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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

40

C

NEWS Volume 42, Number 16

EBRATING EL

YEARS

At Playoff Time, Clipper Pride

A Downtown Bike Share Program

7

8

Since 1972

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

April 22, 2013

The Beacon Finally Shines After Eight Years, an Arts District Condo Project Opens

photo by Gary Leonard

Peklar Pilavjian is part of the team that opened the $20 million Beacon Lofts. The project at Fourth and Alameda streets is nearly sold out. by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

A

t first glance, Fourth and Alameda streets seems like an unwelcoming portion of Downtown. Noisy bigrig trucks often travel down Alameda and there is little pedestrian traffic in the immediate area. But in late 2005, Peklar Pilavjian, a co-owner of the St. Vincent Jewelry Center on Hill Street, saw the corner as his

chance to jump on the Downtown residential bandwagon. He and some partners paid $9 million for a former storage facility on the northeast corner of the intersection. They planned to create 53 for-sale lofts in the 1923 structure on the edge of the Arts District near Little Tokyo. Then, the recession hit and the market crashed. Banks stopped lending and projects stalled. In the following years the development plans flipped from condos to rentals and

back to for-sale status. Now, things have stabilized, and the story has a happy if long-delayed ending. Pilavjian and his partners finally completed the project, now called Beacon Lofts, in October. Six months later, they have nearly sold out the $20 million project. The 67,000-square-foot building holds units from 650see Beacon, page 15

Downtown’s New Political Power Player Young Internet Firm NationBuilder Is Leading a Revolution in How Candidates and Businesses Organize by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

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nside the Downtown offices of NationBuilder, there’s little evidence that the company plays a crucial role in hundreds of high-profile elections across the country. The Pershing Square-adjacent headquarters for the company, which sells cloud-based organizing software to political campaigns and other businesses, feels more like a shared workspace for recent Stanford grads than a political war room. The firm’s 52 mostly jeans-clad employees sit on couches and exercise balls while typing. They play ping-pong during breaks. The office kitchen features a gourmet coffee machine with a touch screen and three choices of high-end beans.

On a recent Friday afternoon, firm founder and CEO Jim Gilliam was working on his laptop while lying on a coach, blanketed in the afternoon sun coming in from an adjacent window. It was somewhat of a marvel that he was even awake. The casual feel belies the role NationBuilder plays in determining who gets to wield political power in Los Angeles and beyond. In the March 5 city elections, NationBuilder users included victorious City Council members Mike Bonin, who won the 11th District seat, and 15th District incumbent Joe Buscaino (who faced only token opposition). In Council District 13, eight candidates, including the top two finishers Mitch O’Farrell and John Choi, who have

moved on to the runoff, used the nonpartisan NationBuilder. So did Eric Garcetti, who advanced to the mayoral runoff against Wendy Greuel (she is not using the business). Others high-profile figures using its services include Newark, NJ Mayor and U.S. Senate hopeful Corey Booker, New York City mayoral candidate Christine Quinn and recently elected Bay Area Congressman Eric Swalwell. The company bills its product as an affordable, one-stop online shop for community organizing. NationBuilder websites are equipped with a slate of tools that help campaigns — or businesses, nonprofits and government agencies — track, analyze and engage with their supporters. Monthly see NationBuilder, page 18

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W O R K P L A C E


2 Downtown News

AROUNDTOWN Blossom Plaza Sets Groundbreaking

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fter years of delays, the potentially transformative Blossom Plaza project in Chinatown is finally ready to move forward. Officials with Forest City, which inked a contract with the city for the project, said a ceremonial groundbreaking for the development at 900 N. Broadway will take place in May, with actual construction starting in August. City Councilman Ed Reyes, whose First District covers Chinatown, has long said he hopes to get the project moving before he is termed out of office on July 1. The project at 900 N. Broadway will replace Little Joe’s, a strategically located restaurant that has been closed for more than a decade. The $95 million Blossom Plaza would include about 240 market rate and affordable rental units, 20,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, a 175-space parking garage and a public plaza that would connect Broadway to the Gold Line Station. Officials said they envision opening the project in late 2015. Blossom Plaza has been in the works in one form or another for nearly a decade.

TAKE MY PICTURE GARY LEONARD

Central Market that will be the first of a handful of new eateries coming to the historic property during the next few months. The Thai comfort food establishment comes from David Tewasart, the owner of Soi 7 on Seventh Street, and Johnny Lee, a former Rivera and Flying Pig chef. The food stall began serving in March and prepares what Tewasart called “completely authentic Thai food.” Christophe Farber, the director of business development and special projects for Grand Central Market, said Sticky Rice will be followed in June by Horse Thief, which will serve Texas-style barbecue. The market has also signed the Silver Lakebased Valerie Confection to open a spot at the market shortly after Horse Thief. Farber said the eatery will expand from selling just sweets to become a “classic lunch counter” when it debuts. The owners of the Cheese Cave in Claremont, which sells artisan cheeses, wines and sandwiches, have also signed a lease, he said. “We have some empty spaces that we’re trying to fill with new flavors,” Farber said. There are currently eight empty stalls at the nearly 100-year-old market between Broadway and Hill Street, Farber said.

New Restaurants Coming Merced Theatre to Get To Grand Central Market $23 Million Upgrade

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n April 30 grand opening is set for Sticky Rice, a new Thai restaurant inside Grand

GREAT DEALS

April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

T

he city’s public access television channel is moving to a new location at a hefty

Regent Theatre

Reconstruction

446 South Main

cost. The City Council this month approved moving Channel 35 from its current Little Tokyo home to the 1870 Merced Theatre at the El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument. The decision still requires the signature of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. The change is not cheap or easy: According to city documents, the project, which would require “significant retrofit and rehabilitation,” including seismic upgrades and an elevator that could accommodate freight and disabled access, could take about three years to complete and cost up to $23 mil-

lion. The move is intended to save money on rent and lower station operating costs. According to city documents, the annual savings in lease costs would be $341,710 per year. The Merced Theatre, which is currently vacant, is in a two-block portion of El Pueblo known as the Pico-Garnier Block. It was the first theater in Los Angeles and has been part of a long-planned restoration effort. Channel 35 airs all City Council meetings and other programs related to city departments and events. see Around Town, page 19

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April 22, 2013

Downtown News 3

Celebrating 40 Years

Real People, Real Stories

Annette Allen, Accountant Currently Driving: 2013 Porsche Cayenne.

