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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS August 2, 2010

Volume 39, Number 31

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Urban Scrawl on the X Games.

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A courthouse swap, a night out, and other happenings Around Town. Chinatown launches a nighttime series, with a little help from the CRA.

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Dick Van Dyke appears Downtown.

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BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF

INSIDE

Dogs rule!

Special Section Starts on Page 1 1 BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF

The Civic Park’s master builder.

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The New Cheese Wiz A South Park At Mac & Cheeza, Everything Revolves Watermarke Around a Single Dish by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

All the latest Health news.

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The 3 on 3 b-ball tournament returns.

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Five great entertainment options.

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30 CALENDAR LISTINGS 32 MAP 33 CLASSIFIEDS

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arkin Mackey and Joshua McBride don’t make macaroni and cheese like your mother made it. Nor do they make it like Kraft, which turned the dish into a simple-to-prepare American classic in the 1930s when they put it in a box and called it Kraft Dinner. Instead Mackey, the chef, and McBride, the PR and business mind, have turned the old concept of the meal on its head. In their restaurant Mac & Cheeza, which opened in February on the ground floor of the photo by Gary Leonard Chapman Building at Larkin Mackey (on bike) and Joshua McBride at Mac Eighth and Broadway, & Cheeza. The restaurant that opened four months they reveal what the ago is dedicated to letting customers customize their humble dish is really ca- macaroni and cheese. pable of becoming. “People have done mac more like an ice cream parlor, where and cheese at restaurants before, but customers pick their flavor and add this is the first totally customizable toppings. In Mac & Cheeza’s case, mac and cheese restaurant where they start with a size (Baby Mac, you get to pick what goes in it,” said Momma Mac or Daddy Mac), then Mackey, a talkative chef who left his select the type of noodle, which can office job at a children’s hospital to be the regular or rice varieties. That pursue his love of cooking. is followed by a choice of cheese, To wit, the 400-square-foot space either Mackey’s three-cheese secret functions less like a restaurant and see Mac & Cheeza, page 10

Luxury Tower Sees Life After Beginning As a Meruelo Maddux Project by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

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itting on the seventh floor terrace of the new Watermarke Tower, a luxury apartment building at Ninth and Flower streets that sold for $110 million this year, one can’t help but be impressed by the views. Looking south from a row of lounge chairs on the east side of the terrace, there’s a long view down Flower Street. The north side affords a mostly unobstructed view of the towers of the Financial District. From

the southern portion of the terrace, near the 100-foot infinity pool, there are site lines not only in the direction of L.A. Live, but also of the Santa Monica Mountains to the west. But the most impressive direction may be straight up. With a craned neck, squinting at the sky, one can see up the top of the 35-story, aquacolored glass monolith. It is the tallest purely residential tower in Downtown Los Angeles. Named after the company that acquired the building in April, see Watermarke, page 6

photo by Gary Leonard

Watermarke Properties director of acquisitions Peter DiLello oversaw the company’s $110 million purchase of the former Meruelo Maddux tower at Ninth and Flower streets.

The Voice of Downtown Los Angeles


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AROUNDTOWN National Night Out This Week

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owntown’s celebration of National Night Out, an annual event that aims to bring together community members and the police department, takes place in Chinatown on Tuesday, Aug. 3. As in years past, when the event has been held in locales such as Little Tokyo and El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, National Night Out will feature live music, food vendors and karate and boxing exhibitions. New to the party will be a police escorted bicycle tour of Downtown and an “Iron Chef” competition, said LAPD officer and event organizer Jack Richter. The free festival takes place in Chinatown’s Central Plaza, at 951 N. Broadway, from 6-10 p.m.

Dick Van Dyke Picks a Winner

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pring Street’s Bolt Barbers got a distinguished visitor last week, when Dick Van Dyke dropped by. On Monday, July 26, the legendary actor showed up to pick the first winner, a vacation worth $5,000, in a series of raffles benefiting the Midnight Mission. Another “early bird” drawing will be held Aug. 25, and in September the big prizes, including a BMW 750 or $65,000 in cash, will be handed out. The raffle, for which Downtown News is a co-sponsor, is an effort to help the mission at a time when it has more people seeking services yet fewer donations due to the economy. Tickets are $50 and can be purchased at winnerschoicemidnightmission.com or by calling (877) 338-2968.

City Looks at Parker CenterCourthouse Site Swap

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ity leaders are exploring the possibility of taking over a 3.6-acre Downtown site that currently sits empty in exchange for the already nearly vacated Parker Center. On Tuesday, July 27, the City Council approved a motion by Ninth District Councilwoman Jan Perry to consider a property exchange between the city and the federal government. The federal site, at the southwest corner of First and Broadway, is set aside for a courthouse, but the project has

been stalled since estimated costs ballooned to more than $1 billion — Congress had appropriated $314 million for the building. The LAPD recently vacated most of Parker Center as it moved into the Police Administration Building. The city Chief Legislative Analyst’s office will determine if the exchange would be in the city’s interest, and is expected to report back within 30 days.

Chinese Group Makes Play for Broad Museum Parcel

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Chinese group hoping to develop a 3,000-seat theater and performing arts academy on the parcel tabbed for philanthropist Eli Broad’s $100 million art museum is clamoring for local officials to more closely consider their proposal. At a press conference on Thursday, July 29, Shizhong Chen, a spokesman for the performing arts group Shen Yun, argued that since the Grand Avenue project as originally construed has changed, new developers should be allowed to bid on portions of the site. Broad’s museum, slated to rise on a parcel at Second Street and lower Grand Avenue, is part of the long-delayed $3 billion Grand Avenue plan. Ninth District Councilwoman Jan Perry recently told Downtown News that Grand Avenue plan developer Related Cos. maintains the authority to assign rights to portions of the plan. The museum was recently approved by the Community Redevelopment Agency. Chen said CRA officials suggested that they “build it in Chinatown,” which Chen called “insensitive,” and believes it will be a better fit in the heart of Downtown’s cultural district. Chen said the group has financing in place, but declined to discuss estimated costs of the project.

Police Arrest 13 in Crackdown At Seventh and Main

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APD officials last week arrested 13 men as part of an enforcement operation targeting drug sales at Seventh and Main streets. The arrests come in the wake of three recent shootings in the area that police suspected were tied to residents of the nearby Huntington Hotel — a link that is

TWO HOT!

photo by Gary Leonard

Dick Van Dyke dropped by Bolt Barbers on July 26 to pick a winner for the Midnight Mission’s raffle. See story this page.

now called into question as none of the suspects lived in the building. Intelligence from gang and narcotics officers investigating the May 19, May 20 and July 4 shootings pointed to new groups of drug dealers coming into the area and vying for control, said Lt. Paul Vernon in a statement. Early on Tuesday, July 27, police fanned out on the sidewalks near the hotel at 752 S. Main St., where drug dealing is common. Undercover officers watched dealers and made buys, leading to the arrest of three men: Kyle Smith, 20, of Long Beach; Deondre Washington, 29, who claimed to be homeless; and Charles Madison, 63, of South Los Angeles. Once the dealers were arrested, undercover detectives moved in and began selling fake drugs, resulting in the arrest of seven men, five of whom were on parole or probation for prior convictions.

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EDITORIALS Pets and the Public Good

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his page has repeatedly touted the benefits of both privately owned and operated spaces that are used for public good, and the way that pets, in particular dogs, can help ignite street life and create a sense of community. The Dog Day Afternoon gathering, which took place on the evening of Tuesday, Aug. 27, clicked on both counts. The free event put together by officials from the Downtown Center Business Improvement District and the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels (where it was held) pulled in more than 1,000 people and 500 dogs. A nice thing about the happening is that there was no agenda beyond bringing people and pets together, and orchestrating a public gathering in a private space. Instead of a

long program with self-serving speakers, it was an opportunity for people to meet their neighbors. It worked perfectly, luring a crosssection of Downtown Los Angeles residents and workers. Strangers talked while their dogs played, and children ambled about, approaching pets (there was even a small cage of cats for adoption) and providing another conversational spark. These are the type of happenings people generally expect governmental agencies to orchestrate. In this case, however, it was the business group and the cathedral. It is especially gratifying to see the Los Angeles Archdiocese continue to live up to a pledge it made before the cathedral opened: that it would be a gathering point not just for

Catholics, but all Angelenos. With the traditional Shakespeare show not happening at the Cathedral plaza this summer due to the production group’s reorganization and budget issues, this may be one of the few times this year that non-Catholics think to enter the plaza or the building. This type of activity, where nonprofits or businesses seek to lure the public for a community event with limited profit potential, is happening with increasing frequency in Downtown. This week Anschutz Entertainment Group will turn the area around Staples Center into a public gathering point as it hosts a three-on-three basketball tournament. Last year about 15,000 people attended the event, and with more entrants, organizers said crowds could hit 25,000 this year. Other entities are pulling in the public with more traditional cultural offerings. Brookfield Properties, one of Downtown’s biggest land-

owners, with several office high-rises and an outdoor mall in its portfolio, has scheduled an impressive lineup of free concerts and arts programs. This activity occurs in tandem with other longtime providers of community friendly events, such as the concerts staged at Cal Plaza by the organization Grand Performances, and the music, film and festival lineup at Pershing Square run by the city Department of Recreation and Parks. The list goes on. We hope the private entities keep doing what they are doing, and that others join them. Big-ticket festivities are not always needed. Sometimes the only thing required to bring a community together is a reason. Dogs on a warm summer evening at the cathedral were a great one. The more activities that are in the mix, the better it is for Downtown.

Chinatown Disappointment

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t the close of the 1974 Roman Polanski film Chinatown, private eye Jake Gittes is pulled away from a tragedy, stunned by what he just saw. A friend, referencing the unpredictability and dark machinations of a neighborhood, tries to explain it all away with, “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown.” There’s nothing quite as ominous in what transpired with Chinatown’s widely anticipated Blossom Plaza, but community stakeholders could be forgiven for feeling the same way as Gittes. A sure-thing project that should have benefited the community, and should have erased a huge blighted plot, has instead dissipated into so much smoke. The turmoil unfolded in front of everyone’s eyes. The result is that Chinatown is essentially back at square one when it comes to activating the key parcel that runs between North Broadway and the Gold Line station and fronts College Street. Although city officials are trying to put the best face possible on the situation, the fact is that with the economic malaise, there probably will not be any construction at the site for several years at the soonest. All of which means that Chinatown will continue to suffer, and a dead building will stand ugly at a key intersection. We’re not quite sure what lessons there are in the fate of

Blossom Plaza, which Los Angeles Downtown News reported on last week. Clearly city officials erred in picking developer the Bond Companies for the $165 million project; the firm’s inability to move quickly enough to secure financing doomed the project, which ultimately fell into foreclosure. Then again, others have faced trouble in similar situations — Related Cos. has yet to be able to move forward on the $3 billion Grand Avenue development. The big difference, of course, is that Related still controls its site. At Blossom Plaza, the Community Redevelopment Agency recently approved allocating $3.3 million toward the $9 million purchase of the 1.9-acre plot. The acquisition from Prime Property Fund, a lender which foreclosed on the site in June 2009, is expected within several weeks, according to a CRA official. Blossom Plaza was supposed to create two towers with 262 residential units, 20% of them reserved for affordable housing. City Councilman Ed Reyes, whose First District includes the site, was on board with the project, which also would have held a 372-car garage and a 17,500-square-foot plaza to be used for public events. Perhaps most importantly, the project would have razed the former Italian restaurant Little Joe’s, which has been

closed for a dozen years. The development would have connected the heart of Broadway with the Gold Line station, paying off for local businesses and giving the community a new eastern entrance. Now, the CRA is preparing another public bidding process. The selling point this time is that entitlements have been secured, meaning any developer who follows the footprint of the Bond Companies might have a relatively easy time. Then again, that could be a red herring, as developers will have their own ideas on what will pencil out and what sort of project will entice lenders — if the banks said no to Blossom Plaza not too long ago, they probably are not ready to fund a similar project now. The bad news is that Chinatown will continue to suffer. As one official pointed out to Downtown News, the community largely missed the residential wave that Downtown enjoyed over the past decade (though a few projects have arrived). Even worse, the eyesore of Little Joe’s is unlikely to be torn down until a new developer is selected. The community should be disappointed over the fate of Blossom Plaza. We hope there is a forward-thinking plan to do things right next time, to act quickly, and not to accept the old excuse of, “It’s Chinatown.”

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com • email: realpeople@downtownnews.com facebook: L.A. Downtown News

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Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: David Friedman, Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Jay Berman, Jeff Favre, Michael X. Ferraro, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins ProductioN AssistANt / EvENt coordiNAtor: Claudia Hernandez PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Steve Epstein, Catherine Holloway, Tam Nguyen, Kelley Smith, Brenda Stevens circulAtioN: Norma Rodas distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

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Downtown Dog Daze Photos by Gary Leonard

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hey came. They sniffed. They barked. And they did a lot of other things at the fourth annual Dog Day Afternoon on Tuesday, July 27. The event at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels lured 1,017 people and 537 dogs, according to Hal Bastian, who organized the event with the Cathedral’s Monsignor Kevin Kostelnik (Scooter and Joaquin, their respective canine companions, were cohosts). The pets came in all shapes, sizes and colors, from pint-sized Chihuahuas to an immense Great Pyrenees named Bernie. Over three hours, the pets mingled, ate, drank and got to know their neighbors. So did the people.

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Watermarke Continued from page 1 Corona-based Watermarke Properties, the 214-unit building began leasing in May. It has since filled about 40 units, said Peter DiLello, the company’s director of acquisitions. In addition to the South Park structure, the company, which considers itself a regional investment firm that buys and holds multifamily properties for the long term, owns two Koreatown complexes. Its other assets are scattered from Sacramento to Riverside to Anaheim, with one project in Phoenix, Ariz. Watermarke, which was founded in 2007 by a family DiLello declined to identify, also owns a handful of Southern California office and industrial facilities. In a way, the Downtown tower is an unlikely addition to the portfolio. The project began as an ambitious effort from veteran Downtown landowner and developer Meruelo Maddux, which was forced to sell the building just weeks after completing it due to financial troubles. Meruelo Maddux is now wading through Chapter 11 bankruptcy. With the acquisition and some upgrades complete, the building has become a point of pride for the new owner. “The Watermarke Tower is our marquee property,” DiLello said. “Without question.” Hot Corner If the Watermarke Tower marks the company’s first investment Downtown, it may not be the last. DiLello said the firm is interested in acquiring additional Downtown properties, even if it was not initially sold on the area. “When we first came here, it took a lot of time for us to sit down at the corner in the lobby just watching the people go by, walking to the Financial District, to FIDM, to Ralphs, to all the events at Staples Center and L.A.

