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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS

Old School Rides

June 6, 2011

Volume 40, Number 23

June 14-19, 2011 See ad on page 10 for more info.

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JuNE 14–19 2011

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

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Urban Scrawl on a city scandal.

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A piece of the past.

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Downtown Dining at a Kosher Kitchen The man who always works out.

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18 CALENDAR LISTINGS 24 MAP 29 CLASSIFIEDS

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Two 21-Year-Olds Find Their Niche With an All-Schnitzel Restaurant by Ryan E. Smith

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hile untold numbers of 20-somethings arrive in Los Angeles every year with dreams of making it big in Hollywood, Yakov Brenenson and Menachem Eliyahu had other plans. When they settled in the City of Angels last year, they brought along 20 suitcases and dreams of… schnitzel. It’s an unlikely approach, yes, but the two friends who grew up in Israel were dead set on creating a kosher restaurant dedicated to chicken coated in breadcrumbs. “We wanted to bring a new thing to a new area,” Brenenson said on a recent Thursday

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afternoon. “Originally it’s from Israel, this idea, the schnitzel store. It’s very big.” Last July, the two ultra-Orthodox Jews opened their first schnitzel shop, the appropriately named Schnitzly (it means “my schnitzel” in Hebrew) in the Pico-Robertson neighborhood. It was a natural location given the area’s dense Jewish population. In March, they expanded Schnitzly to a possibly surprising location: Downtown Los Angeles. Located at 119 E. Seventh St., the restaurant’s sign beckons passersby with a chicken’s giant red comb and beak. Inside, drop-down see Schnitzel, page 27

photo by Gary Leonard

Yakov Brenenson (left) and Menachem Eliyahu opened the kosher schnitzel restaurant Schnitzly on Seventh Street in March. While they expect to have observant Jews as customers, they also hope to pull in the Downtown residential community.

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2 Downtown News

Twitter/DowntownNews

June 6, 2011

AROUNDTOWN Eat Five Courses, Help Start a School

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owntown parents and others interested in elementary education have a chance this week to eat a gourmet fivecourse meal and, simultaneously, help start a school. On Saturday, June 11, Tiara Café will host a fundraiser and launch party for El Rio Charter School, a progressive public institution scheduled to launch in September 2012. Tickets are $75 for the 6 p.m. event that will feature a menu assembled by Tiara owner Fred Eric (those who arrive after 7:30 p.m. for tapas and drinks will pay $40). El Rio, slated to rise in Northeast Los Angeles but open to all elementary school students, will be a public facility inspired by the Waldorf model; the curriculum will incorporate art, music and storytelling, and emphasize the use of imagination to encourage critical thinking and develop math, science, verbal and problem-solving skills. The fundraiser, at 127 E. Ninth St., will include an art auction and music by Joey Altruda and Preston Smith. More information and tickets are at elriocharterschool.org.

June 30 Lease Deadline For Olvera Street Merchants

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erchants at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument have until June 30 to sign a new rental agreement or face eviction. Following recommendations from the El Pueblo Commission, the City Council last week agreed on the sunset clause that states that, “After June 30, 2011,

the Concession Agreement offered by the City to the Olvera Street tenants will no longer be available to the tenants.” The move comes after city negotiators and merchants’ representatives appeared to have reached a deal that would raise rates and keep tenants in their spaces for up to 40 years. On May 3, the council unanimously approved the agreement that offered rates up to 30% below what was imposed on merchants in April 2010. If tenants don’t sign by June 30, and accept a plan that gives them five years to pay back rents and phases in increases up to market rates, they will have to pay the higher rents imposed last April. Paul Hamilton, an attorney representing the Olvera Street Merchants Association, said the deadline is a reasonable time period and he thinks any outstanding issues will be resolved by then. He noted that a few sticking points remain, among them a need for a re-evaluation of what qualifies as retail and storage space in some of the larger businesses, and restrictions on what kind of merchandise can be sold.

Waiting Game for High Speed Rail

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he California High Speed Rail project would ultimately have significant impacts on Downtown, and not just because the so-called bullet train would whisk Downtowners to San Francisco, Anaheim and San Diego at up to 250 miles per hour. Area residents and commuters had a chance to check out some basics on Wednesday, June 1, when the California High Speed Rail Authority hosted an open house focused on the Los Angeles to San Diego sec-

photo by Gary Leonard

One of Downtown’s most popular events, Hope for Firefighters, returned last week. The happening on Thursday, June 2, which included muster games and sales of firehouse food, raised $120,000 for the Los Angeles Firemen’s Relief Association’s Widows, Orphans and Disabled Firemen’s Fund.

tion. Perhaps the deepest local impact will be found in how the train approaches and departs Union Station. That question is still largely unanswered; several studies and political tugs-of-war over other sections of the 500-mile track mean that an environmental report that will lay out options for how the train will approach Downtown from the north is at least eight months away. CHSRA officials are currently studying whether to reintroduce a route to Los Angeles from Bakersfield that travels along the I-5 Grapevine, instead of swerving east to run through Palmdale and the Antelope Valley.

If the Grapevine route is deemed feasible from engineering and funding perspectives, it would be included in the environmental report, and the study scheduled to be released in the first quarter of 2012 would be pushed back another six to eight months, said Dan Tempelis, project manager of the L.A. to Palmdale route. Meanwhile, the L.A. to Anaheim route remains in the draft EIR phase. The report will present an array of options for approaching Union Station from the south. It is expected to be released for public comment in the fall of 2012. see Around Town, page 26

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June 6, 2011

Downtown News 3

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4 Downtown News

Hail the Kitchen Wizards

Twitter/DowntownNews

June 6, 2011

EDITORIALS Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis

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he revival of the Downtown dining scene has received ample attention. In addition to Los Angeles Downtown News, numerous media outlets and food blogs chronicle the comings and goings (mostly the comings) of restaurants to the area. There’s major interest among residents, people who work in the community and those outside the area on which chef is cooking what and where. It’s no surprise that Downtown is attracting top chefs. What is a surprise is how many of them are flocking here. Last week, Downtown News published “The 11 Most Interesting Chefs in Downtown,” highlighting a collection of kitchen wizards who are pushing food forward in the neighborhood. Even we were surprised that a geographically compact area has so many engaged in accolade-earning, cutting-edge cuisine. What is perhaps most interesting is that this is not the type of foodforward focus seen in other cities. This is not limited to (nor even primarily) upscale establishments putting a spirited spin on $35 entrees. This is not all about chichi chefs going crazy with foam, gelatin or other quasi test tube concoctions. Instead, the Downtown kitchen wizards are upping the dining ante on a number of fronts. Yes, there are high-end food auteurs like John Rivera Sedlar at South Park Latin food establishment Rivera, but there are also people like Ilan Hall, who is essentially inventing a whole new cuisine, Jewish-Scottish fare, at The Gorbals. There is Josef Centeno, whose Lazy Ox Canteen creations let people eat parts of animals (pig’s ear, beef neck, etc.) they may never have considered sampling. There is Judy Han, who at Mendocino Farms takes fine dining ingredients off fancy plates and puts them between artisan bread in sandwiches. The list goes on, and much of it is affordable. The food has a benefit beyond just giving people a place to eat. As a whole, these chefs continue the momentum of the neighborhood. They give curious diners a new reason to come Downtown, and once here, people can be exposed to other options, whether it’s a place to grab a drink, catch a show, go dancing or something else. The power of inventive cuisine is not limited to what’s on the menu. So far, Downtown has done a good job of welcoming these chefs, with reasonable rents, nearby food and farmers markets and enough adventurous diners to build a clientele. The community should recognize and appreciate what it has. There has probably never been a better time than now to find a new place to eat in Downtown.

Put Union Station Tie in Streetcar Vision

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he effort to build a Downtown streetcar is still in the early stage. Even though the project spearheaded by 14th District City Councilman José Huizar has raised about $10 million and secured some prominent backers, the vast majority of the funding still must be pulled together. That remains the most significant challenge, considering the estimated $125 million price tag. Another issue, one that is coming into focus now, concerns the specific route of the streetcar. For three years we’ve known basically where it’s going — it would connect the hubs of L.A. Live and the Music Center on Bunker Hill. Both in honor of past streetcar lines and for the practical reason of stimulating the revival of Broadway, it would use that corridor as a principal southbound spine. The main northbound route would probably be on a nearby Historic Core street. Now another question is bubbling to the surface, and it’s a good one with a clear answer, even if the answer creates additional challenges: Should the route be extended, either south toward Washington Boulevard and Los Angeles Trade-Technical College, or northeast, so that the terminus is near Union Station? We think the northeast extension is a solid idea worth serious consideration. While it would likely spur a price hike for an already expensive effort, it seems like a no-brainer to ensure that the line would have a connection to Southern California’s primary mass transit center. Not making the streetcar reach (or get close to) Union Station would be a Downtown equivalent of the goof of not running the Green Line into LAX. In the past month, Metro, which was brought on board to oversee the environmental analy-

sis of the project, has begun looking publicly at specific route options, including potential extensions of what otherwise would be a closed loop. An open-house event was held for the streetcar last month (attendees included Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard, a vital link to secure federal funding for the project). A public comment period on this early outreach effort closed May 31. To be sure, some still question whether this project is needed. Detractors point primarily to the cost and say that if making urban circulation easier is the goal, then people could be ferried about the community with an enhancement and expansion of the DASH or some other shuttle or bus system. They opine that the costs would be much less than a streetcar, and that the money could instead go to regional bus or light-rail projects. Huizar has long countered that the streetcar is more than just a spruced-up bus. He and officials from Los Angeles Streetcar Inc., the entity he established to guide the project, maintain that people who eschew buses will climb aboard a streetcar. They point to Portland and other cities where the creation of a streetcar led to upgrades of businesses, buildings and entire blocks along the route. Huizar’s point is that the streetcar is not a standalone development to get people from an entertainment hub on the south of Downtown to one on the north, but also a key part of the plan to upgrade Broadway. That remains a necessity, as the stretch continues to lag behind Main Street, Spring Street and other Downtown corridors that have seen an upshot in the past decade. All of that is also why it would make sense to tie the streetcar to Union Station. Although tens of thousands of commuters already arrive in the terminal each day and then continue into the

heart of Downtown Los Angeles via bus or subway, one can see how people would come from an outlying region and then use the streetcar to access the Historic Core or another Downtown neighborhood. Families or other visitors looking to amp up the “fun factor,” something the streetcar plays upon, could make an entire mass transit trip into Downtown, leaving the car at home and instead riding, say, the Gold Line and then hopping aboard a streetcar. Another possible benefit is tied to the need for a maintenance facility for the project. It may prove easier and less expensive to acquire a plot of land for this either south or north of the initial route area. We understand that the biggest barrier to extending the streetcar is cost. That is no trivial matter for a development that will likely seek public funding for about half of the project. Officials have discussed a tax assessment, similar to those levied in a business improvement district, for people who own property (including condominiums) close to the route. Persuading owners to dip into their pockets will already be a challenge — it becomes harder if the rates are increased or more people are asked to pay. Another option in the quest to stick to $125 million would involve trimming the service area. This raises its own issues, and people whose businesses might get cut from the potential benefits of a streetcar would likely protest. As stated above, there remains a lot to decide, including whether the streetcar is the way to go. We still think this is a project worth considering, but as it moves forward, the tie to Union Station needs to be seriously explored. It would be relatively easy to link the mass transit hub to the project before construction begins. It would get a lot harder and more expensive later.


June 6, 2011

Downtown News 5

Opinion

The Readers Speak on the Downtown Streetcar Website Comments on Where the $125 Million Project Should Go

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very week Los Angeles Downtown News gets online comments to the stories we publish. Two recent articles, “Streetcar Could Ride Farther North, South,” published online May 6, by Ryan Vaillancourt, and “Speaking Out on the Streetcar,” published online May 20, by Richard Guzmán, generated even more response than usual. These are some of the most interesting comments inspired by the stories. Additional responses are welcome at ladowntownnews.com.

connect with a Blue Line station. Taking it up Chinatown would benefit that community and its merchants too. It could swing in via North Spring after Cesar Chavez if people are worried about streetcars on Broadway itself in Chinatown; there are some big parcels of land that might work for maintenance across Spring from the Gold Line station, which the streetcar ought to serve anyway. —Rick Risemberg, May 9, 8 a.m.

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f the streetcar goes down Los Angeles Street instead of Broadway, this project will go down. Los Angeles Street is dirty, tacky and filled with drug dealers. Why on earth would someone on Broadway or Spring walk east to catch the streetcar? Keep it on Broadway. The street has so much more potential for a comeback —Rob, May 7, 6:54 a.m.

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agree highly with Rob. You have broken the “walking” distance that most DTLA residents will go to catch this rail-car. Use this opportunity to rebuild/develop Broadway. Keep it at its original track. Money is tight and AEG seems to be willing to help out. If in 10 years another DTLA boom comes, deal with it then. —Todd, May 9, 4:22 a.m.

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roadway is in many ways the heart of Downtown and is filled with a variety of retail. The Blue Line is jammed, especially on weekends, with people riding up to shop on Broadway. It makes sense for the streetcar to run from L.A. Live if it must, but definitely

ob: You see “dirty and tacky,” I see potential. When thinking about projects like a streetcar line, you have to think long term. First Spring Street gentrified, then Main, and soon enough Los Angeles Street will be on the way. In fact, there have already been new projects on Los Angeles Street, with more in the pipeline. How about PE Lofts, Santee Village, the Medallion or the planned Budokan athletic center? Los Angeles Street is already on its way, and by 2015 — the earliest the streetcar will be running — it will be unrecognizable. What’s more, the street has a nice, dense, urban feel. It reminds me more than a little bit of 6th Avenue in Lower Manhattan. —Chris L., May 9, 10:03 a.m.

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or the love of the transit gods, please give this streetcar its own traveling lane to share with other transit vehicles! Otherwise it’ll be slow. —Carlton Grub, May 9, 1:09 p.m.

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strongly endorse the Broadway route. However, if a southbound curbside alignment is used, what effect will it have on the Million Dollar, Los Angeles, State and United Artists theaters? As these gems are revitalized — as they most certainly will be — there’ll need to be places for cars/taxis/limos to drop patrons off and for media trucks to cover special events like premieres and sy of LASI galas. Is a center street rendering courte alignment possible? —Hilly, May 9, 4:58 p.m.

L I A R E MOR

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ake it to Dodger Stadium. Keep it on Broadway. —M. Johnson, May 11, 10:22 a.m.

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y definition a streetcar won’t have its own right-of-way. Sharing the tracks keeps construction costs relatively low. This is not a commuter service; slow is not a bad thing for a pedestrian circulator because it

allows frequent stops and easy inspection of the surroundings. The key requirements are to have stops on every block and to make the streetcars so frequent (less than five minutes) that no one ever feels a need for a schedule. —Richard Schumacher, May 13, 7:32 a.m.

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his is the worst idea I have ever heard. Downtown Los Angeles is the only major transportation hub in the city — because of this, thousands of buses travel through Downtown daily. Why would we need something else to clog the roadways? Why don’t we spend $125 million on elevated pedestrian bridges at major intersections, bike lanes, turning signals and a streetcar/train that ushers people in and out of Downtown? We need designated bus/ train and parking stations to get traffic out of these districts and make a tourist and pedestrian safe place so people will want to come to Downtown. A 2 mph streetcar cruising down Broadway is not going to do anything for anybody. —Michael, May 17, 7:04 p.m.

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his is great news for Downtown. For the barren streets of Downtown to thrive at night it needs a streetcar. Union Station to Pico Boulevard makes perfect street sense. —Bill, May 20, 3:30 p.m.

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reat addition to Downtown, however, taxing abutting property owners for public transportation is unfair. Everyone who benefits should participate in the cost equally. —Charlie, May 23, 4:53 a.m.

metro.net/works

S K R O W E H T IN

The Expo Construction Authority passed two major milestones for Phase 2 of the Expo Transit Corridor to extend the nearly completed light-rail line to Santa Monica.

po line

metro ex

ridor nsit cor a r t r o t connec regional

> The route connects with the Metro Blue and Expo lines at 7th Street/Metro Center Station and with the Metro Gold Line at Alameda Street. > The Regional Connector will save approximately 20 minutes of travel time by eliminating passenger transfers through Downtown. > Under the 30/10 Initiative, leveraging Measure R funding with federal dollars, construction could begin in 2014 and be completed by 2019. For more information, visit metro.net/regionalconnector.

A $1.5 billion agreement between Metro and the Expo Construction Authority will fund the Exposition Transit Corridor Phase 2 project through Measure R tax revenue as well as state and local funds. > A $541.7 million contract was awarded to design and build Phase 2 of the Expo Line extending the line now under construction farther west to Santa Monica. > Train testing is currently underway on Phase 1 of the Expo Line running between Downtown LA and Culver City. > Work on Phase 1 is 90 percent complete and it is expected to partially open later this year. For more information, visit buildexpo.org.

11-1438_WSC_II_11-004_r1.indd 1

update-wsc-ii-11-004 ©2011 lacmta

Metro has been conducting geotechnical tests along the planned two-mile underground route of the Regional Connector light rail line connecting the Metro Gold Line, Blue Line and future Expo Line through Downtown LA.