Customer since 2013

This new Cayenne from Porsche of Downtown L.A. is my anniversary gift from my husband after 18 years of marriage. Our salesperson Jonathon made this a truly pleasurable experience. We will definitely purchase our next vehicle from Porsche of Downtown L.A. — Annette Allen

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4 Downtown News

April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

EDITORIALS Big Vision At the Medallion

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis

T

he new entertainment and dining concepts at the Medallion project are the most exciting proposed development for the Historic Core since Tom Gilmore kicked off the Downtown housing revival with his Old Bank District 13 years ago. The key word in all this is “proposed.” As Los Angeles Downtown News reported last week, Saeed Farkhondehpour is trying to turn a real estate stumble into a roaring success. He opened the first phase of the Medallion on the northeast corner of Fourth and Main streets three years ago, and although the 96 apartments filled up quickly, the retail space has been a problem. Only one restaurant has arrived and a large area pitched to wholesale businesses and discount retailers has floundered. A mere 10% of the 200 small spaces are occupied. Thus, Farkhondehpour has made the exciting turn, one that would have more appeal to the residents and workers of Downtown. He hopes to bring a movie theater to the site. He hopes to tweak some of the existing space to hold 10 new restaurants. He hopes to establish something that sounds like a cross between a permanent farmers market and Grand Central Market, with at least 50 vendors selling produce, wine, cheese, coffee and more seven days a week. Making all this happen won’t be easy, and Farkhondehpour may need aid from other members of the community as well as public officials as the plan moves forward. We hope that those who can help access money and get complicated developments approved will come to him proactively. A successful project would benefit all of Downtown. Among the most exciting elements of what might be called Medallion 2.0 is the Alamo Drafthouse. The Texas-based cinema chain is adored for its independent spirit, as well as the food and booze it serves during films. Farkhondehpour and the company have signed a letter of intent to build an eight-screen movie house on the site, something which would win huge support from Downtowners. However, the lease has not yet been inked. The restaurant shift is already underway, with plans to open an upscale sushi establishment at the corner of Fourth and Main by June, and a new cafe also coming that month. Beyond that, things get challenging. Farkhondehpour wants 10 more restaurants, but he’ll have to create a sense of vibrancy and perhaps critical mass to get some of them to locate in a part of the project that cannot easily be seen from the street. The permanent market is equally exciting, and one can see it faring well in a neighborhood that has convenience stores and small shops but no supermarket. Once again, the independent aesthetic of the vendors would fit well with the spirit of the area. Farkhondehpour will have his work cut out as he moves forward. Although the economy has recovered from the depths of the recession, securing credit and all necessary approvals will be a challenge. We wish him luck and hope he gets support from wherever he needs it.

Endorsement: Curren Price In the Ninth District

I

n the post-redistricting era, the Ninth Council District is a tricky place to be politically, economically and even geographically. The district includes the campus for L.A. Live and the Convention Center. It extends south along the Figueroa Corridor to USC before spreading to encompass a large portion of South Los Angeles. Although there is vast financial power and development potential in the small section that remains in Downtown and around the university, for the most part the Ninth is terribly impoverished. Unemployment is high. Crime, illegal dumping and packs of abandoned dogs — some dropped there from other parts of the city — are among the entrenched problems that scar the once-proud district. Jan Perry, who has ably led the district for 12 years, will be termed out July 1. Her successor will need to be a forceful problem-solver adept at building community coalitions. That person will also need skin thick enough to withstand the complaints and criticisms that will inevitably fly. Additionally, the new council rep will have to be tenacious and know how to play the political hardball required to secure the financial and other resources the district so desperately needs. Independent thinking and the ability to say no to friends and supporters will be crucial. In short, he or she will need to be excellent at two levels. The rep must be a visionary who can see well beyond the limitations of the area as they are widely accepted now, and he or she will need to be extraordinary at ground level — cleaning up alleys, helping neighborhoods deal with gangs, bringing in services common to other parts of the city. Think jobs, housing, retail, health services, homeless assistance, etc. Neither State Sen. Curren Price nor former council aide Ana Cubas, the two candidates in the runoff for the seat, meets all of these criteria. However, we think Price best fits the description. Los Angeles Downtown News endorses him in the May 21 election. As someone with experience in elected office, solid ties to the district and longstanding relationships with prominent leaders, we think Price is the better positioned of the two to move the community forward. Realizing the potential of the part of the Ninth that falls in Downtown and eradicating the blight spots in the rest of the area will likely take decades. We believe Price will have the most success in finding solutions to the deep-seated and enduring problems. We don’t love everything about Price, and we have serious qualms about the City Council morphing into “Sacramento South,” as a