Twitter/DowntownNews Live,” he said. “Then we saw, you know what, there’s definitely a pulse on that corner.” Ninth and Flower is a sort of microcosm of South Park’s development over the decades. On the southwest corner of the intersection, directly across from Watermarke, is Astani Enterprises’ sleek Concerto complex, the first phase of which opened late last year. Although the second phase, a 30-story tower, is nearing completion, its opening date is unknown, as Astani is embroiled in financial uncertainties due to issues with the project’s loan. On the northeast corner is the Ralphs Fresh Fare grocery store in the Market Lofts building, among the community’s most catalytic projects. The southeast corner holds the Skyline Condominiums, built in 1983 and a reminder of the neighborhood’s residential beginning, said Mike Pfeiffer, executive director of the South Park Stakeholders Group. The Watermarke drew attention long before its acquisition. It was developed by Meruelo Maddux as condos under the moniker 705 W. Ninth. Like a host of other Downtown residential projects, it switched to rentals amid a changing economy that cramped down on credit markets and eviscerated buyer pools. Unlike some developers who have stated plans to turn rental buildings back into for-sale projects once the market recovers, Watermarke sees the building as a long-time apartment complex — indeed, the company has a minimum 10-year hold policy on all its purchases. That strategy is largely what led the company to invest $110 million — plus an undisclosed amount on ongoing renovations and upgrades to the lobby and other common areas — amid a recession that has otherwise put a stranglehold on most development. After all, experts don’t have the brightest near-term expectations for the Downtown rental market. Though its findings were contested by a host of area real estate investors, an April study by the USC Lusk Center

for Real Estate predicted that rents in Los Angeles County apartments would decline by an average of 3.5% this year. In 2009, Downtown rental rates plunged by 9.9%. “It is our position that it is going to be a very slow climb out of this recession but we’re certain there will be a recovery,” DiLello said. “We can kind of weather the storm for the next 24 to 36 months, and that’s when this works out for us.” If the $110 million price tag seems steep, the company sees it as a bargain. Their analysis suggested that the acquisition price is less than it would cost to build the project now. Meruelo Maddux court documents indicate that the company spent $150 million to construct the tower. Boutique Apartments Being surrounded by mostly for-sale projects also represents an opportunity for Watermarke as a rental property, said DiLello. There are other rental options nearby, including The Met Apartments, but perhaps the most obvious competitor is the Hanover Company’s 717 Olympic two blocks away. Both properties are targeting a high-end clientele. Lease rates at the Watermarke average about $3 per square foot. Units range from 862-1,546 square feet and rent for $2,390 to $5,070. Four two-level penthouses go for $15,000 per month. All units are equipped with wood floors, stone countertops, stainless steel appliances and luxury bathroom finishes. Each apartment offers floor-to-ceiling windows: Aqua and opaque from the outside, the glass is a clean, neutral color inside. The project holds one- and two-bedroom units; all of the latter feature balconies, while the former have windows that open slightly to circulate fresh air. The one-bedrooms also have a portion of the unit jut out of the building façade, creating an indoor balcony effect. The tower rises above a six-level concrete

August 2, 2010

photo by Gary Leonard

The 35-story structure is the tallest purely residential tower in Downtown Los Angeles.

podium that encases a 357-space parking garage, equipped with a valet service. The common area known as Level Seven is the jewel of the building’s amenities. The outdoor space includes a pool and hot tub, barbecue grills and a terraced “serenity garden” of native plants. The garden functions as a water percolation system for storm runoff. Inside on the same floor is a cardio workout room (weightlifting equipment is in its own room in the basement), a common dining area and a lounge with televisions. “Our goal is to operate somewhere between a boutique hotel and the highest quality residential living,” DiLello said. As the company finalizes some physical upgrades to the lobby and the seventh floor common spaces, it is leasing at a clip of about 20 units per month. “This is a good addition to the inventory in Downtown Los Angeles,” Pfeiffer said. “I have high hopes it’ll be filled and be running fine.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.


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The Civic Park’s Master Builder Pankow Takes on the $56 Million Park, Partly Because the Project Is So Tricky staff wRiteR

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s crews broke ground on the $56 million Grand Avenue Civic Park on July 12, they hustled first to ready a secure perimeter that will keep the public out for the next 22 months. Behind the concrete barriers and inside the plywood walls, a small army of subcontractors is building the vision for the 12.5-acre attraction. Handing out the marching orders is Charles Pankow Builders, the Pasadenabased general contractor that won the competitive bidding process to lead the job. The 47-year-old company faces the challenges of creating something for seemingly everyone: The park designed by Rios Clementi Hale Studios features lawns, performance spaces, seating areas, walking paths, vegetation, an upgraded fountain and even a dog park. Then there are the complicating factors, chief among them fixing a garage entrance that has been a scourge of Bunker Hill for decades. Also part of the equation are the logistical challenges of making sure the work does not impact the daily schedules of the County Hall of Administration, immediately west of the project site, or the courthouse on the east. In other words, it’s a difficult task. But it’s par for the course for Pankow, whose calling card is solving complex engineering, construction-related and planning puzzles. “I believe that’s why we got this job,” said

William “Red” Ward, the project superintendent. Ward may only be partially right. Pankow won the Civic Park contract in a close contest with three other builders: Matt Construction, Hathaway Dinwiddie Construction Company and Swinerton Builders, said Barry Widen, vice president of construction for Related. “They were all very enthusiastic about the project,” Widen said. “Since they are four good quality contractors, there wasn’t a large margin between the four bidders, but we selected Pankow because of their team and because of their fee and general conditions.” Pankow’s successful bid may have come down to the personnel they attached to their proposal, including Ward, who Widen called an “extremely experienced, highly regarded superintendent in the industry.” “They all had about the same staff,” Widen said. “But the quality of the people Pankow proposed for this project, some of the key people were A+ players.” Bring on ‘The Muncher’ The existing park, due to re-open in May 2012, has what many observers of the space consider to be some glaring design flaws, none more head-scratching than the two giant spiraling parking ramp entrances on Grand Avenue that lead to an underground garage. The upper walls of the ramps largely obscure site lines of the park, even blocking the space’s crown jewel — the 1960s-era

photo by Gary Leonard

Rick Stupin, Red Ward and Jack Mollenkopf in the Bunker Hill offices of Charles Pankow Builders. Ward calls it his war room, where he has mapped out the schedule for constructing the $56 million Civic Park.

Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain. Passersby on Grand Avenue could be forgiven for not knowing that a park even exists. While the design process generated debates over how best to use or alter the space, the decision to demolish the upper levels of the ramps was an easy one. Realizing that change, along with a handful of other infrastructure improvements, will be the hard part. The project will involve cutting out the upper layer of the ramps, using a piece of industrial machinery that Ward refers to as “the muncher,” and connecting the lower levels with new ramps that will access them from the sides. Ward, who has helmed Pankow jobs all over California and in Hawaii — the firm has an office in Honolulu — has been devising the Civic Park schedule since the firm won the contract in January.

That timeline is nearly as complex as some of the individual jobs themselves, since Pankow will have to manage up to 30 subcontractors; those firms account for about 75% of the construction costs, Widen said. Overseeing those firms involves an array of pre-development activities, such as ensuring that their contracts include 30% local hiring covenants required by the city and county. During a recent visit to the project’s planning headquarters, situated in Pankow’s Downtown offices at One California Plaza, three dry-erase boards were covered in notes depicting the next three weeks worth of tasks. Days were listed in columns, and the contractor responsible for the job was named in the corresponding row. Managers for each sub-contractor with work to do that week gather in the office for progress briefings every Thursday. “I call it my war room,” Ward said.

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Downtown News 9

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On the Job in Downtown A Roster of Pankow’s Central City Projects The $56 million Civic Park is not the first Central City task for Pasadena-based Charles Pankow Builders. In fact, the 47-year-old firm has been active in Downtown for more than two decades, working on everything from residential to cultural to medical projects. Project Name

Date of Completion

Client

Brief Description

Civic Park

2012

LACCD District Educational Services Center Renovation

2011

Grand Avenue Park Development LLC Los Angeles Community College District

12.5-acre park is part of Grand Avenue plan Approximately 79,000 SF tenant improvement

7th & Figueroa Retaining Wall

2009

Maguire Properties

New retaining wall

Suede Bar & Lounge

2008

VG Entertainment

Washington Building (311 S. Spring St.)

2008

La Canada Properties

Eastern Columbia

2007

Kor Group

Bar and Lounge in the lobby of the Westin Bonaventure Hotel Common area upgrade and water damage repair Conversion to condominium tower; parking structure

Los Angeles Theater Center Renovation

2006

Latino Theatre Company

Renovation of historical theater building

White Memorial Medical Center Specialty Care Tower White Memorial Medical Center MOB & Parking Structure

2006

White Memorial Medical Center

2005

White Memorial Medical Center

Union Station Building One

2004

Catellus Urban Construction, Inc.

177-bed, seven-story replacement hospital 90,000 SF medical office building and 507car subterranean parking garage 55,000 SF office building; tenant improvements for First 5 LA

Metropolitan Water District Headquarters Building California Garment Mart (now called California Market Center)

1998

Alliance Property Group, Developer/ Metropolitan Water District, Owner

800,000 SF, 12-story building

1996

Equitable Life

Renovation of lobby space, fashion theater and Buyer’s Club totaling 63,100 SF

Gateway Center

1995

Catellus, Developer/Metropolitan Transit Authority, Owner

28-story MTA headquarters bldg, 3,300car subterranean parking structure, entry portal to Union Station, 120,000 SF bus plaza

Chase Plaza (801 S. Grand Ave., now called Sky)

1986

Grand Financial Associates, Ltd.

470,000 SF, 22-story office building and seven-story parking structure

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The war room will move over to a trailer at the job site as soon as crews finish securing the park (expected imminently). Adding Value While there are some notable engineering and construction challenges — the ramp demolition, gutting and replacing old plumbing beneath the fountain — the park’s main test is one of logistics. For a firm that specializes in large-scale, complicated developments, the park is not one of its most daunting, at least from an engineering or construction perspective, said Mike Helton, president of Pankow Special Projects. The complicating factor centers on the neighbors: government buildings, all of them crucial gears in the Los Angeles municipal machine, surround the park site. That means Pankow must tear down and build new infrastructure without jeopardizing public safety or interfering with work schedules. “This job is all about logistics,” Helton said. “Technically it’s not the hardest thing we’ve done, but logistically it takes a high degree of skill and experience to do it the right way and protect the public. It’d be easy if we could just shut it down for a year and go knock it out, but that doesn’t work.” Pankow, which brings in about $350 million in annual revenue, has a long history Downtown, dating back to 1986 when it built Chase Plaza (now the Sky building). The company helmed the conversion of the Eastern Colombia building into lofts, the Metropolitan Water District headquarters building and it renovated the Los Angeles Theatre Center in the Historic Core (see sidebar). Though it has offices in Oakland, San Francisco and Honolulu, the 220-employee company considers itself a Southern California firm, Helton said. Charles Pankow, who died in 2004, founded the company in 1963 in a garage in Altadena. Though the company’s projects span a wide categorical range, from civic to private, new construction to renovation, large job to small, every gig is similar in that they’re technically or logistically challenging. “The easier a project is, the less likely we can bring anything to the table that everyone else can’t,” Helton said. “The more complex a project is, the more opportunity we have to add value.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.


10 Downtown News

Mac & Cheeza Continued from page 1 mixture or a soy-based choice. Then comes the real fun, where diners become chefs by picking and choosing vegetables and meats. Toss-in options include collard greens, black olives, peas, ground beef, BBQ chicken, hot links, tuna and veggie sausage. The final step is the topping, either the house cheese blend or, for the vegans, spicy toasted walnuts. It’s all placed in a recyclable aluminum container and put in a conveyor oven, where it pops out on the other side with a crispy top. “Everybody loves mac and cheese,” remarks McBride, explaining the impetus to build a restaurant around a single dish. “I mean, seriously, who doesn’t love mac and cheese?” Noodle Art So far, a lot of people seem to love mac and cheese, and, for that matter, Mac & Cheeza. It has earned generally positive reviews on Yelp and the foodie website Eater LA. In an early review in the L.A. Weekly, Pulitzer Prize-winning food critic Jonathan Gold wrote, “Is this the mac ’n’ cheese of the future? It might be.” The restaurant offers neither tables nor chairs. Instead, a pair of padded benches and stools offer a place to “snack in.” Most customers pick up orders to go. A yellowish floor and white and yellow walls mix with brown columns and McBride’s noodle art, which hangs on the walls. A yellow and black sign bearing their logo of a wedge of cheese and a macaroni noodle hangs outside where their delivery vehicle, a yellow electric scooter with a basket attached to the back, is parked. “We wanted a really relaxed lounge, bench couches, stools, something simple, clean, with a yogurt shop feel but completely dif-

Twitter/DowntownNews ferent,” said McBride, a slim, tattooed former hair stylist. On a recent afternoon, Peter Molina was picking up a Daddy Mac portion for his family, which was visiting Los Angeles from Santa Barbara. Although an out-of-towner, Molina seemed to be a convert. “It’s our second time coming here before we leave, and it has been really good. We order it and take it back to our hotel,” Molina said. “We read about it online and it just seemed like such a cool place, so simple but really appealing.” Hands Off the Cheese Mac and Cheeza is not the first restaurant for Mackey and McBride, who are both business and life partners. In 2007 they opened Larkin’s Joint, a neo-soul food restaurant in a converted house in Eagle Rock. The idea for the Downtown space came about one day while they were chatting in the kitchen. “I thought, why doesn’t anybody throw other things in macaroni and cheese?” recalled Mackey. “You can put bacon, you can put just about anything. It’s like a pizza.” A week later they did a mac and cheese special at Larkin’s Joint. It was a hit, and inspired them to look at a standalone restaurant. When they shared their concept with Jessica Wethington McLean, executive director of City Councilman José Huizar’s Bringing Back Broadway initiative (Huizar’s territory also includes Eagle Rock), she argued that they should be in Downtown. “I thought this would be so great for Broadway,” she said. “It was an interesting and unusual concept. It felt very urban, very L.A.” It didn’t take much arm-twisting to get them Downtown. Mackey and McBride live in the neighborhood, and wanted to be part of the growth of the area. Recognizing the street life and the growing crowds at all hours, they operate seven days a week, staying open until 11 p.m. on weeknights and 2 a.m. on weekends.

August 2, 2010

photo by Gary Leonard

Mackey and McBride first gained a following with Larkin’s Joint, a soul food restaurant in Eagle Rock. They opened the Downtown restaurant after experimenting with macaroni and cheese choices at Larkin’s.

The recipes, meanwhile, are hybrid versions of those Mackey grew up with. The biggest change is that he incorporates fresher ingredients. “I’m a stickler for basic good ingredients: milk, butter, cheese,” he said. “Nothing that’s processed or full of chemicals.” The family tie runs strong in Mac & Cheeza. Mackey’s brother has opened a second location in Bakersfield, where Mackey grew up. And his mother, who first fed him macaroni and cheese, makes the desserts, which include peach cobbler, red velvet cake

and chocolate chip cookies. But she doesn’t have a hand in preparing the main dishes. “Not with my mac and cheese,” Mackey said with a smile. “She’s the dessert lady. I don’t touch the dessert, and she doesn’t touch my mac and cheese.” Mac & Cheeza is at 223 W. Eighth St., (213) 622-3782 or macandcheeza.com. Open Sunday-Thursday 11 a.m.-11p.m. and Friday and Saturday 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Contact Richard Guzman at richard@downtownnews.com.


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Readers Choice

The votes are in, and the winners are...

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12 Downtown News

Twitter/DowntownNews Best Of Downtown

August 2, 2010

• www.goodsam.org

Celebrating 125 Years: From Tradition To Tomorrow 1885-2010 Voted Best Hospital in Downtown Los Angeles 11 Years Running! Proudly serving patients with outstanding care that makes Good Samaritan Hospital One of America’s 50 Best Hospitals 4 years in a row (2007-2010) by HealthGrades. Good Samaritan Hospital is also a recipient of the following HealthGrades awards: • Joint Replacement Excellence Award – 3 Years in a Row • Stroke Care Excellence Award – 6 Years in a Row • Maternity Care Excellence Award – 4 Years in a Row • Women’s Health Excellence Award – 3 Years in a Row (2007/08-2009/10)

For a referral to some of our excellent doctors call 1-800-GS-CARES (1-800-472-2737)


August 2, 2010

New Residents, New Businesses and New Entertainment Options Mean a Change in the Best of Downtown by Jon RegaRdie executive editoR

ere’s the thing about a growing community: The more it expands and changes, the more you have to recognize and detail. That line of thinking reaches its apex when it comes to the Best of Downtown. Chronicling the crème de la crème in 2010 is completely different than noting what was tops in, say, 2000. A decade ago Downtown was just beginning its residential revolution. While there were plenty of things worth touting at that time, the area lacked the copious competitors that it now has in categories such as Best Restaurant and Best Bar Happy Hour. To commemorate that evolution, Los Angeles Downtown News has updated our annual collection of the Best of Downtown. For the first time, we’ve made the Best of Downtown a section inside a regular issue of Downtown News (after all, the news doesn’t stop just because we have a Best of issue). Additionally, we responded to the growing number of Downtown stakeholders; we let those who live, work or spend significant time here do most of the choosing.