5/24/11 2:10 PM


6 Downtown News

June 6, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews photo by Gary Leonard

Chunky Cheetah Rides the Bus A Committed Car Commuter Learns the Secrets of Mass Transit When His Ride Breaks Down by Richard Guzmán city editor

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here are a few things to expect when your car breaks down: Repairs will cost more than you anticipate, and you’ll have to find other ways of getting around and to work. REPORTER’S NOTEBOOK

Some people rent a car. Others get rides from friends. But when my fine piece of German machinery ended up at the mechanic’s garage for more than a week, I chose a third option. I got on the bus. I know this isn’t exactly radical. Metro and other agencies spend a lot of time and money trying to convince people that taking mass transit works, helps the environment and lets drivers save on gas. Indeed, hundreds of thousands of people in the region ride the bus every day, and I know I’m fortunate to own a car. There are also Central City advantages. Here in Downtown, the Dash system crisscrosses the neighborhood, and locals can catch a bus or rail line to just about anywhere from Union Station. In fact, for the most part the bus worked for me, a committed car commuter. I got to work every day and back home each night. There were also some surprises, like exercise, new friends, funky smells, mental fighting skills, freedom to drink, time away from

my kids and a newly revived love for my piece of garbage car. Express Ride On paper, taking the bus from Santa Monica looks like a cinch. The city’s Big Blue Bus stops about two blocks from my house. The Freeway Express 10 line is designed specifically to bring Santa Monicans to Downtown and back, with limited stops to discourage short-distance riders. I left my house at 7:15 each morning to catch the 7:30 bus. Sometimes I made it easily, but other times I was a little late and had to run. That’s embarrassing, since those already on the bus stare at you, and you gaze right back as if they can somehow help. I probably looked like a chunky cheetah chasing and missing its prey. Over time, I made friends with a few fellow Express 10 riders, people who take the bus the same time each day. These were somewhere between real friends and Facebook friends. I didn’t actually become close with anyone, nor did I get their names. On the other hand, we smiled in recognition and sometimes exchanged actual words, things like, “Is this seat taken?” On the 7:30 a.m. ride there was the young kid with glasses, slacks and a shirt always tucked in. I imagined he must be an intern at a Downtown law firm saving up for his first car. There was the guy who looked like the

Riding the bus can be a shock to the system for someone used to driving each day.

construction worker from the Village People who was always on his cell phone arguing with someone. There were the hipster girls who each day sat in the handicapped seats up front. They got off at Olive and Ninth streets, FIDM students no doubt. I wonder how they classified me. Did people glance and say, “He must be an award-winning journalist”? Or was it, “Hey, the chunky cheetah actually caught the bus today?” Then there were people who, I admit, made me uncomfortable. Ironically, they were guys who kind of looked like me: shaved head, tattoos, facial hair. I realize that this was probably my own issue, that folks likely are not catching the 7:30 a.m. bus from Santa Monica to Downtown just to cause trouble. This is probably what happens when you get used to commuting inside the safety of your own vehicle with the doors locked and the windows up. Still, I often found myself sizing up the guys who looked like they should be on an LAPD poster, mentally preparing my fight moves to bring them down quickly. It never happened, but I was ready. What I wasn’t ready for were the odors that come with public transportation, especially on the way home from work, when showers have worn off and the bus windows remain shut. “The bus smells like a mix of coolant, armpit and sadness but at least it’s running. U

Don’t wait

know what’s not running? My Mini,” I posted on Facebook from the bus one afternoon on the way home. I also wasn’t ready for the effect it would have on my family. I usually drive my kids to grandma’s house every morning. It’s a long commute from Santa Monica to the Valley and then to Downtown, but I’ve gotten used to it and enjoy the time I spend with them, even if it’s in the car. That simply wasn’t feasible, not with an occasionally crying baby and a job with daily deadlines. The bus, however, is good if you want to have a few drinks after work, since you don’t have to worry about driving home. I did this on the final day of my car-less adventures. After taking advantage of several Downtown happy hour specials, I hopped on the Metro 720 (since the 10 Express stops running at around 10 p.m.). Of course, this turned out to be the day that the bus broke down and 10 of us wound up stranded for about 15 minutes on a Mid-Wilshire corner. I was ready the next Monday to have my Mini back. I was happy to commute on my schedule, and to get the time with my kids. I’m not ready to ditch the car, at least not with this drive, but it’s nice to know that if necessary, I have the skills to survive just fine on the bus. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownews.com.

Vaccinate

Vaccines are the safest, most effective way to protect children, teens, adults and seniors against serious disease. They also help stop the spread of highly contagious disease in our schools and community, like whooping cough and the flu. It’s easy to find out which vaccines are right for you or your loved ones by calling your doctor or clinic. But for everyone’s health and well-being, please don’t wait.

Visit www.vaccinateLA.com or call 211.

stay healthy. Vaccinate.

This publication was supported by Grant/Cooperative Agreement Number 1H75Tp000350-01 from CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC.


June 6, 2011

Downtown News 7

DowntownNews.com

Let the Games Begin The E3 Convention, and Its $25 Million Impact, Storms Downtown by Ryan Vaillancourt staff writer

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nna Wilhelmsen’s calendar in her office at J Restaurant and Lounge has a bunch of circles around June 7-9, the period when the E3 video game expo is in town. No, the marketing coordinator for the South Park eatery and event venue is not a die-hard gamer. Wilhelmsen circles the dates, and scrawls stars around them too, because E3 means big sales. “We see an overall surge of business during that week, and just in Downtown in general,” Wilhelmsen said. “This is one of our favorite conventions. Someone always comes back and we’re just super busy for it.” Conventions are a major feeder of the local economy, bringing in visitors whose expense accounts go to hotels and restaurants. Still, the local nightlife industry especially looks forward to E3 because companies in town to promote their newest games and gadgets are known for doing so at private events after the sun goes down. “They go all out,” said Wilhelmsen, whose J Lounge is booked for two nights by E3 participating companies. The Edison nightclub is, for the third year in a row, booked completely for three nights, said venue spokeswoman Barbara Jacobs. “If I had 20 venues that looked like the Edison, I’d be able to sell each of them out every night,” Jacobs said. “It’s an amazing thing for the city.” Jacobs and other venue operators would not identify the specific events and companies booking space, but they described parties befitting of young professionals and video game aficionados. E3 events are less suit and tie affairs, and more the kind of soiree where people network over liquor luges and interactive video game set-ups.

across the city. In 2008 it returned to the Convention Center, but still in a downsized fashion, and without the legendary party circuit. In 2009, the ESA went back to the party bonanza. The estimated 41,000 people who attended that year were down from the more than 60,000 who turned out in 2006, though crowds have climbed ever since. Last year, E3 officials put the attendance at more than 45,000, and L.A. Inc. says that number is expected to jump again this year. Liberman said he also expects E3 to stay in Los Angeles for the long haul. The event has been booked for 2012, and the ESA has signed a tentative agreement to keep E3 at the

Convention Center through 2016, Liberman said. That’s good news not just for area nightlife players, but for niche businesses like Patrick Dalal’s Downtown-based Trade Show Models Los Angeles. E3 is a major boon to Dalal’s business, which provides some of the female “brand ambassadors” popularly known at conventions as “booth babes.” They’re the ones who frequently don skimpy outfits and sometimes brightly colored wigs to grab the attention of the overwhelmingly male clientele roaming the halls. Last year, Dalal’s group provided Nintendo with 158 models, who had to pass tests to demonstrate a certain video game ability. The models ended up featured in a photo accompanying a story in the Wall Street Journal. “Nintendo came to me and said, ‘Guess what?’” Dalal said. “‘Next year we want 207 models.’ So they’re making an even bigger splash.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

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photo by Gary Leonard

The Electronic Entertainment Expo will fill the Convention Center, and numerous Downtown restaurants and party venues, June 7-9. The affair generates 28,000 local hotel room nights.

The surge for local restaurants and nightlife venues is a slice of an economic impact pie that the Los Angeles Convention and Visitors Bureau, or L.A. Inc., estimates at $25 million. Because the event is open only to industry professionals, most attendees are visiting from out of town. That means a big bump for area hotels, said Marc Liberman, president and CEO of L.A. Inc. Last year, E3 generated 22,000 “reserved room nights,” which was more hotel business in the city than any other convention. Liberman says that number will increase to 28,000 this year. “It’s exciting to have them return once again as many of our hotels throughout Los Angeles see the positive effect of those attending the meeting,” Liberman said. According to L.A. Inc., in 2010, the second biggest convention in terms of hotel business was Siggraph, with 21,000 room nights. The third largest convention, a gathering for the National Cable and Telecommunications Assn., resulted in 14,500 room nights. Back Again The return of the Electronic Entertainment Expo — as it’s formally known — to the Los Angeles Convention Center marks the steady rebuilding of a confab that was a Downtown staple before organizers abruptly pulled the plug in 2007. Instead of the massive trade show that fills the entire 700,000plus square feet of the facility, the Entertainment Software Assn., which organizes the event, hosted smaller meetings

newest buildings to grace the L.A. Skyline. The office tower’s sleek modern design by renowned architect Kohn Pederson Fox combines a distinctive design with exceptional functionality. Facades of flamed and polished Swedish granite alternate with a glass curtain wall. A dramatic two-story lobby greets visitors in striking fashion while an enclosed courtyard with a tranquil waterfall and a reflecting pool provides places to escape. Both AT&T Center and 550 South Hope are available for immediate occupancy and moments from all the downtown excitement found at STAPLES Center and LA Live!

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8 Downtown News

The Marvelous Mr. McGinnis Who Says Los Angeles Doesn’t Have History? by GreG Fischer

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native Angeleno died in April. He was 92 years old. His passing was hardly noticed except among those who have lived in Los Angeles a long time. The man, whose ties to Downtown Los Angeles go back nearly a century, died in one of the suburbs, leaving behind A PIECE OF THE PAST

a wife and two grown sons. He was a gentleman of the old school, courtly, conservative and quiet. He led a wellordered life. His name was Felix Signoret McGinnis, Jr. It’s a mighty impressive name, a combination of French and Irish backgrounds. Felix was born in the home of his grandfather, Carl Leonardt, at No. 2 Chester Place. The home is now on the campus of Mount St. Mary’s College near Adams Boulevard and Figueroa Street, between Downtown and USC. This was a very elegant residential park at the turn of the 20th century. Leonardt was the owner of the Southwest Portland Cement Company and poured many of the concrete sidewalks in Los Angeles. The company also provided concrete to many of the older office buildings (such as the H.W. Hellman building at Fourth and Spring streets, most recently known as the Banco

Popular Building), hotels and other commercial structures, among them the current home of the Southern California Institute of Architecture in the Arts District. McGinnis was born in 1918 during World War I and the locally devastating influenza epidemic. He had to be baptized at home because gathering in public places such as a church was banned for health reasons. He was named for his greatgrandfather Felix Signoret, a French immigrant who was a barber in the post-Civil War era of Los Angeles. The Signoret home was on Main Street adjacent to the El Pueblo plaza, close to the Church of Our Lady, Queen of the Angels, better known as La Placita. Since his father worked for the Southern Pacific Railroad at their headquarters in San Francisco, McGinnis grew up there. He returned to Los Angeles to run the cement firm, to marry and to raise his family. McGinnis lived life out of the limelight, a behind-thescenes kind of guy. He lived well and yet modestly, preferring the company of his immediate and extended family. He was a man of profound faith. No brass band. No searchlights. No fluff. He was opinionated and well-read, a student of current affairs. My point is this. There are folks in Los Angeles who have roots in this town that go back some distance. In this case,

photo courtesy Mount St. Mary’s College Archives

The house at No. 2 Chester Place, on the Mount St. Mary’s College campus, where Felix Signoret McGinnis, Jr. was born in 1918.

it’s almost 150 years. They don’t talk much about it, but it doesn’t mean that they don’t exist. They remember Los Angeles in a different way than most people. Much of their understanding of Los Angeles is preserved in their memories as a fossil is preserved in amber. It’s not necessarily a better or worse Los Angeles. It’s just different from what we have today. It is a part of the passage of time, a part of the story of a town that is 230 years old this year. So the next time you find someone who is new to town and says that there is no story here, nobody who’s been here longer than 10 years, think of Felix Signoret McGinnis, Jr. and smile. Greg Fischer is a Downtown resident and amateur historian.

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photo courtesy Lira


10 Downtown News

June 6, 2011

Arts & Entertainment

Britney Spears and Nicki Minaj

s. o r B g n i Ringl m & Bailey Barnu s les Center Circau t Stap

at Staples Center

G

photo by Gary Leonard

photo by xxxx

hings you will see July 20-24 when the world’s most famous circus rolls into Downtown Los Angeles for 11 performances (including three a day on weekends) of the show dubbed Fully Charged: Crazy clowns, lion tamers, highflying acrobats, kids laughing at crazy clowns, a parade of four-ton Asian elephants, tiger tamers, kids crying because they’re freaked out by crazy clowns even though they’re supposed to be funny, Arabian horses, two Ukranian strongmen lifting telephone poles, a guy rocketing through the air on a human crossbow, kids with huge open-mouthed “Wow” expressions, a group of Chinese acrobats dunking basketballs using bounce stilts, and of course, parents loaded down with circus souvenirs. At 1111 S. Figueroa St., ringling.com or ticketmaster.com.

Art in the StreetS at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

B

illed as the first major American museum show surveying the history of graffiti and street art, Art in the Streets is a whirlwind of color and gritty urban creativity. The show that opened in April and continues through Aug. 8 will pull in crowds with some of the biggest names, past and present, in the wild world of street art, including Banksy, Fab 5 Freddy, Lee Quiñones, Futura, Margaret Kilgallen, Space Invader and Shepard Fairey. The exhibition features paintings, tricked-out cars and a comprehensive street art timeline illustrated with photos, video and street art ephemera. In a nod to the often overlapping worlds of street art and skateboarding, the show includes a skate ramp, where a team sponsored by Nike gives demonstrations on Thursday and Saturday afternoons. At 152 N. Central Ave., (213) 626-6222 or moca.org.

Les Misérables at the Ahmanson Theatre A

lthough Les Misérables hasn’t been on Broadway since 2003, the show’s legend has not diminished. Expect it to heighten in Los Angeles this summer, when the story of Jean Valjean, the protagonist of Victor Hugo’s sprawling novel, comes back to life in celebration of the show’s 25th anniversary. This is no retread, as mastermind Cameron Mackintosh is overseeing a new production of the Tony winning Les Miz. It lands June 17 at the Ahmanson Theatre (previews start June 14) with upgraded sets and scenery inspired by Hugo’s paintings. The epic story about the human spirit runs through July 31. Expect plenty of arcs, dips and songs like “I Dreamed a Dream,” “Do You Hear the People Sing?” and “Castle on a Cloud.” At 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or centertheatregroup.org.

photo by Deen van Meer

T

photo courtesy of Live Nation

ive Britney Spears this — even though she stumbles regularly (see the 2007 MTV Awards performance, Kevin Federline and the ugly custody battle), she always manages to bounce back. She usually does so in skimpy patent leather get-ups that only she can get away with. In what feels like her zillionth big comeback, Britney is singing and dancing on her “Femme Fatale” tour with the tonguetwisting rapstress Nicki Minaj. The duo strikes Los Angeles at 7 p.m. on June 20 at Staples Center. For the Britney haters, guess what? You’re outnumbered. She’s still selling out arenas and rocking the joint. At 1111 S. Figueroa St. or staplescenter.com.

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Downtown News 11

Arts & Entertainment

T

at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels

D

og Day Afternoon is sort of like a Downtown Dr. Seuss experience: There are big dogs and small dogs, short dogs and tall dogs. There are black, brown and white dogs, and even Dodger hot dogs. The event is one of the most unique and enjoyable happenings in Downtown, with no real purpose except for people and their pets to get out, mingle and build a sense of community. The organizers of the July 26 event, the Downtown Center Business Improvement District and the Cathedral, recommend social dogs only, and canines must be on leash. People congregate on the plaza, take pictures of other dogs, pose for photos with Cardinal Roger Mahony, and generally have a dogtastic time. It’s canine love from 6-9 p.m. At 555 W. Temple St., downtownla.com/dogday. photo by Gary Leonard

XGames

he world’s biggest annual extreme sports competition is back in Downtown, anchored at L.A. Live July 2831. That means more highflying, gravity defying, leaveyour-mouth-agape acrobatics on bikes, skateboards and a host of other wheeled devices. The specific times and dates of events haven’t been announced yet, but expect all the biggest stars in each of their respective sports. There’s at least one new category this year, and it sounds worthy of its own event: Rally Car Racing, through the streets of Downtown. Confirmed athletes for X Games 17 include Bob Burnquist, Jake Brown and Ryan Sheckler. At 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., espn.com/action/xgames.

photo by Gary Leonard

D g Day Afternoon

at L.a. Live

Fun Family Festival the Bootleg of Tragedy atTheater OutdOOr Cinema FOOd Fest

photo courtesy of Kimberly Zsebe

S

hakespearean tragedies may not be the stuff kids’ dreams are made of, but theater company L’Enfant Terrible mixes conflict with wacky fun in an easy to digest manner for children of all ages. Through July 31 every Saturday and Sunday, the Fun Family Festival of Tragedy will fold kings, clowns, bubbles and confetti into the storylines of Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear and Titus and turn Shakespeare’s death-soaked tragedies into comedic life lessons. With titles like Hamlet Prince of Puddles (shown here), Macbeth and the Monster and Titus the Clownicus, children may, after all, go home and dream of the cheerier side to madness. At 2220 Beverly Blvd., lenfantterrible.org.

at VariOus LOCatiOn

G

oing to the movies in Downtown doesn’t always mean having to go inside. For the second season of the Outdoor Cinema Food Fest, organizers are hosting events on Saturday evenings through Sept. 3 at different parks around the city, though mostly in Downtown. Highlights include a June 11 showing of the gangster classic Goodfellas at Exposition Park; Old School is at the same venue June 18. Don’t forget to read the memo about those TPS reports before you head out to catch Office Space at Grand Hope Park July 16. In addition to a 52-foot screen, each event includes a live band and about a dozen food trucks. At various locations, outdoorcinemafoodfest.com.

photo courtesy Outdoor Cinema Food Fest

June 6, 2011


12 Downtown News

June 6, 2011

Arts & Entertainment

Year of the Rabbit

This Is Your Library at the Central Library

at the Japanese American National Museum

ne cool thing about the June 23 This Is Your Library event: This is a rare occasion when you’re expected to consume alcohol in the Central Library. Another cool thing: The third installment in the youth-skewing evening with the talk show format features DJs, musician Amanda Jo Williams, filmmaker and art critic Chris Kraus and, best of all, TV host Huell Howser. Amazing! Essentially, the night (it starts at 7:30 p.m.) hosted by the Aloud series’ Justin Veach is about exploring creative types in L.A. and learning how they do what they do. It’s also an opportunity to eat Pink’s Hot Dogs and, if you have enough booze, wander through the stacks and play sexy librarian. At 630 W. Fifth St., lfla.org/aloud.

