‘I’m very optimistic about our project and this area. Our development would really add to this area. It would become a center of activity and a gateway between the Arts District and Little Tokyo.’ —Charlie Woo

ment,” Toebben said. He noted that with more than 15,000 square feet of retail space, it would provide needed shopping opportunities in the Arts District. That is something Woo is banking on. “It’s an area where you’re seeing more and more people after work, walking dogs, business people coming here,” he said. “The critical mass is there and this project would provide them with more amenities.” Catching the Upswing Despite Woo’s enthusiasm, there are risks in starting a new project at this time, say real estate industry observers. Credit markets remain tight and, in Downtown Los Angeles specifically, many developers of new housing projects have yet to fill their buildings. “There’s a lot of supply on the market and more is coming down so you have to be cautious,” said Jack Kyser, senior vice president and chief economist of the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. “I would say it’s going to take several years for Downtown residential to get its supply and demand back in balance.”

rendering by Megatoys Company LTD

Woo’s project would raze the Megatoys building on Second Street and replace it with a six-story housing complex lined with 15,000 square feet of retail.

Kyser said that he was surprised to hear about the project, and that while Woo is undoubtedly a good businessman with a long track record, there is a big leap from the toy industry to the world of residential development. “Charlie is a pretty sharp businessman, he’s done a lot for Downtown. But trying to do any type of a residential project right now you would have to be cautious about it,” he said, adding that he believes the best spots for current housing development are along the Figueroa and Flower streets corridor. Woo said some of the funding would come from his own pocket, but that he would need to look for additional financing. He said he would focus on that once the project goes through the entitlement process.

If he can find investors, Kyser said, Woo would be in a strong position. He noted that the prices of most construction materials have dropped recently, and that contractors with idle workforces might be eager to make a deal. Some Downtown leaders are confident that Woo can get it going. “I think it’s a very exciting project,” said Councilwoman Jan Perry, whose Ninth District encompasses the project. “Charlie is a great business person. He’s very innovative. He has spent his life working in a volatile industry and he has survived very well, and I expect he will bring those same skills in moving this project forward.” Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

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10 Downtown News

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DowntownNews.com

HEALTH Choose Your Experience Pilates, Yoga and Spinning All Offer Benefits by Cheryl Walker

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or decades people have been running to the gym to get in shape by lifting weights, using a treadmill and riding stationary bicycles. But more than ever these days, yoga, Pilates and spinning are becoming popular. But how do you know which is best? Before deciding, it’s crucial to first learn about what the exercises really involve. Yoga is the holistic practice of being able to move easy through movement and stretching. It concentrates on physical postures for the body, but is also a meditative state to refresh the mind. “There are so many different kinds of yoga,” said Viveca Jensen, a dancer, bodybuilder, aerobics instructor and trained boxer who owns V Pilates in Toluca Lake. “Yoga is tranquil with a mental calmness. You learn your body in yoga.” Pilates, developed by Joseph Pilates during World War I, builds flexibility, strength, endurance and coordination without adding muscle bulk by using non-impact exercises. “You can do Pilates with or without machines,” said Jensen. “It involves more stretching and with machines you are able to go further with different kinds of stretching. Pilates is more fast-paced. You learn how to use muscles that you never felt on your body.”

Jensen, who has trained notable names such as actress Hilary Duff, is such a believer in Pilates that she created her own exercise form she calls piloxing, which mixes Pilates and boxing. “There are so many different areas women need to be strong,” she said. “I wanted women to feel strong but feel sleek, sexy and powerful.” No other exercise contains such extremes, according to Jensen. “The powerful feeling of boxing, throwing solid punches, then transferring your body movements into Pilates and feeling like a ballerina, both are extreme workouts,” Jensen said. “Yet both share the common ground of working from the core region.” There are other health benefits to this workout technique. “Pilates helps with osteoporosis,” she said. “It is a correcting exercise because it all stems from the spine. It improves posture, your energy level will rise, you’ll lose weight and it builds muscle tone.” Spinning is indoor cycling with a group in a class setting. Jonathan Goldberg created the concept in the 1980s and Mad Dogg Athletics, Inc. later trademarked it as spinning. This form of aerobic exercise involves an instructor who leads cyclists through routines designed to simulate terrain similar to riding

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a bicycle outdoors. Music is usually played to help with motivation in positions that include hill climbs and sprints. “Many health clubs and gyms offer these classes and I recommend them to all of my patients,” Dr. Gabe Mirkin, who is certified in sports medicine and has practiced for more than 40 years, wrote on his blog. “Spinning is relatively safe because it is done with a smooth rotary motion that does not involve the muscle-damaging road shock of running.” Although it is called spinning, it’s not the speed that counts. “The amount of work you do is determined by the resistance on your pedals,” Mirkin wrote. “You perform a lot of work

when you spin slowly against great resistance, and do not do much work when you spin very fast against very little resistance.” When it comes to choosing which exercise to take up, the important thing, say experts, is to pick any activity that uses continuous motion, whether that is cycling, swimming, skating, running or dancing. “Start out at a relaxed pace until your muscles feel heavy and then stop,” Mirkin wrote. “For the first several days or weeks you may be able to exercise only a few minutes. Increase the amount of time gradually until you can exercise 30 minutes a day at a relaxed pace and not feel sore. Then you are ready to begin your training for fitness.” Article by Creators News Service.

USC Gets Millions in Stem Cell Funding Officials Hope for New Treatments of Disease by Meghan Lewit

R

esearchers at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California have been awarded nearly $3 million in grants from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to support research into stem cell discoveries that lay the foundation for future therapies. The Basic Biology Awards received formal approval this month from the Independent Citizens Oversight Committee (ICOC), the 29-member governing board of the institute. The state’s stem cell agency awarded a total of $16 million to researchers at five institutions in the first round of funding for Basic Biology Awards. The grants are intended to lead to advances in understanding the basic mechanisms underlying stem cell biology, cellular plasticity and cellular differentiation. Keck School of Medicine faculty members Martin Pera, PhD., director of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC, and Wange Lu, assistant professor of biochemistry & molecular biology, were among the 12 award recipients. Pera’s grant of approximately $1.4 million will fund studies into key processes involved with stem cell renewal. Lu’s grant of approximately $1.4 million will look into the molecular mechanisms of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells-cells that can be programmed to become any kind of tissue in the body. “The research will provide new insights into how embryonic stem cells multiply in the laboratory and how they take the first steps into becoming special-

ized tissues,” says Pera. “The scientists will also learn more about the reverse of this process, specifically how cells from adult tissues can undergo conversion to a state resembling early embryonic cells. These findings will help in large scale production of various specialized cells for use in research or the treatment of disease.” “Our research ultimately will allow us to improve methods to create patientspecific iPS cells for individualized cell replacement therapy, and disease-specific iPS cells which will help in research of the cause of diseases and screening for drugs to treat those diseases,” Lu said. Alan Trounson, CIRM president, said these grants will maintain the flow of ideas entering the research pipeline. “These basic biology grants will generate new ideas for future therapies and also provide information to help overcome barriers in bringing therapies to patients,” he said. Funding basic research is also a good economic investment, according to Trounson. Former Acting NIH Director Raynard Kington estimated that each dollar invested by the NIH stimulates $2.50 in associated economic activity. CIRM was established when voters passed Proposition 71 in 2004 to borrow and spend $3 billion over 10 years to support stem cell research. To date, USC faculty members working at the USC Health Sciences Campus and its affiliate Childrens Hospital Los Angeles have secured more than $60 million in funding. More information on USC’s stem cell programs is at stemcell.usc.edu. Article courtesy of USC HSC Weekly.