Our online ballot this year contained 116 categories. Sure, that’s a lot, but as referenced above, there’s a lot happening. Considering the wealth of options, it makes sense for readers to pick things we could never have fathomed a short 10 years ago. Thus they chose Downtown’s Best Mac ‘n’ Cheese, Best Cupcakes and Best Farmers Market, among many others. Not everything is different. The Downtown News editorial staff also has a hand in the issue, picking 21 of our favorite, if eclectic, things about the community. A list of winners in categories including Most Jaw-Dropping Mural and Best Church Music begins on page 18. We don’t pretend that even this big list is complete. We also know plenty of people have other thoughts on what is the best in any number of categories. If you feel the need to write in, please do. Or suggest new bests to include next year. Actually, all this raises a question. If the Best of Downtown in 2010 is so much different than the best of 2000, then what will the best of 2020 look like? We can’t wait to find out. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.

They Came, They Voted, They Won A Big Turnout for the Best of Downtown, And Even Bigger Prizes

W

ith a ballot that was undeniably daunting, there was a question as to how many people would turn out. But turn out they did. Los Angeles Downtown News this year placed a mammoth 116 categories on our Best of Downtown readers’ ballot. In addition to such staples as Best New Restaurant, Best Hotel Bar and Best Hospital, we asked readers to speak out on new categories sparked by the turns Downtown has taken in the past several years. Thus they selected the Best Organic Foods Option and Best Scooter Dealer. And, perhaps as a sign of the economic times, they also voted for the Best Employment Agency. All told, 5,400 people signed up for the online voting. Even more impressive, the ballots were cast in a three-week period. In addition to selecting winners, some voters were winners themselves. We held random drawings of people who voted in at least 30 categories, and have come up with some hefty awards. The grand prize goes to Erica Hauck, who works for the Downtown engineering and consulting firm Psomas. She received a two-night stay at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel, dinner for two at Sai Sai, $200 cash, dinner for two at Morton’s The Steakhouse, a $150 Ticketmaster gift card and a Los Angeles Conservancy walking tour. Hauck was not the only person to benefit

photo by Gary Leonard

And Now for Something Completely Different

H

Downtown News 13

Best Of Downtown

Erica Hauck won the grand prize in the readers’ ballot drawing.

from the time she spent voting online. Lee Boylan won an iPhone, and Anne Samuelson Williams, Myrna Pietri and Laurent Newman will all receive $100. Additionally, Sara Jones and Lindsay Clark earned $50 gift certificates for Takami Sushi and Robata Restaurant, and Yolanda B. Salas walked away with a $25 Ciudad gift card. Susan Chesney pocketed a $20 gift certificate from Rowdy Red. Downtown News says a huge thank to all who voted. The Best of Downtown will return again next summer, and we’ll need the readers more than ever.

Dear Downtown News Readers,

THANKS!

For Voting Us The

cooLeST HoTeL + BeST HoTeL BAR in LA’s coolest and best hood...just sayin

550 SoUTH FLoweR AT 6TH STReeT STANDARDHoTeLS.com


14 Downtown News

August 2, 2010

Best Of Downtown

BEST EST EATING Readers Choice BEST NEW RESTAURANT Winner: Katsuya Runner-Up: Lazy Ox Canteen

Best Steakhouse T n’s rto o M

MOST ROMANTIC RESTAURANT Winner: Café Pinot Runner-Up: Cicada

he Steakhou

se

BEST OLD-SCHOOL RESTAURANT Winner: Philippe, The Original Runner-Up: The Original Pantry Café

BEST HOTEL RESTAURANT Winner: WP24 – Ritz Carlton Runner-Up: Checkers Downtown – Hilton Checkers BEST AFFORDABLE/MID-RANGE RESTAURANT Winner: Mendocino Farms Runner-Up: Casa BEST UPSCALE RESTAURANT Winner: Bottega Louie Restaurant & Market Runner-Up: Morton’s The Steakhouse BEST BUSINESS LUNCH Winner: Engine Co. No. 28 Runner-Up: Nick and Stef’s Steakhouse

photo courtesy of Morton’s The Steakhouse

BEST BARGAIN LUNCH Winner: Philippe, The Original Runner-Up: Mendocino Farms BEST BREAKFAST Winner: The Original Pantry Café Runner-Up: Nickel Diner BEST LUNCH Winner: Mendocino Farms Runner-Up: Casa

photo courtesy of Mendocino Farms

BEST L.A. LIVE RESTAURANT Winner: Yard House Runner-Up: Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar

BEST DINNER Winner: Bottega Louie Restaurant & Market Runner-Up: Morton’s The Steakhouse BEST AMERICAN Winner: Yard House Runner-Up: Pete’s Cafe and Bar BEST ASIAN FUSION Winner: Roy’s Hawaiian Fusion Cuisine Runner-Up: Katsuya BEST BBQ Winner: Original Texas Barbecue King Runner-Up: Spring St. Smoke House

Best Thai Cit

y T h ai

BEST CHINESE Winner: Yang Chow Runner-Up: Empress Pavilion BEST DIM SUM Winner: Empress Pavilion Runner-Up: ABC Seafood

Best Lunch ocino Farms nd e M

BEST PIZZA Winner: California Pizza Kitchen Runner-Up: Pitfire Pizza Company BEST SEAFOOD Winner: Water Grill Runner-Up: McCormick and Schmick’s BEST STEAKHOUSE Winner: Morton’s The Steakhouse Runner-Up: Nick and Stef’s Steakhouse pho to c our tesy of

BEST FRENCH Winner: Church and State Runner-Up: Café Pinot

Roy ’s

HEAD TO HEAD: BEST INDIAN Winner: Saffron Indian Cuisine Runner-Up: Gill’s Cuisine of India BEST LATIN/MEXICAN Winner: Ciudad Runner-Up: Casa

Best Asian Fusion

BEST ITALIAN Winner: Bottega Louie Restaurant & Market Runner-Up: Drago Centro BEST JAPANESE Winner: Shabu Shabu House Runner-Up: R23 photo by Gary

BEST MIDDLE EASTERN Winner: Lula Kabob Runner-Up: Kabab and More

BEST SUSHI Winner: Sushi Gen Runner-Up: R23 BEST THAI Winner: City Thai Runner-Up: Soi 7

Ro

aiia aw H y’s

n Fusion

Cu isin e

d nar Leo


August 2, 2010

Downtown News 15

Best Of Downtown

photo by Gary Leonard

photo courtesy of Cafe Pinot

BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF

Best Outdoor Dining r eO h T

Ca

Ca fé

BEST BURGER Winner: Original Tommy’s Runner-Up: Yard House

BEST ORGANIC OPTIONS Winner: Mendocino Farms Runner-Up: Urth Caffe

BEST MAC ‘N’ CHEESE Winner: Mac & Cheeza Runner-Up: Pete’s Cafe and Bar

BEST BRUNCH Winner: Bottega Louie Restaurant & Market Runner-Up: Checkers Downtown

BEST SANDWICH/WRAP Winner: Philippe, The Original Runner-Up: Mendocino Farms BEST CAFÉ Winner: Urth Caffe Runner-Up: Lost Souls Cafe BEST VEGETARIAN FRIENDLY RESTAURANT Winner: Bottega Louie Restaurant & Market Runner-Up: Blossom

fe Pinot

BEST FOOD COURT Winner: Grand Central Market Runner-Up: 7+FIG

BEST DOWNTOWN VIEW Winner: Takami Sushi & Robata Restaurant Runner-Up: L.A. Prime BEST RESTAURANT ATMOSPHERE Winner: Bottega Louie Restaurant & Market Runner-Up: Pete’s Cafe and Bar

Best Pizza C

a Pizza Ki tch rni o f en ali

BEST BAKERY/DESSERTS Winner: BabyCakes Runner-Up: Corner Bakery Café

BEST RESTAURANT DECOR Winner: Cicada Runner-Up: Takami Sushi & Robata Restaurant

BEST CUPCAKES Winner: BabyCakes Runner-Up: Big Man Bakes

BEST OUTDOOR DINING Winner: Cafe Pinot Runner-Up: Bonaventure Brewing Co.

BEST ICE CREAM/YOGURT Winner: Yogurtland Runner-Up: Cold Stone Creamery

BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF

THANK YOU, DOWNTOWN, FOR YOUR VOTE. WE’RE CELEBRATING THIS THURSDAY EVENING, JOIN US!

�U���� �OA�T THURSDAY, AUGUST 5 | 5-8PM

Enjoy tender roasted lamb, gourmet sides and excellent wine pairings served al fresco! Bring your picnic blankets and spend a summer evening under the olive trees in Maguire Gardens adjacent to Café Pinot. $25 per person* Wine, cocktails and beer available for purchase RSVP to 213 239 6500 Save the Date for our upcoming Summer Roasts August 19 & September 2.

Thank you Downtown LA VOTED BEST BUSINESS LUNCH RESTAURANT

700 W. Fifth St. | www.cafepinot.com *tax & gratuity additional

644 South Figueroa Street Los Angeles, CA 90017 (213) 624-6996 www.engineco.com EngineCo28

photo courtesy of California Pizza Kitchen

Best Breakfast

al Pantr y igin


16 Downtown News

August 2, 2010

Best Of Downtown

d nar Leo ary G y to b pho

BEST EST BUSINESS Readers Choice BEST NEW BUSINESS Winner: The Last Bookstore Runner-Up: Vespa Los Angeles BEST HAIR SALON Winner: Salon Pure Runner-Up: Salon Eleven

BEST SHOE REPAIR Winner: Shoe Wiz Runner-Up: Shoe Masters BEST DRY CLEANERS Winner: Sloans Dry Cleaners Runner-Up: Bunker Hill Cleaners

BEST OPTOMETRIST Winner: Downtown LA Optometric Vision Center Runner-Up: LA Optical Gallery BEST DENTIST OR DENTAL OFFICE Winner: Downtown Dental Runner-Up: Zen Dental BEST CHIROPRACTOR Winner: Downtown Chiropractic Runner-Up: Courtyard Wellness BEST TRAVEL AGENCY Winner: AAA Travel Agency Runner-Up: Flight Centre BEST FITNESS Winner: 24 Hour Fitness Runner-Up: Los Angeles Athletic Club BEST PET BOARDING/SITTING/WALKING Winner: Bark Avenue Runner-Up: Go Dog LA BEST PET GROOMING Winner: Pussy and Pooch Runner-Up: Bark Avenue BEST BANK/CREDIT UNION Winner: Bank of America Runner-Up: Wells Fargo

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BEST DAYCARE Winner: La Petite Academy Runner-Up: Hope Street Friends

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BEST PLACE TO BUY TIRES Winner: Discount Tire Runner-Up: Goodyear Downtown

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BEST HOSPITAL Winner: Good Samaritan Hospital Runner-Up: St. Vincent Medical Facility

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August 2, 2010

Downtown News 17

Best Of Downtown

photo by Gar y Leon ard

photo by Gar y Leon ard

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BEST BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT Winner: Historic Downtown BID Runner-Up: Downtown Center BID

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BEST PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Winner: Subway, Light Rail, Buses (Metro) Runner-Up: DASH Downtown

BEST LAW FIRM Winner: O’Melveny and Myers, LLP Runner-Up: Latham and Watkins, LLP BEST EMPLOYMENT AGENCY Winner: Apple One Employment Services Runner-Up: Manpower

BEST DOWNTOWN RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE AGENT Winner: Bill Cooper – The Loft Expert! Group Runner-Up: Paula Samuel – Downtown LA Realty

BEST INVESTMENT/STOCK BROKERAGE FIRM Winner: Merrill Lynch Runner-Up: Wells Fargo

BEST DOWNTOWN COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE/BROKERAGE FIRMS Winner: CB Richard Ellis Runner-Up: Grubb and Ellis

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BEST PROPERTY MANAGEMENT COMPANY Winner: CB Richard Ellis Runner-Up: Downtown Properties

BEST WI-FI SPOT Winner: Starbucks Runner-Up: Central Library

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MOST BEAUTIFUL BROADWAY THEATER Winner: Orpheum Theatre Runner-Up: Los Angeles Theatre BEST-LOOKING BUILDING Winner: Walt Disney Concert Hall Runner-Up: Bradbury Building

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18 Downtown News

August 2, 2010

Best Of Downtown

Best of downtown staff picks These Are a Few of Our Favorite Things

n Most Jaw-Dropping Artwork: Barry Shy’s Lion Mural n Best Church Music: Skid Row Praise n Best Reason to Move Downtown: The Restaurants n Best Quote Master: Lt. Paul Vernon n Best Thing to Do for Your Pet: Hire a Professional Dog Walker n Best Trend: Let’s Have a Downtown Film Festival n Best Priced Cultural Outing: Grammy Museum Conversations n Best Fountain: Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain n Toughest Way to Win a Medal: YMCA Stair Climb n Best Crime Story: Brian Alexik n Best Pool: Los Angeles Athletic Club n Best Surprise: Angels Flight Reopening n Best War Story: Frank McCourt vs. Jamie McCourt n Best Way for Men to Look Good: ‘Man Grooming’ at Bolt Barbers n Best Free Date: Grand Performances n Best Downtown Cheerleader: Hal Bastian n Best Unbuilt Project: The Broad Collection n Best Downtown Weed Whackers: Angels Knoll Goats n Best Government Program: Restaurant & Hospitality Express n Best Place to Walk Fido: Los Angeles State Historic Park n Most Unusual Thing to Eat: Bugs at the Natural History Museum

dining scene in Los Angeles, with celebrity chefs like Celestino Drago behind the $7 million Italian restaurant Drago Centro in the Financial District, fusion pioneer John Rivera Sedlar at Rivera in South Park and Wolfgang Puck at the new WP24 at L.A. Live. There are also adventurous young types like Ilan Hall, who mixes Scottish and Jewish fare at The Gorbals in the Historic Core, and Josef Centeno, whose fearless take on modern American food has his Little Tokyo spot Lazy Ox overflowing with satisfied foodies. Of course there is the always packed Bottega Louie on the Seventh Street corridor. That’s just the beginning.—Richard Guzmán

historic Broadway movie palaces. The response was instantaneous, and over time the event known as the Last Remaining Seats became a Downtown cultural landmark. Now others have caught on, and these days everyone seems to want to do a film festival here. The aptly named Downtown Film Festival returns for its third installment in September, and the adventure-minded Jules Verne Film Festival has set up shop in the Central City the past few years. A few months ago the Downtown Independent hosted the Surrealist Film Festival, and REDCAT each years stages the International Children’s Film Festival. But things really changed in June, when the Los Angeles Film Festival kicked the Westside to the curb and brought its 200-movie slate to L.A. Live and other venues. Amazingly, the community that was once a back lot for the production industry is now a vital screening ground.—Jon Regardie