T

he rabbit featured at JANM’s summer show isn’t like Bugs Bunny. Inside, the titular subject of the exhibition that opens July 9 is Usagi Yojimbo, a sword swinging samurai rodent from 17th century feudal Japan. Year of the Rabbit: Stan Sakai’s Usagi Yojimbo, which runs through Oct. 30, is based on the historical figure Miyamoto Musashi. The Little Tokyo museum will celebrate the character Sakai created 25 years ago. The work has become popular due to its storylines that mix humor and drama to tell adventures that incorporate Japanese history and culture. At 369 E. First St., (213) 625-0414 or janm.org.

photo courtesy Aloud

O

John Prine T

photo by Stan Sakai

roubadour John Prine has been telling distinctly American stories through song for more than 40 years. Why stop now? Prine’s songbook draws from a mix of adored originals like “In Spite of Ourselves” and “Your Flag Decal Won’t Get You Into Heaven Anymore,” as well as tried Americana classics like “Nine Pound Hammer.” The 64-year-old Illinois native is on tour promoting his 2010 release, In Person and On Stage, a collection of live recordings. Of course, you don’t need to get the record to hear the live show. Instead, check it out June 10 at the Orpheum Theatre at 8 p.m. If you need another reason, the opening acts is Loudon Wainwright III. At 842 S. Broadway, (877) 677-4386 or laorpheum.com.

Shea by Jim photo

D

photo by Gary Leonard

espite all the Farmers Field hubbub, Los Angeles misses football. It will be the same this fall, whether there’s an NFL lockout or not. On July 18, however, Downtown becomes the center of the pro pigskin universe. The annual NFL 101 All-Access event, staged by the Los Angeles Sports and Entertainment Commission, takes over the Coliseum, the site of the first Super Bowl. Attendees catch passes, kick field goals and receive on-field instruction from NFL figures like former Ravens coach Brian Billick, and get autographs from football icons such as Joe Theismann and Pete Carroll. There’s a silent auction, a Wolfgang Puck dinner and panel discussions with league execs and players. It almost, almost, makes up for L.A.’s 18 year NFL vacuum. At Exposition Park, 39th and Figueroa streets. Tickets and information at (213) 236-2354 or lasec.net at L.A. Mem

photo by Scott Groller, copyright CalArts 2010

at the Orpheum Theatre

Radar LA at REDCAT

D

NFL 101 All-A ccess orial Colis eum

The

Dan BanDat Club Nokia A

photo courtesy of Goldenvoice

cherry on top of the excellence that is the 2003 comedy Old School is The Dan Band, the group fronted by Dan Finnerty who sang a very heartfelt and curse-inflected “Total Eclipse of the Heart” during a wedding scene. He did it again in Starsky & Hutch by sing-

uring the second week of June, a lot of people will come Downtown for the L.A. Film Festival. Those who want another reason to head into a dark theater also have plenty of opportunities, thanks to the inau inaugural Radar L.A. theater festival. Helmed by REDCAT, it brings 15 companies from around the world (in (including L.A.) to the Central City, where they perform at venues such as REDCAT, the Los Angeles Theatre Center and the “tinker toy” parking structure on the southwest corner of First Street and Grand Avenue. Most of it is avant-garde stuff, like San Francisco troupe Pomo Afro Homos’ Fierce Love, and Brewsie and Willie (shown here), a piece by the Poor Dog Group based on a Gertrude Stein text. The fun runs June 14-19. Tickets at redcat.org.

ing Roberta Flack’s “Feel Like Making Love” to a 13-year-old at her bat mitzvah and again in The Hangover with a slowed-up and inappropriate version of 50 Cent’s “Candy Shop.” Believe it or not, The Dan Band is even more entertaining live, which Downtowners

will find out July 8 when Finnerty and friends perform at Club Nokia. It’s not all covers either — the band has original songs with innovative lyrics, including one about prostitutes during Christmas. At 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 7657000 or clubnokia.com.

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June 6, 2011

Downtown News 13

Arts & Entertainment

s a m o s P cht a Y r e Pap Challenge at City National Plaza

Anime expo

photo by Gary Leonard

at the Los Angeles Convention Center

I

BoB Marley, MessenGer at the Grammy Museum

R

eggae’s biggest name, and one of music’s most iconic personas, is immortalized this summer at the Grammy Museum. The exhibit Bob Marley, Messenger opened in May and runs through Oct. 2, with more than 90 items from the star’s short but significant life. Pieces on display include one of his favorite guitars, photographs, clothing, album covers and set lists. There are also videos of other artists speaking about how they were influenced by the musician who died at the age of 36. It’s everything you wanted to know about the writer of “Get Up, Stand Up,” “Redemption Song” and too many other hits to name. At 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org.

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heets of plain white paper and water don’t usually make for summer fun. That’s what makes the Psomas Paper Yacht Challenge unique. For three years, Downtowners have figured out ways to fold 20-pound bond (i.e. the stuff in your printer) so it catches the wind from giant fans; the “yachts” then race across the fountain in front of City National Plaza. The fourth annual event takes place June 22 at 5:30 p.m., and everyone from architects to administrative assistants will seek to design the fastest craft. There’s also a silent auction, and costumes are encouraged. BTW, it’s all for a good cause: Entry fees ($35 minimum) and proceeds benefit the Ronald McDonald House. At Fifth and Flower streets, psomas.com.

photo courtesy Anime Expo 2010

S

f you see warriors, vixens, pirates and a whole bunch of other crazily costumed characters wandering around the Convention Center July 1-4, don’t blame it on the heat. Instead, credit it to the 20th annual Anime Expo, the largest anime and manga event in North America. The gathering is expected to draw more than 100,000 fans of Japanese animation and comic books to Downtown. The convention, which is open to the public, includes screenings, panel discussions, autograph sessions, and video gaming competitions. Although the event’s guest of honor is television personality Danny Choo, the real star of the show are the thousands of people who spend hours creating intricate costumes, allowing them to look like their favorite characters. At 1201 S. Figueroa St., (213) 741-1151 or anime-expo.org.

los angeles film festival at Various Locations

L

ast June, after 15 years on the Westside, the Los Angeles Film Festival moved to Downtown Los Angeles. The organizers must have liked the response, because they’re bringing the 17th installment of the festival back to the Central City June 16-26. There will be more than 200 features, shorts, and music videos from about 30 countries, as well as panel discussions and a plethora of parties, during the event concentrated at the Regal Cinemas at L.A. Live. The opening show is Richard Linklater’s Bernie (shown here), starring Jack Black, Shirley MacLaine and Matthew McConaughey. The festival is produced by Film Independent. Full lineup at lafilmfest.com.


14 Downtown News

Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing

at 7+Fig

at the California African-American Museum

T

E

photo by Gary Leonard

DanCe Downtown, DisCo night

at Music Center Plaz a

T

photo courtesy of Cal Phil

photo by Berger/Conser Photography

veryone has seen the iconic image Last Remaining Seats, ‘Safety Last’ at the Orpheum Theatre of Harold Lloyd hanging from clock hands and dangling over a bustling cityscape in the 1923 silent film Safety Last. What many don’t realize is that the climactic shot from the 73-minute movie took place in Downtown. In fact, when the film shows at the Orpheum Theatre on June 29, it will be just half a block away from where Lloyd and director Hal Roach worked 87 years ago. The screening is the final installment of the Los Angeles Conservancy’s Last Remaining Seats series, and there will be live accompaniment on the venue’s Wurlitzer organ. The night will be hosted by Suzanne Lloyd, Harold Lloyd’s granddaughter. Other films in the series include 1935’s Captain Blood at the Million Dollar Theatre (June 8) and Billy Wilder’s classic Sunset Boulevard June 26 at the Palace. At 842 S. Broadway, (213) 623-2489 or laconservancy.org.

A

ndrew Lloyd Webber and Giacomo Puccini may not, at first glance, seem like they go together, but as composers of Phantom of the Opera, Cats, Evita, La Boheme and Madama Butterfly, they might as well be brothers from another musical mother. Don’t believe it? Just consider their sweeping sagas, tragic storylines and knack for extricating pronounced emotion from audiences. The Cal Phil (California Philharmonic for those who like to be formal) have it right with a July 3 program that pairs excerpts from Webber’s pieces with arias and choruses from Puccini’s works. At Walt Disney Concert Hall, the orchestra will provide the powerful instrumental to the voices of Broadway star James Barbour and opera singers Christopher Bengochea and Sandra Rubalcava. At 111 S. Grand Ave., (626) 300-8200 or calphil.org.

Cal Phil

at Walt Disney Concert Hall

he Music Center’s Active Art s program has been pleasing Down towners for years with its free slate of participatory al fresco events. The hig hlight of the effort is Dance Downtown, which takes place every other Friday fro m 6:30-10 p.m. through Sept. 9. While cro wds come out for styles such as Bollyw ood/bhangra (July 1) and zydeco (Aug. 26) , it doesn’t get any better than July 29, wh en the musical theme is disco. Some folk s dress the part, many don’t, but everyo ne channels their inner Saturday Night Fev er. It’s exactly the disco inferno you think it is, a night of the Bee Gees, Chic and other stuff you secretly adore. For those not skilled, the night starts with free lesson s. At 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-3660 or musicccenter.org.

he 75-year-old Apollo Theater in Harlem is rich with history — performers including Sammy Davis Jr., Duke Ellington, Redd Foxx, Louis Armstrong and The Jackson Five all got their start on its stage. The Smithsonian Institution commemorates the theater’s anniversary with a touring exhibition. Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing traces the evolution of the Apollo, from its start as a whites-only burlesque hall to its current form as one of the most famous music venues in the world. The exhibit landed at Exposition Park’s California African-American Museum June 2 and runs through Sept. 4. It features landmark items such as Miles Davis’ flugelhorn and Michael Jackson’s fedora. There are also listening stations. At 600 State Dr., (213) 744-7432 or caamuseum.org.

Ballet Nuabcaional de C at the DorotlerhyPavilion

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he story of Don Quixote, who battles windmills believing they are giants, will go a few steps further at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion June 23-26. That’s when the Ballet Nacional de Cuba turns Cervantes’ epic saga into a passionate dance. The performances of Don Quixote will feature the choreography of company General Director Alicia Alonso, and the L.A. Opera Orchestra will provide the music for the two-hour performance. The company is based at the Great Theater of Havana and is considered one of the top ballet companies in the world. At 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-0711 or musiccenter.org.

Chand

photo by Jacques Moatti

photo courtesy Lira

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rookfield Properties’ Summer on the Plaza concert series closes July 29 with world music songstress Lira. A national treasure in her native South Africa, Lira is known for her blend of Afro-pop, R&B and jazz. Although she often performs in front of tens of thousands of people, playing in big arenas and at festivals, the outdoor setting at Ernst & Young Plaza in the Financial District will certainly be much more intimate. Other shows on Brookfield’s lineup are saxophone player Mike Phillips (July 22) and R&B/soul singer Leela James (July 15). Concerts run from 5:30-8:30 p.m. At 735 S. Figueroa St., artsbrookfieldproperties. com/los_angeles.

photo courtesy of Shahar Azran

Lira

June 6, 2011

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June 6, 2011

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Crime Writers N Panel

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Angeles. o city is harder boiled than Los nts than This is due less to historic eve pen crime stoto the imaginative writers who City of Angels. ries set in the underside of the e may be L.A.’s Private detective Philip Marlow but Raymond supreme bad-guy mystery solver, start of a long Chandler’s creation was just the potboiling totradition that’s still alive and es hosts four day. On July 14, the Aloud seri tral Library modern crime writers for a Cen and the stories panel discussion on their genre, ht. And somethat keep even them up at nig nt’s tagline — body give whoever wrote the eve e to” — a sin“We murder, so you don’t hav ods (Charlotte cere pat on the back. Paula Wo h Gar Anthony Justice) moderates the talk wit omi Hirahara Haywood (Cemetery Road), Na Smith (Baked). (Blood Hina) and Mark Haskell 00 or lfla.org. At 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-75

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nessy n 2004, John Hen o a D ha d a vi si on : el Ang esone-day, Los of the hit specific version Amazing TV show “The .A. was a at Olvera Street Race.” His RaceL d in 2007 huge success, an e sh or tit sp aw ne d th enger three-hour scav er CityRace. The ace in pl ke ing contests ta 25, hunt/puzzle-solv ne Ju hoods, and on era various neighbor lv O d an to El Pueblo get s the race returns er ay pl two to four to a Street. Teams of in em th unching la ., m a. 10 at nus of a clue t that has the bo en ev n fu g, in ng out the challe of information ab 81. lth ea w a g in rt impa d in 17 ngeles was founde area where Los A cela.com. Registration at ra

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n the past few years, the Friday Night Flicks series has become one of the most popular events in Downtown, and crowds flock to the free showings in Pershing Square. It’s on again this summer, and starts with a bang July 15 with Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind. All movies will be shown after dark on a 40-by-20 foot screen at the park. The lineup runs all the way through Oct. 28. Other highlights include Young Sherlock Holmes July 22, Raiders of the Lost Ark Aug. 5 and, on July 29, Mommy Dearest, with Faye Dunaway portraying screen legend Joan Crawford’s abusive relationship with her adopted children. Maybe leave the kids at home for that one. At 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare.

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photo by Gary Leonard

at the Central Library

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Downtown News 15

Arts & Entertainment

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re you feeling cramped in your Downtown apartment? Here’s a thought: Take a trip to Dodger Stadium for the June 24-26 Freeway Series against the Anaheim Angels — you’ll get both a little summer evening entertainment and the chance to literally stretch out. The Dodgers’ ownership issues have soured fans’ relationship with the team, and they’re not so hot on the field these days either. With attendance falling, that’s good for bargain hunters who delight in cheap seats, a spacious stadium and folks who just want to take in a ballgame for old time’s sake. And, because there are so few people, your chance to catch a fly ball has increased significantly! So bring a glove. At 1000 Elysian Park Ave, (323) 224-1507 or dodgers.com.


June 6, 2011

Arts & Entertainment

photo courtesy Semi Precious Weapons

Freedom Festival

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t may not be the summer of love, but it’s definitely the summer of you on July 9 at the Free to Be Freedom Festival at L.A. State Historic Park. The event, which is pitched toward the gay/lesbian/ bisexual/transgender community but welcomes everyone, includes performances from Semi Precious Weapons (shown here), who just finished touring with Lady Gaga. Also scheduled to play is indie act Danielle LoPresti and the Masses, and country crooner Jared Ashley. Several DJs, including Dave Aude and Tony Moran, are also on the lineup for the day-long show in the green fields overlooking the Downtown skyline. At 1245 N. Spring St., (213) 620-6152 or freetobeconcert.com.

Dinosaur Hall at t His he Na tory tu Mu ral seum

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his summer Downtown, or at least the southern edge of the Figueroa Corridor, will belong to the T-rex. That’s because the Natural History Museum in Exposition Park will open its Dinosaur Hall on July 16. The 14,000-square-foot exhibition will be built around a T-rex skeleton meticulously reassembled by the museum’s paleontologists. The show will also include more than 300 fossils, 20 full-body specimens and manual and digital interactive displays. The T-rex will be joined by a triceratops, a 68-foot long-necked creature called the mamenchisaurus, and giant reptiles that lived in the oceans covering what is today California. At 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-3466 or nhm.org.

photo by Gary Leonard

Elmo Live at Nokia Theatre I

f you have a toddler at home, then you are familiar with a little red monster who has a goldfish named Dorothy, talks to a hurricane and gets all the attention on “Sesame Street.” Yes, it’s the Elmo show at the Nokia Theatre, and he has all the red-furred fun June 17-19 in an event titled Elmo’s Healthy Hero. What’s that entail? An exciting adventure (well, exciting for the under-5 set) that begins when Super Grover loses his super powers. Then, Elmo and friends like Abby Cadabby explore nutrition and a healthy lifestyle to help Grover get his groove back.