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August 31, 2009

Downtown News 11

DowntownNews.com

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provolone, avocado and pesto spread. I haven’t been to LA Café on a late weekend night/ Those who want more traditional late night fare can morning, and with my toddler-inspired bedtime, I doubt opt for the burgers. The L.A. Sliders, a basket of three beef I will any time soon, so I’m not sure how crowded it gets. You Don’t Have to Stay Up sliders with sweet onions and cheddar cheese ($7.99), But if there’s a line and you live Downtown, don’t fret. Just Until 4 a.m. to Enjoy LA Café come with a house sauce that set them apart from regu- go home and call them up — they deliver. lar fast food choices. The cheeseburger ($7.99) is a good At 639 S. Spring St., (213) 612-300 or thelacafe.com. by RichaRd Guzmán wiches and wraps as well as cookies baked through- choice as well and is served with the restaurant’s crispy Contact Richard Guzmán at city EditoR out the day. Choices for the latter include white choc- house chips. richard@downtownnews.com. ack in the days before I was in bed by 10 p.m. olate chip, cherry, rocky road and the classic chocolate every night thanks to fatherhood, one of my chip. Go with the classic, but make sure to have a traditions after a night of partying was to grab napkin handy since it is filled with warm chocolate some late-night grub at whatever place was open. and some of it will likely end up on you. Presented by The California Rice Commission Usually I ended up at garden variety chain diners Since man can’t live on chocolate alone, I also with nothing but greasy plates, or the latest hip all- ordered the chipotle chicken wrap ($7.99). It’s one of night venue that was harder to get into than the club the most popular items on the menu and after one I was coming from. bite you’ll understand why. If only LA Café would have been around back in The chicken is tender and juicy, grilled just right. those days. The Historic Core space is cool, with a The combination of beans, avocado and salsa give it great variety of food that is unlikely to add indigestion a hint of burrito flavor without the greasy guilt, and to your hangover. Best of all, it is open until 4 a.m. the chipotle ranch dressing is a nice complement. The Thursday through Saturday. (It is open other days macaroni salad that comes with it is fresh and simple. 2009 SushiMasters Finals East/West Challenge until 9 p.m. and Sundays until 5 p.m.) For those on the go, or who want to balance all the Featuring the JACCC Food & Sake Festival The place is small, with only a few tables on the drinks of the night before, there is the Breakfast in a sidewalk that are great for people watching. The food Cup ($4.25), with granola, vanilla yogurt and mixed choices, meanwhile, are numerous, and are healthier fruits. that most late-night greasy spoons. At lunch panini choices include the pesto chicken They serve breakfast, soups, salads, panini sand- ($7.99) with grilled chicken, sun-dried tomatoes,

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12 Downtown News

August 31, 2009

DowntownNews.com

The collective known as Slanguage will start their three-month residency at MOCA on Sept. 3 with a series of films and documentaries, including Helter Skelter, a 1976 work about the Charles Manson murders.

photo courtesy of Slanguage

A Return Engagement MOCA Series of Thursday Night Performances Goes All Helter Skelter

by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

I

n 2002, Mario Ybarra and his wife Karla Diaz decided to do something about the lack of movie theaters and video stores in their neighborhood in Wilmington. They started showing films to friends and members of their small artist collective, known as Slanguage, in a 1920s house which used to be home to a psychic. The home’s former occupants influenced the title of the film series, Psychicinema Multiplex. It took place weekly and included films and documentaries by members of the collective and others. Seven years later, the series has had a result no one could have ever predicted: This week, it will expand into a film program at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Downtown Los Angeles. The event on the evening of Thursday, Sept. 3, will also launch a three-month residency for Slanguage. It will include two more public programs. “Being at MOCA will help us grow as artists, and thanks to the kind of resources the museum can provide to us, we’ll be able to do things we can’t do ourselves,” said Ybarra. This means that, in addition to just watching movies, attendees of the Slanguage nights will do everything from catch spoken word performances to take in some break dancing. Slanguage is coming to MOCA as part of the museum’s Engagement Party, a free series launched last October. It offers non-traditional artists a three-month residency at the museum and an open forum to express their creativity using any medium they see fit. The programs, depending on the group, can range from performance pieces to lectures, screenings or workshops. Or in the case of Slanguage, a little bit of everything. “It’s a different art experience than going to look at an installation or a sculpture or a painting on the wall,” said Aandrea Stang, MOCA’s senior education program manager and the overseer of Engagement Party. “It’s an art event where they’ll have interaction with the artists and other audience members in order to have a fulfilling experience.” As part of Engagement Party, the museum seeks out artists who are doing socially based work that isn’t always easy to define, said Stang. The museum is also looking for groups that lack the platforms to expose their creativity to bigger audiences. “We are committed to progressively looking at new artists and what is the cutting edge of contemporary art, and these kinds of collectives have really been proliferating

throughout Los Angeles over the last five years,” said Stang. “MOCA felt that it was time to take a look at this and see how we can incorporate it into our programming.” Influences Slanguage’s first installment is Thursday night from 7-10 p.m. It will feature films created or aired in response to the museum’s 1992 exhibition Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s. Although many in the city may be unfamiliar with the show, it was hailed as a groundbreaking exhibit that featured a mix of artists and writers from Los Angeles. “It was something that influenced my generation in Los Angeles,” said Ybarra. “It was one of the first exhibitions I saw when I got out of high school and it was really important because it showed a lot of L.A. artists and writers and it really put L.A. on the map.”

‘It’s a different art experience than going to look at an installation or a sculpture or a painting on the wall.’ —Aandrea Stang, MOCA

In putting together the tribute to the show, Ybarra said Slanguage is focusing more on influences than on the actual artists from Helter Skelter. Thus, as part of the program, Slanguage will screen Helter Skelter, the 1976 film about the Charles Manson murders (which took place 40 years ago this summer), who took the name from the Beatles song that also influenced the MOCA exhibit title. There is more to the night. Simultaneous screenings of different films will take place at various locations around the museum’s Grand Avenue campus. Discussions about the films will unfold both informally and in conversations led by members of Slanguage. Among the other films on the docket is Manazar, a documentary about the Chicano poet Manazar Gamboa. It focuses on the artist’s experience growing up in Chavez Ravine, the small community that was razed to build Dodger Stadium. The collective will also screen documentaries on the Los

Angeles graffiti scene, clips from films like Blade Runner, as well as videos made by Slanguage, including a dance performance called The Harder They Come. “We wanted to bring as many things to the pot as possible, everything that’s influenced us as artists,” Ybarra said. New Audiences While Slanguage’s inaugural work will be a film presentation, their second event, scheduled for the first Thursday in October, will be a spoken word performance featuring improvisational acts and pre-written pieces mixed in with a DJ. The third program, in November, will go in a completely different direction — it will be a performance by a break dance crew the collective sponsors. “They’re highs school kids and we give them space to practice in our backyard, but we’ve been trying to find new ways to introduce them to different types of dance forms,” said Ybarra. “What the residency at the museum has done is provide us the chance to workshop them with a contemporary choreographer.” The residency will also provide Slanguage with an audience that would have otherwise been unlikely to see the group’s work. That happened with previous collectives like Ojo, a Los Angeles-based group that performed at the Engagement Party series from June through August. The group utilized language, music, synthesizers and everyday objects to create freeform improvisations. A highlight came when Ojo had members pack into a small car and make music by using the car’s interior, and also used the car’s battery to power other instruments. Audience members were invited to join in the concert. The piece ended with a choreographed crash. “It was an amazing experience,” said Eamon OreGiron, a member of the Ojo collective. “We usually do everything with no money and no budget, so to be able to create whatever we want with the full support of MOCA and the access to the media, with oriented posters, a spot on KCRW, it really helped us get exposure.” Ybarra hopes the experience at MOCA will give Slanguage the same kind of benefits, introducing the group to an audience beyond its Wilmington home. “It’s a great way to highlight our local talent, show them the talent from our neighborhood and even maybe influence someone else,” he said. Engagement Party with Slanguage is Sept. 3, 7-10 p.m., at MOCA Grand Avenue, 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-1745 or moca.org/party. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.