BEST QUOTE MASTER

Lt. Paul Vernon A good quote, one that is clear in meaning yet also full of colorful language, is crucial to any good news article, especially crime stories. And there is no better modern quote master than Lt. Paul Vernon, the head of the LAPD’s Central Division detectives. For example, take his comment on a group of young men who in March were wielding Tech 9 modeled air rifles on the roof of the Huntington Hotel. “Technically it did not qualify as a crime. It did qualify as felony stupid,” Vernon told reporters. Vernon plays a lead role in getting crime information out to the Downtown community. Yet rather than rely on dry cop-speak, he offers quotes that simultaneously clarify the story, provoke a chuckle and remind that crime doesn’t pay. When 24-year-old suspect Michael Rivas was tracked down and tied to looting after the Lakers won the 2009 championship, Vernon had this to say: “In the pictures, Mr. Rivas is laughing. He wasn’t laughing when we showed up at his job to arrest him last Friday.” When police chased after a Downtown bike thief in a sting, Vernon gave a play-by-play: “Apparently, the thief hit his front brake too hard which brought the rear wheel over the front. Obviously, he’s not a skilled rider.” Zing!—Ryan Vaillancourt

MOST JAW-DROPPING ARTWORK Barry Shy’s Lion Mural

BEST PRICED CULTURAL OUTING

Grammy Museum Conversations Brian Wilson. Jacob Dylan. Dr. John. Ozomatli. Ringo Starr. Charlie Haden. What do they have in common? They’re among the roster of revered artists who have appeared at the Grammy Museum. The L.A. live facility — an extensive library and ode to American music and the recording process — also boasts the Grammy Sound Stage, a 200-seat theater for live performances. As impressive as the lineup is the ticket price: rarely more than $15. That’s a fraction of what it would cost to see them in the large venues they usually play. The Grammy Museum shows are, granted, not very long, just a handful of songs. But they include extended on-stage conversations with museum director and former music journalist Robert Santelli. It’s a different kind of show, but for the money, it’s more than worth it. At 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org.—Ryan Vaillancourt

BEST FOUNTAIN

photo by Gary Leonard

BEST THING TO DO FOR YOUR PET

Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain They turned off the fountain between the County Hall of Administration and the Courthouse on July 15, and it probably won’t gurgle again until the summer of 2012 as work progresses on the $56 million Grand Avenue Civic Park. Which is too bad, because the Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain is a majestic mix of concrete, 1960s architecture and aqua ballet. The elegant structure, named for a former county chief administrative officer, looked like a multi-tiered crown rising up. Streams of water in concentric circles arced forth and a plume of white-tinged wet stuff launched high from the center. Fortunately, it will still be there when the new park opens.—Jon Regardie

Hire a Professional Dog Walker

When you see it, you go “WOW!” Yes, in capital letters. Yes, with the exclamation point. What other possible reaction is there upon glimpsing the approximately 20-by-10-foot mural in the lobby of developer Barry Shy’s SB Tower? The seven male and one female kings of the Downtown jungle are scattered across a sort of Central City of the future. One lounges lazily by a river. Several sit atop prominent local high-rises. One stands near U.S. Bank Tower and another is next to a waterfall. Yes, a waterfall! In Downtown! WOW! At 600 S. Spring St.—Jon Regardie

TOUGHEST WAY TO WIN A MEDAL YMCA Stair Climb

BEST REASON TO MOVE DOWNTOWN The Restaurants Downtown was once a mere 9-to-5 neighborhood. Then came the residential boom of the 21st century, and as inhabitants moved in to the hip lofts, a batch of restaurateurs sprung up to meet them. The community is now the hottest

It’s not easy being a dog in Downtown. There are no backyards to run around in, parks are limited, and it’s hard to socialize with other mutts when they all live in high-rises. So be nice to your four-legged pal and get him/her a professional dog walker. There are several in Downtown, including but not limited to Walk Fido and Walka Walka Dog Walkers. Fees vary, but in most cases the dog walker will come get your pooch, introduce him/her to other members of the pack, and take them on a stroll. The dogs get to exercise and make doggy friends, and you don’t have to worry about taking them outside for as many potty breaks.—Richard Guzmán

BEST TREND

Let’s Have a Downtown Film Festival Twenty-four years ago, the Los Angeles Conservancy launched a short summer series of classic films screened in

photo by Gary Leonard

Skid Row Praise You hear it before you walk in the door. Once inside, a wall of thick, joyous sounds pulsates through the small room in what the Skid Row community calls the “church on the corner.” Located at Sixth and San Pedro streets in Skid Row, Pastor Jeffrey Thomas’ Central City Community Church of the Nazarene is not often visited by outsiders. But it’s worth a stop on any Sunday, believer or not, for the rollicking yet tight sounds of Skid Row Praise, the house band. Comprised of top-notch musicians who live or have formerly lived in Skid Row, the group lays down an uplifting soundtrack fit for anyone’s paradise. They pack the stage deep with musicians playing brass, rhythm and strings, and a vocal chorus too. Praise God if you will, but anyone can praise this band. At 419 E. Sixth St., (213) 689-1766 or lacentralcity.org.—Ryan Vaillancourt

photo by Gary Leonard

BEST CHURCH MUSIC

Elevators exist for a darn good reason: Climbing stairs in a high rise is tough. But sometimes, it’s worth doing. The Ketchum Downtown YMCA’s Stair Climb to the Top is one see Staff Picks, page 20


August 2, 2010

Downtown News 19

Best Of Downtown

Best drinking Readers Choice Best BAr Winner: Edison runner-Up: Library Bar

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Best sPOrts BAr Winner: ESPN Zone runner-Up: Big Wangs

Best BAr HAPPY HOUr Winner: Edison runner-Up: Library Bar

Best LAte nigHt sPOt Winner: Yard House runner-Up: Pete’s Cafe

Best Wine BAr Winner: Corkbar runner-Up: The Must

Best restAUrAnt HAPPY HOUr Winner: Casa runner-Up: McCormick and Schmick’s

Best HOteL BAr Winner: Standard Rooftop Bar – Standard Downtown runner-Up: O Bar – O Hotel

Best nigHtCLUB Winner: Edison runner-Up: Conga Room

Best restAUrAnt Beer seLeCtiOn Winner: Yard House runner-Up: Weiland Brewery

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Best COFFee Winner: The Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf runner-Up: Urth Caffe

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20 Downtown News

milk-quaffing is little league compared to the divorce proceedings that were ignited during the 2009 playoffs. Bombs have already been detonated, with reports that Jamie needs millions a year in alimony, that Frank is leveraged from here to Timbuktu, that, egads, they paid a Boston-based Russian brainiac to think positive thoughts about the Blue Crew. So much ugly stuff has already fastballed out, and if a trial begins as anticipated this month, the blows will be harder than those from Manny’s performance-enhanced-era bat. With a mediocre team, this will be the most exciting Dodger contest of the year.—Jon Regardie

Staff Picks Continued from page 18 of the community’s standout events. The September happening is a fundraiser for the Ketchum Downtown YMCA, and thousands, including some corporate teams, sign up for the chance to walk, or sprint, up the 1,500 steps of the 75-floor U.S. Bank Tower. If they make it to the top they have the pride of knowing they climbed the tallest building in the West. They also get a shiny medal. At ymcastairclimb.org.— Richard Guzmán

BEST FREE DATE

Grand Performances California Plaza on Bunker Hill is not your typical date site. During the week it’s a corporate playground. But on summer evenings, it’s packed (but almost never too packed) with people from across the region, listening intently or dancing to an array of programming that mirrors the city’s own diversity. Grab a bottle of wine, take your sweetheart in your arm, and head over to the Watercourt for the free music, theater and other cultural programming. To add to the romance, have a pre-show picnic on Angels Knoll, the small, somewhat hidden park enjoyed by the couple in the film (500) Days of Summer. Let’s just hope your love story ends better than theirs. Upcoming highlights include Bassekou Kayete and Dengue Fever on Aug. 13. At 350 S. Grand Ave., grandperformances.org.—Ryan Vaillancourt

BEST POOL

Los Angeles Athletic Club It’s not Olympic-sized, nor is it new. In fact, it’s only 25 yards long and five lanes wide, and it’s pretty darn old. But that’s what makes the pool at the Los Angeles Athletic Club so worth diving into. Surrounded by old photographs of men and women in vintage swimsuits, the historic hotel and club’s pool is on the sixth floor. Windows looking out over Seventh Street give swimmers the sense that they’re doing the breast stroke up above the city. Then there’s the overhead skylight that keeps the room bright. So instead of looking up at a drab ceiling or fluorescent lights, or staring at the sun as is often the case at outdoor pools, backstrokers are treated to a muted wash of natural light. At 431 W. Seventh St., (213) 625-2211 or laac.com.—Ryan Vaillancourt

BEST DOWNTOWN CHEERLEADER Hal Bastian

BEST SURPRISE

photo by Gary Leonard

photo by Gary Leonard

Angels Flight Reopening

Frank McCourt vs. Jamie McCourt The days in 2003 when the McCourts came to town now seem quaint, but maybe we should have seen the hints. After all, they publicly proclaimed how the family was so competitive that they had milk-drinking contests. Of course,

BEST DOWNTOWN WEED WHACKERS Angels Knoll Goats

photo by Gary Leonard

‘Man Grooming’ at Bolt Barbers Looking good takes planning, commitment, and for some, a little help from professionals. That’s where Bolt Barbers comes in. The Historic Core shop organizes a session called “Man Grooming for the Social Beast.” The weekly event at the old-school barbershop costs $50 and includes a cut, shave and shoeshine, whiskey tasting, a cigar, and advice from a wardrobe consultant. You know you need it. Bolt Barbers is at 460 S. Spring St., (213) 232-4715 or boltbarbers.com.— Richard Guzmán

Brian Alexik When Brian Alexik evaded police by scampering down a fire escape of the Reserve Lofts building on April 19, it set off Downtown’s best crime story in decades. The twists never seemed to stop: As he remained out of police grasp, he was suspected of counterfeiting money as well as drug and weapons violations. His apartment overlooking the Federal Reserve sparked concern from the LAPD about some sort of never-detailed plot. Then there was the mysterious tile CIA logo in the floor of his unit. And why was his loft filled with photos of Alexik with U2 frontman Bono and model Janice Dickinson? Although some media reports speculated that he had fled the country, on June 3 Alexik was captured in a small Arts District apartment where he had been hiding out with his girlfriend. Who knows what will come out during the trial?—Jon Regardie

BEST WAR STORY

Broad would pay for the whole thing, which would rise on a current parking lot behind REDCAT. Sure there’s a personal legacy play here, but this could-be landmark just might reignite the stalled $3 billion Grand Avenue plan. Think of it as, if he builds it, they will come see art.—Jon Regardie

BEST WAY FOR MEN TO LOOK GOOD

BEST CRIME STORY

For nine years following a fatal 2001 accident the world’s shortest railway remained closed. The situation soon became Downtown’s greatest tease, with John Welborne, president of the Angels Flight Railway Foundation, promising for years that the funicular would reopen “soon.” Then, in early March of this year, Welborne announced yet another opening date: April 15. Again, he was wrong, but only because the railway shocked everyone by coming online March 15. At 6:45 a.m. that day, riders were again able to skip the steep walk up 153 steps and instead could pay the 25-cent fare to ride back and forth between Cal Plaza on Bunker Hill and the Historic Core. The cars Sinai and Olivet continue to provide residents, workers and visitors to a nostalgic treat. At Cal Plaza or 351 S. Hill St., or angelsflight.com.—Richard Guzmán

August 2, 2010

Best Of Downtown

There’s something almost unbearably pleasing about the site of goats munching away at overgrown brush against the backdrop of Cal Plaza’s skyscrapers. And everyone seems to smile when the Community Redevelopment Agency brings in a herd of goats — instead of, say, landscapers — to remove overgrown brush from a hill below Angels Knoll park. The CRA has employed different herds four times since the inaugural feeding in the summer of 2008. The goats have a four-compartment stomach that helps them digest roughage such as grass, brush, poison ivy and hay. More importantly, they are a daily cause for joy for passersby, and testament to the fact that not all bureaucrats are incapable of thinking outside the box. Some of them think inside the pen. At 356 S. Olive St. or Fourth and Hill streets.—Ryan Vaillancourt

BEST GOVERNMENT PROGRAM

Restaurant & Hospitality Express Anyone who has tried to open a restaurant in Los Angeles knows full well the horror: Cumbersome permitting and couldn’t-care-less bureaucrats and inspectors make seemingly simple tasks long and difficult, to the point that many restaurateurs are nearly broke by the time their dream business opens. In June, the city finally responded, as Downtown’s Central City Association worked with First Deputy Mayor Austin Beutner to, in polite terms, kick some bureaucratic tail. They launched Restaurant & Hospitality Express, which gives business owners a case manager to solve and anticipate problems. The goal is cut the time it takes to open a restaurant in half, to just six to nine months. Key entities including the Department of Building and Safety, the Fire Department and the County Health Department are on board. The big question is whether it will work. At ladbs.org.—Jon Regardie

BEST PLACE TO WALK FIDO As senior vice president and director of economic development for the Downtown Center Business Improvement District, Hal Bastian’s job is to get people, and in particular, business people, excited about coming Downtown. With a sharp sense of humor, an eager grin and an effervescent personality, Bastian has no trouble commanding attention for and touting the benefits of the neighborhood he also calls home. Bastian spends much of his time leading tours of the area and helping entrepreneurs find the right location for their business — among his successes are helping bring Bottega Louie and First and Hope to Downtown. He has also helped make the area pet friendly with the annual Dog Day Afternoon event held at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. If there is a person who embodies the adage “If you see someone without a smile, give them yours,” it is Hal Bastian.—Richard Guzmán

BEST UNBUILT PROJECT

The Broad Collection A close runner-up in this category is Korean Air’s plan to raze the Wilshire Grand hotel and erect two huge skyscrapers. While that would have a significant business bounce, philanthropist Eli Broad’s proposed $100 million art museum could mean more to Downtown. The Broad Collection would hold some of the philanthropist’s 2,000 pieces of art inside a building designed by a not-yet-identified “world class” architect.