Nike 3 oN 3 TourNameNT aT L.a. Live

photo by Austin Young

photo by VEE Corporation

At 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6030 or nokiatheatrelalive.com.

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photo by Gary Leonard

t’s become Downtown’s trademark event, attracting more than 20,000 people to the Historic Core. Art Walk attendees flock here on the promise of art, as dozens of local galleries launch new shows, and street performers — puppeteers to mimes to rock bands — stake out sidewalk space. People also come to sample a veritable buffet line of food trucks (they’re usually cloistered in parking lots around Fourth and Spring streets) and the chance to walk city streets teeming with pedestrians. Art Walk takes place the second Thursday of every month, meaning be careful where you drive on June 9, July 14 and Aug. 11. Officially, the event ends at 9 p.m. Unofficially, it continues all night as crowds spill inside bars to round out the party. At Gallery Row, predominantly on Spring and Main streets between Second and Ninth streets, or downtownartwalk.com

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16 Downtown News

I EXEnE and Phranc at Grand PErformancEs B attle #1: Exene Cervenka fronted seminal L.A. punk band X, while Phranc (shown here) flew to prominence as the world’s foremost Jewish lesbian folk singer. Point to Exene. Battle #2: In the ’90s, Exene co-owned a hipster store in Silver Lake, while Phranc has a financial alter-life in Tupperware sales. Point to Phranc. Battle #3: That comes Aug. 20, when the two talented veterans appear on the same bill at Grand Performances. The 8 p.m. show should prove to be a showcase in songwriting that attracts loads of people in their 40s and older. Don’t be surprised if some of punk’s elder statespeople are in the crowd. At 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 687-2159 or grandperformances.org.

t’s going to be a three-peat for the Nike 3 on 3 basketball tournament at L.A. Live, as the basketball bonanza takes over South Park for the third time from Aug. 5-7. The quickly growing tradition brought an estimated 25,000 people to Downtown last year, and crowds are expected to increase again. There will be dozens of half courts set up around Staples Center, and teams play in categories, arranged according to age and skill — there’s also a tournament for wheelchair hoops players. Whether you’re an avid baller or just a spectator, the bustling scene is not to be missed. In addition to the competitive tournament, expect celebrity games and a dunk contest in Nokia Plaza. At 1000 W. Olympic Blvd. or nike3on3.com.


photo by Elazar C. Harel

hat do you get when you blend Cirque du Soleil-style acrobats, cutting-edge dance, raw athleticism and real theatrical sensibilities? It’s Diavalo Dance Theatre, an L.A.-based troupe performing July 7-8 at Grand Performances. To get an idea of what guides the company, consider their namesake, “Diavolo.” Dia is Spanish for “day” and Greek for “through, across, from point to point.” Volo is Latin for “I fly.” It also harkens the French word diablerie, which refers to the playful, comical pranks of a child. With an array of rolling and bouncing props, the dancers leap, dangle, balance and fall, inspiring a cascade of audience “oohs” and “ahhs.” It’s a welcome return for a longtime favorite of crowds at the Cal Plaza Watercourt. At 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 687-2190 or grandperformances.org.

Bloomfest L.A.

at Third Street and Traction Avenue

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ong before the Arts District became filled with restaurants and residents, there was Bloom’s General Store. Long before a batch of people started speaking out for the neighborhood, there was the shop’s proprietor, the curmudgeonly yet still lovable Joel Bloom (shown here). Though he passed away in 2007, his memory lives on in Bloomfest L.A., which returns to the area on July 23. Though details were slim at press time, the free event that runs from 2-10 p.m. will feature indie bands, food trucks and a street art tour. Plenty of fun will be had, and plenty of people will celebrate the community and remember a neighborhood pioneer. At Third Street and Traction Avenue, bloomfestla.wordpress.com.

arke andace P her sidelined for pt able injury ke asn’t avail ttle w e sh d n a ea st season, ainst the S most of la 2010 match-ups ag auren Jackson ie L rks’ in the Spa Storm, led by Auss Byrd, ended up e h S T t . les ou ue Storm onn stand year. They visit Stap C U r e rm last king and fo NBA title k and loo c a W b e is th r g e in winn the Pa nd Park Aug. 30, a mesis from Center on parks beat their ne ains the face of m eS to help th est. While Parker re ague MVP and w le h e rt th o oth cific N she won b 2009, and dunked in — A B N the W ture ards in s yet to cap the year aw rookie of tive games — she ha ship ring. cu ion two conse rdware — a champ wnba. a or h l t. a S re a the . Figuero At 1111 S s. com/spark

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here’s no bigger name in Rock en Español than Maná. Revered in their native Mexico, their heartfelt classicrock-meets-cheesy-pop tunes are adored north of the border too. Don’t believe it? Who else gets four nights at Staples Center? The boys of Maná are in town July 23-26 playing hits like “Oye mi Amor,” “Refrijerador” and “Vivir Sin Aire.” Fans will now be humming those tunes for the rest of the week. You’re welcome. At 1111 S. Figueroa St., staplescenter.com.

photo by

Gary Leon ard

aking its name from “One Thousand and One Nights” (aka “Arabian Nights”), a collection of Arabic, Middle Eastern and South Asian folk tales, 1001 Inventions seeks to spread public awareness on the contributions of the Muslim world. The exhibit (which has appeared in London, New York and other locales) opened at the California Science Center in Exposition Park on May 27. Displays are divided into seven zones with more than 60 interactive exhibits on achievements that helped shape the world. Think everything from a ninth century woman who founded the world’s first modern university to a 13th century mechanical engineer whose theories provided the blueprints in driving planes, trains and cars. At 700 State Dr., (323) 724-3623 or californiasciencecenter.org.

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Downtown News 17

Arts & Entertainment

The R at Per shingomant ics Squar e T

he city Department of Recreation and Parks staffers who program Pershing Square have gotten quite skilled at rekindling summertime nostalgia. Last year, acts including Fishbone and The Tubes played outdoor concerts in the Financial District park. This year, it’s even better, with groups such as A Flock of Seagulls (July 16), 10,000 Maniacs (July 30), Stan Ridgeway and Downtown resident Michelle Shocked (Aug. 13) and The English Beat (Aug. 20). Any and all of those are worth donning a skinny for, but the pièce de résistance falls July 23, when The Romantics take the stage. Everyone will be singing along to the 1983 hit “Talking in Your Sleep,” and they’ll be downright giddy and hop and down for “What I Like About You.” Admit it — you know all the words. At 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare.

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June 6, 2011

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LISTINGS EVENTS

facts about the storied screens and stages. Free, no reservations required.

SPONSORED LISTINGS Where’s the Money? Access to Capital Business Expo Sheraton Los Angeles Downtown, 711 S. Hope St., vedc.org. June 25, 8 a.m.: The Valley Economic Development Center hosts this business expo and workshop with a panel of experts and lenders. $10 registration includes breakfast, lunch, workshops and one-on-one loan consultation. More info and registration at vedc.org. L.A.’s Largest Mixer XIII Shrine Auditorium Expo Center, 700 W. 32nd St., lamixer.com. July 21, 5-9 p.m.: Join L.A.-area chambers and business organizations for the ultimate business networking event. Mix and mingle with hundreds of exhibitors and thousands of business people representing industries and companies in and around Southern California. Mixer admission is $20 per person (no credit cards). For exhibitor or general information call (323) 230-5656.

saTurday, June 11 Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org. 10:30 a.m.-noon: The Culinary Historians of Southern California present speaker David Strauss. His new book is titled “Setting the Table for Julia Child: Gourmet Dining in America 1934-1961.” Free and open to the public. Mixed Roots Film & Literary Festival Japanese American National Museum, 369 E. First St., (213) 625-0414, janm.org or mxroots.org. Through Jun. 12: Multiracial Americans will celebrate stories of the mixed experience through workshops, readings, film screenings and family activities in a two-day festival open to the public. Morono Kiang Gallery 218 W. 3rd St., (213) 628-8208 or moronokiang.com. 5-7 p.m.: The gallery’s writers group presents a staged reading of new writing inspired by the themes and artworks featured in the current exhibition It’s All True. El Rio School Fundraiser 127 E. Ninth St., (818) 760-8816 or elriocharterschool.org 6 p.m.: Fred Eric’s Tiara Café hosts the launch of the fundraising campaign for El Rio, a new charter school that would bring public Waldorf education to Northeast L.A. A five-course meal is served at 6 p.m. Music provided by Joey Altruda and Preston Smith. There’s also an art auction. Vintage! Show 1869 Pico House, 424 N. Main St., (213) 485-8432 or italianhall.org. 6:30-11 p.m.: A 1910-1940s themed event will benefit the Italian American Museum. Expect live music and dancing to Big Lucky, vintage cocktails by the Tar Pit’s Jay Perrin, cuisine by Jose Correa, a performance by the Atomic Cherry Bombs, a costume contest and fashion show.

Monday, June 6 Aloud at the Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org. 7 p.m.: Eric Overmeyer, co-creator of HBO’s New Orleans-set “Treme,” talks with USC professor Josh Kun in a program titled “Catastrophe, Survival, Music & Renewal: New Orleans Culture Post-Katrina.” Tuesday, June 7 Scholarship Awards Luncheon Wilshire Grand Hotel, 930 Wilshire Blvd., (323) 2921297 or glaaacc.org. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.: The Greater Los Angeles African American Chamber of Commerce’s Education Fund & Foundation event honors graduating high school seniors. The guest speaker is Blair Taylor of the Los Angeles Urban League. Thursday, June 9 Downtown L.A. Art Walk Info and map at downtownartwalk.com. Noon-9 p.m.: The mammoth, crazily popular “museum without walls” attracts 20,000-plus attendees to more than 40 art galleries, formal and informal art events, restaurants and bars in the Historic Core. The Art Walk Lounge 434 Spring St., downtownartwalk.com. 6-9 p.m.: The official “Visitor’s Center” of the Art Walk is where you can pick up maps, T-shirts and more. Downtown Broadway Historic Theatre District Walking Tour Clifton’s Cafeteria, 648 S. Broadway, (213) 999-5067 or lahtf.org. 6:30 and 7:00 p.m.: Tied in to Art Walk, the Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation leads tours of up to 16 grand movie palaces on and around Broadway. Docents share histories, photos and fun

A A A

FuTure evenTs Aloud at Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org. June 12, 5:30 p.m.: The 16th annual Los Angeles Public Library Awards dinner honors Walter Mosley with its 2011 Literary Award. June 14, 7 p.m.: UC Riverside’s Kenneth Rogers leads “We Are Here: We Could Be Everywhere,” a panel on media, arts and activism in Los Angeles with Aniko Imre, Henry Jenkins, Reed Johnson and Fabian Wagmister. June 16, 7 p.m.: The Library Foundation’s Young Literati group presents Alina Simone, who will talk with KCRW music librarian Eric Lawrence about her “Tragic-comic Journey Through the Indie Rock World.” Simone will also give a performance. June 21, 7 p.m.: A panel of contemporary writers and artists investigates Aldous Huxley’s cultural influence on America. The discussion will include excerpts from panelist Mary Ann Braubach’s 2009 documentary Huxley on Huxley. June 23, 7:30 p.m.: “This Is Your Library,” a series of late-night talk show style events, returns with

Huell Howser, writer and art critic Chris Kraus and theater artist Diane Rodriguez. The event also includes DJs, live music, Pink’s Hotdogs and a full bar. July 7, 7 p.m.: It’s a night of poetry and readings hosted by Suzanne Lummis of the L.A. Poetry Festival and Richard Modiano of the Beyond Baroque Literary Arts Center. July 12, 7 p.m.: Artist Michael McMillen creates environmental installations with architectural references. Curator Howard Fox talks to McMillen about his creative process and current obsessions. July 14, 7 p.m.: A panel of contemporary L.A. mystery and crime writers — Gar Anthony Haywood, Naomi Hirahara, Mark Haskell Smith and Paula L. Woods — talk about their genre and their craft. They murder so you don’t have to. July 19, 7 p.m.: When a massive wildfire blazed across California in June 2008, five monks risked their lives to save Tassajara Zen Mountain Center. Fire historian Stephen Pyne and author Colleen Morton Busch discuss the ways of wildfires in the West and what it means to meet a crisis with full presence of mind. With William Deverell, professor of history at USC. July 21, 7 p.m.: Kevin Roderick, editor and founder of the website LAObserved.com, talks to cultural historian Leo Braudy about the Hollywood sign: how it got there, why it stayed, and what it means today. July 26, 7 p.m.: Author Annie Jacobson talks to M.G. Lord about her book “Area 51: An Uncensored History of America’s Top Secret Military Base.” Jacobson uncovers what really goes on in the Nevada desert, from testing nuclear reactions to building super-secret, super-sonic jets to pursuing the war on terror. And, sorry UFOologists — she’s got some myths to debunk, too. Bloomfest Bloom Square, 300 E. Third St., bloomfestla.com. July 23, 2-10 p.m.: Enjoy live music, food and one of the largest public displays of street art in Los Angeles. Sponsors, booth exhibitors, performers and other information TBD. Downtown L.A. Art Walk Info and map at downtownartwalk.com. July 14, August 11, noon-9 p.m.: The Downtown Art Walk is a self-guided tour that showcases the many art exhibition venues in Downtown Los Angeles — art galleries, museums and nonprofit art venues. Japanese American Cultural & Community Center Aratani/Japan America Theatre, 244 S. San Pedro St., (213) 628-2725 or jaccc.org. June 11, 1-4 p.m.: The Aurora Foundation talks “Living With Nature – Exploring Our Gardens and Flowers.” June 12, 1-3 p.m.: In conjunction with the two upcoming exhibitions, Ito Jakuchu: A Man with No Age and Masterpieces from the Price Collection, at the Bowers Museum in Orange County, the JACCC presents artist Hirokazu Kosaka sharing his unique and spiritual approach to life and art. L.A. Convention Center 1202 S. Figueroa St., (213) 741-1151 or lacclink.com. June 25-26: The Dwell on Design conference

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brings together the best in modern interior and home design. July 1-4: Get ready for South Park to swarm with doe-eyed school girls and blade-toting ninjas, because the Anime Expo is back. July 30-31: Channel your inner bridezilla for the BrideWorld Expo. Aug. 13-21: Barneys New York Warehouse Sale packs the place with huge discounts on designer threads. L.A. Derby Dolls 1910 W. Temple St., (310) 285-3766 or derbydolls.com. July 9 and Aug. 20, 6-10 p.m.: Southern California’s premiere women’s banked track roller derby league, The L.A. Derby Dolls, hosts squads visiting from San Diego and Orange County. LAVA Sunday Salons Clifton’s Cafeteria, 648 S. Broadway, lavatransforms.org. June 26, July 31, Aug. 28, noon-2 p.m.: On the last Sunday of each month, Los Angeles Visionaries Association welcomes interested individuals to gather for a loosely structured conversational salon featuring short presentations and opportunities to meet and connect with one another. In June, Milt Stevens talks about the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society. MOCA Grand Avenue, Geffen Contemporary 250 S. Grand Ave. and 152 N. Central Ave. Visit moca.org. June 16, 6:30 p.m.: Graffiti artist Mister Cartoon leads a museum walkthrough and discussion of his work in the context of the Art in the Streets. At the Geffen Contemporary. June 19, 3 p.m.: In conjunction with Art in the Streets, senior editor of Paper magazine and New York art writer Carlo McCormick will take a look at the destructive and creative aspects of uncommissioned public art. At the Geffen Contemporary. June 26, 3 p.m.: In conjunction with William Leavitt: Theater Objects, the artist will co-direct a staged table-reading of his never-before-performed play, Pyramid, Lens, Delta (2003) with Rob Sullivan. Free with museum admission; no reservations. At MOCA Grand Avenue. June 30, 6:30 p.m.: In conjunction with Art in the Streets, co-curator Roger Gastman will lead an exhibition tour and discuss the history of graffiti and street art. At the Geffen Contemporary. July 3, 1 p.m.: Take a tour focusing on the use of sound in the exhibition William Leavitt: Theater Objects followed by musical performances in the museum and sonic activities on the sculpture plaza programmed by experimental arts organization “the wulf.” At MOCA Grand Avenue. July 7, 10 p.m.: The Los Angeles Urban Rangers present Bunker Hill Expedition. Hike the unique topography of Bunker Hill to discover the redevelopment strata of Downtown’s primary geologic feature. Trek through public-private monuments all in search of L.A.’s elusive civic heart. At MOCA Grand Avenue. July 14, 3 p.m.; July 17, 6:30 p.m.: Underground film star and Fun Gallery founder Patti Astor leads a tour and discussion that will begin with Art in the Streets’ installation of the Fun Gallery and the Ram-