growing number of former state legislators join the 15-person panel. We also hope Price will have the fortitude to go against the council’s herd mentality and buck the group’s leadership when necessary. Still, Price brings some compelling experience and proposals, such as his aim to create business improvement districts for key corridors like Central and Slauson avenues, and his plans to tap into the Ninth’s “network of nonprofits” to combat the worsening homelessness problem (not as bad as exists on Skid Row, but obviously related). He comprehends the needs of small businesses along the Figueroa Corridor and knows the importance of addressing basic issues. He has received extensive backing during the campaign from business and labor groups, and these ties could help propel change. There are positive things to say about Cubas. The former chief of staff to Councilman José Huizar has an impressive personal story of overcoming poverty, and she has run a solid campaign, immersing herself in the community during the vote-courting process. We like her long-term vision for the district and her ideas including working with USC to create a biomed and cleantech corridor. We think highly of her initiative to create educational opportunity zones around area schools. We also support her desire to work to increase the number of women holding elected office in Los Angeles. The fact that Perry is currently the only female member of the council is deplorable. This endorsement decision is not easy. That is partly because Price and Cubas both carry some serious baggage, and in a few cases it’s the same baggage. Both worked to facilitate the redistricting last year that devastated the Ninth, removing Downtown from the district and creating a shockingly poor territory. Price testified at meetings in favor of the carving. Cubas has sought to downplay her role, saying that in working for Huizar, who supported changing boundaries, she was doing her job. Still, her job meant hacking apart the community and she did not publicly protest. Both also can be accused of carpetbagging, as each only moved into the district for the sake of running for the council seat. Although both claim historic or familial ties to the area, the fact remains that until recently neither was sufficiently familiar with the daily challenges of life in the Ninth. This is another effect of redistricting — removing the best homegrown or resident candidates, and instead sparking the need to move in someone allied with other communities or interests. Still, on election day one must pick the person who has the best chance of solving problems and bettering the district. That person is Curren Price.


April 22, 2013

Downtown News 5

Opinion

The Readers Respond

ful decision on May 21. —Jack McGrath, March 29, 11:37 a.m.

Website Comments on a Downtown Movie House, The Little Tokyo Mall, the Future of Pershing Square, and More

E

very week Los Angeles Downtown News gets online comments to the stories we publish. These are some of the most interesting responses. Additional comments are welcome at ladowntownnews.com. Regarding the article “Plan in Works to Bring EightScreen Movie House to Historic Core,” by Richard Guzmán, published online April 10

G

reat news and a great counterpoint to the Regal cinemas. I doubt the frat crowd will be hanging out here and if they do, they’ll get kicked out for texting. Yay. —Dex Nomadico, April 10, 4 p.m.

T

his is so awesome! I just moved here after almost 20 years in Austin. Alamo Drafthouse is on my short list of what I miss most. —Troy Dalmasso, April 10, 7:26 p.m.

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cross the other side of Third Street stands the remains of the 1910 Wonderland Theater, the first theater constructed in the West expressly for cinema. North of that stood a two-story building constructed in 1901 and the center storefront on the ground floor was leased to Thomas L. Tally who used the space as “The Electric Theater,” the first commercial cinema in the Western U.S. —Juanito Crandell, April 10, 9:58 p.m. Regarding the article “Bowling Alley, Sports Bar to Open at Little Tokyo Mall,” by Richard Guzmán, published online March 29

G

iven the building’s proximity to the Arts District, someone should suggest the owners let some popular street artists have a stab at livening up the exterior. It could look

pretty great with some color and animation. —Stacy Tillett, March 29, 2:27 p.m.

W

hen Yaohan Plaza (Little Tokyo Galleria now) opened in the mid-1980s there was a 24-lane bowling alley on the third level. It had a pinball arcade and restaurant. Sadly, it closed sometime during the 1990s. —Dennis Pierce, March 30, 7:30 a.m.

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agree with Stacy. This “mall” is really a fortress, and because of that it’s not an inviting structure. I do not enjoy going in there, even for a cream puff fix. Will anyone really know that a new bowling alley is in there? Not without some obnoxious sign, I’m afraid. But if you make it more of an open space (in spite of its walls) and put more color/animation/art, then maybe you may have more of a center that people would want to visit, and prospective tenants would lease there. —Eric Wang, April 2, 2:56 p.m. Regarding the article “Wesson Talks About a Mayoral Endorsement and Billboard Dealings,” by Jon Regardie, published online March 28

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his council president laid down the marker. The council is equal or stronger than the mayor. Certainly Eric Garcetti knows about the equal branch of city government, since he was council president. As mayor he will treat the city council with due respect. As far as all of these endorsements, who really cares? Each one gets a few newspaper articles and that is it. I believe this campaign will be decided by the upcoming debates. Mano y mano. Who can really debate, i.e. punch and counter punch? Garcetti is a better speaker with a stronger voice. I hope the Downtown News promotes all the television debates, so the electorate can really make a thought-

Regarding the article “Despite Money Concerns, Huizar Pushes Forward on Pershing Square,” by Jon Regardie, published online March 21

I

arrived in Downtown L.A. back in 1980 and Pershing Square was an eyesore then and still is today. The city and private businesses spent millions and year after year I kept reading the same thing. To me the only solution is to sell the property and build some tall office and hotel buildings. Stop pouring money into a lost cause. —Jorge Bar-Percivale, March 22, 1:39 p.m.

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irst, get rid of the pathetic bell tower and the other concrete monoliths. Second, close Olive Street to cars and integrate the square with the complex of attractions on the Biltmore block, which would also connect Pershing Square to the library; this would make great pedestrian flow which would likely include the Library Steps and maybe even the mall at Seventh and Figueroa streets. Bring back lawns and trees and a bit of human-scale charm. Thousands of people live, work in and visit the area around Pershing Square. They, and the city, deserve better than the monument to banality we suffer now. —Richard Risemberg, March 22, 3:31 p.m.

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more significant problem is the surrounding context for Pershing Square. There is no pedestrian attraction along either side of its east or north streets. The number of pedestrians walking north past the Biltmore is small. Where would they be going? Or, going north past the Jewelry District, where would they be going except to the Metro station in a hurry? The Pershing Square context is what the Councilmember needs to consider. Of course Pershing Square itself can be improved, but it needs to be a center of something. First things first. —Robert Harris, March 22, 7:34 p.m.

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eeing Pershing Square and Grand Park, one can only wonder why there seems to be a deliberate effort to not have any trees Downtown. I wonder why. When there’s time, check out Union Square in San Francisco. Hey, I think I’ll go there now. —Travis Deal, March 23, 10:24 p.m.