Los Angeles State Historic Park It’s kind of ironic that Downtown, with its urban fabric and general lack of green space, is such a hit with dog owners. The pets are everywhere. And while they don’t seem to mind pounding the pavement, everyone needs a little grass under their feet sometimes. That is why dogs and the people at the end of their leash delight in the 32-acre Los Angeles State Historic Park. Just east of Chinatown, this patchwork of grass, dirt paths and fields of wild flowers (at the right time of year, anyway) is a haven for those who love canines. It’s also an ideal place for dogs to stretch out their legs with a good run, uninterrupted by stoplights. Since the park requires dogs to remain on leash, that means their human cohorts have to jog too. At 1245 N. Spring St., parks.ca.gov.—Ryan Vaillancourt

MOST UNUSUAL THING TO EAT

Bugs at the Natural History Museum If you ever get bored of the same old restaurants and really want to try something different, then head over to the Natural History Museum for a one-of-a-kind meal. Every May, the Exposition Park attraction holds its Bug Fair, which draws about 14,000 people. Bugs of all kinds are exhibited, and you can see them, hold them, buy them, and in some cases, eat them. A bug chef prepares dishes out of crawlers like crickets, wax worms and grasshoppers. They’re cooked on the spot and handed out to audience members who are brave enough to try them. The crickets and wax worms go down easy, but the grasshoppers are rough, crunchy and hard to swallow. At 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-3466 or nhm.org.—Richard Guzmán


August 2, 2010

Downtown News 21

Best Of Downtown

BEST EST SHOPPING Readers Choice ph oto

BEST AUTO DEALER – NEW CARS Winner: Downtown LA Motors Mercedes Benz Runner-Up: Toyota Central

BEST TUX/GOWN STORE Winner: Bella Bridal & Tuxedo Runner-Up: Tokyo Bridal & Tux

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BEST PET SUPPLIES/BOUTIQUE Winner: Pussy and Pooch Runner-Up: Bark Avenue

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BEST FARMERS MARKET Winner: Pershing Square Farmers Market Runner-Up: 7+FIG Farmers Market

BEST STORE FOR THE HOME Winner: Loft Appeal Runner-Up: (Sub) Urban Home

BEST AUTO DEALER – USED CARS Winner: Downtown LA Motors Mercedes Benz Runner-Up: Honda of Downtown Los Angeles

BEST BOUTIQUE STORE Winner: FIDM Museum Shop Runner-Up: PopKiller

BEST CELL PHONE STORE Winner: AT&T Wireless Store Runner-Up: T-Mobile

BEST BOOKSTORE Winner: Central Library Store Runner-Up: The Last Bookstore

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BEST WOMEN’S CLOTHING Winner: Macy’s Runner-Up: FIDM Scholarship Store

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BEST JEWELRY MART Winner: St. Vincent Jewelry Center Runner-Up: California Jewelry Mart

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BEST MEN’S CLOTHING Winner: Macy’s Runner-Up: American Apparel

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BEST SCOOTER DEALER Winner: Vespa Of LA Runner-Up: Scooter Dynasty

Clockwise from top left: FIDM Museum Shop, Best Botique Store; St. Vincent Jewelry Center, Best Jewelry Mart; Downtown L.A. Motors Mercedes-Benz, Best Auto Dealer - New and Used Cars; Pershing Square Farmers Market, Best Farmers Market; Pussy and Pooch, Best Pet Supplies/Botique

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22 Downtown News

Best Of Downtown

August 2, 2010


August 2, 2010

Le Tour de Downtown A Two-Wheeled Ride Becomes the Best Way To Explore the Central City

photo by Gary Leonard

The traffic-clogged streets of Downtown can become a fun and easy place to bike ride outside of work hours. The community has climbs, coasting areas and plenty of sights.

by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

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ome cities have embraced the bicycle as a vital component in the transportation equation. Los Angeles is not one of them. L.A. has earned its reputation for being relatively bike un-friendly. Yet there are reasons that the city is really a biker’s paradise, weather chief among them. Downtown happens to be one of the best

Downtown News 23

Best Of Downtown

places to ride, for pleasure or exercise. The Central City is especially easy to navigate on a bike in the evening — one of the benefits of an urban center still dominated by commuters who leave after work, taking their cars with them. From the hills of Chinatown to the Fashion District flats, Le Tour de Downtown is a roughly 10-mile loop around the area. Follow it exactly, or use it as a loose guide. A few sugges-

tions: Wear a helmet, use front and rear lights, and always ride with a buddy (or buddies). Stage 1, El Pueblo, the Park and Chinatown, 3.8 miles: What better place to start Le Tour than at the place the city was founded, El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument? Spin out from around the plaza and head north on Main Street. Turn left onto Alameda, toward Los Angeles State Historic Park, and take the Spring Street bridge. Now that you’re at the northern end of Downtown, come back via the Broadway Bridge, and as you do, take in one of the best views of the Downtown skyline. Cruise into Chinatown on Broadway, go right on College Street, then right again at Hill Street. This is the trickiest part of the ride: Turn left onto Bernard Street — you’ll have to ride on the sidewalk. Take Bernard to the helix pedestrian ramp to cross the Pasadena (110) Freeway. Look down at rush hour traffic and remind yourself why you’re on a bike. At this point, just ride south, back toward the center of Downtown. You can navigate the hills of Chinatown or find a flatter route. Just make sure to get to the intersection of Cesar Chavez and Grand avenues, the start of Stage 2. If you’re at the High School for the Performing Arts, you’re in the right place. Stage 2, Grand Avenue, 1.7 miles: Remember that skyline view? Now you’re in the middle of it. Pedal past Walt Disney Concert Hall and MOCA, and roll into the most dramatic downhill of the tour as you coast from Bunker Hill. Try to time the lights so they’re green at Fifth Street, allowing you to fly past the Central Library into the Financial District. One-way streets like Grand make for some of the roomiest cycling.

Stage 3, L.A. Live, 1.2 miles: Go west on 11th Street, which will turn into Chick Hearn Court at L.A. Live. Salute the Lakers (or Clippers, God help you), turn left on Cherry Street, and left again on Pico so you ride underneath the bridge that connects the west and south halls of the Convention Center. Depending on the time of year, this is a great place to glimpse life-sized anime characters or gaggles of video game geeks. Stage 4, South Park, 2 miles: You can turn off Pico and head north on any street, but Olive is ideal, again because it’s one-way. Go east on Ninth Street toward the Fashion District. This is a neighborhood that’s fun to ride through any time of day. During business hours, it’s bustling with pedestrians and textile hawkers. At night it’s a ghost town, so empty and quiet it can feel downright post-apocalyptic. Ride Ninth Street all the way until it turns into Olympic Boulevard, cross Alameda Street and head into the Arts District. Head north on Mateo Street. Stage 5, Pit Stop, or Finish Line, 2 miles: You’re thirsty by now. Suddenly the bars in this growing neighborhood — Tony’s Saloon, Royal Claytons, the new Villains Tavern and Wurstküche — are beckoning. So what the heck, take a pit stop. Or keep riding up Mateo to Fourth Street and head west toward Little Tokyo, another sensible spot to replenish those carbs. Are you an overachiever? Do you wear a yellow Livestrong bracelet? Then go right on Main Street and do the loop again. Or, forget this route and make up your own. Happy riding. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

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24 Downtown News

August 2, 2010

Best Of Downtown

Best entertainment Readers Choice Best mUsiC VenUe LarGe Winner: Walt Disney Concert Hall runner-Up: Nokia Theatre L.A. Live

Best FamiLY attraCtiOn Winner: Natural History Museum runner-Up: Downtown On Ice (Pershing Square)

Best mUsiC VenUe smaLL Winner: California Plaza (Friday Night Sessions) runner-Up: Grammy Museum

Best Free FamiLY attraCtiOn Winner: Olvera Street runner-Up: Central Library

Best Free mUsiC/LeCtUre series Winner: Grand Performances at California Plaza runner-Up: Pershing Square Summer Concert Series

Best PerFOrminG art VenUe Winner: Ahmanson Theatre runner-Up: Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

sHOWs tHe Best mOVies Winner: Regal Cinemas L.A. Live runner-Up: California Science Center IMAX

Best DOWntOWn eVent Winner: Downtown Art Walk runner-Up: Grand Performances at California Plaza

Best mUseUm Winner: Museum of Contemporary Art runner-Up: Natural History Museum

Best attraCtiOn Winner: Downtown Art Walk runner-Up: L.A. Live

nard y Leo Gar y b s oto ph

Best DOWntOWn tOUr Winner: Downtown L.A. Walks runner-Up: Los Angeles Conservancy

From left: Walt Disney Concert Hall, Best Music Venue Large; California Plaza, Best Music Venue Small; Downtown Art Walk, Best Downtown Event; Regal Cinemas L.A. Live, Shows the Best Movies

BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF X BEST OF

The Best Hidden Public Secrets How to Get Away Without Leaving Downtown by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

O

pen public space is not something most people associate with Downtown. After Pershing Square and Los Angeles State Historic Park, those in search of an urban oasis generally draw a blank. There are, however, a few unexpected hidden spaces that can provide a needed escape from the fast pace of city life. They’re free to enter, open to the public and can make you feel like a Downtown insider. Here are a few of the best public escapes Downtown Los Angeles has to offer. James Irvine Japanese Garden: It’s not every day that you can stroll through a peaceful Japanese garden in the middle of a bustling city. But you can do precisely that each Tuesday through Friday at the James Irvine Japanese Garden. Located adjacent to the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center at 244 S. San Pedro St. in Little Tokyo, the 8,500-squarefoot attraction recently underwent a $300,000 transformation. Hummingbirds flit about the greenery, a waterfall rushes down a cascade of stones and a small stream rumbles past shrubs and other flora. Created in 1980 by landscape architect Takeo Uesugi, the garden has won the National Landscape Award from the American Association of Nurserymen. Which essentially means that it’s a great place to get away. The garden at Walt Disney Concert Hall: Every day tourists photograph and wander through the Frank Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall. With its stunning exterior, it’s understandable how another great aspect of the venue at 111 S. Grand Ave. can sometimes be overlooked. But those who climb the stairs at First and Hope streets or at Second Street and Grand Avenue, are rewarded with the nearly one-acre Disney Hall garden, which has great views of neighborhood landmarks and a tranquil setting. About 50 trees that bloom throughout the year grow here, as do bushes and other greenery. The focal point is the Lilian Disney Memorial Fountain; fashioned in the form of a giant rose, it pays homage to the namesake’s love of Delft porcelain and roses. Reinforced iron bars were bent to form the flower petals and hundreds of

photo by Gary Leonard

photo by Gary Leonard

Biddy Mason Park provides a nice escape from the energetic activity of the Broadway corridor. It is named after a former slave who came to Los Angeles and became a prominent landowner.

The James Irvine Japanese Garden brings a bit of nature to Little Tokyo.

porcelain vases and tiles were broken on site and applied by an eight-person team.

mayors). Step outside to the balcony, which wraps around the building. The views are spectacular, offering extensive views of the city and, if it’s clear enough, even the ocean. But if you’re even slightly afraid of heights, it can be daunting.

Biddy Mason Park: Not many people in Downtown know about Biddy Mason, a former slave who arrived in California in 1851 and went on to become a midwife, a Downtown landowner and the founder of the city’s first African Methodist Episcopal Church. Those and other details can be gleaned at Biddy Mason Park, located behind the McDonalds on Broadway just south of Third Street. Built out of a parking lot and alleyways, the park offers courtyards and walkways as well as seating areas shaded by trees. A fountain made of metal pipes provides a relaxing view while a series of plaques commemorate Mason’s life.

LAPD Memorial Seating Area: When it comes to public space and the $440 million Police Administration Building, most people think of the lawn fronting Second Street. That’s nice, but it ignores a quiet and intimate garden area. A set of steps on Main Street just before Second Street leads to the brass memorial with the names of more than 200 LAPD officers killed in the line of duty. Behind the memorial is a circular seating area. It’s a bit hidden, and is a good place to get away from it all while still being in the middle of Downtown.

City Hall Observation Deck at the Tom Bradley Room: This public space is 27 floors above Downtown and is open during City Hall hours, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Head to City Hall (200 N. Spring St.) and tell the guard you want to go to the observation deck. At the top you’ll find the Tom Bradley Room, a conference and reception space (a floor below you can see portraits of all of L.A.’s

City Hall South Plaza: Hidden from view by the news vans that park on Main Street when covering City Hall, the small plaza between City Hall East and the Los Angeles General Services Department building is a great find for those needing some quiet time. A water feature that resembles a jungle gym offers a refreshing mist, while benches and shaded areas allow you to relax in the heart of the Civic Center. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.


August 2, 2010

Downtown News 25

Best Of Downtown

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HEALTH Eating Right, and Cheaply There Is No Need to Sacrifice Health in a Bad Economy by Reina V. KutneR

— such as potatoes, onions, garlic, celery, let- 3 cloves garlic, minced he economy has taken a toll on tuce and carrots — tend to have lower price 1 red pepper, cut into 1/4-inch pieces many families across the country. tags no matter the season. 3 scallions, cut into 1/8-inch pieces Layoffs are everywhere. Many peo- n Canned and frozen items are inexpensive 1 large carrot, cut into 1/4-inch pieces ple are scared and want to cut back on costs. and major timesavers in the kitchen. Stock 1 cup snow peas Yet they still want to put good, nutritious up on canned corn, beans and tuna, or get 1 can stir-fry veggies food on the table. spinach, broccoli and peas in the freezer aisle. 1/4 cup soy sauce It may be tempting to resort to buying The nutrients are still there, and they will 1/4 cup honey cheap fast food, but that is not the best way last longer than fresh items. Just remember: Directions: Cook and drain noodles. to keep your body working at its best and give Drain and rinse canned foods in order to get Meanwhile, heat a large skillet or wok with children the nutrition they need. But don’t rid of that from-the-can taste. oil over medium heat. fret; there are plenty of ways to stay healthy de- n Look to your backyard. If you have the Add the soy strips or tofu. Add garlic, red Creators.com photo courtesy of CDC/Dawn Arlotta spite difficult times. Follow these tips to make space and a green thumb, grow your own pepper, scallions, carrots, snow peas and can Planting a vegetable garden in your yard is a great your dollars go further at the grocery store. fruits and vegetables. If you feel uncomfort- of stir-fry veggies to the soy strips. Season way to eat healthy and save money. n Look at the unit price of each item, or how able, start with herbs; you can save lots of with salt and pepper. Make sure they are all much each serving costs. For example, if a money by growing your own basil, parsley, cooked through. Combine the veggie mix 2 teaspoons honey $1.50 box of pasta has eight servings, it actually rosemary, thyme and oregano versus buying with the noodles. Hamburger buns costs approximately 19 cents per serving. Most them at a store. Tomatoes are also an easyIn a small bowl, combine honey and soy Directions: Season turkey with salt and groceries list them, but if yours doesn’t, just to-grow option. sauce until smooth. Pour over the noodles pepper. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a divide the price by the number of servings. n If all else fails, do it the old-fashioned way: and vegetables. Mix and serve. pan. Add onion and garlic. Season with salt n Reconsider your proteins. Cuts of meat Look for sales at your local supermarket and and pepper. Allow onion to become slightly vary in price. Some are much more expensive clip coupons from your newspaper. There Turkey Joes brown. Remove to a small bowl, and add the than others. For a less expensive and healthier are also websites that specialize in coupons. 2 pounds ground turkey other 2 tablespoons of olive oil. option, poultry, such as chicken and turkey, n If you are having a hard time getting the 1 large onion, chopped Add ground turkey and stir in pan until is a good bet. Ground beef is good if you kids to eat healthy foods, allow their food to 4 cloves garlic, minced cooked thoroughly. Add the onions and garwould like red meat, but make sure its fat be fun. Vegetarian noodle bowls have a lot of Dash salt and pepper lic back, as well as the flour. Stir until flour percentage is low. vegetables and protein and will allow them to 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided absorbs the juices from the meat. Add the n Don’t forget vegetarian options. Dishes slurp their noodles. Turkey joes have all the 1/4 cup flour barbecue sauce, honey, mustard and rice such as beans and rice can be not only tasty joy of sloppy joes, and ground turkey is less 4 tablespoons rice vinegar vinegar. Stir until every piece is coated comand inexpensive, but also have lots of nutri- fattening and more flavorful than beef. 1/2 cup barbecue sauce pletely. Serve on hamburger buns. ents. Tofu and “mock meats” are cheap and n Here are a couple easy-to-make meal op- 2 teaspoons mustard Copyright 2010 Creators.com. good sources of protein, so don’t hesitate to tions: * In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. cook with them as a meat replacement several times a week. Bowls Los Angeles. In TheVegetarian Heart ofNoodle Downtown n Buy seasonal fruits and vegetables. When 1 pound fettuccini or udon noodles The of Downtown Los Angeles. In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles. they are not in season, theyInhave to Heart be 2 tablespoons oil * shipped from different parts of the world, 1 box of soy strips or 1 block of tofu, cut into which is expensive. However, certain staples cubes and soaked in teriyaki sauce In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles.