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mellzee loft. At the Geffen Contemporary. July 21, 6:30 p.m.: Legendary L.A. graffiti artist Chaz Bojorquez leads an exhibition walkthrough and a discussion of his work in the context of Art in the Streets. At the Geffen Contemporary. July 31, 3 p.m.: Lynda Benglis takes part in a conversation on the day her show opens at MOCA Grand Avenue. Music Center 135 N. Grand Ave., visit musiccenter.org. June 25, 6:30 and 8 p.m.: The Friday Night Sing Along invites you to belt out popular favorites and classic tunes with hundreds of fellow song lovers while accompanied by live musicians. Lyric sheets are provided. No experience necessary. Tonight, The Jacksons. July 23, 6:30 and 8 p.m.: Friday Night Sing Along with Disco Hits. Music Center Plaza In the plaza at 135 N. Grand Ave., visit musiccenter.org. June 18, 7:30 p.m.: Dance Downtown is the popular and free Friday night series for people of any level of expertise. This evening is lindy hop and swing. June 24, July 22 and Aug. 19, 6:30-8 p.m.: At Friday Night Sing-Alongs, join hundreds of voices belting out popular favorites and classic tunes, accompanied by live musicians. Lyrics provided. Come prepared to sing. No experience necessary. July 1, 6:30 p.m.: Dance Downtown with Bollywood bhangra. July 9, Aug. 13 and Sept. 3, 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m.: Drum Downtown invites everyone to bang on a drum and make music in the moment at this unique outdoor group experience. Drums and other percussion instruments are provided. No experience necessary. July 15, 6:30 p.m.: Dance Downtown with Argentine tango. July 29, 6:30 p.m.: Dance Downtown with disco night. Aug. 12, 6:30 p.m.: Dance Downtown with 60s night. Aug. 26, 6:30 p.m.: Dance Downtown with zydeco night. Sept. 9, 6:30 p.m.: Dance Downtown with samba. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-DINO or visit nhm.org. June 19 and 26, 1-4 p.m.: Learn to start your own healthy vegetable garden at home in these master

Downtown News 19

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American Ballet Idols photo by Rosalie O’Connor

June 6, 2011

Dmitri Shostakovich had a tough life, and a tough time pleasing his Soviet rulers. Much of his work would be banned by Stalin, including his ballet The Bright Stream. Lucky for Shostakovich, or lucky for his legacy anyway, the work has been revived for modern audiences. The American Ballet Theatre presents the work — a comedic ballet set on a Russian farm collective in the 1930s — at the Music Center July 14-17. How Stalin could despise a ballet set on a farm collective is sort of mind-boggling, but then again, Stalin was never an easy nut to crack. At 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-0711 or musiccenter.org. gardening classes. July 18-Aug. 12: Adventures in Nature is a day camp for children in grades K through six. Participants explore a wide variety of museum topics, covering Earth’s features, creatures and cultures. Call (213) 763-ED4U or e-mail educate@nhm.org. July 30, 10 a.m.: Join Ichthyology curator Chris Thacker and tour the department’s extensive fish

specimens, which include sharks, flying fish, Antarctic specimens and Chris’s specialty, gobies. Free for members at the Patron Family level and higher. Call (213) 763-3316 to reserve a tour time. Readings at Metropolis Metropolis Books, 440 S. Main St., (213) 612-0174 or metropolisbooksla.com. June 13, 7 p.m.: In Vlad, author C.C. Humphreys

tells the story of the man behind the legend of Dracula. Humphreys stops at Metropolis for a reading and signing. June 18, 6 p.m.: A reading and discussing surrounding new L.A. literary journal, Slake, a quarterly collection of long-form journalism, photography and short stories.

Continued on next page

L.A.’S BUSINESS NETWORKING EVENT

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5 PM - 9 PM

Join Los Angeles area chambers and business organizations for The ¨ Ultimate Business Networking Event ! Mix and mingle with hundreds of exhibitors and thousands of business people representing industries and companies in and around Southern California. The 13th annual L.A.'s Largest Mixer¨ is a great opportunity to reach small to large companies, meet new clients and learn how the different chambers of commerce and business organizations can make your business grow.


20 Downtown News

Continued from previous page Staples Center 1201 S. Figueroa St., staplescenter.com. July 20-24, various showtimes: The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus is back with it’s newest show, “Fully Charged.” Aug. 14, 4:45 p.m.: The WWE body-slams and pile-drives its way into Staples Center for Summer Slam. Tuesday Night Project Aratani Courtyard, 120 Judge John Aiso St., tuesdaynightproject.org. First and third Tuesdays, June-Aug.: Tuesday Night Project hosts a free open mic event twice monthly. It showcases a community of artists, organizers, activists, professionals, independent business owners. Aug. 6, 12:45 p.m.: Tuesday Night Project benefit at the Higashi Honganji Buddhist Temple, 505 E. Third St. Town Hall Los Angeles Visit townhall-la.org. Venues vary, but all listed take place Downtown. July 12, 11:30 a.m.: Tim Mason, CEO and president of Fresh & Easy, will discuss the company’s business model, which is rooted in the idea that wholesome, fresh food should be available and affordable to everyone. At the Millennium Biltmore, 506 S. Grand Ave.

ROCK, POP & JAZZ

Love Letters Tour. He loves love. Openers are Keyshia Cole and Marsha Ambrosius. Orpheum Theatre 842 S. Broadway, (213) 622-1939 or laorpheum.com. Jun. 10, 8 p.m.: The awesome and venerable John Prine with opener Loudon Wainwright III. REDCAT 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. Jun. 10-11, 8:30 p.m.: The ensemble Partch performs works by the legendary and definitively inventive composer Harry Partch. Get ready for oneof-kind instruments such as Cloud Chamber Bowls, Kithara and the Chromelodeon (don’t ask). Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com. Jun. 7, 10 p.m.: Dusty 45’s, Rusty Spurs, The BNoirs, Peachy Keen and C-Horse. Jun. 8, 10 p.m.: Fun throwback surf pop with the Insect Surfers. Also The Graves, Brothers Deluxe, Old Lumps and Poupee The Human Toy. Jun. 9. 10 p.m.: The Blissins. Jun. 10, 10 p.m.: Seryn, Driftwood Singers and Fort King. Jun. 11, 1 p.m.: All ages show with The Waldos, Dirty Eyes and Symbol Six. Jun. 11, 8 p.m.: The Waldos, Dirty Eyes and The Stitches. Jun. 12, 10 p.m.: The Hi-Z’s, Cigarette Bums and Dharma Bums. Senor Fish 422 E. First St., bodegasundays.blogspot.com. Jun. 12, 5 p.m.-midnight: Bodega Sundays is a multicultural party with an Afro-Latin vibe featuring live drummers, bands, dancers and three DJs. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., (213) 614-0737 or sevengrand.la. Jun. 7, 10 p.m.: The Makers. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. Jun. 7, 9 p.m.: All-Star Crass Tribute Band celebrates the release, 30 years ago, of one of punk rock’s greatest albums. Jun. 10, 9 p.m.: Corima, Upsilon Acrux, The Sleeping Car and Modern Memory. Jun. 11, 9 p.m.: Catwalk, Black Elephant, Sea Lions and Paper Tigers. Jun. 12, 9 p.m.: Protectme, Hissy Fit, Neonates and Cool Moms. Varnish 118 E. 6th St., (213) 622-9999 or thevarnishbar.com. Jun. 6, 9 p.m.: Live jazz piano with Jamie Elman. Jun. 7, 8 p.m.: Live jazz piano with Marc Bosserman.

2 Street Jazz 366 E. Second St., (213) 680-0047 or 2ndstjazz.com. Jun. 9, 9 p.m.: Live rock night. As opposed to dead rock night. Blue Whale 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St. Suite 301, 213-6200908 or bluewhalemusic.com. Jun. 7, 8 p.m.: A jazz jam session hosted by the Kevin Kanner quintet. Bootleg Bar 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.org. Jun. 7, 10 p.m.: Band of Skulls and Rachel Goodrich. Jun. 8, 10 p.m.: Sloan and Dearly Beloved. Jun. 9, 10 p.m.: Electric Guest. Jun. 10: Flash Bang Grenada, Open Mike Eagle, Co. and DJ Nobody and Trackstar the DJ. Jun. 11, 8:30 p.m.: Timber Timbre and Marissa Nadler. Future rock, PoP & Jazz Jun. 12, 8:30 p.m.: The Fuse, LA Ghost, Fidlar and Casey’s Irish Pub The Boom Bang. 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. Conga Room June 3, 10, 17 and 24: Magic Mirror in residence L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 749-0445 or Fridays in June. congaroom.com. Cicada Jun. 9, 8 p.m.: Hot bachata sensations Monchy & Cicada Restaurant, 617 S. Olive St., (213) 488-9488 or Nathalia. cicadarestaurant.com. Grammy Museum Sundays, 6-11 p.m.: The restaurant is transformed 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or into a vintage, old Hollywood-style dance club every grammymuseum.org. Sunday. Come out to appreciate the big band, swank Jun. 8, 8 p.m.: Discussion and Q&A with four- costumes, dinner and cocktails. Visit cicadaclub. time Oscar nominated and Grammy-award winning com. composer Danny Elfman. Subjects include a 13-film Conga Room collaboration with Tim Burton and the release of L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic, (213) 749-0445 or the new box set The Danny Elfman & Tim Burton congaroom.com. 25th Anniversary Music Box. June 14, 9 p.m.: Multi Grammy winning ColomJun. 9, 8 p.m.: Eclectic vocalist/pianist Diane bian superstars, Aterciopelados. Schuur walks the tightrope between jazz and pop, Club Nokia inspired by the jazz singers of the ’40s and ’50s and Corner of Olympic Blvd. and Figueroa St., the pop music of the late ’50s and ’60s. After a dis- clubnokia.com. cussion and audience Q&A, Schuur will perform wnaNews June 25, 8 p.m.: Funky soul with Musiq Soulchild /L.A.Downto m o few songs. .c July 8, 9, p.m.: Hilarious satirists, who F’ing need k o o b Face Nokia Theatre you more than ever, The Dan Band. 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6030 or July 9, 8 p.m.: Rock en Espanol with Saul Hernokiatheatrelalive.com. nandez (formerly of Caifanes). Jun. 8, 8 p.m.: Tied in to E3, the Video Games July 14, 7 p.m.: Streetlight Manifesto teams up Live tour features live musical performances of the with the ska-rific Reel Big Fish, along with Rodeo sounds from games including Mario, Zelda, Sonic, Ruby Love and the Maxies. Halo, Warcraft, Final Fantasy, Castlevania and God July 15, 8 p.m.: ‘Til the end of the road with Boyz of War. For at night, the geeks shall inherit the con- II Men. cert hall. July 17, 7 p.m.: Flamenco masters Ottmar Liebert Jun. 9-10, 8 p.m.: Wisin y Yandel. and Luna Negre. Jun. 11, 8 p.m.; Jun. 12, 7 p.m.: R. Kelly is on his July 21, 7 p.m.: Owl City hoots into town with nd

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The Bob Baker Marionette Theater in City West is in its 51st season, and is the nation’s oldest ongoing puppet theater. All summer, it’s offering the show Magic Strings. It employs an “in-the-round” cabaret style, with the puppeteers not only exposed to the audience, but serving as an integral part of the show. It’s family friendly, but entertaining for all ages. Don’t worry — you won’t be the only adult there without kids. Shows are Tues.-Fri. at 10:30 a.m.; Sat. and Sun. at 2:30 p.m. At 1345 W. First St., (213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com.

Matt Kearney and Breanne Duren. July 24, 7 p.m.: The B’z are Tak Matsumoto and Koshi Inaba, on guitar and vocals. No other instruments needed. July 29, 8 p.m.: Mint Condition is in the house. July 30, 8 p.m.: Mexican alt rockers Zoe. Aug. 3, 8 p.m.: Rappin’ reggae style for YHWH, it’s Matisyahu. With Tea Leaf Green. Grammy Museum L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. These shows take place in the museum’s Sound Stage theater. June 15, 8 p.m.: As part of the celebration honoring his 25-year career, the museum welcomes country icon Randy Travis. June 17, 7:30 p.m.: Reggae historian Roger Steffens’ “Life of Bob Marley” multi-media presentations have been hailed as “the next best thing to seeing Bob Marley live.” He screens rare and unreleased video footage and photos while recounting Marley’s legendary life story. June 20, 8 p.m.: The legendary drummer and music director Max Weinberg talks about his time with Springsteen and Late Night with Conan O’Brien. June 21, 8 p.m.: The museum hosts an evening Starts with Ben Harper. 26/June 3 June 22, 7:30 p.m.: Los May Feliz natives the Airborne Toxic Event. They’ll talk about their music and perform. Grand Performances California Plaza, 350 S. Grand Ave., visit grandperformances.org. June 17, 8:30 p.m.: The L.A. Dept. of Cultural Affairs presents Ian Ruskin’s new one-man play, To Begin the World Over Again: the Life of Thomas Paine.Also, Sheetal Gandhi’s work-in-progress, Hu-

man Nature, inspired by Shel Silverstein’s children’s book, The Giving Tree. June 18, 8 p.m.: As part of the Boyle Heights Project, Conrad Romo’s “Tongue and Groove” is a monthly offering of short fiction, personal essays, poetry, spoken word and music. Each of the program’s ten artists will represent the resonance of Boyle Heights’ multiethnic (Latino, Jewish and Japanese) past and present. June 19, 8 p.m.: Librettist Terry Wolverton teams up with composer David Ornette Cherry for a concert reading of Embers, a jazz opera that fuses world music, hip hop grooves, song and spoken word. Directed by Michael John Garces. June 24, 8 p.m.: Showman, author and humorist Charles Phoenix presents a fun-filled tour of the city’s many “lands” including Downtown and Boyle Heights — all new, and created especially for Grand Performances. June 25, 8 p.m.: In 1983, Deborah Peagler, a woman brutally abused by her boyfriend, was sentenced to 25 years-to-life for her connection to his murder. Twenty years later, as she languished in prison, a California law allowing incarcerated domestic-violence survivors to reopen their cases was passed. Crime After Crime is a documentary recalling the remarkable case of Peagler, her lawyers, and the battle that pitted them against the Los Angeles D.A.’s office. June 26, 8 p.m.: Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1917) showcases three of the early 20th century’s most talented women: author Kate Wiggin, screenwriter Frances Marion, who adapted Wiggen’s novel for screen, and Mary Pickford, who produced and starred in the film. L.A.’s own 21st century composer Maria Newman’s penned a new score to this

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classic film. July 7 and 8, 8 p.m.: Los Angeles’ highly celebrated international touring modern dance company, Diavolo Dance Theater, is a unique collection of gymnasts, acrobats, athletes and actors who create powerful, witty and exhilarating movements. Also performing is Colombia-based Noruz, which features two dancers and an actress in a work that looks at women in that country’s prison system. Thursday night in English and Friday night in Spanish. July 8, noon: Mr. Little Jeans’ whimsical pop songs run the gamut from seductive to experimental, with electro gloss, drums, synths and breathless, lyrical vocals. July 9, 7:30 p.m.: One Night, One World, One Stage presents artists from Scotland, Japan, Cuba, Peru, Tunisia and Angola. July 15, noon: A chamber octet featuring eight guitarists, Los Angeles Electric 8 blends minimalism, atonal chords and polyrhythms. July 15, 8 p.m.: Torchbearer and soul-incarnate of Fela Anikulapo Kuti, Seun Kuti and the famous Egypt 80 Band return to Grand Performances for an evening of funky, soulful, driving African rhythms. July 16, 8 p.m.: Congolese-Belgian singer/rapper Baloji and his band blend the melodious guitar sounds of traditional Congolese music, rumba and Nigerian afro funk with lyrics that weave sociopolitical stories about life in Kinshasa and Belgium. Also performing is Canadian-born Tasneem, a singer/songwriter whose lilting voice and pop groovebased music is infused with rhythms that reflect her East African and Indian roots. July 21, 8 p.m.: Take a peek at a slice of the Boyle Heights Jewish community’s foodways traditions through the beloved kosher pickle. Reservations are required for this workshop, where you’ll learn the history of the American kosher dill, how to make your own, and what makes a pickle kosher. July 22, noon: Ethiopian-born, San Franciscobased Meklit Hadero is a soulful singer-songwriter delving into jazz, soul, hip-hop, art-rock and folk traditions from the Americas and her East African homeland. July 22, 8 p.m.: Get ready to dance. Fania Records opens its vaults to New York DJ Joaquin Joe Claussell and his six-piece band, giving them leeway to remix and create a new vibe for classic recordings by Latin funk/salsa/merengue greats. Later, Palenke Soultribe shares the stage with a mix of electronica, pop, rock and Colombian folk sounds. July 23, 8 p.m.: The Pan Afrikan People’s Arkestra and Build an Ark join for a celebration of experimental jazz and soul-stirring astral vibes. July 29, noon: Grace, passion and enduring strength mark the Shoghaken Ensemble’s music of Armenia, both modern and traditional. July 29, 8 p.m.: Ghana-born rapper Blitz the Ambassador’s urgent lyrical flow paints vivid sociopolitical images over a brassy, percussive backbeat. Also performing are Marthin Chan and Malverde, leading a group of musicians fusing elements of hiphop, ska, rock and electro with Latin sounds. July 30, 8 p.m.: Shoghaken returns with Tigran, who marries traditional Armenian music with experimental piano techniques. Aug. 4, 8 p.m.: From the 1930s to the 1980s, The Phillips Music Co. of Boyle Heights was more than a music store or a record shop; it was a space for democracy. USC professor Josh Kun leads a multimedia lecture that explores this rich musical and cultural history. Aug. 5, noon: Miguel Atwood-Ferguson returns with his string quartet, Quartetto Fantastico, to perform unexpected covers and new compositions in genre-fusing styles that challenge musical boundaries while exposing Angelenos to a new musical experience. Aug. 5, 8 p.m.: Miguel Atwood Ferguson and Geoff “Double G“ Gallegos (daKAH Hip Hop Orchestra) team up to present an evening of new works and surprising interpretations of covers. Aug. 6, 8 p.m.: Israel-born singer Ravid Kahalani, who grew up in a traditional Yemenite family, brings his nine-piece group Yemen Blues to perform a program that mixes jazz, funk and a healthy dose of Middle Eastern music. And Watcha Clan, from France, melds the spiritual eclecticism of Gnawa music, trance, drum-n-bass, Balkan brass and Sephardic folk. Aug. 12, noon: Mariachi Rock-O from Guadalajara covers classic and contemporary rock. Aug. 12, 8 p.m.: Mariachi Rock-O returns to share the stage with Mariachi Mystery Tour, which interprets Beatles classics through Mariachi music. Aug. 13, 8 p.m.: Iranian vocalist and composer Sussan Deyhim takes the stage. Aug. 18 and 19, 8 p.m.: New Zealand’s Indian Ink Theatre Company presents “The Guru of Chai,” a story that connects the lives of a poor tea seller, a young girl, a policeman in love and a disreputable poet. Aug. 19, noon: I See Hawks in L.A. returns. Aug. 20, 8 p.m.: Exene and Phranc: Two original voices from Los Angeles’ punk and folk music scene come together on one stage for an evening of witty,