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6 Downtown News

Celebrating 40 Years

April 22, 2013

Central City Association of Los Angeles with  Title Sponsor

AEG

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Wells Fargo Presenting Sponsors 

Bank of America Broadway Theatre Group Brookfield Office Properties Sapphire Sponsors 

AT&T, EB5 Global, EVOQ Properties, LBA Realty, L&R Investment Company Los Angeles Downtown News, PacMutual/Rising Realty Partners PBS SoCal, U.S. Bank, USC, Williams/Dame and Associates

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April 22, 2013

Downtown News 7

Celebrating 40 Years

photo by Gary Leonard

The Pride of the Clippers One Fan’s Journey as the Team Morphs From Laughingstock to Contender by Jon RegaRdie executive editoR

F

or any serious Los Angeles basketball fan, the start of the 2013 playoffs means one thing: wondering how far the Clippers can go. Sorry Lakers faithful. The purple and gold may have 16 NBA championship trophies in their case, but the Kobe-less crew is not primed for a deep run in the playoffs that began on Saturday. Few who follow pro ball believe the team that now must rely on a hobbled Steve Nash and a still recovering Dwight Howard can compete with the deeper, smarter, better coached and more handsome San Antonio Spurs (one of those means little on the court). Even if the Lakers pull off a minor miracle and grab the series, expecting them to make THE REGARDIE REPORT

it to the NBA Finals by beating the Oklahoma City Thunder is like predicting the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will give Caddyshack the Best Picture Ever! Oscar during next year’s ceremony. Theoretically it could occur, but it would require — no, there’s no way it’s happening. Instead, the next few weeks are all about the Clippers, who enter the playoffs with a seven game winning streak. I couldn’t be more pleased. Or, for that matter, more surprised. I’ve spent years cheering for the longtime laughingstock of the NBA. Until recently that meant setting myself up for disappointment each time I plunked down hard-earned cash on Clipper tickets. The experience turned me (and other fans) into the equivalent of an NBA sadist. “Here’s my money,” I figuratively said each time I walked into Staples Center. “Now punch me in the solar plexus and then laugh at my misfortune.” It gets worse. I even began taking my kids to Clippers games before they were out of diapers (the kids, not the Clippers). At least I chose to root for the red, white and blue on my own volition/insanity. Kids expect their parents to protect them from bad things like monsters and a team owned by Donald Sterling. Instead, I brought them straight to the monster’s door. Lousy Hamburger Why, in a city with the gloss, glory and history of the Lakers did I pick the Clippers? It’s a fair question, since choosing to support them is sort of like entering the finest steakhouse in L.A. and saying, “No, I don’t want filet mignon. I’ll have your lousiest hamburger, please.” Patient Zero in my Clippers fandom is my friend Mike. He began buying season tickets back when the team played in the Sports Arena, an Exposition Park building that is sort of like a mausoleum, but without the charm. He followed the Clippers to Staples after the Downtown Los Angeles venue opened in 1999. He’d invite me to games, and feeling that I hadn’t been kicked in the ribs recently, I’d accept. We watched one loss after another. The trend continued once I teamed with a few friends on our own set of season tickets. Partly it was the price — you pretty much need to sell a kidney or be a kidney surgeon to afford decent seats to a Lakers game. Like so many people, Clippers tickets for me became a great way to see the good players on other teams. Yet over time, like an infection, a Clippers affinity took hold. I cheered for and believed in the potential of middling players like Chris Wilcox and Darius Miles. I nodded in foolish agreement when Mike talked excitedly about the “tremendous upside” of, uh, Keyon Dooling. At the start of each season I’d be like Charlie Brown running joyously to kick the football before Lucy yanks it away. I’d convince myself this year’s squad would be good, only to see them finish 23-59 (the Clippers’ record in 2007/08. The next season they were 19-63). Eventually I became habituated to the losing. Although there was one freak playoff year, things immediately reverted to the miserable normal. It was my very own basketball Stockholm Syndrome. Then suddenly, in the time it takes to say “Blake Griffin,” everything changed. Lottery Pick Griffin was the basketball Dunkenstein out of Oklahoma who the Clippers lucked into by winning the NBA draft lottery. Although he missed his rookie year with a knee injury — the Clippers Curse strikes again! — he returned for the 2010-11 season. His energy was ferocious, his dunks thunderous. The next season things got really weird. The Clippers landed Chris Paul after the NBA nixed a trade that would have sent the star guard to the Lakers. The exciting young Clippers, now nicknamed Lob City, began winning in highly entertaining style. Friends would ask to go to a game with me, rather than turning down my invitation. Last year’s team romped to the playoffs and won a tremendous seven-game series over see Clippers, page 32

The Clippers’ years of being an NBA doormat changed when they lucked into Blake Griffin. Now they’re “Lob City” and are by far the most exciting team in town.

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8 Downtown News

April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Bike Share Program to Roll in Downtown Ten Rental Stations Expected to Debut in Civic Center in Coming Weeks by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

A

s the center of the regional transit system, Downtown is already one of Los Angeles’ easiest neighborhoods to navigate. Now, for those willing to use pedal power, it’s about to get even easier. The City Council last week approved a new permitting process that officials say will pave the way for a robust bike share program in Downtown, Westwood, Venice and Hollywood. Run by Irvine-based Bike Nation, the sys-

tem would be comprised of stations situated on sidewalks where users can check out a three-speed, chainless bike. Users pay a fee that varies depending on the length of their trip. Eventually, the system will consist of up to 400 rental stations with 4,000 bikes furnished at no cost to the city by Bike Nation. In the Downtown area, Bike Nation has approvals to eventually permit and install 125 stations. For now, the company has identified 10 Civic Center locations that will function as test facilities for the first 60 to 90 days after the facilities notch permits, which is expected

The most coveted diamonds of the past?