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28 Downtown News

August 2, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

CALENDAR

L.A. Live’s 3 on 3peat Weekend Basketball Tournament Expects to Draw 25,000 Hoops Heads by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

T

he Lakers and Clippers are on vacation, but this week, the area around Staples Center will resound with the beat of basketballs pounding and sneakers squeaking on pavement. After working with the Lakers to launch a public basketball tournament last year, L.A. Live owner Anschutz Entertainment Group has now partnered with shoe giant Nike. The two-day hoops bonanza will take place Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 7-8. Known now as the Nike 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament, the event has already eclipsed last year’s roster of more than 500 three- to four-person squads, said Scott Hanley, vice president of events and marketing for AEG. He said another 200 registrations are pending, and ultimately expects close to 1,000 teams to participate. “We learned last year that there’s a huge appetite in L.A. and surrounding communities for an event like this,” said Hanley, who estimates that, including players’ friends and families, the event drew more than 15,000 attendees in 2009. He expects that number to grow to at least 25,000 this year. “There hasn’t been this kind of an organized three-on-three tournament of this size and the appetite is out there.” L.A. Live proved to be a street ball paradise last year, with some 40 half-courts set up along a closed-to-traffic Chick Hearn Court and on top of the event deck west of the Nokia

Theatre. To accommodate the larger team pool this year, AEG will erect about 30 additional half-courts in the parking lots east of Figueroa Street across from Staples Center, said AEG spokesman Michael Roth. Though the tournament was conceived as an L.A.-centric community event, the inaugural year brought teams from Arizona and Spokane, Wash. This year, the geophoto by Gary Leonar The Nike 3 on 3 Ba d sketball Tournament graphic reach has expanded, with will transform L.A. Live into a street ball pa radise for thousands of teams teams flying in for the weekend in six divisions. from across the Western U.S., Hanley said. The link to Spokane stems from AEG’s liked what it saw, and agreed partnership with an organization that pro pro- to become the event’s title sponsor. duces Spokane Hoop Fest, a major annual “It’s a promotional vehicle for three-on-three tournament in that city. The them,” Roth said. Spokane group, like last year, will devise the As a result, the company’s tournament architecture, splitting teams into “swoosh” logo will be everywhere, on brackets according to skill level and height. the hundreds of balls used over the Comparing the L.A. event to Washington weekend and splashed on the exhibi-may offer a glimpse of the future for tion courts at Nokia Plaza. And while the Downtown Los Angeles tournament. the event no longer names the Lakers Launched in 1990 by two friends, the event as a sponsor, AEG added the Clippers started with 512 teams that played on 35 to the lineup (all tournament particicourts, almost exactly mirroring the local pants will get a ticket to a Clippers event last year. In June 2009, at the 20th an- game in the coming season). nual tournament in Spokane, they had 6,725 Nike 3 on 3 organizers have tried to teams on 428 courts. ensure that the tournament is open Accommodating All to everyone. It features six divisions: This isn’t a first for Nike. The company was wheelchair, Special Olympics, youth, a presenting sponsor of last year’s tournament. high school, adult and elite. All teams But apparently, the Oregon-based shoe giant are guaranteed to play at least three photo by Gary Leonard games. ed to draw some 25,000 The tournament is expect Those looking to assemble a team ts. Games will take place on pan tici spectators and par still have some time — registration more than 70 half-courts. forms will be accepted online through * Aug. 2, Hanley said. Mostly, the tournament will have the look There are plenty of reasons to attend the and feel of last year’s event, just bigger — a Bring in ad for discount. event, however, even for those not planning trend AEG hopes to continue. to lace ’em up. Nokia Theatre will be home “Our first year was very successful,” Hanley to several exhibitions, including a slam dunk said. “We really wanted to build this as a bigger contest — the Nike Throw Down. The court community and regional event. We want peowill also host a celebrity game (participants ple to fly in and stay for the weekend and make were not confirmed as of press time), a mascot it as big as the area around us can handle.” of everything from breakfast to dinner. game, and a stage set-up will feature live music Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at *Exp. 8-29-10 and DJs throughout the weekend. ryan@downtownnews.com.

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@

SPOTLIGHT ON

LA

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August 2, 2010

DowntownNews.com

Downtown News 29

A Spark in Chinatown Summer Nights Series Brings Dining, Crafts and Al Fresco Dancing by Ryan Vaillancourt staff writer

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or years, Chinatown has been relatively quiet as a nightlife destination. But every Saturday in August, the outdoor plazas that comprise the heart of the community are set to come alive with dancing until midnight, al fresco dining and drinking, and a bustling crafts fair. If all goes as planned, visitors from across Los Angeles will stream into the area and help realize local stakeholders’ vision of a more active Chinatown. An array of entertainment, highlighted by DJs from Santa Monica public radio station KCRW, will strive to add a hint of hipness to the area’s longstanding and permanent draws — the Chinese-inspired architecture and lanterns, merchants selling ethnic gifts and restaurants serving authentic Asian cuisine. What the visitors to the affairs, branded as Chinatown Summer Nights, won’t know is that this picture of urban vitality is really a neighborhood planning experiment sponsored by the Community Redevelopment Agency. The CRA has been studying Chinatown for more than a year, focusing on strategies to revitalize a cultural resource that has lost much of its commercial luster over the years. On most nights, Central and West plazas, which make up the heart of the neighborhood, are quiet. Merchants close early. Few if any restaurants have waits. Tapping insight from merchants and

property owners in Central and West plazas, as well as Bamboo Lane, the CRA hosted a series of community workshops this year to devise a plan to entice more visitors to the area, especially at night. Most of the conclusions relate to proposed physical improvements. In the wake of the CRA workshops, dozens of property owners are in the process of restoring and enhancing their façades, paying for the upgrades with CRA grants. There are also plans to give the plazas an infrastructure makeover, with new benches and tables, a restored fountain and other proposed physical changes. Those efforts are considered long-term projects. In total, the agency plans to spend $3 million on Chinatown improvements. In the short term, almost all the stakeholders who participated in the meetings agreed that if Chinatown is to draw visitors, it needs to activate the area with live entertainment and other buzzworthy draws that have followings. Enter Aaron Paley and Community Arts Resources, a consulting group that coordinates events in public spaces that the CRA enlisted to help produce the series. Paley struck a partnership with KCRW, which will have DJs at every event (on Aug. 7, it’s Raul Compos). The station jumped at the chance to have a visible presence in Chinatown, and added the event to its own roster of “Summer Nights,” the umbrella brand for its seasonal events

photo by Gary Leonard

Central Plaza in Chinatown will fill on Saturday nights this month with dancers, diners and other visitors. It is part of the CRA’s Chinatown Summer Nights series.

throughout the region, said KCRW general manager Jennifer Ferro. “It’s relatively low cost for us and it has this great payoff because it provides something for the community and we get to reach out and see the community, be face to face with the people who listen to us, as well as people who don’t even listen to radio,” said Ferro, who added that the station will promote the event on air and through its social networking efforts on Facebook and Twitter. Creating the Buzz For every Chinatown Summer Nights event, Central Plaza will feature a wooden dance floor. Early in the evenings, from 6-7:45 p.m., there will be dance lessons, with the styles changing each week. The sessions will range from this week’s ballroom to salsa (Aug. 28) to Sweaty Sundays with Joe Schneck (Aug. 14). West Plaza will host cultural workshops, all with ties to Chinese traditions. This week,

the Confucius Institute will be on hand, and future weeks will feature institutions such as the Chinese American Museum. Also in West Plaza will be cooking demonstrations by Chinatown chefs, from 5-6 p.m. and 8-9 p.m. Speaking of food, in addition to the dozens of restaurants, the series will include several food trucks — another draw that Paley expects to bring in visitors who might not otherwise end up in Chinatown. DJs will lend a soundtrack to West Plaza until 10:30 p.m. Central Plaza will have DJs until the events end at midnight. The happenings on Aug. 14 and 21 will include the L.A. Craft Experience, a vendor village featuring handmade craft artisans. “We’re trying to re-brand Chinatown in the mind of Angelenos,” Paley said. “Because Angelenos do not think of Chinatown as a place to go to at night.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.


30 Downtown News

August 2, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

LISTINGS THE Don’T miss lisT

saTurday, aug. 7 American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life Miguel Contreras Learning Complex Stadium, 246 Lucas Ave., (800) 227-2345 relayforlife.org. 9 a.m.-9 a.m.: Relay For Life is an overnight activ-

Lit tle Sin atr a

ca le n da r

photo by Gene Ogami

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The Califo rn Downtown ia Philharmonic is ta ’s summer classical sla king up eclectic seri ck es at Walt Disney Co with an throughout n cert Hall the p.m., condu season. On Sunday, A ug. 8, at 2 ctor Victor Vener and h present “Fra is orc nk to Classics” , Tony & The Maestro: hestra C in a strang e-bedfellow ocktails of Frank s program Sinatra an d Tony B paired with ennett hits Sa Capriccioso, R int-Saens’ Introduction and im Elgar’s Enig sky-Korsakov’s Scheher Rondo azade and ma Variation s. If you wa the inspirati nt to on you can ask for the intriguing com know bination, Vener himse lf a at 1 p.m. in BP Hall. A t a pre-concert talk t (800) 745-3 000 or calph 111 S. Grand Ave., il.org.

photo courtes y of

evilive/M. N unez

photo by Craig Schwartz

The California African American Museum currently has a unique exhibition, one more personal and immersive than the more standard critical-based art shows. Aptly titled Our Love of John T. Scott,, it celebrates and pays tribute to the late New Orleans native, creating a portrait of the artist through his work, through the eyes of fellow artists and friends, and through notes, film clips, letters, photos and videos; it all can be glimpsed while the music Scott listened to in his studio plays throughout the museum. His famous kinetic sculptures and large woodcut prints reflected African, African-American, Caribbean and Southern Creole cultures and experience. The show runs through Oct. 31 at 600 State Drive, (213) 744-7432 or caamuseum.org.

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Every bad guy has a Padraic, a so n Ir ish politic ft spot. For cats. In fac a l terrori t, the gun-lo ated by p ving chara st, it’s laywright cter creMa ballistic w hen he fin rtin McDonagh go ds out tha es Thomas h t his as of Inishmo been murdered. Th kitty Wee eL re bloody on is a comedy, folks — ieutenant e to be su re — starr a dark and (Star Trek’s ing young Ca ptain Kirk) Chris Pine broken an as the hea ti-hero ou rtt fo running a t the Mark r revenge. The pla y, on Aug. 8 Taper Fo rum, clos ,s es some wic o now’s your last ked ch (213) 628-2 laughs. At 135 N. ance for Grand Av 772 or cen e., tertheatre group.org .

photo courtesy AEG Live

a diva de las bandas,” aka Jenni Rivera, graces the Nokia Theatre with her royal presence for a two-night stand Aug. 6-7, at 8 p.m. Rivera, a first generation MexicanAmerican who was born and raised in Long Beach, has established herself as the premier female singer of regional Mexican music, a genre dominated by men. Brass-based banda includes a melting pot of musical styles — its German polka roots, rancheras, corridos, cumbias, baladas, boleros, pop and rock. Rivera adds girl power to the mix. At 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6000 or nokiatheatrelalive.com.

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Se nd in ca M form len is a da s L tio r@ ist n a do sub nd wn m p tow issi ossi nn ons ble ew to Do n’t s.c om .

Friday, aug. 6 Metabolic Studio Public Salons 1745 N. Spring St. #4, (323) 226-1158 or farmlab.org. Noon: “Fair Trade, Sweat-free Labor and What We Can All Do to Help End Slavery in Manufacturing” features Leslie Gersicoff, who chairs the Los Angeles Network to End Slavery. Japanese American Cultural & Community Center JACCC Plaza, 244 S. San Pedro St., (213) 628-2725 or jaccc.org. 7 p.m.: The “Movies on the Plaza” series continues. Timeless is a series of three concert films featuring the music of composers/arrangers that have influenced hip-hop. J.ROCC of the Beat Junkies will be mixing all three films live for this outdoor screening and Dublab will screen the best videos from their Vision Version film project. Friday Night Flicks 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. Sunset: Pershing Square’s amphitheatre transforms into an outdoor movie palace with tonight’s screening of 1950’s classic Sunset Boulevard. Presented on a 40 x 20 foot outdoor screen, movies are free with lawn seating. Bring a blanket and snacks.

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Tuesday, aug. 3 Tuesday Night Project JACCC Plaza, 244 South San Pedro St., tuesdaynightproject.org. 7:15 p.m.: Tuesday Night Project presents live performance, music, poetry, short film, live-stream broadcasts and an eclectic gathering of Los Angeles art and community. Thursday, aug. 5 MOCA Grand Avenue Art Talk 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-1745 or moca.org. 6:30 p.m.: In conjunction with Dennis Hopper Double Standard, MOCA presents a conversation exploring Hopper and his relationship with longtime friend and collaborator, artist Bruce Conner. Barbara Steffen, an independent curator currently organizing a Conner exhibition at Kunsthalle, Vienna, will moderate the discussion. California African American Museum 600 State Drive (213) 744-2024 or caamuseum.org. 7 p.m.: On the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, CAAM presents Spike Lee’s HBO documentary, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Parts to be screened on Thursdays in August, followed by a community dialogue led by Dr. Rema Reynolds. Admission is free; reservations required.

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Who has been plucking and strumming for 50 years and recorded more than 40 albums and 3,000 sessions? Real live guitar hero Lee Ritenour. The master drops in at the Grammy Museum Sound Stage for a conversation about his influences, his collaborations, his technique and his newest album, 6 String Theory, on Tuesday, Aug. 3, at 8 p.m. The multi-styled release features such axe legends as BB King, George Benson, Slash and John Scofield, and introduces young bucks like 16-yearold classical guitarist Shon Boublil, from Montreal, who won a YouTube competition conceived by Ritenour. He’ll be signing the CD and taking audience questions after the talk. And he’ll probably play a little bit too. At L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org.

Ba nd aB om | be r, a @ nd a

SPONSORED LISTINGS Winners Choice Fundraiser Midnight Mission, 601 S. San Pedro St., for tickets call (877) 338-2968. Through Sept. 15: A $50 ticket can earn you the chance to win a new 2010 BMW 750 or $65,000 cash while also helping those in need. Tickets for The Midnight Mission 2010 Winner’s Choice fundraiser are now on sale and include 30 prizes worth more than $100,000. For more information go to WinnersChoiceMidnightMission.com. Grand Performances California Plaza, 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 6872159 or grandperformances.org. Aug. 6, noon: The Indus Valley Civilization plays Indo-jazz. Aug. 7, 8 p.m.: The Grand Performances films series presents Jeanne De L’Arc, the 1928 French silent masterpiece. L.A. composer George Sarah performs a new score with string and choir quartets to complement the film. Aug. 8, 8 p.m.: Latin America Cinemateca of Los Angeles presents a wide-ranging survey of new and classic Latin American and Carribean music videos and shorts. Downtown Stage Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., 213-847-4970 laparks.org/pershingsquare. Aug. 5, 8-10 p.m.: Spaceland Under the Stars presents Gamble House. Aug. 6, dusk: Friday Night Flicks presents an outdoor screening of Sunset Boulevard. Aug. 7, 8 p.m.: Live rock with Fishbone and the Janks.

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August 2, 2010

Downtown News 31

DowntownNews.com

But Wait, There’s More!

Additional Event Information on the Web

LADOWNTOWNNEWS.COM/CALENDAR : EVENTS | ROCK, POP & JAZZ | CLASSICAL MUSIC THEATER, OPERA & DANCE | ART SPACES | FILM | BARS & CLUBS | MUSEUMS | FARMERS MARKETS | TOURS ity that mobilizes communities across the country to celebrate survivorship, remember those who lost their lives to cancer and raise money for the fight against cancer. Teams camp out and take turns walking or running around a track or path. Esotouric Bus Tours Departing at 1001 N. Alameda, (323) 223-2767 or esotouric.com 11 a.m.-3 p.m.: “The New Chinatowns” explores how the Beverly Hills of the East crashed and burned in the 1920s, became a refuge for hardworking Italian-American immigrants and hard-drinking cowpokes, and saw the birth of the mass-produced potato chip and the Hula Hoop, before exploding into a new American Chinatown. Readings at Metropolis Metropolis Books, 440 S. Main St., (213) 612-0174 or metropolisbooksla.com. 4 p.m.: Eva Gordon reads and discusses her Wolf Maiden Chronicles. Grand Performances California Plaza, 350 S. Grand Ave., grandperformances.org. 8 p.m.: The 1928 French silent masterpiece La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc screens. Composer George Sarah performs a new score with string and choir quartets to complement the extreme close ups, innovative camera angles, distinctive lighting choices and rapid edits. Sunday, Aug. 8 Classic Tetris World Championship Downtown Independent, 251 S. Main St., (213) 6171033 or tetrischampionship.com. Noon-11 p.m.: This is an all-day event open to the public. Come test your skills against the world’s greatest players and compete for a spot in the semifinals and also for prizes. Grand Performances California Plaza, 350 S. Grand Ave., grandperformances.org. 8 p.m.: Latin America Cinemateca of Los Angeles presents a wide-ranging survey of new and classic Latin American and Caribbean music videos and shorts in “Video Jukebox.”