DowntownNews.com

Downtown News 13

This One Goes to Infinity Exhibition at USC Melds Philosophy, Science and Mythology by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

T

yson Gaskill and Andrew Wulf know very well that the subject of the show they have just curated at USC’s Doheny Library is sprawling in its conceptual enormity. The exhibit From Zero to Infinity, which opens Thursday, Sept. 3, features 20 mixed media prints by Southern California artists Victor Raphael and Clay Spada, each attempting to tell the story of, well, everything. The pieces blend imagery from the realms of natural science, philosophy, religion, mythology and other cultural reference points. “It’s a bit of hubris I’ll say, the story of everything,” said Gaskill. “But we thought ‘Well, let’s do it.’ It’s kind of cheeky, kind of fun and when you see it all together you kind of go, ‘Oh, I get it.’” The participants don’t pretend to have put world history in a neat box. If anything, the scope of the show is more a reflection of the lack of boundaries the artists had in putting it together. “I don’t have the answers to the universe,” Raphael said. “However, I think there’s a lot to be said for not discounting things we’re not familiar with just because they’re not from our culture or point of view. I think when you can combine these ideas in imagery, it reaches people on a different level than reading as a story or as a didactic.” Raphael and Spada collaborated, in part, by trawling through the library’s special collections, gathering images, texts and inspiration from ancient and modern books. Ultimately, Gaskill said, the show doesn’t purport to answer important life questions as much it strives to ask them. The Art of Collaboration Raphael (who also has a 30-year retrospective opening at the USC Fisher Museum of Art on Sept. 8) and Spada have been collaborating for years. In fact, 10 of the 20 pieces in this show were created before they were commissioned to make work for the library exhibition. Over the years, the artists have developed a method that starts with Raphael and a Polaroid camera. He snaps photos,

usually of an abstract surface, then decorates it with dots of gold and metal leaf. Spada, the digital graphics wizard, then takes a scanned version of the Polaroid and overlays different images that correspond with the work’s general theme, Gaskill said. The end result is an image that strives to make harmony out of seemingly disconnected ideas. The piece “Problema X,” for example, shows a bright yellow image — scanned at high resolution from a German text on Hindu cosmology — One of 20 works featured in From Zero to Infinity, “Problema X” melds images from Hindu of a globe, which is supported by the cosmology, 17th century mathematics and a 16th century treatise on astronomy. backs of elephants, who in turn stand on the shell of a massive tortoise. Room (the original home, in 1932, of the library’s special collecScrolling across the print is a part of an equation on prob- tions), filling 18 display cases with books that match a theme. ability by the 17th-century Swiss mathematician Jakob In the “Discover” case, for example, is a facsimile of Bernoulli, as well some visual elements from a 16th-century Christopher Colombus’ first letter (written in Latin) after disSpanish astronomical treatise by Juan Pérez de Moya. Taken covering the new world. The small, leather bound book is not together, the image has a celestial aura, highlighted by a blurry the original, but it’s almost as old: It was printed in 1493. mass that encircles the frame, like the rings around Saturn. “It may be a copy, but it’s one of the best possible copies The melding of such disparate elements could have multi- you could ever get,” Wulf said. ple effects on the viewer: Does it suggest that these disjointed Other themes include Beauty, Birth, Strife, Madness and worldviews are complemented by each other? Or does it call Apocalypse, and include a vast range of texts. The “Strife” into question the way others make sense of the world? case, for instance, holds an Italian writer’s manual from 1598 “What you see here are a lot of questions,” Gaskill said. on how to take or defend a fort in war, and the case dedicated “There seems to be a rationality of structure to the universe, to Entropy features two Charles Bukowski texts. but a lot of people have these beliefs and who’s to say it’s not The Treasure Room exhibition “works in tandem with one big cosmic joke?” From Zero to Infinity, but it’s not slavishly tied to it,” Gaskill Notes on Everything said. “I’d say they’re very complementary.” Running hand-in-hand with Raphael and Spada’s prints is From Zero to Infinity runs Sept. 3-Dec. 13 at the Doheny Notes on the Story of Everything, a sort of sister show organized Library at USC, 3550 Trousdale Parkway. To attend the openby Gaskill and Wulf that features rare texts from the library’s ing reception and get free parking, RSVP by Sept. 1 at (213) special collections, including some that the artists borrowed in 740-1744 or usc.edu/esvp (code: ARTSCIENCE). their works. The curators have taken over the library’s Treasure Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

Take My Picture

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‘Problema X,’ Victor Raphael and Clayton Spada, 2009. Image courtesy of the USC Libraries

August 31, 2009


14 Downtown News

'DON'T LIST MISS'

THE

by AnnA Scott, StAff writer

2nd Street Jazz 366 E. Second St., (213) 680-0047, 2ndstjazz.com or myspace.com/2ndstreetlivejazz. Tuesdays: Jazz jam session. Music usually starts at 9 or 10 p.m. 626 Reserve 626 S. Spring St., (213) 627-9800 or 626reserve.com. Tuesdays, 6 p.m.: Live music with Goh Kurosawa. Thursdays, 6 p.m.: More live sounds, this time with Jessie Torrez. Blue Velvet 750 S. Garland Ave., (213) 239-0061. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 p.m.: Live music

Attention maneaters, and “Maneater” fans: blue-eyed soul/pop duo Hall & Oates come Downtown at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 2, to play L.A. Live’s Nokia Theatre. Flaxen-haired Daryl Hall and the formerly mustachioed John Oates have been rocking together for three decades and are sure to play crowd-pleasers like “Rich Girl,” “She’s Gone,” “Kiss on My List,” “Private Eyes” (the hits just keep coming!), “I Can’t Go for That” and, of course, “Maneater.” Forget the ’80s nostalgia thing — these guys still know how to put on a show. 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6030 or nokiatheatrelalive.com. nnual a e h t acts 5, with , Sept. event reen os y a d r e u n as L on Sat es. Th istory Los Angel ettlers know et at 6 h h g . Me throu k to ish s l walk storic Wal iginal Span wntown L.A Angeles a r e t i l i r Take a ladores H rek of the o t is now Do eblo de Los re will b t ha o he e Pu P l w i s o Lo ne-m Gabriel t d end at El ours later. T , plus i n , 1 8 r n the 17 res from Sa l Mission an and a half h blood suga th e t e o i 28 a e r d 2 r h a b l t s h a ’ t ish ut Pob he San G city o n e e b l h a t p t e g r in en da tt a.m. a al Monum t 10 a.m. to ent honor 5 N. Alame m c a 4 i n 8 r i g a t o n t t 485 His cake cutti and enter lo is a l Pueb on at (213) d o E . o f be a , s .m i e p i t festivit day until 1 d informa ores.org. birth Details an ospoblad rl St. 8376 o

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3

The indie music festival the FYF Fest celebrates its sixth anniversary at the Los Angeles State Historic Park on Saturday, Sept. 5. The formerly Echo Park-based festival will feature performances by more than 20 mostly L.A.-based bands from 2 p.m.-midnight. The lineup includes the Black Lips, Dillinger Escape Plan/Converge, Torche and other groups that will put you in the know in terms of L.A.’s music scene. A variety of food and beverage vendors will also be on hand. Admission is $20. 1245 N. Spring St., fyffest.com.

photo by Joan Marcus

ROCK, POP & JAZZ

photo courtesy of the Nokia Theatre

A Historic Walk, Music and Film Fill Up Labor Day Weekend

Friday, Sept. 4 Farmlab Public Salons 1745 N. Spring St. #4, (323) 226-1158 or farmlab.org. Noon: The salon presents the collaborative work of the Tulane City Center and the New Orleans Food and Farm Network in their efforts to support the growing urban farming/local food movement in New Orleans. Although part of a national trend, the projects presented here also grew out of a post disaster context. Saturday, Sept. 5 Los Pobladores Historic Walk to Los Angeles Meet at San Gabriel Mission, 428 S. Mission Dr., San Gabriel, (213) 485-8376. 6 a.m.: Each year over the Labor Day Weekend, the cities of San Gabriel and Los Angeles come together through the Los Pobladores Historic Walk to Los Angeles. The walk is a reenactment of the 1781, nine-mile trek of the original Spanish settlers (Los Pobladores) from San Gabriel Mission to presentday Los Angeles, which they founded 228 years ago. This year’s walk kicks off at the San Gabriel Mission and ends at Olvera Street, where there will be food, festivities and entertainment. FYF Fest Los Angeles State Historic Park, 1245 N. Spring St., fyffest.com. 2p.m.-midnight: The FYF Fest is an independent music festival, formerly held in Echo Park. This year, the all-day rock bonanza moves to the Los Angeles State Historic Park and will function as a benefit for California State Parks, which is still trying to make sense of steep budget cuts. The Black Lips, Tim and Eric and Lightning Bolt headline. A complete schedule will be available online. Drum Downtown Music Center Plaza, Grand Ave. between First and Temple Streets, musiccenter.org. 10-11:30 a.m.: Jumpstart your Saturday morning with some drum pounding rhythms. On hand will be hand drums, shakers, tambourines, and other percussion instruments for the masses. No experience necessary. Free.