C

ertain diamond cuts have captured hearts for hundreds of years. These vintage diamond styles have stood the test of time and still outshine their modern counterparts. CUSHION/OLD MINE CUT Developed in the 17th century, it features 58 facets—like today’s brilliant cut, but with unique proportions. With a squarish or cushion-like appearance, this style includes diamonds with domed, high crowns as well as ones more oval in appearance. As many of the original cushion and old mine cut diamonds were later recut for contemporary fashions, those of exceptional quality are particularly prized.

EUROPEAN CUT First appearing in the late 18th century, it’s the direct predecessor of today’s round brilliant cut. Symmetrical and round, the European bridges the charm of the old cuts and the uniformity of modern tastes. Cut for candlelight, they exude the warmth and luxury of a bygone era. If you have not experienced these spectacular stones in person, visit the Single Stone showroom to view a beautiful selection. Ari Madilian has been showcasing rare, vintage diamonds in his downtown LA showroom for the past 20 years and has a second location in San Marino. Reach him directly at ari@singlestone.com

photo courtesy of Bike Nation

The city is close to launching a bike share program that envisions 125 stations in Downtown. For a small fee, riders can check out a bike for short trips.

in the coming month. During that initial period, only a select group of public employees from the city, county and state will be able to access the two wheelers. In order to work out the inevitable kinks in the program, city officials requested that Bike Nation implement a testing period before opening the system to the general public, said Derek Fretheim, chief operating officer of Bike Nation. “We’re really creating new territory,” Fretheim said. The stations could be ready as soon as May,

but the timeline for use by the general public is uncertain, said Fretheim. He hopes to have it open to the public during the summer. Bike Share programs are not yet common in the United States, but the concept is slowly gaining traction. Washington, D.C., operates a 1,800-bike system that was launched in 2010, when smaller networks were also established in Denver and Minneapolis. Boston launched its 600-bicycle system in 2011, and last year saw the implementation of a share program in Kansas City, Mo. Bike share has been popular see Bikes, page 10

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April 22, 2013

photo by Gary Leonard

Final Phase of Barker Block Gets Going Developers Kick Off $25 Million Project With 68 Condos by Jon Regardie executive editor

F

or Henry Cisneros, the former mayor of San Antonio, U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary under President Bill Clinton and current head of the real estate firm CityView, a convincing factor in the viability of doing a Downtown Los Angeles project came in an unlikely form: a dearth of neighborhood parking. CityView and its financial partner, the investment firm Blackstone, held a groundbreaking event last week (even though work was already well underway on the transformation of the nearly century-old building) on the 68-unit final phase of the Arts District project the Barker Block. Cisneros recounted how he had made numerous trips to the community for the project across the street from the Urth Caffé. He kept seeing the same thing. “I’ve been here at the Barker Block while it’s been under construction any number of times, and the one constant is I can’t find a place to park,” he said. “People are coming from all over the city.” CityView and Blackstone are partners in the $25 million final phase of the project. Another 242 condos were opened by the project’s original developer, Kor Group, starting back in 2006. The 72,451-square-foot project will create a mix of lofts with open floor plans, from 650-2,000 square feet, and townhouses ranging from 1,100-1,300 square feet. Interior elements will include steel staircases with wood steps, dual-pane windows and what promotional materials term “oversized soaking tubs.” Part of the roof of the outdated building was removed to create a courtyard. The project will include some retail and restaurant space. The transformation includes using materials repurposed from the building, which was constructed in the early 1900s for the Barker Furniture Company. Original brick walls, wood floors and timber rafters have all been put to new use. Construction on the development at 530 S. Hewitt St. is expected to be complete by the end of the year. Although price points have not been set, a City View official said the residences will likely go from the low $300,000s to the high $500,000s. The project comes at a time, Cisneros noted, when Downtown is seeing a heady wave of rental housing being built, but no for-sale projects. Indeed, Los Angeles Downtown News recently reported on the scarcity of for-sale housing in the area, with many of the units that come online in older buildings receiving multiple offers. The attention has been heated in the Arts District, as three condominium developments that opened in the past 18 months are all completely or nearly sold out. The residences in the Beacon Lofts, 940 E. 2nd Street and Gallery Lofts all quickly found buyers. Jon Gray, the global head of real estate for Blackstone, which invests about $50 billion in capital worldwide, much of it for pension funds, said he sees the Barker Block as a wise business move. “We saw the opportunity to create value for our investors,” he said. In addition to being close to Urth, the Barker Block is adjacent to the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator, which houses a collection of start-up companies working on sustainable business endeavors. Cisneros said LACI, Urth and other area businesses are giving the Arts District a critical mass that makes housing creation and other investment viable. “When things reach a critical mass they are at a takeoff point, they will have a natural acceleration and momentum on their own from that point,” he said. “And I think this area in Downtown is at that point now.” Cisneros said that although this is CityView’s first Downtown project, he does not expect it to be the last. In fact, he said company officials recently went to the roof of see Housing, page 10

Downtown News 9

Celebrating 40 Years

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(l to r) Jon Gray of investment firm Blackstone, Henry Cisneros of developer CityView and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa look at a model of the Barker Block last week. The $25 million transformation of a century-old building into 68 condominiums will be completed this year.

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April 22, 2013 rendering courtesy of xxxxx

Celebrating 40 Years

Housing Continued from page 9 the building and took stock of everything in the area. He said several potential development project sites have been identified, and it is now a matter of putting deals together and finding financing. How big a player does he expect CityView to be in the Arts District? “I think it would be a wonderful thing if we had two or three additional projects in this area,” he said. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.

The new phase of the project (in the foreground) comes after 242 condominiums already opened.