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Café Metropol 923 E. Third St., (213) 613-1537 or cafemetropol.com. Aug. 6, 8-10 p.m.: Star Shareef Quartet. Aug. 7, 8-10 p.m.: Lucia Iman. Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. Aug. 6, 9 p.m.: The Fringe Radio Coalition presents Shirley Rolls with their jam glam psychedelic music. Aug. 7, 10 p.m.: Lost Highway presents I See Hawks in LA. Conga Room L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic, (213) 749-0445 or congaroom.com. Aug. 5, 8 p.m.: Alternative Latin rock band Hello Seahorse, direct from Mexico City. Club Nokia Corner of Olympic Blvd. and Figueroa St., clubnokia.com. Aug. 3, 8 p.m.: Hillsong Live with Reuben Morgan. Grand Performances California Plaza, 350 S. Grand Ave., grandperformances.org. Aug. 6, noon: Lionel Loueke. Aug. 6, 8 p.m.: C. Bernard Jackson legacy presentation features Troker, Dwight Trible, Kamau Daaood and others TBA. Nokia Theatre 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6000 or nokiatheatrelalive.com. Aug. 6, 8 p.m.: Jenni Rivera, Queen of the Banda. Pershing Square Downtown Stage Concert Series 532 S. Olive St., (213) 473-5557 or laparks.org/ pershingsquare. Aug. 7: Fishbone and The Janks. Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com. Aug. 3, 10 p.m.: Dirty Ed Tuesdays. Aug. 5, 10 p.m.: Rosie Flores and Ruby James. Aug. 6, 10 p.m.: Soul Dance Freakout with Greg Foreman. Aug. 7, 10 p.m.: Overnight Lows, Bad Assets and Gestapo Khazi. Aug. 8, 10 p.m.: The White Mystery Band. Saturdays @ California Plaza 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 434-7944 or downtownmusicproject.com Aug. 6, 10 p.m.: R&B acts Philip Clark and Jeremian Roiko. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., sevengrand.la.

Aug. 3, 10 p.m.: The Makers, the house band. Walt Disney Concert Hall 111 S. Grand Ave., (800) 745-3000 or calphil.org. Aug. 8, 2 p.m.: The California Philharmonic’s summer series presents “Frank, Tony & The Maestro: Cocktails to Classics” featuring Saint-Saens “Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso,” RimskyKorsakov “Scheherazade” and Elgar “Enigma Variations.” At 1 p.m. in BP Hall, Conductor Victor Vener discusses the musical selections.

FILM Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. Aug. 5, 7 p.m.: Cinefest presents Person of Interest, in which Terrance Dyer is a veteran of the war in Iraq, a self-proclaimed American patriot and seasoned combat fighter, now living underground in the streets of Seattle and fighting an equally hairtrigger battle with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Q&A with filmmaker Gregory Bayne and rooftop party following screening. Flagship Theatres University Village 3323 S. Hoover St., (213) 748-6321 or flagshipmovies.com. Visit website for current schedule. IMAX Theater California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 7442019 or californiasciencecenter.org. Through Sept. 6: Hubble 3D enables movie-goers to journey through distant galaxies to explore the grandeur and mysteries of our celestial surroundings, and accompany space-walking astronauts as they attempt the most difficult and important tasks in NASA’s history. Through Sept. 6: Journey to the royal tombs of Egypt and explore the history of ancient Egyptian society as told through the mummies of the past in Mummies 3D: Secrets of the Pharaohs. Through Sept. 6: Featuring nine-time world surfing champion Kelly Slater, The Ultimate Wave Tahiti 3D will immerse audiences in the story of an ocean wave and the lives it impacts and transforms. From astounding surfing action to the chaos of ocean storms, the film leads audiences on a quest to understand one of this planet’s most intriguing and dramatic phenomena. Regal Cinema L.A. Live 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (877) 835-5734 or lalive.com. Through Aug. 5: Cats & Dogs: Revenge of Kitty Galore 3D (12, 2:20, 4:40, 7 and 9:20 p.m.); Cats & Dogs: Revenge of Kitty Galore (12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:40 and 10 p.m.); Charlie St. Cloud (11:30 a.m. and 2, 4:30,7, 7:50 and 9:30 p.m.); Dinner for Schmucks (11:10 and 11:50 a.m. and 1:50, 2:30, 4:30, 5:10, 7:10, 7:50, 9:50 and 10:30 p.m.); Ramona and Beezus (11 a.m. and 1:30, 4, 6:40 and 9:10 p.m.); Salt (11:40 a.m. and 12:20, 2:10, 2:50, 4:50, 5:30, 7:20, 8, 10:10 and 10:50 p.m.); Inception (12:10, 12:50, 3:30, 4:10, 6:50, 7:30, 10:20 and 11 p.m.); Despicable Me (11:30 a.m. and 2, 4:20, 6:50 and 9:10 p.m.); Despicable Me 3D (12:10, 2:40, and 5 p.m.); The Kids Are All Right (11:50 a.m. and 2:20, 5, 7:40 and 10:30 p.m.); Toy Story 3 in Disney Digital 3D (1:20, 4, 6:40 and 9:20 p.m.). Aug. 6 (partial list): Step Up 3D (11:20 a.m. and 2, 4:40, 7:20 and 10 p.m.).

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE Fabric Alexandria Hotel, 501 S. Spring St., (213) 489-3703 or companyofangels.org. Aug. 6-7, 8 p.m.; Aug. 8, 7 p.m.: Company of Angels, in partnership with the Thai Community Development Center, presents the world premiere of Fabric by Henry Ong. In El Monte, law enforcement officials discovered 72 Thai nationals confined in an apartment complex ringed with barbed wire. Lured to this country with promises of achieving the American dream, the Thai workers instead found themselves engulfed in the harsh reality of the garment industry. Through Aug. 8. The Lieutenant of Inishmore Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. Aug. 3-7, 8 p.m.; Aug. 7, 2:30 p.m.; Aug. 8, 1 and 6:30 p.m.: The Lieutenant of Inishmore is clever, devilishly rakish and, when he’s not torturing his enemies, a lover of cats. It’s this sliver of humanity — juxtaposed against the cold, cruel circumstances of political terrorism — that drives this play to its wicked depths. Through Aug. 8. New Original Works Festival 2010 REDCAT, 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. Aug. 5-7, 8:30 p.m.: For three weeks REDCAT is

a vibrant performance laboratory as Los Angeles artists gather to push the boundaries of creative expression in new dance, theater, music and multimedia performance works. Ser Alexandria Hotel, 501 S. Spring St., (213) 489-3703 or companyofangels.org. Aug. 3, 8 p.m.: Karen Anzoategui’s one-womanshow Ser follows her soccer journey from Los Angeles to Buenos Aires with her zany family to see Diego Maradona, her soccer God. Amidst the romance of Buenos Aires and the music of James Brown, Karen plays the game of life, soccer and politics. Something to Crow About Bob Baker’s Marionettes, 1345 W. First St., (213) 2509995 or bobbakermarionettes.com. Aug. 3-6, 10:30 a.m.; July 7-8, 2:30 a.m.: Bob Baker’s marionettes continues its 50th anniversary season with its most requested show, Something to Crow About, in which the marionettes enact a musical “Day at the Farm.” Through Sept. 26.

MUSEUMS African American Firefighter Museum 1401 S. Central Ave., (213) 744-1730 or aaffmuseum.org. Ongoing: An array of firefighting relics dating to 1924, including a 1940 Pirsch ladder truck, an 1890 hose wagon, uniforms from New York, L.A. County and City of L.A. firefighters, badges, helmets, photographs and other artifacts. Annette Green Perfume Museum FIDM, second floor, 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 6241200 or fidm.edu. Ongoing: One of a kind, the museum is dedicated to enhancing our understanding the art, culture and science of the olfactory. Originally opened in New York City in 1999, the collection — 2,000 bottles, perfume presentations and documentary ephemera dating from the late 1800s to the present — was donated to FIDM in 2005. Also, “High Style: Perfume and the Haute Couture” features a selection of fragrance bottles and packaging that reflect the many ways that fame inspires design.

Listings for additional concerts, exhibits and more in Downtown Los Angeles can be found on our website. Go to ladowntownnews.com/calendar for full information, including time and location, for all the happenings in Downtown. California African American Museum 600 State Drive, (213) 744-7432 or caamuseum.org. Through Jan. 1, 2011: “How We Roll” features four decades of skateboarding legends starting with the birth of surfing and the influence of roller skating to its evolution into the dynamic sport of today. Through Oct. 31: “Our Love of John T. Scott” examines the New Orleans artist’s life, artwork, journey and private reflections and the people he influenced. The exhibition includes lyrical sculptures, paintings and four-by-six-foot woodcut blocks used to make large-scale prints. Ongoing: The multi-functional “Gallery of Discovery” offers visitors the opportunity to connect with the lineage of their own family, engage in artistic workshops, educational tours and other programs of historical discoveries. Hear recordings of actual living slaves from the Library of Congress archives and discover stories from the past. California Science Center 700 State Drive, (323) 724-3623 or californiasciencecenter.org. Current limited engagement: “Mummies of the World,” the largest traveling exhibition of mummies ever assembled, presents a never-before-seen collection of both accidental and intentionally preserved mummies including ancient mummies and important artifacts from Asia, Oceania, South America and Europe as well as ancient Egypt, dating as far back as 6,500 years.

2

Easy ways to submit Your

Event Info

4 WEB: LADowntownNews.com/calendar/submit 4 EMAIL: Calendar@DowntownNews.com

Email: Send a brief description, street address and public phone number. Submissions must be received 10 days prior to publication date to be considered for print.

Indus Valley Civilization Friday, August 6 @ Noon Troker, Dwight Trible & Kamau Daáood and Indus Valley Civilization Friday, August 6 @ 7pm Film Series: La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc with original score by George Sarah The Classic 1928 French silent masterpiece w/new score from George Sarah Saturday, August 7 @ 8pm Film Series: Video Jukebox New and classic Latin American and Carribean music videos and shorts Saturday, August 7 @ 8pm

LA’s best free summer concert series

ntown LA California Plaza • 350 S. Grand • Dow

www.grandperformances.org • 213.687.

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August 2, 2010

Downtown News 33

DowntownNews.com

CLASSIFIED

place your ad online at www.ladowntownnews.com

FOR RENT

L.A. Downtown News Classifieds Call: 213-481-1448 Classified Display & Line ads Deadlines: Thursday 12 pm REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL Condos/Townhouses HIGH RISE CONDO in Dtown LA, Walking distance from Staples Center/LA live.City views.2 bdrm 2 bth w/ wood floors/new bthrms/ kitchen-stnlss steel. Amen:theater/lounge/gym/24 hr concierge/guard, and gated parking. (562) 360-4367 Real Estate Services CONSIDERING Foreclosure? Are you late in payments? A short sale may be your solution. Call Lady Rodriguez, Realtor 310-600-7534. Represent both buyers and sellers.

Buy Sell Lease

BestLARealEstate.com 323.298.0100

lofts for sale

“Be wary of out of area companies. Check with the local Better Business Bureau before you send any money for fees or services. Read and understand any contracts before you sign. Shop around for rates.”

Homes for Sale

LA’s #1 Loft Site

FORECLOSED HOME Auction. 400+ So Cal Homes / Auction: August 14. Open House: July 31, August 7 & 8, 2010. REDC / View Full Listings. www.Auction. com RE Brkr 01093886. (CalSCAN)

TheLoftExpertGroup.com

SOUTH PASADENA Motivated Seller! Liv: 2500 sf, Lot: 10,000 sf. Built in 2007. Reduced to $975,000. Paxton 626-2013464.

Buying, Leasing or Selling a Loft?

TheLoftGuys.net Call 213-625-1313

Bill Cooper

Ultimate life living

Beyond Real Estate! Downtown LA Resident Realtors since 2001

BUY YOUR LOFT with the BEST TEAM in

DOWNTOWN LA

213 626 5433

WWW.ULTIMATELIFELIVING.COM

Meridian Capital Real Estate Services, Inc. - (800) 729-5111 - DRE #01822666

SOUTHERN COLORADO’S Best Land Bargains! Deedbacks, repos, foreclosures. Starting as low as $427 per acre. Excellent financing. Call 1-866-696-5263 x 5548. www.ColoradoRanchdeal. com. (Cal-SCAN)

Out of State BANK OWNED Land! 10 acres. Trout stream, $39,900. Substantial discounts, limited availability. Beautiful Fish Lake Valley acreage w/year round rainbow trout stream in foothills of Boundary Peak, Nevada’s highest mountain. Gorgeous snow-capped views. Great recreational opportunities. Upscale ranch community. Financing available to qualified buyers. Call 1-877-6693737. (Cal-SCAN)

FOR RENT

Lofts/Unfurnished

REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL retail space lease/sale

Retail Store Front

Downtown since 2002

213.598.7555

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

$1000 gross lease a month Downtown LA 1250-2500 sq.ft., 20ft ceiling, water 1403 S. Hill St. Call Pierre or Terri at 818-212-8333 or 213-744-9911

Office Space Lease/Sale LEASE, 1250+ SQ FT, Open office space, Downtown LA, near Music Center. Auto gate with plenty of parking. 310-2937455.

Old Bank District The original Live/Work Lofts from $1,100 Cafes, Bars, Shops, Galleries, Parking adjacent. Pets no charge

AWESOME ONE BEDROOM and studio in renovated classic 1905 building. West downtown/ MacArthur Park. High ceilings, views, walk to Metro-rail, $720 to $1,025 util. paid 213-389-0753. CHARMING Studio w/patio $650. Spacious 1 bedroom $950 & 2 bedroom $1295 with private garages. Quiet small street. 805772-9079. Free ReNT SPECIALS @ the Medici. Penthouse 1 & 2 bdrm apts. Granite kitchens, washer/ dryers, business center, 2 pools, spa! Visit TheMedici.com for a full list of amenities. Call 888886-3731.