one

SPONSORED LISTINGS Summer Concerts in Macarthur Park Levitt Pavilion, 2230 W. Sixth St., (213) 3845701 or levittpavilionlosangeles.org. Sept. 9, 7:30 p.m.: The band Radaid seeks to break the barrier of space and time. Singing in Spanish, French and English these Guadalajara, Mexico natives undertake a radical fusing of electronic wave music and trip hop with all manner of ritual music from Arabia, Mexico and the Balkan Mountains. Sept. 13, 6 p.m.: Conjunto Hueyapan features the shimmering, sonorous sound of the guitar-like jarana, the plucked requinto, and the folk harp. The Herrera family ensemble is comprised of two generations dedicated to the son jarocho, a lively, vibrant traditional music of Veracruz, Mexico. Video Installation Take My Picture Gallery, 860 S. Broadway, (213) 622-2256 or takemypicture.com. Sept. 10, 7-9 p.m.: Artist Barnaby Levy’s “Accident” is a four wall video installation that displays four major streets in Los Angeles: Beverly Blvd., Sepulveda Blvd., Washington Blvd., and Western Ave. Each was videotaped through the windshield of a 1987 Ford Crown Victoria, then divided into five parts and 20 composers chose a section to score as they pleased. Then 20 writers were invited to add words (read or performed) to the sections of sound and image. The show runs through Sept. 13.

LISTINGS

photo by Gary Leonard

EVENTS

August 31, 2009

DowntownNews.com

4

This week marks your last chance to see a limb limbless knight, a killer rabbit and some vicious skewering of Andrew Lloyd Webber. If you just said “Say what?” then you haven’t yet seen Monty Python’s Spamalot at the Ahmanson Theatre. The delightfully wacky and Tony award-winning musical, which spins off the tale of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table and stars John O’Hurley, closes Sunday, Sept. 6. You don’t have to be a Monty Python fan to dig it (though it doesn’t hurt). Get ready for Vegas-style theatrics, a knight who comes out of the closet, and of course, the famous flatulent Frenchman. The show is at 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or centertheatregroup.com.

5 image courtesy of the USC LGBT Resource Center

If you missed last year’s acclaimed biopic Milk, you can catch a free screening of the film at 7 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 31, at USC’s Leavey Library Auditorium. The movie, which tells the story of gay rights activist Harvey Milk and his journey to become California’s first openly gay elected official, earned Academy Awards for screenwriter Dustin Lance Black and actor Sean Penn. Note: bring tissues. A panel discussion with USC anthropology lecturer Joseph Hawkins and others will follow the screening. 651 W. 35th St. RSVP to lgbt@ usc.edu. (213) 740-7619 or usc.edu/lgbt. Contact Anna Scott at anna@downtownnews.com.


August 31, 2009

Downtown News 15

DowntownNews.com

But Wait, There’s More!

Additional Event Information on the Web

DOWNTOWNNEWS.COM/CALENDAR : EVENTS | ROCK, POP & JAZZ | CLASSICAL MUSIC | THEATER, OPERA & DANCE ART SPACES | FILM | BARS & CLUBS | MUSEUMS | FARMERS MARKETS | TOURS and DJs. Café Metropol 923 E. Third St., (213) 613-1537 or cafemetropol.com. Sept. 4, 8-10 p.m.: Keen Inkling is a jazz quintet of Cal Arts grads that features Nate Coyne on drums. Chop Suey Café 347 E. First St., (213) 617-9990 or chopsueycafe.com. Thursdays, 7:30-9:30 p.m.: Live jazz on the patio of the restored landmark. Cicada Cicada Restaurant, 617 S. Olive St., (213) 488-9488 or cicadarestaurant.com. Thursdays, 8-11 p.m.: The velvet-voiced Max Vontaine recreates the sounds and styles of rat packers Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. His smoking jackets and tunes are vintage; his bawdy repartee is less so. Keep a close eye on the unlit cigarette. Sundays, 6-11 p.m.: The restaurant is transformed into a vintage, old Hollywood-style dance club every Sunday. Come out to appreciate the big band, swank costumes, dinner and cocktails. Visit cicadaclub.com. Club Nokia Corner of Olympic Blvd. and Figueroa St., clubnokia.com. Sept. 3, 8:30 p.m.: Long hair and hard rock from Thin Lizzy. Sept. 4, 11:30 p.m.: Crown J is a South Korean rapper who raps in Korenglish. Sept. 6, 6 p.m.: The Vans Warped Tour hosts its 15th anniversary with performances by Bad Religion, Rise Against, NOFX, Pennywise, All American Rejects, The Aggrolites, Ozomatli, UnderOath and and more. Conga Room L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic, (213) 749-0445 or congaroom.com. Sept. 3: Fiesta with Grupo Mi Tierra Sept. 5: Brassy salsa with The Echo Park Project. Grammy Museum L.A. Live, corner of Olympic Blvd and Figueroa St., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. Sept. 1, 8 p.m.: Legendary bandleader Herb Alpert and acclaimed singer Lani Hall join Grammy Museum Executive Director Robert Santelli for an on-stage interview about their musical careers and their new album together, “Anything Goes.” In addition to the interview, Alpert and Hall will take questions from the audience and perform a few songs. J Restaurant and Lounge 1119 S. Olive St., (213) 746-7746 or jloungela.com. Tuesdays: Live acoustic performances in the lounge. Wednesdays: Salsa in the City features complimentary salsa lessons at 8 p.m. At 9 p.m., a batch of live musicians takes over for a jam session. Pete’s Café and Bar 400 N. Main St., (213) 618-1759 or petescafe.com. Tuesdays, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.: Pablo Calogero and Fabiano Nacimento play Brazilian jazz. Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com. Sept. 2, 10 p.m.: Furious, twanged-out, punk rock gutterbilly courtesy of Goddamn Gallows, Murderland and Marauding Ghouls. Sept. 3, 10 p.m.: The Fold presents singer songwriter Tim Easton.

Sept. 4, 10 p.m.: Deadbolt headlines, with Lightnin Woodcock and Thee Cormans Sept. 5, 10 p.m.: The Weight from Brooklyn, Hang Jones, Restavrant and 50 Cent Haircut. Rerax Fridays at Señor Fish 422 E. First St., (213) 625-0566 or senorfishla.com. Fridays, 9 p.m.-3 a.m.: Music, art, VJ performances, silk screening and photos. Royale 2619 Wilshire Blvd., (213) 388-8488 or royaleonwilshire.com. Mondays, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.: A live musical showcase with bands, a DJ and an Eastside vibe. Tuesdays, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.: An acoustic live set in the historic Royale lounge. A DJ spins between sets. Wednesday (second of every month), 9 p.m.-2 a.m.: A fusion of spoken word and acoustic musical melodies. Sundays, 9 p.m.-midnight: Rat pack protégé Max Vontaine. Sheraton L.A. Downtown Hotel 711 S. Hope St., (310) 216-5861. Fridays: The hotel presents a weekly live jazz night. The Smell 247 S. Main St., thesmell.org. Sept. 2: RoMak And The Space Pirates, Strip Mall Seizures, Didimau and Guns N Broses. Sept. 3: Gun Outfit, Milk Music, Mr. Highway and Francis Harold and The Holograms. Sept. 6: Orca Team.

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE Solitude The New LATC, 514 S. Spring St., thelatc.org. Sept. 4 and 5, 8 p.m.: Inspired by Octavio Paz's “Labyrinth of Solitude,” “Solitude” explores love, death, destiny and family through a contemporary lens. On the day of the million immigrant march, Gabriel invites his old neighborhood friends over after his mother’s funeral. As the wine pours and mambo explodes, they share secrets, cry together, laugh together, sing rancheras, dance and confess. Spamalot Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. Sept. 1-2, 8 p.m.; Sept. 3, 2 and 8 p.m.; Sept. 4, 8 p.m.; Sept. 5, 2 and 8 p.m.; Sept. 6, 1 p.m.: “Spamalot” is for both the Monty Python initiated and newcomers to the comedy oeuvre that includes murderous bunny rabbits, insult-spewing French knights, and rampant absurdism. Loosely based on the movie “Monty Python and the Holy Grail.” Through Sept. 6.