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Continued from page 8 in European cities including Paris for several years, and the largest system in the world is in Hangzhou, China. The sharing system is generally geared toward daytime populations of workers and tourists in dense areas. Fretheim said those two groups, along with Downtown residents, are the target audiences. One key constituency could be the tens of thousands of people who commute to Downtown from relatively far distances via Metrolink trains, then need to travel an additional mile to their job locations, said Eric Bruins, planning and policy director of the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition. Those same users might also ride a bike back to Union Station at the end of the workday. “Bike share is really, really good at first and last mile of transit,” Bruins said. Using as an example people who may work a few blocks from the subway stop at Pershing Square, he added, “Imagine you’re trying to get that last mile from Union Station to your job, and you don’t work at Pershing Square. It’s probably a lot faster to just take a bike than to take the Red Line.” Daily or Monthly Bike Nation started in 2009 and currently has one program in place, in Anaheim, where it operates three sharing stations with 30 bikes. It reached an agreement with Long Beach in March to operate 250 stations with up to 2,500 bikes. The company earns revenue through usage fees, plus advertising and sponsorship of its stations, Fretheim said. In Los Angeles, users will pay $6 to access a bike for 24 hours. On top of that, customers incur additional fees for any ride longer than 30 minutes, with every extra half-hour costing $1.50. At first, riders will only be able to pay with a credit card, though Fretheim said the company is looking into selling prepaid cards that could be purchased with cash. Those looking for unlimited access could buy a $75 annual membership. It is uncertain how long it will take Bike Nation to grow its system in Los Angeles, in part because getting a station permitted won’t be a simple task even with the council approval. Standard stations require a 3-by-40-foot space on a sidewalk, so locations will be limited to areas that can fit a Bike Nation rack without blocking the public right-of-way. The bikes are not meant to be locked or stored anywhere other than stations. To protect against theft, the company installs tracking systems on every two-wheeler. Also, Bike Nation will call users who haven’t returned a bicycle. If a bike can’t be recovered, it will be treated as a theft and handled by authorities, Fretheim said. Because the bikes are only intended to be locked and stored at official stations, a system’s effectiveness is closely tied to how many stations are in a dense area, Bruins said. “Small systems don’t work,” Bruins said. “People don’t have a lot of tolerance for walking on either end of the trip. If you have to park it and still walk awhile to get where you’re going, they won’t use it.” Bike Nation plans on installing 125 stations in Downtown and will target employment and retail centers. The company also wants public input on facility locations. Users can download a mobile application to identify preferred station points. Fourteenth District City Councilman José Huizar, who helped usher the program through the city approvals process, said he thinks the bike share system will fill a gap in the local transportation fabric. But he said it will also benefit those who don’t choose to ride. “Whether you’re a user or not, if there are less people in cars it’s going to make more parking spots available and ease up congestion, so everyone benefits,” Huizar said. For more information about the program, or to suggest a station location, visit bikenationusa.org/suggest/losangeles. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.


April 22, 2013

Downtown News 11

Celebrating 40 Years

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12 Downtown News

April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years April 7, a man indicated he had a gun and demanded property from a woman near Main Street and Washington Boulevard. The suspect took money, jewelry and the woman’s phone. Four days before, a 70-year-old man was robbed while waiting for the train at Washington and Grand Avenue.

The Central City Crime Report A Rundown on Downtown Incidents, Trends and Criminal Oddities

I

n the Central City Crime Report, we survey the recent week in public safety. All information is provided by the LAPD’s Central Division.

p.m., two men entered Natural Herbal, a marijuana dispensary at 215 E. Washington Blvd., and brandished guns. Everyone in the store lay down and the weed thieves made off with six pounds of bud. Bummer, dudes.

Dude, What a Buzzkill: If you thought legal marijuana would cut down on stick-up boys robbing product from licensed dispensaries, well, you were wrong. At least in one specific instance. On April 7 at about 4:30

Blue Line Blues Continued: For the second time in four days, a person was robbed near a Metro Blue Line train station. On

Cigg-Sour: A Downtown resident walking to the 7-Eleven at Sixth Street and Broadway to buy cigarettes just after midnight on April 12 was attacked by an unknown man. The 37-year-old victim was punched and knocked out. When he came to, his iPhone and credit cards were missing. Wicked Witch of Downtown: A 39-year-

old man was arrested on April 11 after he attacked a man with a broom. The suspect allegedly hit the man four times, once in the head, after approaching him on a sidewalk near Seventh and Main streets. It marked the second time in the past month in Downtown that a suspect was charged with attack with a deadly weapon for using a broom. Crime Snapshot: So far this year, crime in Central Division, which covers most of Downtown, is down compared to 2012, according to LAPD statistics. Violent crime in particular has fallen by 18% year-to-date. Property crime has dropped 16%. Arrests, meanwhile, are up 9% in Downtown. —Ryan Vaillancourt

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April 22, 2013

Downtown News 13

Celebrating 40 Years

los angeles conservancy presents

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14 Downtown News

Celebrating 40 Years

April 22, 2013


April 22, 2013

Downtown News 15

Celebrating 40 Years

Beacon Continued from page 1 2,000 square feet. They went on the market with prices ranging from the high $200,000s to the low $900,000s. As of late March, only one residence remained, while 48 were sold and three others were in escrow (one will remain as a management office).

need to like concrete. The residences are industrial style lofts with distressed concrete floors, concrete walls up to 11 feet high, concrete ceilings and, in some units, thick concrete columns. Sleeping areas are divided by walls, although some condos, like a pair of twostory penthouses, have a separate bedroom. The residences include stainless steel appliances and washer and dryer hookups. Twenty-eight condos facing Alameda Street have balconies that resemble metal fire escapes. To combat noise from passing trucks, the units have dualpane windows. The property is gated and includes a narrow dirt dog run in the rear of the parking lot. The exterior of the building is gray and minimalist. The small lobby contains a pair of couches in front of a green wall and the narrow hallways also have distressed cement floors. The project offers a rooftop patio with a barbecue and Jacuzzi. There is no space for retail.