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Design Time photos courtesy Dwell on Design

June 6, 2011

Hey you. Yeah, you in the Eames chair, with the wire-rimmed glasses and a copy of Dwell magazine in your lap. The Dwell on Design conference returns to the Los Angeles Convention Center June 24-26. Design enthusiasts shouldn’t miss the annual confab featuring the latest in home decor and general Modern design. There are featured speakers too, like architect William McDonough (June 24, 6 p.m.), and panel discussions sorting out questions like, what exactly is greenwashing (June 25, 1 p.m.)? At the Los Angeles Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa St., dwellondesign.com.

tongue-in-cheek yet heartfelt songs. Aug. 26, 8 p.m.: Drummer Ndugu Chancler and pianist Patrice Rushen give a tribute to Quincy Jones. Aug. 26, noon: Adored in Brazil and Colombia, Chicano Batman lays down a retro, tropicalia groove. Aug. 27, 8 p.m.: The Boyle Heights Project continues with an imagined evening of musical history set in the landmark Phillips Music Co. store, will feature an all-star line-up of musicians, writers, and Boyle Heights locals, along with video, rare photos and spoken word tributes. Nokia Theatre 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6000 or nokiatheatrelalive.com. June 17-19, various showtimes: Sesame Street Live: Elmo’s Healthy Heroes! June 20 and 22, 8 p.m.: Is it day, or night? Doesn’t matter — it’s time to pursue happiness with Kid Cudi. June 24, 7:30 p.m.: Men of Soul features crooners Jeffrey Osborne, Peabo Bryson, Freddie Jackson and Howard Hewett. June 25, 8 p.m.: Banda straight from Mexico with La Arrolladora Banda El Limon. July 16, 8 p.m.: Roberto Tapia and Enigma Norteno Aug. 5-7, 8 p.m.: Three nights with pop princess, she of the girl-kissing and liking it variety, Katy Perry. Orpheum Theatre 842 S. Broadway, (213) 622-1939 or laorpheum.com. June 18, 8 p.m.: Folk popster Brett Denner, with local harmonizing Americana troubadours Dawes. Aug. 20, 8 p.m.: Folk crooner Amos Lee headlines, with Calexico. Pershing Square Summer Concerts 532 S. Olive St., (213) 485-1645 or laparks.org/ pershingsquare. All concerts at 8 p.m. July 16: You ran, ran so far away, but you couldn’t escape A Flock of Seagulls. July 23: The Romantic, with Suddyn. July 30: The night belongs to lovers, but on this night, they must share it with 10,000 Maniacs, who headline a show with the Sultans of Mambo. Aug. 6: The Untouchables, with the Zoot Suit Review. Aug. 13: Stan Ridgway and Downtown’s own Michelle Shocked. Aug. 20: The English Beat with Urban Dread. Yah mon. Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com. All shows start at 10 p.m. June 14: Emma and Her Lady Parts, the Damselles and the B-Noirs. June 15: Saint Christopher, The Heroine. June 16: 3 Balls of Fire. June 18: The Checkers. June 21: Summer Twins, Seasons and the BNoirs. June 23: T.V. Mike and the Scarecrows and Hawkz. June 24: Throw Rag, Lightnin’ Woodcock and

Simon Stokes. June 26: Christie Paige, Stars at Night, Bikini Thrills, Ingenue and Strong Killings. June 28: Simon Stokes and Hookers. June 30: Nikki Corvette, Dirty Eyes, Crazy Squeeze and Rough Kids. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., sevengrand.la. Tuesdays: House band The Makers. Staples Center 1201 S. Figueroa St., staplescenter.com. June 20, 7 p.m.: Britney’s back, and she’s brining Nicki Minaj along with her. June 23-26, 8 p.m.: Four nights with the largest living legends of Spanish rock, Maná. June 28, 7:30 p.m.: Rhianna is in town, and she invites Cee Lo Green under her umbrella, ella, ella. July 1, 7:30 p.m.: The boys are back, on the block, but off the street and no longer new. Huh? Yeah that’s right, it’s the NKOTBSB Tour, with the New Kids on the Block and the Backstreet Boys. Aug. 17, 7:30 p.m.: Smooth Mr. Josh Groban. Aug. 19-21, 8 p.m.: Soldier of love Sadé brings guest John Legend along for the tour. Aug. 23-24, 27-28, 7 p.m.: Taylor Swift and her schoolyard melodies. Summer on the Plaza Earnst & Young Plaza, 735 S. Figueroa St., artsbrookfieldproperties.com. July 15, 5:30-8:30 p.m.: R&B songstress Leela James. July 22, 5:30-8:30 p.m.: Smooth jazz saxman Mike Phillips. July 29, 5:30-8:30 p.m.: South Africa’s Lira. Walt Disney Concert Hall 111 S. Grand Ave., visit musiccenter.org. June 25, 8 p.m.: If choral music has a rockstar, it’s Eric Whitacre. Whitacre is on hand to conduct his work of musical theater, Paradise Lost: Shadows and Wings, featuring soprano Hila Pitmann. June 26, 2 p.m.: The Cal Phil teams up with Beatles impersonators the Fab Four for a night of Beethoven and Beatles music. July 24, 2 p.m.: Victor Vener and the Cal Phil bring in pianist Bryan Pezzonne for a night of classics from Bolero to Black Swan to Grease. Aug. 7, 2 p.m.: The Cal Phil welcomes Broadway stars Brandi Burkhardt and Derek Keeling to sing songs from the Sound of Music, South Pacific, Oklahoma! and more. Aug. 21, 2 p.m.: Violinist Lindsay Deutsch leads the Cal Phil in an afternoon of famous works from Rhapsody in Blue, Fiddler on the Roof, Titantic and more. The Varnish 118 E. Sixth St., (213) 622-9999 or thevarnishbar.com. Mondays, 9 p.m.: Jamie Elman tinkles the house ivories. Tuesdays, 8 p.m.: Jazzman pianist Mark Bosserman entertains.

CLASSICAL MUSIC Saturday, June 11 The Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 6 p.m.: The Paderewski Music Society presents a

concert featuring pianist Piotr Kosinski. There will be a screening of a short documentary on the composer and a reception to follow. Visit ijpaderewski. org. 7:30 p.m.: The School of Performing Arts Season Finale Honors Recital. Free, no ticket required. Sunday, June 12 The Colburn School 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. 4 p.m.: The seventh annual concert of the LA Korean Youth Orchestra. Tickets and info at (323) 243-6079 or wesleymusicministries.wordpress.com. Future ClaSSiCal MuSiC Zipper Hall 200 S. Grand Ave., colburnschool.edu. June 18, 8 p.m.: Vox Femina gives a performance they’re calling “Women Gone Wild.” Sounds like these normally well-behaved ladies are letting their hair down. June 19, 3 p.m.: Pianist Rufus Choi gives an all Liszt program including all 6 Paganini Etudes, Sonata in B minor, Mephisto Waltz No.1 and Valse Impromptu. Tickets and information at rufuschoi. com or call (424) 235-0507.

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE Bordering on Love Company of Angels, Alexandria Hotel, 501 S. Spring St., (213) 489-3703 or companyofangels.org. Jun. 10-11, 8 p.m.; Jun. 12, 7 p.m.: Evangeline Ordaz’ new play takes on marriage and immigration. It’s a platonic love-story dramedy with a drag queen chorus. Through July 2. The Fun Family Festival of Tragedy Bootleg Theater, 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.org. Jun. 11, noon: Macbeth and the Monster. Jun. 11, 2 p.m.: King O’Leary. Jun. 12, noon: Titus the Clownicus. Krunk Fu Battle Battle David Henry Hwang Theater, 120 Judge John Aiso St., (213) 625-7000 or eastwestplayers.org. Jun. 8-11 8 p.m.; Jun. 12, 2 p.m.: In East West Players’ hip hop musical, young Norman Lee battles the baddest B-boy crew at Sunset Park High for respect, honor, and the heart of sweet Cindy Chang, all under the tutelage of Sir Master Cert. Through Jun. 26. La Razón Blindada 24th Street Theatre, 1117 West 24th St., 213-745-6516 or 24thstreet.org. Jun. 11, 8 p.m.: Argentine playwright/director Aristides Vargas infuses Cervantes’ classic novel El Quijote with Franz Kafka’s The Truth About Sancho Panza and testimonies by Chicho Vargas and other political prisoners held in the 1970s during Argentina’s dictatorship. Two political prisoners, oppressed by physical and emotional abuse, find solace in meeting every Sunday at dusk to tell the story of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza. Through Jun. 25. LoveSick LOFT ensemble, 929 E. Second St., (213) 680-0392 or loftensemble.com.

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22 Downtown News

Listings

Get Down to the Afrobeat photo by LeonardX

man Nature, is a multi-media dance theater piece inspired by Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree. July 7 and 8, 8 p.m.: Los Angeles’ highly celebrated international touring modern dance company Diavolo Dance Theater is a unique collection of gymnasts, Continued from previous page acrobats, athletes and actors who create powerful, Opening Jun. 11, 8 p.m.; Jun. 12, 7 p.m.: A dark, witty and exhilarating movements for the stage. comic Wonderland-like journey into the poetic Also performing is Colombia-based Noruz, story of two lovers caught in the same dream. Hate which features two dancers and an actress in a work when that happens. Through Jul. 24. that looks at women in that country’s prison sysMagic Strings tem. Suite para Barrotes y Presos (Suite for Bars and The Bob Baker Marionette Theater, 1345 W. First St., Prisoners) will be presented Thursday night in Eng(213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com. lish and Friday night in Spanish. Jun. 7-10, 3, 10:30 a.m.; Jun. 11-12, 2:30 p.m.: The Hayworth Theater More than 100 of Bob Baker’s fantastical marionettes 2509 Wilshire Blvd., (323) 960-4442 or come together in an hour-long variety revue. Expect thehayworth.com. puppet horses frolicking on an old-fashioned merryThrough June 30: In Riding The Midnight Exgo-round and a marionette “Day at the Circus.” After press With Billy Hayes the protagonist goes on a the performance, guests are invited to have refresh- fascinating journey into peril, fame and fortune. It’s ments in the Party Room. Open-ended run. a strange voyage of discovery, from the heights of youthful folly to the crushing depths of despair. Future theatre, Opera & Dance Listings LOFT Ensemble 24th Street Theatre L.A. Fringe Theatre, 929 Second St., Studio 105, (213) 1117 West 24th St., 213-745-6516 or 24thstreet.org. 680-0392 or loftensemble.com. June 5, 8 p.m.: Argentine playwright/director ArisThrough July 24: In LOFT ensemble co-founder tides Vargas infuses Cervantes’ classic novel El Quijote Larissa Wise’s “LoveSick,” Benjamin, an unusual with Franz Kafka’s The Truth About Sancho Panza young man obsessed with death, falls in love with Los Angeles Downtown News and testimonies by Chicho Vargas and other political Sophia, a colorful young woman brimming with life. 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 prisoners held in the 1970s during Argentina’s dicta- Against his better judgment, Benjamin finds himself phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 torship. Through June 25. becoming more and more enchanted with Sophia’s web: DowntownNews.com • email: realpeople@downtownnews.com Ahmanson Theatre contrasting world. facebook: twitter: Los Angeles Street Loft 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or L.A. Downtown News DowntownNews centertheatregroup.org. 533 S. Los Angeles St., 2nd Floor, redcat.org. Through July 31: If you’ve dreamed a dream, you June 15-19, 8 p.m.: The CalArts Center for New can dig Boublil & Schönberg’s Performance joins forces with the Poor Dog Group, Editor & PublishEr: Sue Larisclassic Les Miserables. GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawnclassic Eastin novel, it’s an epic Based on Victor Hugo’s again, for another run of Brewsie and Willie by Gerand upliftingEditor: story about the survival of the human trude Stein. A disparate group of American soldiers ExEcutivE Jon Regardie spirit. and nurses wait in limbo to return to their homecitY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt Bob Baker Marionettes land and an uncertain future: What work will they coNtributiNG Editors: Kathryn The Bob Baker Marionette Theater,Maese 1345 W. First St., have? What will America’s future be? And what is coNtributiNG writErs: Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, (213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com. their place in it? Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Open-ended run: In “Magic Strings” more than Los Angeles Theatre Center Art Brian Allison marionettes appear in an 100 ofdirEctor: Bob Baker’s fantastical 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi hour-long variety revue. After theKanegawa performance, guests The LATC is a venue for Radar L.A., an interANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins areProductioN invited to have refreshments in the Party Room. national theater film festival run from June 14-19. PhotoGrAPhEr: Bootleg Theater Gary Leonard Showtimes and dates vary. 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or June 15-19, 8 p.m.: Inspired by Octavio Paz’s AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt bootlegtheater.com. “The Labyrinth of Solitude,” a collection of essays AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin June 4-25: The “Fun Family Festival of Tragedy” on Mexican thought and identity, Solitude is set on sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz presents for AdvErtisiNG family-friendly plays: Catherine Hamlet, Prince clAssiFiEd MANAGEr: Holloway the day of the million-immigrant march. ofAccouNt Puddles,ExEcutivEs: King O’Leary, Clownicus andBill McBee, June 14-18: An award-winning mix of drawIediaTitus Hess, the Catherine Holloway, Brenda Stevens Macbeth and the Monster. Show dates and times ing, animation, puppetry, projection and paper, 2 vary throughoutNorma the month. Dimensional Life of Her is a richly imagined perforcirculAtioN: Rodas June 17-July MANAGEr: 17: “The Interlopers” is a Romeo and mance installation set in an artist’s studio. distributioN Salvador Ingles Juliet story set in Los Angeles’ transgender inBonillaJune 14-18: Mashing up spoken word, comedy distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo,world, Gustavo which a group of unique misfits are brave enough to and hip-hop, Steve Connell and Sekou Andrews dechallenge the obstacle course of life. liver hyper-kinetic performances in The Word BeThe Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles Company of Angels a newLos satire that examines the current Ameriand is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences gins, of Downtown Angeles. Hotel, 501 S. Spring St., (213) 489-3703 or Alexandria can cultural landscape as it appears to a young white companyofangels.org. man and a young black man. One copy per person. Through July 2: Evangeline Ordaz’ new play BorJune 15-18: In Ground to Cloud and Myth and dering on Love combines two provocative questions: Infrastructure, two artists, Christine Marie and Miwa What are the definitions of marriage and immigra- Ma, share a program that demonstrates how wordless tion? It’s a platonic love-story “dramedy” with a performance paired with evocative visuals can cast drag queen chorus. You’ve been warned. new light on theatrical storytelling. Part of Radar L.A. Dorothy Chandler Pavilion June 15-18: In a performance space filled wall-to135 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-8000 or musiccenter.org. wall with prison bunk beds, performers and audiJune 23-26: Ballet Nacional de Cuba combines ence share overcrowded conditions akin to a Caliclassical romanticism with Latin boldness in their fornia state prison for State of Incarceration, the latest ballet presentation of Don Quixote. Accompanied work from Los Angeles Poverty Department. by the L.A. Opera orchestra. June 15-19: In As You Are Now So Once Were We July 14-17: The American Ballet Theatre presents dozens of cardboard boxes are manipulated to create Alexei Ratmansky’s “The Bright Stream.” Set to a a variety of theatrical settings in this wry, engaging witty score by Dmitri Shostakovich, the ballet won and award-winning work by Chilean director Jose the Critics’ Circle National Dance Award. Miguel Jimenez and his Dublin-based company. East West Players June 15-19: Pomo Afro Homos presents Fierce David Henry Hwang Theater, 120 Judge John Aiso St., Love (Remix), an update of the 1991 work featuring (213) 625-7000 or eastwestplayers.org. stories from black gay life. Through June 26: In the hip-hop musical extravaJune 16-19: Titus Redux reconfigures Shakeganza that is Krunk Fu Battle Battle, young Norman speare’s tale of revenge in a visceral exploration of Lee battles the baddest b-boy crew at Sunset Park the personal toll of U.S. military action in our time. High for respect, honor, and the heart of sweet Jack Stehlin stars as a modern Titus, returning home Cindy Chang. to his family after five tours of duty in Afghanistan. Grand Performances His battles continue with violent manifestations of California Plaza, 350 S. Grand Ave., visit post-traumatic stress and escalating paranoia. grandperformances.org. June 17-19: In Hot Pepper, Air Conditioner, and June 17, 8:30 p.m.: The L.A. Dept. of Cultural The Farewell Speech, characters wrestle with issues as Affairs presents Ian Ruskin’s new one-man play, seemingly banal as selecting a restaurant for dinner or To Begin the World Over Again: the Life of Thomas the workings of an office climate control system, and Paine. Also, Sheetal Gandhi’s work-in-progress, Hu- as awkward as the departure of a young co-worker.

Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz clAssiFiEd REDCATAdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Iedia Hess, Catherine Holloway, 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800, redcat.org. Bill McBee, Brenda Stevens

Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com email: realpeople@downtownnews.com

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ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard

There may be no music on the planet more universally danceable and uplifting than the Afrobeat of Seun Kuti and Egypt 80 — at least not since the 1997 death of the band’s founding frontman, Afrobeat godfather Fela Kuti. Fela’s youngest son, Seun, who has led Egypt 80 since he was 14, is still carrying the torch, and on July 15 at 8 p.m. he delivers it to Cal Plaza. Most of the members of Egypt 80, an army of drummers, reed and string players, are originals with the band. There’ll be no need to bring a seat Los Angeles Downtown News cushion this one — as 1264 W. First Street, Losto Angeles, CA 90026 sitting won’t be an opphone: 213-481-1448 • fax:really 213-250-4617 tion. And oh yeah, it’s free. web: DowntownNews.com email: realpeople@downtownnews.com At Cal Plaza, 350 S. Grand Ave., grandperformances. facebook: org. L.A. Downtown News

showcases the paintings of Iranian-born American HK The Zamani.. Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper forGallery Downtown Los Angeles and is disREDCAT is a venue for Radar L.A., an inter- Charlie James tributed every Monday throughout the offices and circulAtioN: Normafilm Rodas national theater festival run from June 14-19. 975 Chung King Road, (213) 687-0488 or residences of Downtown Los Angeles. distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles Showtimes and dates vary. cjamesgallery.com. One copy per person. distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla June 15-18: In The Car Plays, theater company Opening Jun. 11: Animal Stories, a solo show of Moving Arts presents a series of intimate ten-min- Bay Area artist Carol Selter, brings together vidute plays in which audiences of two move from eo, photographs and animal death masks. Fun! vehicle to vehicle, experiencing works by different Through Jul. 16. Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris playwrights in a dramatic setting familiar to all An- Chinese Historical Society of Southern California GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin gelenos — the car. 411 Bernard St., (323) 222-0856 or chssc.org. June 16-19: imagery, bold staging and Ongoing: An exhibition about the history of imExEcutivE Editor:Projected Jon Regardie layered voices construct the unknown journey of a migration from China to the United States. citY Editor: Richard Guzmán manwritEr: gone missing in Amarillo. The Company stAFF Ryan Vaillancourt 946 Yale St., (213) 221-7082 or thecompanyart.com. coNtributiNG Editors: Kathryn Maese Opening Jun. 18: Live at the Acropolis features coNtributiNG writErs: Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, of Kenji Fujita, Zak Kitnick and Sam PulitKristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada the work Los Angeles Downtown News art space exhibitiOns anD inFOrmatiOn zer. 1264 Through Aug. 13. Los Angeles, CA 90026 W. First Street, Art dirEctor: Brian Allison Angel City Brewing Crewest phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa 216 S. Alameda (off Traction), angelcitybrewing.com. 110 web: Winston St., (213) 627-8272 or crewest.com. DowntownNews.com ProductioN Rawlins ThroughANd JulyGrAPhics: 10: StreetAlexis Brewed: An Exhibition of Through Jun. 26: The Art of Transportation. email: realpeople@downtownnews.com Contemporary Street Art features about 25 interna- Downtown Art Center Gallery PhotoGrAPhEr: Leonard tionally knownGary artists, many included in MOCA’s 828 S. Main St., (213) 627-7374 or dacgallery.com. facebook: current street art show. Opening Jun.L.A. 9: New worksNews by David Jang turn Downtown AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt Art Share Los Angeles everyday materials such as styrofoam cups, poWarehouse Gallery, 326 S. Hewitt St., (213) 687-4278 tato chip bags and paper towels into “machines.” twitter: AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin or artsharela.org. Through Jul. 8. DowntownNews sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz Through Aug. 4: Downtown Legends honors Lili Edgar Varela Fine Arts clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway Lakich, Andre Miripolsky, Robert Reynolds, Rick 102 W. Fifth St., (213) 604-3634 or AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Iedia Hess, Catherine Holloway, Robinson and Michael Salerno — three painters, edgarvarelafinearts.com. Bill McBee, Brenda Stevens one sculptor and one neon artist — who have been Through June: Michael Ups. The Los Angeles Downtown Frost: News isCut the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is discreating art in Downtown for more than 30 years. Gary Leonard circulAtioN: Norma Rodas tributed every Monday throughout the offices and Arty 860 S. Broadway, takemypicture.com. residences of Downtown Los Angeles. distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles 634 S. Main St., (213) 213-7829 or artyla.com. Take My Picture is a gallery dedicated to Gary distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla One copy per person. Through Jul. 9: Advancements of Science * Fiction Leonard’s photographs, documenting the public is a showcase of 45 small and large sculptural works and private culture of Los Angeles with significant by Jocelyn Marsh. guest collections. Bert Green Fine Art Hive Gallery & Studios 451 S. Main St. #1206, (213) 842-8574 or bgfa.us. 729 S. Spring St., (213) 955-9051 or thehivegallery.com. Opening Jun. 6: New paintings from Los AngelesThrough Jun. 28: Circus, Circus, a group show, based Ken Bracken are a series of interlocking lines includes paintings and drawings from the Chiodo — formal compositions using line, space, color and Brothers, known for their cult classic film Killer texture, abstractly conceived and rendered as real Klowns from Outer Space. objects. Through Jun. 30. By appointment. Hold Up Art Buchanon Gallery 358 E. Second St., (213) 221-4585 or holdupart.com. 204 W. Sixth St., (323) 823-1922 or Through Jul. 6: You Lucky Bastards is a group byronbuchanan.com. exhibition featuring Asian-influenced contemporary Ongoing: Pop paintings by Bryon Buchanan. art of multiple genres, including graffiti, graphic deCB1 Gallery sign, illustration, 3D graphics and more. 207 W. Fifth St., (213) 806-7889 or cb1gallery.com. LA Artcore at Union Center for the Arts Through Jul. 2: In-between Air, Land and Sea 120 Judge John Aiso St., (213) 617-3274 or laartcore.org.

Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin

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June 6, 2011

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AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Iedia Hess, Catherine Holloway, Bill McBee, Brenda Stevens circulAtioN: Norma Rodas distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

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June 6, 2011 Through Jun. 29: The art of Dan Nadaner and Michael Wood. LA Artcore at the Brewery Annex 650 A South Avenue 21, (323) 276-9320 or laartcore.org. Through Jun. 12: Thai group show. L2kontemporary 990 N. Hill St. #205, (626) 319-3661 or l2kontemporary.com. Through Jun. 25: Kim Tucker’s Loudmouth Ghosts and Reckless Sweethearts features both ceramic and on-paper portraits of the confidently imperfect reckoning with their fears and anxieties The Latino Museum 514 S. Spring St., (213) 626-7600 or thelatinomuseum.com. Ongoing: The Latino Museum holds a unique collection of work from emerging and established contemporary Mexican, Latino and Chicano artists working and living in the United States as well as throughout Latin, Central and South America. Los Angeles Center For Digital Art 102 West Fifth St., 323 646 9427 or lacda.com. Through Sept. 18: In partnership with a satellite exhibit in Venice, Italy, the video installation FLOW-a work in motion by Norwegian Pia Myrvold involves monitors and projections assembled in immersive structures. Los Angeles Public Library Central Library, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7500 or lapl.org. Through Oct. 9: The exhibit Forty Years of Sesame Street Illustration: Selections from the Publishing Archive of Sesame Workshop, explores the history of the popular children’s educational show. Bert is all over it. Ongoing: The Annenberg Gallery displays some of the materials collected by the Los Angeles Public Library since its founding in 1872. The inaugural exhibit Treasures of Los Angeles features items from the Hollywood collection, including vintage film posters, publicity photographs, postcards and more. Morono Kiang Gallery 218 West 3rd St., (213) 628-8208 or moronokiang.com. Through Jul. 9: It’s All True!, a group exhibition, features video and photography works by Xin Yunpeng, Larissa Sansour, Martin Healy and Ruben Ortiz Torres. Norbertellen Gallery 215 W. Sixth St., (818) 662-5041 or norbertellengallery.com. Through Jun. 25: Alive, a unique ultraviolet light

Downtown News 23

DowntownNews.com presentation by contemporary Mexican artist Angel Acordagoitia, features portraits of celebrity and local urban culture. Phil Stern Gallery 601 S. Los Angeles St., (805) 300 1627 or philsterngallery.com. Through July 16: Oddball! features photographic portraits by Phil Stern of icons including James Dean, Marlon Brando, Marilyn Monroe and John Wayne. POVevolving Gallery 939 Chung King Rd., (310) 594-3036 or povevolving.com. Current: The Tyranny of Impermanence features 23 new monotype prints by Grady Gordon. Opening Jun. 11: New paintings by Marco Zamora. He uses a mostly black and white palette to depict the urban landscape and the often overlooked happenings of everyday life. Raw Materials 436 S. Main St., (213) 627-7223 or rawmaterialsla.com. Through Aug. 6: Skateboard culture photographer Hugh Holland’s “Photographs” brings to the forefront selections of his less often seen works during a 15-year period spent in Mexico. The show in the window box off Raw Materials is concurrent with MOCA’s Art in the Streets, which features several Holland photos. Sam Lee Gallery 990 N. Hill St. #190, (323) 227-0275 or samleegallery.com. Opening Jun. 11: Two By Sea: photographic art by Rebecca Sittler and Adam Thorman. Through Aug. 6. Sci-Arc Gallery 960 E. Third St., (213) 356-5328 or sciarc.edu. Opening Jun. 10: The Library Gallery exhibition You Are So Beautiful and I Am A Fool, a series of new paintings by Los Angeles-based artist Wendy Heldmann. Through Jul. 29. Through June 26: Undergraduate Thesis Presentations — a culmination of five years of study and coursework leading toward the B.Arch degree — as well as undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate design studio projects will be on view throughout the school. Temple of Visions 719 S. Spring St., templeofvisions.com. Ongoing: Group shows of contemporary mystical and visionary art.

Terrell Moore Gallery 1221 S. Hope St. (213) 744-1999 or terrellmoore.net. Ongoing: A mini-retrospective of Terrell Moore includes his recent work, Glyphs. Group shows and featured solo artists revolve on a continual basis.

FILM Devil’s Night Drive In 240 W. Fourth St., (310) 584-1086 or devilsnight.com. Jun. 11, 7:30 p.m.: Dirty Dancing screens on the rooftop parking lot in the great outdoors. No car necessary. Love of Patrick Swayze mandatory. Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. Jun. 7, 9:30-11:30 p.m.: That Movie Show Seasons 1 and 2 re-cut and uncensored with Bobby Miller. Jun. 9, 7 p.m.: Roundabout Theatre Company’s Broadway production of Oscar Wilde’s comedy The Importance of Being Earnest filmed live. Jun. 11, 8 p.m.: Go old school with a 3D screening of the 1953 classic House of Wax starring Vincent Price. Also, a slide show and talk by his daughter Victoria Price. Flagship Theatres University Village 3323 S. Hoover St., (213) 748-6321 or flagshipmovies.com. Through Jun. 9: Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (12, 3, 6 and 9 p.m.); The Hangover 2 (11:30 a.m. and 2, 4:30, 7 and 9:30 p.m.); Kung Fu Panda 2 (11 a.m. and 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8 and 10:15 p.m.). Jun. 10 (partial list): Super 8 (midnight). IMAX Theater California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 7442019 or californiasciencecenter.org. Through Jun. 30: A sweeping portrait of the history, culture and religion of the Arabian Peninsula, Arabia 3D is a mix of contemporary scenes of modern-day Arabian life, epic historical recreations of ancient civilizations and stunning digital visual effects, shot at more than twenty locations across Saudi Arabia. Last Remaining Seats Million Dollar Theatre, 307 S. Broadway, laconservancy.org. Jun. 8, 8 p.m.: Captain Blood (1935), the swashbuckler that catapulted Errol Flynn to stardom and garnered Academy Award nominations for Best

Picture and Best Director (Michael Curtiz), screens at one of the first movie palaces in the U.S. Outdoor Cinema Food Fest Exposition Park, 700 Exposition Park Dr., outdoorcinemafoodfest.com. Jun. 11, 5:30 p.m.: The ultimate picnic environment for entertainment and food features gourmet food trucks, live music and a movie on a 52-foot screen every. Tonight Goodfellas screens at 8:30 p.m. Regal Cinema L.A. Live 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (877) 835-5734 or lalive.com. Through Jun. 9: X-Men: First Class (10 and 11:50 a.m. and 12:30, 1:10, 3, 3:40, 4:20, 6:20, 7, 7:40, 9:40, 10:20 and 11 p.m.); The Hangover Part II (10:40 and 11:20 a.m. and 12, 1:20, 2, 2:40, 4, 4:40, 5:20, 6:40, 7:20, 8, 9:20, 10 and 10:40 p.m.); Kung Fu Panda 2 (11:10 and 11:50 a.m. and 1:30, 2:10, 3:50, 4:30, 6:50 and 9:10 p.m.); Kung Fu Panda 2 3D (10:10 a.m. and 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30 and 9:50 p.m.); Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (12:20, 3:30, 6:40 and 9:50 p.m.); Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides 3D (10 a.m. and 1 p.m.); Bridesmaids (10:30 a.m. and 1:20, 4:10, 6:30, 7:10, 9:30 and 10:10 p.m.); Thor 3D (10:20 a.m. and 1, 3:50, 6:30 and 9:10 p.m.); Fast Five (10:50 a.m. and 1:50, 4:50, 7:50 and 10:50 p.m.).

MORE LISTINGS Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

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Downtown News 25

DowntownNews.com

Driving It Old School Photos by Gary Leonard

Hundreds of old Chevys, and the people who love them, showed up at Felix Chevrolet on Sunday, May 29. The All Chevrolet Show was a throwback automotive extravaganza featuring decades-old restored rides, among them a 1918 D5 and a 1933 Eagle Coupe. The event was organized by the Vintage Chevrolet Club of America and Felix Chevrolet. The happening also celebrated the 90th birthday of the dealership on the southern end of the Figueroa Corridor.

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26 Downtown News

June 6, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Around Town Continued from page 2

Hotel Marketing Plan Moves Forward

T

he City Council last week gave final approval to the formation of the Los Angeles Tourism Marketing District, a new type of business improvement district which aims to raise about $11.5 million annually to promote the city to out-of-towners. The funds, which will come from an additional 1.5% surcharge on hotel rooms, will more than double the approximately $10 million

the city already spends annually on the effort through a small portion of the hotel tax (also known as the Transient Occupancy Tax). It would put Los Angeles on par with competitors in the effort to court business and leisure travelers. The council approved the plan on Wednesday, June 1. The deal impacts hotels with 50 or more rooms. Downtown entities affected by the new district include the Westin Bonaventure Hotel & Suites, Hilton Checkers, the Millennium Biltmore Hotel, the Omni Los Angeles Hotel and the J.W. Marriott/Ritz-Carlton.

SCI-Arc Gets Grants to Put Lectures Online

At the Corner of Politics and Food

T

T

he greatest lectures ever delivered at the Southern California Institute of Architecture, including addresses by major names in the field, will soon be available for all to hear, any time they want. Officials with the Arts District school announced recently that it received a $200,000 grant from the Getty Foundation and $70,000 from the National Endowment for the Arts. The money will be used to create a digital lecture archive with more than 1,000 hours of lectures and symposia from 1974 to the present. SCI-Arc will transcribe, digitize and present lectures from important architects, designers and theorists who have appeared at the school; they include celebrated architects Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid and Thom Mayne. The lectures will be available online, by phone apps and e-readers in about nine months. “SCI-Arc’s lecture archive is unique and impressive,” said school Director Eric Owen Moss in a statement. “The record of lectures is especially useful going forward, suggesting what might be coming next, and, reciprocally, going backward to test whether what was claimed by the speakers was subsequently delivered.” The lectures will be free and will be available at sciarc.edu.

his month, two mayoral hopefuls, and another figure who many believe covets Antonio Villaraigosa’s job, will show up at Downtown Latin food establishments, where they’ll rub shoulders with lunch diners, grade the food, and maybe, just maybe, discuss the 2013 campaign. The meals/encounters are a run-up to Sabor de Las Americas, a July 15 food contest and fundraiser for the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project at Union Station. On Friday, June 10, Ninth District Councilwoman Jan Perry will appear at noon at Chichen Itza restaurant in Mercado la Paloma (3655 S. Grand Ave.). On June 24, City Controller Wendy Greuel, who like Perry has filed paperwork to enter the race, will appear at noon at Rivera restaurant (1050 S. Flower St.). On June 30, Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, who has publicly pondered but has not committed to running, will show up at La Golondrina on Olvera Street. City Council President Eric Garcetti and former Villaraigosa top deputy Austin Beutner appeared at similar events last week. More information on the fundraiser is at svrep.org.