BARS & CLUBS The Association 610 S. Main St., (213) 627-7385. Carved out of the area that used to belong to Cole’s, the bar in front, the Association is a dimly-lit, swank little alcove with some serious mixologists behind the bar. Look for a heavy door, a brass knocker, and a long line. Banquette 400 S. Main St., (213) 626-2768 or banquette-cafe.com.

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This petite cafe and wine bar with its red and white striped awning has become a popular hangout for casual evenings of drinking wine and meeting up with friends. During monthly Art Walks on the second Thursday of the month, Banquette buzzes with almost every kind of Downtown denizen you could imagine. They have a small but lovely selection of wines by the glass as well as beers. Barbara’s at the Brewery 620 Moulton Ave., No. 110, (323) 221-9204 or barbarasatthebrewery.com. On the grounds of the Brewery, this bar and restaurant in an unfinished warehouse is where local residents find their artistic sustenance. Beer on tap, wine list and full bar. Bar 107 107 W. Fourth St., (213) 625-7382 or myspace.com/bar107. Inside the keyhole-shaped door, tough-as-nails Derby Dolls vie for elbowroom with crusty old bar guys and a steady stream of Old Bank District inhabitants. Velvet señoritas, deer heads with sunglasses, a wooden Indian and Schlitz paraphernalia plaster the red walls. There’s no shortage of entertainment, with the funky dance room, great DJs and the occasional rock band. In the photo booth, you can capture your mug in old-fashioned black and white. Located just two blocks east of the Pershing Square Metro stop, Bar 107 is open from 3 p.m. to 2 a.m. seven days a week. Blue Velvet 750 S. Garland St., (213) 239-0061 or bluevelvetrestaurant.com. Located off a small side street, look for the blue neon sign that says The Flat. This stylish poolside restaurant and lounge in the former Holiday Inn (now a residential building) features sparkling views of Staples Center, a dining room with a 17-foot sunken granite table, and a sleek bar with white stools where you can saddle up cowboy style. Bonaventure Brewing Company Westin Bonaventure, 404 S. Figueroa St., (213) 2360802 bbc2go.com. Where can you get a drink, order some decent bar food, sit outdoors and still feel like you’re Downtown? It’s a tall order to fill, but this bar in the Bonaventure Hotel does it admirably. Sure, the hotel is vaguely ’80s, and you’ll probably encounter some convention goers tying a few on, but it only adds to the fun. Pub Quiz Trivia Night every Wednesday at 8:15 p.m. Bona Vista Lounge 404 S. Figueroa St., (213) 624-1000 or starwoodhotels.com. Located in the heart of the Financial District in the landmark Westin Bonaventure Hotel, this revolving cocktail lounge offers a 360-degree view of the city. Bordello 901 E. First St., (213) 687-3766 bordellobar.com. If the name doesn’t clue you in, a sultry voiced “madam” on the answering machine lets you know Bordello isn’t exactly for the buttoned-up crowd. This onetime house of ill repute has shed its most recent life as Little Pedro’s with a gussied up interior oozing sex appeal — lush scarlet velvet, ornate black chandeliers and heart-shaped chairs in hidden alcoves. Bottlerock 1150 S. Flower St., bottlerock.net

Listings for additional concerts, exhibits and more in Downtown Los Angeles can be found on our website. Go to downtownnews.com/calendar for full information, including time and location, for all the happenings in Downtown. Situated on the groundfloor of the Met Lofts in South Park, this wine bar features a vast range of bottles from around the world and a price range equally as wide. Wines by the glass start at around $8, but if you’re feeling overcome by oenophilia (or just deep-pocketed) there are some first growth Bordeauxs for more than $1,000 for the bottle. And if you don’t get your fill while at the bar, which also features a rotating crop of artisanal beers and a full dinner menu, the bar also sells bottles at retail. Broadway Bar 830 S. Broadway, (213) 614-9909 or thebroadwaybar.net. Located next to the Orpheum Theatre in the Platt Building, the Broadway Bar’s blue neon sign beckons patrons inside to its 50-foot circular bar. The casualchic spot is based on Jack Dempsey’s New York bar, with low lighting and a dose of ’40s glam. There’s a patio upstairs with nice views, and a jukebox. Casa 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2249 or casadowntown.com. There’s a classy bar inside, from whence you can check out the action in the kitchen and behind the bar, as the bartenders craft their fresh-juiced margaritas. But the place to be is outside, under the stars and high-rises, nestled in one of the patio’s pod “casitas.” Casey’s Irish Bar & Grille 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. With its worn brick staircase, tin ceilings and dark wood decor, it’s easy to see how this neighborhood bar and grill still works its Irish charm. Regulars cozy up to the 60-foot mahogany bar with a pint of Guinness and a plate of bangers and mash. Casey’s has a full menu with six beers on tap and a selection of Belgian ales and microbrews. Cicada 617 S. Olive St., (213) 488-9488 or cicadarestaurant.com. Every Sunday, the restaurant is transformed into a vintage, old Hollywood-style dance club, with a big band, swank costumes, dinner and cocktails (visit cicadaclub.com). Ciudad 445 S. Figueroa St., (213) 486-5171 or ciudad-la.com. Chefs Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger’s Downtown restaurant serves up Latin recipes from Spain and South America. The modern space also hosts a thriving happy hour with live music on the outdoor patio several nights a week. Don’t miss the mojitos.

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4 wEB: www.DowntownNews.com 4 EmAiL: Calendar@DowntownNews.com

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August 31, 2009

Downtown News 17

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18 Downtown News

August 31, 2009

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get your green CarD or CItIZenshIp Law Office of H. Douglas Daniel Esq., (213) 689-1710

EMPLOYMENT

aDvertIsIng CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING in 240 Cal-SCAN newspapers for the best reach, coverage, and price. 25-words $550. Reach 6 million Californians!. Free email brochure. Call 916-288-6019. www.Cal-SCAN.com. (CalSCAN) DISPLAY ADVERTISING in 140 Cal-SDAN newspapers statewide for $1,550! Reach over 3 million Californians! Free email brochure. Call 916-288-6019. www.Cal-SDAN.com. (CalSCAN) NEWS RELEASE? Cost-efficient service. The California Press Release Service has 500 current daily, weekly and college newspaper contacts in California. Free email brochure. Call (916) 288-6010. www.CaliforniaPressReleaseService.com. (Cal-SCAN)

taIlor

Take your wardrobe to the next level! Same Day Service! Open 7 days a week! 115 E. 8th St. L.A. 90014 (213) 399-1177

eddiestailorshop.com

hoMe IMproveMent

Construction

$98

s.f.

Architectural Plans + Permit Included GC# 308729 est. 1975

details 323-960-5792

general

HELP WAntED telemarketing

earn $1000+ Weekly! Commercial Collection sales. Guaranteed weekly rate plus commissions on every deal. *$300 Signing Bonus! FT/PT/Seniors/Students. Business to business cold calling. Start immediately! Experience preferred. Downtown LA.

213.621.2394 • Fax 213.621.7679 Help Wanted

Movie Extras

CleanIng

EDDIES TAILOR SHOP

DrIvers

CONCEPTO’S CLEANING Crew. Professional, experienced, cleans apartments, homes, offices and restaurants. Call for a quote. 323-459-3067 or 818-409-9183. MONTE CARLO CLEANERS offering Free Pick Up & Delivery 7 Days a Week on Dry Cleaning,Laundry,& Alterations. Call for specials. 213-489-9400. housekeepIng MONTE CARLO MAIDS References available. All major credit cards accepted, call for a free estimate. Licensed & Insured. 213-489-9401

Earn up to $150/Day People needed for background in a major film production. Exp. not required.