The Beacon Lofts follow a few other significant Arts District developments. In late 2011 the 38-condo 940 East 2nd Street hit the market, with units from $540,000-$1.3 million. It is nearly sold out. Over on Santa Fe Street across from SCI-Arc, the $160 million One Santa Fe is under construction. It is set for completion in 2014 and will create more than 400 apartments and 78,000 square feet of retail. Oruncakciel and Pilavjian say they are comfortable in their little corner of the Arts District and think their project will play an important role in the future of the community. “This was a good infill project when you consider the other development happening all around us,” Oruncakciel said. Their corner could see more residents in a few years. A second phase of the project, a ground-up collection of 22 townhouses, is in the planning stage and could be completed in as soon as two years. At least, that’s the plan for now. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

photo by Gary Leonard

The project converted a former storage facility into 53 residences. Units were priced from the high $200,000s to the low $900,000s.

Although the overall condominium market is extremely tight, with only a few dozen residences available on the Multiple Listings Service, Pilavjian has another theory as to why the building sold so quickly. “It’s pricing, all about the pricing,” he said during a recent visit to the structure. “It was priced very aggressively and we hit the market at the right time.” Also, despite what some may say about the location, the partners think the Beacon Lofts have a prime placement. They note that Little Tokyo and the Barker Block complex are nearby, and that Woori Market in the Little Tokyo Galleria is across the street. “It’s close enough to Downtown, yet far away from the congestion of, say, Figueroa or the Historic Core,” said Mardik Oruncakciel, one of the development partners. It was location and price that convinced Heather Canning and her boyfriend to purchase a 1,260-square-foot home for $484,000. They looked at places in Los Feliz, North Hollywood and Downtown before settling at the Beacon Lofts. “We wanted to be able to walk everywhere,” said Canning, 33. “You can walk to places and the neighborhood has this up-and-coming feel to it.” The sentiment was the same for Andrew Jung, 31. He thinks he and his wife got more for their money at the Beacon Lofts than they would in other neighborhoods. They purchased a 1,300-square-foot home for about $450,000. “It’s been a great experience so far,” he said. “We have no complaints.” Concrete Condos The project may be selling quickly, but as with other developments announced just before the recession, there were plenty of bumps. The building was originally constructed as a storage facility for the Bekins Company, though it had more recently operated as a jewelry manufacturing building. Pilavjian originally planned to open the six-story structure as condos in 2008. It was then pushed to late 2011. “It was delayed because of the market and we weren’t sure if we were going to go rental or for sale,” Pilavjian said. Construction finally began in mid-2011. The interior was gutted and new electrical, plumbing and air conditioning systems were installed. The reinforced concrete edifice also needed seismic upgrades. “It was in pretty bad shape,” Pilavjian recalled. “The skeleton was good, but the inside was a mess.” Now the units are ready, but there is one caveat: Buyers

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16 Downtown News

April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

In the Presence of Angels Photos by Gary Leonard

I

s everyone an angel? They are when they pose for photographer Gary Leonard in front of the trio of angel wings that artist Collette Miller painted on the metal doors at the Regent Theatre. Over the past couple months, Leonard has photographed a vast cross section of Downtown Los Angeles at the site, from politicians to residents to developers to members of the homeless community. A small sample of those who Leonard has angelfied are here. Many more are at downtownnews.com/community. Check out the constantly growing gallery.

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22, 2013News 1April Downtown