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Downtown News 27

DowntownNews.com

Schnitzel Continued from page 1 lighting and spring-green walls provide a clean, contemporary look. The concept is similar to many fast-food sub shops that allow patrons to customize their sandwiches. Schnitzly’s menu lives up to the name, with about 10 kinds of schnitzel sandwiches. There’s chili schnitzel, falafel schnitzel, Indian schnitzel and even a vegetarian schnitzel made with Portobello mushrooms. Numerous homemade sauces include everything from sweet chili to chimichurri. Among the sides are kosher French fries and an Israeli salad. “The main reason we opened this location is for the nonkosher or non-Jewish [customer],” Brenenson said. “If we see that the customers like this place then we have the green light to open everywhere. This is like a big test for us.” Rabbi’s Approval Rabbi Moshe Greenwald, who keeps kosher and runs the Jewish Community Center-Chabad of Downtown Los Angeles a few blocks west on Seventh Street, had an immediate interest in Schnitzly. As a place that strictly adheres to Jewish dietary laws, the restaurant is one of only a few in the vicinity where he can eat. “I’ve lived Downtown for close to four years,” Greenwald said. “I’ve seen five kosher places open and close, unfortunately.” The problem, he said, is that many kosher establishments don’t build upon their natural, but small, base. While the area is home to numerous Orthodox Jews, many of whom work in the nearby Jewelry District, Greenwald noted that a successful restaurant also has to lure the growing residential community. To accomplish that, Greenwald thinks Schnitzly has to stay open late. That’s in the playbook for Brenenson and Eliyahu. Although the Pico outlet serves past midnight every night (except Friday, when it closes at 3 p.m. for the Sabbath), the Downtown shop currently closes on weekdays at 6 p.m. (the Seventh Street location also has the Friday 3 p.m. close). The owners hope that business will pick up and quickly warrant an extension. Greenwald, for one, is a fan — both of the giant, custommade sandwiches served on fresh-baked baguettes, and the

pluck of the 21-year-olds. “I think their food is delicious,” he said. “These kids have a lot of guts to come out here.” Saving Up Both Brenenson and Eliyahu, who wear yarmulkes, or skullcaps, as part of their faith, grew up in the religious community of Kfar Chabad in central Israel. They moved to New York as teenagers seeking more opportunities for financial success There they tried their hands at a variety of jobs. Brenenson, the son of American expatriates, helped set up security systems. Eliyahu ended up working with schnitzel. With nothing more than what they could fit in their luggage, the pair traveled across the country to start their own restaurant. In less than a month, they succeeded. How they managed to save up the necessary $275,000 is a bit of a miracle, they said, but it’s one they worked hard at accomplishing. “We’re very focused,” Brenenson said. “When I was in Israel I used to have a period that I used to work like 20 hours a day. Literally we used to eat toast for half a year every day just to save our money.” The Pico Boulevard Schnitzly met with immediate success. That led to fast-tracking the Downtown location. They raised another $250,000 and were excited by the challenge. “We want to take this risk,” Eliyahu said. As a kosher restaurant, Schnitzly must have all of its products made under the strict supervision of someone intimately familiar with Jewish dietary law. Everything from the ingredients to the way the food is prepared to the way the chickens are slaughtered must follow specific procedures. Also, as an establishment that serves meat, it cannot offer any dairy products. All of this adds to the cost of doing business, but Brenenson doesn’t mind. In addition to offering a rare eatery for observant Jews like himself and Eliyahu, he believes the kosher label could actually draw in others. “They know that it’s better quality food,” he said. Moreover, he continued, the point always has been to make a great restaurant that happens to be kosher, not just an eatery that conforms to religious standards. “We felt that Downtown was missing that — kosher but then also good,” Brenenson said. “We’re trying to be a restaurant. We’re not trying to be a synagogue.”

photo by Gary Leonard

Schnitzly serves a variety of sandwiches featuring pounded chicken coated in breadcrumbs. Options include a chili schnitzel, falafel schnitzel and even an Indian schnitzel.

To help entice patrons, Downtown’s Schnitzly offers lower prices than the original location. Combo meals for drinks and giant sandwiches are $10 after tax. Brenenson and Eliyahu said they hope their efforts are embraced by residents and lead to a revival of the area where their business is situated. Although Seventh Street west of Olive has emerged as a restaurant row in recent years — Bottega Louie, Sugarfish and Mas Malo are among the new businesses that have found an ample audience — the blocks between Olive and Los Angeles streets continue to lag. All of which means that life will stay busy for the entrepreneurs who have already had a crazy year. In 10 months they opened two restaurants, Brenenson got married and Eliyahu became engaged. Who knows what the future holds? If Brenenson and Eliyahu have anything to say about it, it will involve more schnitzel. “The reason we’re so sure of ourselves is, when you taste the sandwich you’re hooked,” Brenenson said. “You never go out hungry. It’s always fresh. It’s something different.” These two certainly haven’t gotten tired of it yet. As Eliyahu admitted, “I eat [schnitzel] almost every day.” Schnitzly is at 119 E. Seventh St., (213) 488-9511 or schnitzly.com.

You Spoke We LiStened

We’ve transformed our bill into a larger, easy-to-use format with: 3 Previous balance, payment, and current charges conveniently laid out 3 LADWP and City of LA charges clearly boxed and shaded 3 The due date, total amount due, and payment stub on first page 3 Simple charts to help you better monitor your water & power use

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10

• toyotacentral.com

1600 S. Figueroa (at Venice), LA — 2 blocks south of the Staples Center


28 Downtown News

June 6, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

HEALTH ‘Any Normal Person Would Have Gone to the Hospital’ In His Own Words, Hal Bastian Describes a Near-Death Experience, And How It Got Him to the Gym 1,000 Days in a Row as told to RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

T

here are three parts to this story: I have an incredible threshold for pain; I am too busy to go to the doctor; and I’m just plain silly. “On January 25, 2006, at 5 p.m., I was sitting at my computer and I got a searing, stabbing pain from the far right of my abdomen all the way to the left side of my abdomen. I immediately thought, ‘Oh my God, could this be my appendix?’ But with my advanced medical training [laughs], I decided it was food poisoning from something that I ate at lunch. Any normal person would have gone to the hospital immediately. I went home to try to grin and bear it. “I didn’t sleep all night and the next morning I had a meeting, and then I got on a plane to go to Washington, D.C. for a conference. On Friday my pain had not abated. So Saturday, at two in the morning, I was in a hot bathtub trying to get through this pain. Once again, any normal person would have gone to the hospital. “I called my Blue Cross 24-hour nurse and told them what was happening. They told me I needed to get to a hospital. I got a taxi and went to the hospital. Any normal person

would have called an ambulance. “It turns out, I had a ruptured appendix. I almost died, and I had an open wound for a year after that so I couldn’t exercise or anything. “Normally they would reattach all of your muscles, but they couldn’t reattach my muscles because I was so septic. Later, because I couldn’t exercise, I got heavy, up to 218 pounds. Ultimately I went to physicians to find out if they could repair my abdomen and they said sure, but you have to lose weight. “I had stopped smoking through hypnosis in 2003, so I went to my hypnotist and we did a plan to reduce my carbohydrate intake and to do my exercise motivation. I changed my eating habits and I started going to the gym every day. I lost 33 pounds and had the surgery. “After I finished healing, I decided I was going back to the L.A. Athletic Club, which is where I lost all the weight originally. I decided that I was going to exercise in some way, shape or form, once a day, every day, until the day I didn’t. So it was a one day at a time kind of thing. “Usually it’s 40 minutes on the Lifecycle. If I’m traveling and there’s no equipment I walk for an hour. I walk four miles in one hour

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flat, the fastest walk there is below a jog. On days that I’m running short on time or I don’t feel well, which is rarely, I might be less strenuous than that. “For the most part I don’t get sick. If I am feeling a little under the weather, I deny it and I go and I keep up my work, and you know why I do that? Disease doesn’t like a moving target. But the point is that it’s not about the intensity of the exercise — it’s my intention to keep my streak alive. “A thousand days was never a goal for me. I never aimed for it. If anything it was a thing other people were talking about. My standard thing was another day is another notch in my book. I was proud of every single day I did it. “My definition of exercise actually is going to the gym, getting my gym clothes on, getting on that Lifeycle and doing it, and breaking a sweat. Breaking a sweat is really my definition. If I’m feeling under the weather, and if I break a sweat in 20 photo by Gary Leonard Hal Bastian, a Downtown resident and the senior vice president minutes, that counts. “I get to the gym between and director of economic development for the Downtown Center 6-7 in the morning and Business Improvement District, was given a surprise party at the when I’m on the Lifecycle L.A. Athletic Club May 24 in honor of his 1,000 consecutive days of working out. I pray and meditate, and read the L.A. Times and the Downtown News cover to cover. until the day I don’t. There’s no long-term “Here’s the most important thing: My first goal. If you do that you psyche yourself out appointment every day is with me. I schedule because it seems too big to achieve. I didn’t it in my calendar first thing in the morning feel the pressure because I did it one day at before all heck breaks loose. Once I do that, a time, and I’ll do it one day at a time until I I can be strong for the community and help don’t.” my fellow Downtowers. Contact Richard Guzmán at “My commitment is to do it every day richard@downtownnews.com.

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LADOWNTOWNNEWS.COM


June 6, 2011

Downtown News 29

DowntownNews.com

CLASSIFIED

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FOR RENT

l.a. downtown news Classifieds Call: 213-481-1448 Classified Display & Line ad Deadlines: Thursday 12 pm REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL

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lofts for sale

“Be wary of out of area companies. Check with the local Better Business Bureau before you send any money for fees or services. Read and understand any contracts before you sign. Shop around for rates.”

FOR LEASE: Bunker Hill Tower, Single Apartment, $1,000 per month. Call: 213-327-8976 CommerCial spaCe

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213.598.7555 out of state NY STATE Land Rivers & Small Lakes for Sale 27 Acres-Salmon River Area -$39,995. 97 Acres w/ Stream Surrounded by State Land -$110,995. Independence River-Adirondacks-16 Acres WAS: $129,995. NOW $79,995. Oneida Lake Proximity 16 Acres -$29,995. Over 100 New Properties Offered. Call 800-229-7843 Or Visit www.LandandCamps. com. (Cal-Scan)

BRAND NEW Luxury Apartments Homes. Orsini III. Now open for immediate Occupancy. Call for Specials. Never Lived in, Free Parking, Karaoke Room, Free Wi-Fi, Indoor Basketball, Uncomparable Amenity Package. Call today to schedule a tour - 866-479-1764. CALL FOR SPECIALS @ the Medici. Penthouse 1 & 2 bdrm apts. Granite kitchens, washer/ dryers, business center, 2 pools, spa! Visit TheMedici.com for a full list of amenities. Call 888886-3731.

timeshare/resorts SELL/RENT Your Timeshare For Cash!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for Cash! Over $95 Million Dollars offered in 2010! www.SellaTimeshare.com (877) 554-2098. (Cal-Scan)

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VICTORIAN HOUSE Converted to Office Building—2349 sq. ft. building 6621 sq. ft. lot.PARKING: 8 to 10 spaces, in rear of the building. 213-985-4458 loft/unfurnished

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downtownnews.com

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

EMPLOYMENT drivers ACT NOW! New Pay Increase! 37-46 cpm. New Trucks in 2011. Need 2 months CDL-A Driving Experience. 1-877-258-8782. www. MeltonTruck.com. (Cal-Scan) DRIVER - Drivers choose from Weekly or Daily Pay! Regional, OTR or Express Lanes, Full or Part-time, CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 800414-9569. www.DriveKnight. com. (Cal-Scan)

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DRIVERS - No Experience - No Problem. 100% Paid CDL Training. Immediate Benefits. 20/10 program. Trainers Earn up to 49c per mile. Crst Van Expedited. 1-800-326-2778. www. JoinCRST.com. (Cal-Scan) DRIVERS/CDL Training - Career Central. No Money Down. CDL Training. Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k 1-877-3697091. www.CentralDrivingJobs. net. (Cal-Scan)

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Version 1

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(866) 561-0275 • PELOFTS.COM • 610 S. Main, Downtown LA


30 Downtown News

June 6, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Continued from previous page

SERVICES

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


June 6, 2011

Downtown News 31

DowntownNews.com LEGAL

Autos WAnted DONATE YOUR Car, Truck or Boat to Heritage For The Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-9026851. (Cal-Scan) DONATE YOUR Car: Children’s Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child’s Life Through Research & Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy & Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. (Cal-Scan) DONATE YOUR Vehicle! Receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, NonRunners Accepted, 1-888-4685964. (Cal-Scan)

ITEMS FOR SALE Misc. iteMs 1930’s Movie Clock Prohibition Era. Original green frame. Pink neon switch. $300 213-8805992

Fictitious Business nAMe Fictitious Business name statement FILE NO. 2011033366 The following person is doing business as: jOSEPH kALMAR ARTwORk, 688 S. SANTA FE AVENUE #304, LOS ANgELES CA 90021, are hereby registered by the following registrant:jOSEPH HYRUM kALMAR, 688 S SANTA FE AVENUE #304, LOS ANgELES, CA 90021. This business is conducted by an individual. Registrants has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with DEAN LOgAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on May 19, 2011. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of

this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 5/23, 5/30, 6/06, 6/13/2011 notice oF sAle NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HERE BY gIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell on the 14th day of june 2011 at 11:00 A.M. on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Thriftee Storage Company LLC, 1717 N. glendale Blvd. in the city of Los Angeles, County of Los Angeles, State of California, the following:

Name of Owner: Alfonso gamez Space number: A8,B8,D25,L14,S9 Description of goods: Personal effects Amount: $6725.00 Name of Owner: Holly Hughes Space number: S00 Description of goods: Personal effects Amount: $265.00 Name of Owner: Michael Locke Space number: g17 Description of goods: Personal effects Amount: $322.00 Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. All purchased storage units with the items contained herein are sold on an as is basis and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between Thriftee Storage Co. and obligated party. Thriftee Storage Company LLC Dated at Los Angeles, CA by Felipe F. Islas / Manager june 2, 2011 Pub. 6/6, 6/13/11

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$19,488 2010 VW Tiguan ............................................................... Certified, 2.0L Turbo, Silver/Beige, Moon Roof, Alloys, Only 16k Miles. ZV1201/AW001172 $23,680 2008 VW Touareg SUV .................................................... $28,980 Certified, Only 31k Miles, 24V GDI DOHC, Navigation. ZV1225 / 8D046176 Certified, 2.0L Turbo, Auto, 4 Door Hatchback, Gray/Gray, Only 26k Miles. ZV1129/8W143590

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2010 CHEVY COBALT UC808R /103397

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Great Fuel Economy, white ext/gray int, only 39k miles

2010 Chevy Impala ..........................................................

$15,900 $25,900 26,694 miles, Grey Metallic exterior, Auto, 5.3L, V8. UC722/G178131 2010 Chevy Suburban 1500 LT ...................................... $27,900 Black/Gray, 5.3L V8, 3rd row split bench. UC781/142503 3.5L V6, Auto, AC, ABS, CD, Only 39k miles. UC801R /168271

2008 Chevrolet Avalanche .............................................

AUDI OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

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2008 VW GTI .....................................................................

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(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.)

OVER

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400

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2008 Mercedes E350 Sedan ...........................................

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32 Downtown News

June 6, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

We Got Games Dodgers Hit the Road, Sparks Host Mercury Los Angeles Dodgers Dodger Stadium, 1000 Elysian Park Ave., (213) 224-1400 or dodgers.mlb.com. In one of the most grueling stretches of the season, the Blue Crew is on the road all week, in Philadelphia (June 6-8) to take on the stacked Phillies, and then in the high altitude of Denver to play the Colorado Rockies (June 9-12). It’s part of a 13-games-in-13-days stretch. As if the Dodgers needed such schedule silliness. Then again, the team may be finding itself; last week it notched three victories in a row, and during that period the anemic bats managed to put 23 runs across the plate. The Dodgers have leaned on big hits from first baseman James Loney and a steady, hit-for-average diet of Casey Blake. But they still lack that power punch, and pitching remains inconsistent,

especially in the bullpen. How they fare on this road stretch could determine how much of a factor they are in the NL West race for the rest of 2011. Los Angeles Sparks Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 929-1300 or wnba.com/sparks. June 10, 7:30 p.m.: Fresh off their opening back-to-back against Maya Moore and the Minnesota Lynx, the Sparks have a week to prepare for the always tough Diana Taurasi, Penny Taylor and the Phoenix Mercury. Candace Parker, of course, is back and leading the Sparks again, with DeLisha Milton-Jones the always reliable second-in command. Can the Sparks stop the Mercury from rising? Wait and see. —Ryan Vaillancourt

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM


06-06-11