(888) 366-0843 BECOME A HOST FAMILY: Promote International Understanding. Volunteer Host Families needed for High School Exchange Students. Open your heart, open your home. 1-866462-3423 or www.afice.org. (Cal-SCAN) PETROLEUM SUPPLY: Up to $15,000 BONUS. Keep the Army National Guard’s Watercraft, Aircraft, Trucks & Tanks rolling! Expand your skills through career training. www.NationalGuard. com/Careers or 1-800-GoGuard. (Cal-SCAN) WHOLESALE BUYER- BS Marketing or related req’d; Fax resume: BS&T USA 323-6514733 Los Angeles CoMputers/It ATTENTION: International Wellness Company Expanding Online Computer Work! Work from anywhere 24/7. Great pay. Will train. Request info online: www. KTPGlobal.com or 1-800-3308446. (Cal-SCAN)

On Spring St.

Spring Tower Lofts:

ANDRUS TRANSPORTATION Seeking Team Drivers! Dedicated Team Freight. Also Hiring OTR drivers - West states exp/ hazmat end, great miles/hometime. Stable Family owned 35 yrs+ 1-800-888-5838, 1-866806-5119 x1402. (Cal-SCAN) retaIl/sales OVER 18? AVAILABLE to Travel? Earn Above Average $$$ with Fun Successful Business Group! No Experience Necessary. 2wks Paid Training. Lodging, Transportation Provided. 1-877-646-5050. (CalSCAN)

AUTOS & RECREATIONAL autos WanteD DONATE YOUR CAR: Children’s Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child’s Life Through Research & Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy & Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. (CalSCAN) DONATE YOUR VEHICLE! Receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, NonRunners Accepted, 1-888-4685964. (Cal-SCAN)

ITEMS FOR SALE ClothIng/JeWelry VINTAGE 1950’s Sterling Silver pocket lighter. Asking $50. 213488-0930. FurnIture LOFT MODERN Stainless steel, upholstered chairs from LAX theme building $100. 323-2566172 MIsC. IteMs ARCADE VIDEO GAME Golden Tee Golf. Complete, not working $75. 818-642-4263 John

2300 sqft. w/3 bdrm 2 bath LOFT $2,800/mo. • Live/Work space • 14 story bldg. • Rooftop garden terrace w/city view • Pet friendly

Premiere Towers:

Offices • Offices • Offices • Offices

2 bdrm/2 bath, $1550/mo. • Rooftop garden terrace/GYM w/city view • 24 hr. doorman • free (1) parking

City Lofts:

900 sqft, 13 ft ceilings, $1500/mo. • Granite marble top • Stainless steel appliances/ refrigerator etc. • Pet friendly

Burbank • Brentwood Century City • Downtown L.A. Woodland Hills

We are located in a prime area in Downtown LA nice neighborhood w/ salon, market, café etc. Wired for high speed internet & cable, central heat & A/C

www.cityloftsquare.com

CAN YOU

Items In Need: 3 Clothing & Shoes for girls, boys, men & women 3 Personal Hygiene items: shampoo, conditioner, soap, facial cleanser, tooth paste, tooth brushes etc. 3 Medicine/Vitamins 3 School Supplies, Computers, Notebooks, Pens/Pencils All products must be in there original packaging and clothing with price tags due to customs.

Items will be collected at:

Global Travel Outreach 1105 Wesley Ave. Pasadena, CA 91104

626-791-7900 www.GlobalTravelOutreach.com

ATTENTION CONSUMERS: Tired of corruption, frauds, scams & rip-offs? Well it’s time to fight back! Watch & Hear- Emmy winning consumer advocate & TV investigative reporter Judd Mcilvain’s all new trouble shooter Consumer Protection TV & Radio Show. Visit www.TroubleshooterJudd.com for channel & air times... (Cal-SCAN)

LEGAL FICtItIous BusIness naMe FictitiouS BuSinESS nAmE StAtEmEnt FiLE no. 20091255539 The following person is doing business as: (1) NODAV Jewelry Laserworks (2) Eco-Fusion Jeweled Adornments, 412 W. 6th Street, Suite #908, Los Angeles, CA 90014, are hereby registered by the following registrant: David Alvarado, 806 S. Lake Ave., Pasadena, CA 91106. This business is conducted by an individual. Registrants has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on August 14, 2009. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 8/24, 8/31, 9/7, 9/14/09 naMe Change SuPERioR couRt oF cALiFoRniA, countY oF LoS AnGELES oRDER to SHoW cAuSE FoR cHAnGE oF nAmE no. BS122138 Petitioner (name): TAMMY ANN BYLER, 3579 E. Foothill Blvd., #638, Pasadena, CA 91107, filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: TAMMY ANN BYLER Proposed Name: ISABELLA SOPHIA ROMALATTI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: 9/25/2009

SuPERioR couRt oF cALiFoRniA, countY oF LoS AnGELES oRDER to SHoW cAuSE FoR cHAnGE oF nAmE no. BS122139 Petitioner (name): DONNA MARIE LEE, 3579 E. Foothill Blvd., #638 Pasadena, CA 91107 filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: DONNA MARIE LEE Proposed Name: MIKAYLA ANGELINA ROMALATTI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: 9/25/09 Time: 9:00 a.m. Dept.: 1A Room: 548 The address of the court is Los Angeles Superior Court, 111 N. Hill Street, Los Angeles, CA 90189. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in Los Angeles Downtown News, 1264 W. First Street, LA CA 90026 of general circulation, printed in this county of Los Angeles. Filed: August 12, 2009 Murray Gross, Commissioner John A. Clarke, Executive Officer/Clerk By Dawn Alexander, Deputy Pub. 8/24, 8/31, 9/7, 9/14/09 polICe perMIt noticE oF APPLicAtion FoR PoLicE PERmit Notice is hereby given that application has been made to the Board of Police Commissioners for a permit to conduct a MASSAGE BUSINESS NAME OF APPLICANT: VANNY NGUON KHUON DOING BUSINESS AS: PRETTY BODY WORKS LOCATED AT: 11421 Moorpark Street N. Hollywood, CA 91602 Any person desiring to protest the issuance of this permit shall make a written protest before September 24, 2009 to the:

Beautiful Offices For As Little As $400 Fully Furnished/Corporate ID Programs Flexible Terms/All New Suites

OFFICE SPACE

Services Include: • Reception • Mail • T-1 • State-of-the-Art Voice Mail & Telephone • Westlaw • Fax • Photocopy • More

oFFICe spaCe & event spaCe For lease! Beautiful, historic Banks Huntley building located in Gallery Row district of Downtown LA offering office space close to Federal Court House and City Hall – ideal for non-profits but for profit organizations are also welcome! Rental rate: $1.60-$1.70/sq.ft./ month Full Service Gross. Ground-floor event and conference space also available in gorgeous art-deco setting, perfect for private functions, weddings, business meetings, etc. For further information, please contact Karrie Lieu at 213-629-2512 ext.110 (klieu@maldef.org) or Carlito Manasan at ext.117 (cmanasan@maldef.org)

CAN YOU HELP?

HELP?

Distributing Medical Supplies, Food & Clothing to Children & Families.

speCIal events

Time: 9:00 am Dept.: 1A Room:548 The address of the court is Los Angeles Superior Court, 111 N. Hill Street, Los Angeles, CA 90189. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set of hearing on the petition in the Los Angeles Downtown News, 1264 W. First Street LA CA 90026 of general circulation, printed in this county of Los Angeles. Filed: August 12, 2009 Murray Gross, Commissioner By Dawn Alexander, Deputy John A. Clarke, Executive Officer/Clerk Pub. 8/17, 8/24, 8/31, 9/7/09

Locations Nationwide

Please call 213.627.6913

Additional Features: Kitchen Facilities, All Support Services, Great Views, Free Conference Room Hours, Fully Trained Staff, Cost Effective.

photo by j. mcnicol

Mission to Cambodia

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Jenny Ahn (213) 996-8301 jahn@regentBC.com www.regentbc.com Global Travel Outreach aides Daughters of Vision A three phase program, Daughters of Vision seeks to aide the poverty-stricken children of Cambodia.

Van For Sale An existing structure bequeathed to Global Travel Outreach

Phase I

Phase II

Phase III

Only 6,573hall. miles will be transformed into a school and community like-new fOr a$22,000 We will open the Daughters of Vision Girls home, place dedicated towards ending the extreme poverty & destitution affecting Cambodia’s children, as wellEXcELLEnt as a refuge and sanctuary for young girls from the reach of childconDition traffickers. Still under warranty! Create a medical clinic to service the community.