FREE RENT SPECIALS Up to $3500 off select apartment homes! Additional Look + Lease specials may apply. Free parking, free tanning, free wi-fi + biz center avail. Cardio Salon, pool, Spa, steamroom, sauna. Call us today. 866-742-0992. ORSINI III - Now Pre-leasing for May 2010. Hard Hat Tours Available by appointment. Never Lived in, Brand New Luxury Apartment Homes, Free Parking, Karaoke Room, Free Wi-Fi, Indoor Basketball, Uncomparable Amenity Package. Call today to schedule a tour - 866-479-1764. Continued on next page

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

Call 213.253.4777 LAloft.com

Apartments/Unfurnished

Milano Lofts Now Leasing! • Gorgeous Layouts • 10-15’ Ceilings • Fitness Center • Wi-Fi Rooftop Lounge • Amazing Views 6th + Grand Ave. • 213.627.1900 milanoloftsla.com

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


34 Downtown News

August 2, 2010

Twitters/DowntownNews

Continued from previous page

EMPLOYMENT Drivers COMPANY DRIVERS (Solos & Hazmat Teams) * Great Pay * Great Miles * CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated & regional positions available. Call 866789-8947. Swift. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVE FOR THE BEST! Gordon Trucking, Inc. Immediate Openings!! Teams - All the miles you can log! Regional & OTR openings. Full Benefits, 401k, Regular Hometime. We have the Freight! Talk to a recruiter live! www.TeamGTI.com 1-888832-6484 EOE. (Cal-SCAN)

DRIVERS-ASAP! New Pay Increase! 34-40 cpm. Excellent Benefits. Need CDL-A & 3 months recent OTR. 1-877-258-8782. www. MeltonTruck.com. (Cal-SCAN) REEFER & FLATBED Drivers Needed! Experienced drivers & Class A commercial students welcome! Assistance obtaining your Class A license through Prime’s Training program. 1-800-277-0212. www.PrimeInc.com. (Cal-SCAN) TRUCK DRIVERS Wanted! More Hometime! Top Pay! Excellent Benefits! Newer Equipment! Up to $.41/mile company drivers! Heartland Express 1-800-441-4953. www.HeartlandExpress.com. (Cal-SCAN)

General AUTOMOTIVE Great jobs in downtown LA! Full time or part time. Two blocks south of the Staples Center at Figueroa & Venice. Toyota Central is growing! Sales Associates - all levels. Internet Associates. Service Technicians. Service Consultants. Drivers. Cashiers. Receptionists. Bilingual Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Middle Eastern and women encouraged to apply. Great compensation package and employee benefits. Please call 800-597-5516 or send resume to autosuccess@ aol.com. EOE.

voted downtown's best residential living six years in a row

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPS needed for Herbalife retailing. Good phone diction; will train. Work from home option. High income potential. www.teamcoach2.com HELP WANTED Movie Extras. Earn up to $150/day. People needed for background in a major film production. Exp. not required. 888-366-0843 HealtH Care ACUPUNCTURIST - MS in Acupuncture or Oriental Medicine req’d. Mail resume to Cho & Lee Health Center, 3240 Wilshire Bl. #205, Los Angeles CA 90010. ACUPUNCTURIST. MASTER’S degree in Acupuncture or Oriental Medicine required. Mail resume to Nazareth Clinic Corp., 2140 W. Olympic Blvd. Ste. 321, Los Angeles, CA 90006, Atten: Jeremy Choi. OffiCe/CleriCal JOBS NATIONWIDE! Admin., HR, Clerical, Accounting, Mgmt., Tech., etc. - www.Jobs444.com and www.JobsBloom.com.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Help WanteD TRUCK DRIVERS: CDL training. Part-time driving job with Fulltime benefits. Get paid to train in the California Army National Guard. Up to $12,500 bonus. www.NationalGuard.com/Truck or 1-800-GO-GUARD. (CalSCAN)

SERVICES attOrneys

ABOGADO DE IMMIGRACION! Family, Criminal, P.I. for more than 20 yrs! Child Support / Custody Necesita Permiso de trabajo? Tagalog / Español / Korean

Get your Green CarD or CitiZensHip Law Office of H. Douglas Daniel Esq., (213) 689-1710

eDuCatiOn HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in 4 weeks! Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-5623650 ext. 60 www.SouthEasternHS.com (Cal-SCAN)

Business serviCes

finanCial serviCes

ADVERTISE ONLINE in a network of 140-plus newspaper websites. Border to Border with one order! $7 cost per thousand impressions statewide. Minimum $5,000 order. Call for details: (916) 288-6010. www. CaliforniaBannerAdNetwork. com. (Cal-SCAN)

CASH NOW! Get cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (Cal-SCAN)

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING in 240 Cal-SCAN newspapers for the best reach, coverage, and price. 25-words $550. Reach over 6 million Californians! Free email brochure. Call (916) 2886019. www.Cal-SCAN.com. (Cal-SCAN) DISPLAY ADVERTISING in 140 Cal-SDAN newspapers statewide for $1,550! Reach over 3 million Californians! Free email brochure. Call (916) 288-6019. www.Cal-SDAN.com. (CalSCAN) CleaninG CONCEPTO’S CLEANING Crew. Professional, experienced, cleans apartments, homes, offices and restaurants. Call for a quote. 323-459-3067 or 818-409-9183.

MisC. serviCes ELECTRICIAN Ccertification Training. We teach you an easy way to Pass your Test. Call for a class near you. 949-698-3375. $300 fee randelectric@gmail. com. (Cal-SCAN) REDUCE YOUR Debt Now! 10k+ in Credit Cards, Store Cards, Medical Bills! Free Debt Settlement Matching Service! Debt Free in 12-48 months. Free Consultation. 1-800-630-1466. (Cal-SCAN) WORLDMARK / Timeshare Sell / Rent For CASH!!! We’ll find you Buyers/ Renters! 10+ years of success! Over $78 Million in offers in 2009! www. SellaTimeshare.com Call (877) 554-2098. (Cal-SCAN)

Luxury Rooms in Downtown Monthly Rents Start at $780 1 & 2 Rooms Available

On Spring St.

Spring Tower Lofts:

1900 sqft, LOFT $2650/mo • 17 ft ceilings, Live/Work space • 14 story bldg. • Rooftop garden terrace w/city view • Pet friendly

Premiere Towers:

3 bdrm/2 bath, $2,100/mo. • Rooftop garden terrace/ GYM w/city view • 24 hr. doorman • free (1) parking

FREE RENT SPECIALS! • • • • • • • • • • •

Studio, one & two Bedrooms Granite kitchens Italian marble counter baths Washer/dryer in every home Crown molding Direct TV & Internet access Dramatic views of the city Free gated parking Sand volleyball court Roof top pool and spa Fitness centers with sauna

24-hour doorman Spectacular waterscapes Study Library FREE tanning bed Private one acre park Golf driving cages Putting green Tennis courts

walk to l.a. live and nokia theater

888.886.3731 •TheMedici.com 725 Bixel St., Los Angeles, CA 90017

We are located in a prime area in Downtown LA nice neighborhood w/ salon, market, café etc. Wired for high speed internet & cable, central heat & A/C

Please call 213.627.6913 www.cityloftsquare.com

Fully furnished with TV, telephone, microwave, refrigerator. Full bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly maid service.

Special STUDeNT RaTe! $690 1 person

Stay 3 months & get

$100 Off

Stay 6 months & get

$200 Off

Mayfair Hotel 1256 West 7th street

Simin (213) 484-9789 Ext. 555 or (213) 632-1111

City Lofts:

680 sqft, 16 ft ceilings, $1425/mo. • Granite marble top • Stainless steel appliances/refrigerator etc. • Pet friendly • • • • • • • •

• Fully Furnished • 100% Utilities Paid • • Refrigerator, Microwave & TV In Each Room • • Wireless Access Throughout Bldg. • Gym • • Close to USC & Loyola Law School • • Presidential Suite with Kitchen • Parking Available Onsite

Monthly from $650 utilities paid. (213) 627-1151

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

madison hotel Clean furnished single rooms. 24-hour desk clerk service. •Daily, $25.00 •Weekly, $99.00 •Monthly, $295.00 (213) 622-1508 423 East 7th St.

(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.)

Monthly from $550 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

LOFT LIVING

Your number 1 source for Loft sales, rentals and development! Downtownnews.com

Do you have something to sell?

Ad Copy: _________________________________________

Ad Prices

________________________________________________

(Marketplace and Automotive Categories ONLY) • Items under $300 • Items $301 to $500 • Items $501 to $1200 • Items $1201 to $2000 • Items $2001+…

Name: Address: City Phone: Cash $ Credit card #: Exp. Date:

FREE! $11.50 $14.00 $16.50 $19.00

12 words, 2 weeks 15 words 15 words 15 words 15 words

All ads run for 2 weeks. Ads may be renewed after two weeks for 50% off the original price of the ad.

With a circulation of State Check $

Zip Credit Card $

47,000,

our classifieds get results!

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

Restrictions: Offer good on private party ads only. Ads must be pre-paid by cash, check or credit card. Certain classifications excluded. Deadline: Thursday at noon for next issue.


August 2, 2010

Downtown News 35

DowntownNews.com

AUTOS

2007 VoLKsWAGeN JeTTA s Certified, (#ZV895/vin104373, $14,888, call 888-781-8102.

PRE-OWNED

DOWNtOWN l.A. AutO gROuP

2008 BMW 328I Mint condition, white/tan, stk c01055D1-2, 888879-9608

Porsche Volkswagen audi Mercedes-Benz nissan cheVrolet cadillac

2008 MerceDes BeNZ cLK350 coNVerTIBLe certified, low miles, navigation, leather, (243042), $37,994, call 888-319-8762.

2002 Porsche 911 TUrBo X-50 yellow, loaded, 28k miles, one owner, vin686559, $56,888, 888-685-5426.

For a complete list of our pre-owned inventory, go to www.DTLAMOTORS.com

2007 AUDI A3 gray, certified, ZA9668/044129, $20,888, call 888-583-0981. 2007 ForD F-150 (c100853-1 vin B88859) only $17,988, call 888-203-2967 2007 NIssAN ALTIMA 2.5 s certified,(Stock#NI3571/7N449473) $14,999, call 888-838-5089

DoNATe YoUr cAr: children’s cancer Fund! help save A child’s Life Through research & support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, easy & Tax Deductible. call 1-800-252-0615. (calscAN)

ITEMS FOR SALE Misc. itEMs seLL YoUr rV FAsT! online at rVT.com Access Millions of rV Buyers. Thousands of rVs sold- serving rV traders since 1999 www.rVT.com or call 877700-8798. (cal-scAN)

DoNATe YoUr VehIcLe! receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, Nonrunners Accepted, 1-888-4685964. (cal-scAN)

clOthiNg/JEWElRy MATerNITY cLoThING: $10.00+ Wholesale to the public. our brand of stimulus package to you. Buy Now! www.GotBelly. com

Sell your items under $300… 12 words, 2 weeks it’s FREE!

ANNOUNCEMENTS

sPORts/ExERc. EquiPMENt MeNs shIMANo gear bikes: nishiki (steel belted tires) $100; mountain bike $150 eD 424258-0834

PETS/ANIMALS

sPEciAl EVENts INTroDUcTIoN To ZeN Lectures, Five Thursdays, 7:30pm, Aug. 5th through sept. 2nd, Zenshuji Temple (Little Tokyo) Fee $70 http://www.zenshuji.org 213-624-8658

tV/ElEctRONics/cOMPutERs ANALoG cABLe reADY color TVs: 19 inch ($25), 13 inch(2 @ $15 each) eD 424-258-0834.

chuRchEs The BrIDGe / Little Tokyo: contemporary worship, 4:00pm sundays, 401 e Third st. www. thebridgewired.org.

We've got what you're searching for! DowntownNews.com

ADOPt A PEt ADoPT (or FosTer) your forever friend from Bark Avenue Foundation. Beautiful, healthy puppies, dogs, cats and kittens available at Downtown’s largest private adoption facility. call Dawn at 213-840-0153 or email Dawn@BarkAveLA.com or visit www.Bark Avenue Foundation. org.

AutOs WANtED A cAr DoNATIoN helping sick kids! Donate Your car to soNGs oF LoVe and make a sick child smile! Featured on NBc (ToDAY shoW), cNN. Tax-deductible, all vehicle conditions accepted. www.songsofLove.org 888-909soNG (7664). (cal-scAN)

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Additional Features: Kitchen Additional Facilities, Mail/Copy Features: Room, Conference Rooms, Mail/Copy Spectacular Views, Kitchen Facilities, Room, Fully Trained Staff Views, Conference Rooms, Spectacular Fully Trained Staff

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Pricing subject to change without notice.

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Voted Best Downtown Residential Real estate Agent Call us today! Bill Cooper • 213.598.7555 • TheLoftExpertGroup.com

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SENIOR QUALITY ASSURANCE ANALYST: Analyze & conduct product software requirements. Implement Test Strategies & Plans. Knowledge of SDLC, Microsoft .NET Framework, VB Script, Web Svcs & SQL Server & “JIRA” req. Req. Master in CS, CIS, Computer Applications or its foreign equivalency OR Bachelor in CS, CIS, Computer Applications or its foreign equivalency + 5 years progressive IT work exp. Resumes: Laura Ramirez, Green Dot Corp., 605 E. Huntington Dr., #205, Monrovia, CA 91016.

DowntownNews.com

ROb NESbiTT

rjn Heritage Realty, Inc. Specializing in Downtown condominiums since 1987 Ask the Downtown expert! Member: Central City Association 213.617.8225 Rob@RobDowntownLA.com RobDowntownLA.com

• Free Resident/Guest Parking in Gated Garage • Private Library, Business Center & Conference Rooms • Free Wi-Fi & DSL Computer Use • Resident Karaoke Lounge • Directors Screening Room • Lavish Fountains & Sculptures • On-Site Private Resident Park with Sand Volleyball, BBQ’s and Jogging Track • Night Light Tennis Courts • Indoor Basketball

Version Casaloma3L.A. Apartments

• Brunswick Four-Lane Virtual Bowling • Full Swing Virtual Golf • 3100 Square Foot Cybex Fitness Facility • Free Tanning Rooms • Massage Room, Sauna & Steam Room • Rooftop Pools with Dressing Rooms • Concierge Service • 24-Hour Doorman • 24/7 On-Site Management • Magnificent City Views *Amenities vary among communities

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Publication:

Includes utilities, basic cable channels, laundry room Size/Color: on site. Gated building in a good area. 208 W. 14th st. at hill st. Downtown LA

For English Call Pierre Design or Terri 213.744.9911 For Spanish Call Susana 213.749.0306

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Sunshine Generation

Take us home ADOPT (OR FOSTER) your forever friend from Bark Avenue Foundation. Beautiful, healthy puppies, dogs, cats and kittens available at Downtown’s largest private adoption facility. call Dawn at 213-840-0153 or email Dawn@BarkAveLA.com or visit www.Bark Avenue Foundation.org.

Singing, dancing, performing and fun! For boys & girls ages 3 and up!

SunshineGenerationLA.com 909-861-4433


36 Downtown News

August 2, 2010

Twitter/DowntownNews

We Got Games Billingsley on Track, Sparks Start a Streak Los Angeles Dodgers Dodger Stadium, 1000 Elysian Park Ave., (213) 224-1400 or dodgers.mlb.com. Aug. 2-7, 7:10 p.m.; Aug. 8, 1:10 p.m.: The Dodgers host the division leading Padres for a four-game set at the Ravine. Hopefully they can mimic their season-long performance against San Diego. In a memorable game last week, Andre Ethier, scratched from the starting lineup because of stomach illness, chipped in with a pinch hit two-run single in the seventh inning. Then there was Chad Billingsley’s second gutsy and scoreless start in a row. Meanwhile, the Blue Crew’s batting lineup will be bolstered by the addition of outfielder Scott Podsednik, acquired in a trade with Kansas City last week. After the Padres, the Nationals come to town for a weekend series. Unfortunately, L.A. fans probably will not get to see rookie

phenom Stephen Strasburg; he went on the injured list for Washington last week. Los Angeles Sparks Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 929-1300 or wnba.com/sparks. Aug. 4 and 6, 7:30 p.m.; Aug. 8, 5 p.m.: And just like that, a spark. L.A.’s WNBA team finally put together a winning streak. It may only be two games (as of press times), the minimum needed for a streak, but they gotta start somewhere, right? This week the Sparks are home, hosting the Chicago Sky, the Tulsa Shock and the San Antonio Silver Stars. Perhaps the home crowd will help the Tina Thompson and DeLisha Milton-Jones-led squad build their streak and salvage a mostly spark-less season. —Ryan Vaillancourt

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM

Profile for Los Angeles Downtown News

08-02-10  

Los Angeles Downtown News is a free weekly newspaper distributed in and around downtown Los Angeles.

08-02-10  

Los Angeles Downtown News is a free weekly newspaper distributed in and around downtown Los Angeles.

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