For more info visit our web site or call toll free. Donations in the form Chevrolet 2008 eXpress 3500 extd wb passenger van- 6,573 miles. of checks, cashiers checks or money orders can be made payable to: 15-Passenger, excellent condition, all power. 5 year /100,000 mile powertrain limited warranty with 24 hr Global roadside assistance. 4-Door, loaded with power Travel Outreach steering, power windows, power locks, tinted windows, 1105 Wesley Ave. Pasadena, CAsecurity 91104 alarm, tilt wheel, air conditioning. Remote keyless entry, loaded with an 6.0 Liter vortec 626-791-7900 v8 engine. Passkey III theft deterrent, am/fm stereo CD player w/mp3 format. GlobalTravel08@gmail.com $22,000. (323) 721-3947 Virginia or (323) 314-4360 Fernando. www.GlobalTravelOutreach.com

Fully furnished with TV, telephone, microwave, refrigerator. Full bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly maid service.

Monthly from $695 utilities paid. (213) 627-1151

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

Monthly from $595 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

LOS ANGELES POLICE COMMISSION 150 North Los Angeles Street Los Angeles, CA 90012 Upon receipt of written protests, protesting persons will be notified of date, time and place for hearing. BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS Pub. 8/24, 8/31/09 legal notICe

DEPARtmEnt oF tHE tREASuRER AnD tAX coLLEctoR notice of Divided Publication noticE oF DiViDED PuBLicAtion oF tHE PRoPERtY tAX DEFAuLt (DELinQuEnt) LiSt Made pursuant to Section 3371, Revenue and Taxation Code Pursuant to Sections 3381 through 3385, Revenue and Taxation Code, the Notice of Power to Sell Tax-Defaulted Property in and for Los Angeles County, State of California, has been divided and distributed to various newspapers of general circulation published in the county. A portion of the list appears in each of such newspapers. I, Mark J. Saladino, County of Los Angeles Tax Collector, State of California, certify that: Notice is hereby given that real properties listed below were declared to be in tax default at 12:01 a.m. on July 1, 2007, by operation of law. The declaration of default was due to nonpayment of the total amount due for the taxes, assessments and other charges levied in 200607 tax year that were a lien on the listed real property. Property upon which a nuisance abatement lien has been recorded shall be subject to sale if the taxes remain unpaid after three years. The name of the assessee and the total, which was due on June 30, 2007 for the 200607 tax years, is shown opposite the parcel number. Tax defaulted real property may be redeemed by payment of all unpaid taxes and assessments, together with the additional penalties and fees, as prescribed by law, or it may be paid under an installment plan of redemption. If the 2006-07 taxes remain unpaid on non-residential property after June 30, 2010, the property will be subject to sale at public auction in 2011. All other residential property remains unpaid after June 20, 2012, will be subject to sale at public auction in 2013. All information concerning redemption of tax-defaulted property will be furnished, upon request, by Mark J. Saladino, Treasurer and Tax Collector, 225 North Hill Street, First Floor, Los Angeles, California 90012, 1-(888) 807-2111 or 1-(213) 9742111. I certify, under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct. Executed at Los Angeles, California on August 13, 2009.

MARK J. SALADINO TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES STATE OF CALIFORNIA Assessees/taxpayers, who have disposed of real property since January 1, 2006, may find their names listed for the reason that a change in ownership has not been reflected on the assessment roll.

madison hotel Clean furnished single rooms. 24-hour desk clerk service. •Daily, $25.00 •Weekly, $99.00 •Monthly, $295.00 (213) 622-1508 423 East 7th St.

(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.)


August 31, 2009

ASSESSOR’S IDENTIFICATION NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION The Assessor’s Identification Number (AIN), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the Assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The Assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the Assessor’s Office. The following property tax defaulted on July 1, 2007, for the taxes, assessments, and other charges for the fiscal year 200607: LISTED BELOW ARE PROPERTIES THAT DEFAULTED IN 2007 FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND 0THER CHARGES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2006-2007. AMOUNT OF DELINQUENCY AS OF THIS PUBLICATION IS LISTED BELOW. BARAJAS,LUIS A SITUS 708 N WILTON PL LOS ANGELES CA 90038-4113 5535-014-003/ S2006-010 $23,572.61 CROCKETT,JAMES JR SITUS 742 N WILTON PL LOS ANGELES CA 90038-4146 5535-014010/S2005-010/S2005-020/ S2006-010 $26,705.76 CRUZ,CARLOS R AND DIAZ,ESTER SITUS 1222 N HOBART BLVD LOS ANGELES CA 90029-1110 5537-011-006 $11,385.96 D CRUZ,FUSAKO SITUS 572 N VIRGIL AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90004-2320 5539-029-033 $2,436.00 EGBASE,VICTORIA SITUS 800 W 1ST ST APT 1308 LOS ANGELES CA 90012-2421 5151-027-087 $1,675.02 FARNSWORTH,SHAWN SI-

Downtown News 19

DowntownNews.com TUS 654 N NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 900042113 5538-027-002 $5,315.30 SITUS 4224 MELROSE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-3531 5538-027-003 $10,081.19 SITUS 4216 MELROSE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-3509 5538-027-004 $3,889.32 FCS MANAGEMENT COMPANY ET AL FASACK INVESTMENTS LLC SITUS 849 N MARIPOSA AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-3472 5538-004017 $9,280.39 FLECK AND ASSOC SITUS 675 N KENMORE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90004-2109 5538-031-013 $12,802.69 INTERNATIONAL MOTORS AND MERCHANDISING INC SITUS 531 N HOOVER ST LOS ANGELES CA 90004-2308 5539-028-010 $18,089.27 JEHAN,OAISER AND BURKNER,JENNIFER SITUS 880 W 1ST ST NO 216 LOS ANGELES CA 90012-2417 5151016-037 $26,845.26 JUAREZ,ARTEMIO AND BONILLA,REINA I SITUS 1117 N KENMORE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-1503 5540009-010/S2005-020/S2006-020 $28,074.48 KOSTANDYAN,KARINE SITUS 742 N EDGEMONT ST LOS ANGELES CA 90029-2506 5538-016-008 $32,187.13 MALDONADO,JUAN J AND

ORELLANA,DELSI SITUS 1000 N NORMANDIE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-3845 5538003-015/S2005-010 $11,616.32 MIKHAIL,ADEL AND ROSE SITUS 864 N MADISON AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-2837 5539-011-011 $6,329.15 NETSUKSAI,SONGYOT SITUS 714 N KENMORE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 900292508 5538-015-011/S2006-010 $28,937.06 NOCUM,BLESILDA SITUS 1115 N NORMANDIE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-1417 5537-017-021 $31,820.94 OKOJIE,LGWUADE B SITUS 880 W 1ST ST NO 314 LOS ANGELES CA 90012-2430 5151016-051 $27,292.50 POPESCU,SIMION SITUS 1225 N KENMORE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-1505 5540-007-015 $1,648.51 PRUDENCIO,ARTURO M SITUS 766 N KENMORE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-2508 5538-015-002 $25,860.89 PRUDENCIO,RAUL O SITUS 1033 N MARIPOSA AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-2409 5538-001-021/S2005-010 $97.48 RAINBOLT,LEROY SITUS 4333 NORMAL AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-2704 5539-010-012 $3,948.02 REYES PROPERTIES LLC SITUS 807 N KINGSLEY DR

LOS ANGELES CA 900293377 5535-034-013/S2005-010/ S2006-010 $1,087.35 SITUS 902 N MARIPOSA AVE LOS ANGELES CA 900294603 5538-006-003/S2006-010 $1,754.40 SITUS 542 N JUANITA AVE LOS ANGELES CA 900042280 5539-032-036/S2005-010/ S2006-010 $13,609.53 ROSENFELD,MARY L SITUS 800 W 1ST ST APT 2709 LOS ANGELES CA 90012-2436 5151-027-219/S2005-010/ S2006-010 $3,397.38 SRI RATANA INTERNATIONAL BUDDHIST CENTER SITUS 804 N NORMANDIE AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-3415 5538-005-013 $17,634.80 US BANK NATIONAL ASSN TR WMALT SERIES 2006 AR7 TRUST SITUS 832 N MARIPOSA AVE LOS ANGELES CA 90029-3405 5538-007-012/ S2006-010 $45,927.90 WHITE,SYLVIA K SITUS 121 S HOPE ST APT 0331 LOS ANGELES CA 90012-5017 5151002-092 $14,153.55 CN824723 553 Aug 24,31, 2009

This is a Notice to the Patients of Dr. Myron Teitelbaum, now deceased, that medical records for his patients are currently being stored. You may contact Marianne O’Donnell at the address below to obtain your medical records. M. Teitelbaum M.D. 6230-A Wilshire Blvd., Suite #1762 Los Angeles, CA 90048-5126 Pub. 8/24, 8/31, 9/7/09 PETITION FOR CUSTODY & SUPPORT SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF ORANGE LAMOREAUX JUSTICE CENTER PLAINTIFF: DARLA JEAN SEBASTIAN-ARANDA vs. DEFENDANT: RAMON CRISTOBAL ARANDA SUMMONS CASE NO. 09P000612 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: RAMON CRISTOBALARANDA

YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PETITIONER: DARLA JEAN SEBASTIAN-ARANDA AN INDIVIDUAL You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and Petition To Establish Parental Relationship or Response to Petition for Custody and Support of Minor Children at the court and serve a copy on the Petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more Information at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp) your county law library or the courthouse nearest you. If you do not know an attorney you may call an

attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org) the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) or by contracting your local court or county bar association. The name and address of the court is: Lamoreaux - Orange County Superior Court 341 The City Center Drive Post Office Box 14170 Orange CA 92863-1570. The name address and telephone number of petitioner’s attorney or petitioner without an attorney is: Joseph Robert Terrazas III SBN 258404 The Law Office Of Joseph Robert Terrazas III 444 West 10th St., Suite 200 Santa Ana CA 92701 (714) 543-1851 Date: May 11, 2009 Alan Carlson Clerk, by Victoria L. Do, Deputy. Pub. 8/24, 8/31, 9/7, 9/14/09

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO FORMER PATIENTS OF DR. MYRON TEITELBAUM:

Free Rent! ELEGANT WORLD CLASS RESORT BRAND NEW APARTMENT HOMES

Orsini

IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY! studios from $1,685* • 1 bedroom from $1,818* • 2 bedroom from $2,212* *Availability and prices are subject to change at any time.

I c o n i c B e au t y S e e k s S t y l i s h M at e

The Alexandria

• Lavish Fountains and Sculptures • Free Tanning Rooms • Concierge Service • 24 Hour Doorman • 24/7 On-site Management • Free DSL Computer Use Available • Free Wi-Fi • Magnificent City Views • On-Site Private Resident Park with Sand Volleyball Court, Workout Stations, BBQ’s and Jogging Track

• Brunswick Four Lane Virtual Bowling • Full Swing Virtual Golf • 3100 Square Foot Cybex Fitness Facility • Massage Room, Sauna and Steam Room • Rooftop Pools with Dressing Room • Free Abundant Gated and Garage Parking • Business Center, Conference Room • Directors Screening Room

at 501 S. Spring St.

is Now Leasing! On-site laundry, free utilities, indiv. bathrooms, 24 hr. security & pet friendly. Free Internet. Close to metro, restaurants, farmers market & supermarket. Units starting at

$775/month

UNITS FEATURE: Private Washer and Dryer • Fully Equipped Gourmet Kitchens Maple European Style Cabinetry • Granite Counter Tops Natural Stone Marble Counter Baths

Sept. Move In Special: ½ Off 1st & 2nd Month’s Rent income & other restrictions apply. Must move-in by Sept. 30

Call 213.626.1743 or stop by for a tour

Available Immediately Top floor of 11 story (18,000 SF) historic building available now! Perfect for corporate hqtrs. Features separate executive suite(s). Stunning views of LA two blocks away from Staples Center and across the street from the new LA Live complex. The building also has approx 4,000 sq ft of beautiful contiguous space and some small offices available. These spaces can be viewed by appointment. Information available to qualified prospective tenants. Email request to mdavis@shammasgroup.com or call (213) 746-6300

NOW LEASING

FROM $1,300’s/Mo. Free Parking ROOFTOP GARDEN RETREAT WITH BBQ AND LOUNGE • GRAND LOBBY FITNESS CENTER • SPA • MODERN KITCHEN WITH CAESAR COUNTERTOPS HIGH SPEED INTERNET • DESIGNER LIVING SPACES • PET FRIENDLY DRAMATIC VIEWS • WALKING DISTANCE TO RALPHS SUPERMARKET STAINLESS APPLIANCES INCLUDING REFRIGERATOR GATEWAY TO FASHION DISTRICT GROUND FLOOR DRY CLEANERS • KELLY’S COFFEE

Orsini

756 S. Broadway • Downtown Los Angeles

Includes utilities, basic cable channels, laundry room on site. Gated building in a good area. 208 W. 14th St. at Hill St. Downtown LA

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For English Call Pierre or Terri

8 7 7 -213.744.9911 4 L A- LO F TS Visit us online at www.LoftLivingLA.com

For Spanish Call Susana

Guess where Drew prefers to 213.749.0306 eat Mexican food and WIN!

Established 1984

For sale: bunker Hill Tower ❏ 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath. Elegant. Ready To Move In. South City Lights View. Recently Refurbished. Offered At $315,000.

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Luxury Rooms in Downtown

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e-mail us: Info@bunkerhillrealestate.com Guess where Nicole loves Guess One of Elicia’s Favorite www.Bunkerhillrealestate.com to eat sushi and WIN! Cafe Hang-Outs and WIN!

Monthly Rents Start at $780 1 & 2 Rooms Available

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DRE #01706351

Unfurnished bachelor rooms with shared bath at $550/mo. with private bath $695/mo.

Bunker Hill Real Estate Co, Inc.

877-267-5911

WWW.THEORSINI.COM

Living Outrageously For Today!®

DRE #01706351

DRE #01706351

Low Move in Special

Living Outrageously For Today!®

DRE #01706351

Pricing subject to change without notice.

DRE #01706351

Requesting Sub-bids from qualified MBE/WBE/ OBE subcontractors/ vendors for: RFP#1917 42’ Heavy Duty Trailer with specialty body Owner: City of Los Angeles Due:9/15/09@1:00pm For information on plans and specifications, and subcontractor assistance, please contact our office. Gerling and Associates 138 Stelzer Ct. Sunbury, Ohio, 43074 Tele: 740-965-2888 Fax: 740-965-5076 Contact: Algy Arnold

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20 Downtown News

August 31, 2009

DowntownNews.com photo by Gary Leonard

We Got Games The Sparks Catch Fire While the Dodgers Lose Steam Los Angeles Dodgers Dodger Stadium, 1000 Elysian Park Ave., (213) 224-1400 or dodgers.mlb.com. Aug. 31-Sept. 5, 7:10 p.m.; Sept. 6, 5:10 p.m.: Who would have predicted such problems just a few months ago? The Dodgers’ mega-lead in the NL West has dissipated, and both Colorado and San Francisco are within striking distance. That makes this week’s homestand key in the effort to secure a post-season slot. It starts against the Arizona Diamondbacks. Young arm Clayton Kershaw will get the ball once in this series, and skipper Joe Torre must be banking on the hurler to bounce back from two tough starts in a row. After the D’Backs, the Blue Crew hosts the San Diego Padres. Both teams are also-rans this year, and if the Dodgers are to re-pad the lead, this is the week.

Los Angeles Sparks Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 929-1300 or wnba.com/sparks. Sept. 1, 7:30 p.m.: Think of the Sparks as the anti-Dodgers. After a woeful first two-thirds of the season, the team has had a rapid rise in the Western Conference, recently rattling off six wins in a row and climbing into third place. With only five games left in the regular season, the Sparks now seem a lock for the playoffs, only weeks after their chances looked grim. They face a real test this week with the Eastern Conference’s number two ranked team, the Atlanta Dream, coming to town. Then on Saturday (Aug. 5), the Sparks go to San Antonio to take on the fourth-place Silver Stars. Lisa Leslie and company look to have put things together. —Ryan Vaillancourt

Dodger pitcher Clayton Kershaw has hit a rough patch. The Blue Crew needs him to bounce back this week against Arizona.

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Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

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08-31-09