Celebrating 40 Years Twitter/DowntownNews

Downtown 17 July News 26, 2010

BE M USEU E RINK M T BES UARE IC G B S E I G SQ T-LOOKIN T OV N M I H T BES PERS FF BES ET BES I S E A U U H /VEN L CINEM BUY ST RS MARK EST L C B I S A O U E A OR M ION REG ) PLACE T ST FARM Y STORE SIDENTI F E PLAC TTRACT -RALPHS RE BE /NOVELT BEST RE ING BE T S D E A N TO GIFT ITIES BUIL BES T B T FAMILY EST (NO IENCE S R.) L S A I I N L T E T N B I S D N E M E F E WIN ION BE CLUB ONV OWN ILDING A P RESID O N P R O AY THEA T T C N N A T E T U R W S U W C C /N STAU T ATTRA EST DAN EAD BE T BE DO ENTIAL B ROUND G R O U P L BROAD REAL ES E R BEST WN BES MALL B AD TO H OR (MUS ST RESID /BUILT G R I TA B L E EAUTIFU NTOWN O DE T W U B T E B E A S E A O W H B NT ST CH TN ER DO DOC BEST RENOVA DOW T THEAT FLORIST E S T CE MO HING EST OMPANY NG BES B B T EST ENCY T ES T /C RS N PA DI B O S B L A C S M O L I I E C E R C U B R I G T G B E AG EW PO IST TIN E UR N’S T NT F ENTIAL S N D E S R E I N E E – O F T E M C M M CAR I T I N R O M E T T E E T W Y D 2 0 1 3 G W S I L S S E/S O M T A A S A E E T L B PL OVE MAN E RE BES UTO DE ER BES ST EMP TOR B T CELL LITY OPERTY IVE REUS S S I M P R T VENUE LOFT ST A T LAWY OP BE OPRAC T BES A E E R N B T P N W E I P S R ING ( H E V R I E L S E D A N H B L EST ST ADA S T B U S A I M I T R C T / E BES BES MMERC W FIRM T BARBE EST ORE BEST BU BOARD T B BE S P S B ES I O Y G A S T T H ORS CLOTHIN AGENT C BEST L ON BE DONTIS JEWELR N FIRM BEST PE ST PRE ITI W N E F T O M BE CE O T MEN’S L ESTATE RTMENT HAIR SAL T ORTH E BES RE/DESIG OKER A S ST A L E E P R S A B I R M T A U S P E T B E/ O T BE N RE VICE DE R BES TIST B R THE H CHITEC /STOCK TO BUY URANT W E STAU O V E E T A R I T R N L O E T R L E N A N E A F S C S / E E E D T DOW ALER BES LE D EST E STORE R BES INVESTM BEST PLA ANGE RE L.A. LIV C B Y E AL C T N R TO D ITUR E REPAI TOR NCY /MID- G BES AMERICA ST RAME BEST RVICE E L O ST AU HOP/MO VEL AGE RE/FURNICS B S T EH GE FIRM MER SE FFORDA NE DININ A EST SHI BE KERY O O S R E B T E T K S H I B I O A T B C KER ST CUST T NEW A BEST F KFAST BES AR IQUE NR T SU BEST BA OR S T O S Y N R E E B A B S A E E E E C ADP K OR BEST EE COM T/STOC IQUE B RIST B TAURANT BEST BR PANESE SSERTS RANT DÉ HE B G N T T E G S A U E E U D J N E CLU /STORA A I M M O T T R T T G VEST ES/B ST OPTO EGANT RAN R BES NT BES EST RES OOR DIN EL REST U A L T OVIN BEST IN T SUPPLI B BE GE ES RA UTD ST HOT E/E R R L U O U N A A G E S B T A T C I P N S N BRUN I S T S E D E T N E O S P T B N I ANK B S I A R E S U T E E B Y CL ST NEW ANIC OP ICAN B RIENDLY É BEST UISINE ACO RER BE WHOUSE T T X S MING BEST DR E F C B BE CAF STERN ORG ATIN/ME RIAN CATE EST BRE ST PLA T T I S N T A E A S P H A L A I RE B T E B R T D BE LE E EST BAR B HEAD BEST ST VEGE FOOD D STAU RENCH T MILY B E D S A I I R F L A M A E E Z E T F O S E T E C B Z I ST S R BES /AMBIAN T SPORT HEAD T ANT WIN N BES E CLU BEST BEST P INESE E B S UR CH AR NNE PHERE T BES CTIO ST DANC HEA E A I T SE B A T K D S U S R A T E T T O E S C S KH ST R BEST AT ALL BE EAD TO TO M B EST CUP H BES T ATMO TAURAN RT BE E U B S H C N S SM N DOC A T T DIM NCH B EST LUN STAURA NTIC RE AM/YOGU TCLUB R T W S I E S O T R O BE NT H E EA E E A OMP C / T FR OUSE B BEST R ST ROM T ICE CR EST NIG ST DOW BEST TH BEST FL GEON M R B O H S BE E SUR MENT FI SIDENTIA E R G C O Y I FFEE WN VIEW RAP M CH BE SPOT R T T R RE LLE AGE LAS N T R LA W UE/S RO O WNT NDWICH/ GAIN LU TE NIGH T ART GA THEATE BOUTIQ ILITY P RTY MAN E REUSE ESS IMP U R A LA ST EN ES PE TIV SIN EST FAC ST S BEST BA BEST EUM B RINK B ING BE EDICAL EST PRO ST ADAP EST BU EVENT V T B R S D M B H BE ST LOF E S B UNC OTEL BA BEST MU ARE ICE ING BUIL PITAL W G E I S E N T I E N H OS QU BEST UILD TAL RAT G AMENI ORSHIP OK EST S H B O B T EST OVIES L G L L S N T A M ES BES KET BE ISTORIC ING REN BUILDIN CE OF W OTHING MERCIA RSHI B L M M BEST AS PE STUFF D A E B MAR BEST H AL BUIL FFIC GUE/ PL MEN’S C GENT CO LAW FIR N M S Y O E R U N T I I E B T O T S C T O A M L S E E N O S G R E A B B BE OR FA ET NA IDE STAT ENT BE HAIR S IST E PLAC E BEST VELTY ST EST RES UILDING URCH/SY TO LIVE L A T B BEST ST DEN ORE/FO N RE DEPARTM L B EST CH PLACE W A I STOR GIFT/NO ITIES O T BE ER NT ICE N DEN FIT B E ST BEST DOW D E A L NCY AME RESI ITUR DR.) SERV

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18 Downtown News

April 22, 2013 photo by Gary Leonard

Celebrating 40 Years

NationBuilder Continued from page 1 fees start at $19 and the price escalates with the size of a user’s database; municipal campaigns pay up to $100 per month. A Congressional campaign could cost up to $500 per month. Customers own their data. Changing the Game In political campaigns, when it comes to digital operations, it has long been standard for staffers to tap multiple software platforms that specialize in different tasks. One program might manage volunteers, while another handles fundraising efforts. NationBuilder simplifies and synthesizes those tasks, making fundraising, get-out-the-vote and volunteer organizing efforts easier and faster to execute, said Kara Scharwath, the firm’s communications manager. “It helps you focus on the individuals rather than thinking I have to manage Twitter and I have to manage Facebook and I have to manage my email software,” she said. “It’s distracting to have to think of all those things individually. When you have it all in one place it allows you to put the focus on the actual people.” Josh Gee, digital director for the Garcetti campaign, uses the system for highly customized communications, such as sending emails to groups of supporters based on characteristics like zip code or volunteer history. That way they are more likely to get results, and less likely to crowd a supporter’s inbox with unwanted mail, Gee said. Gee has also used NationBuilder to identify whether people who have “liked” Garcetti’s campaign Facebook page are registered to vote. Those who haven’t are targeted with registration-related messaging. If it sounds like a simple strategy, it hasn’t always been easy to execute. “That’s something that frankly is still very cutting edge and is very difficult to do without these tools,” Gee said. “Only some of the higher level campaigns have done that.” The software is not only for campaigns. Local business clients

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NationBuilder staffers Joseph Conte and Kara Scharwath in the company’s office at the Pershing Square Building.

include Skild, another cloud-based software company in the Pershing Square Building. It uses NationBuilder to organize online competitions for universities and Fortune 500 companies. Before NationBuilder, the company used popular content management systems such as Wordpress and Joomla. Those provide a range of basic website templates and a small suite of functionality tools. Advanced programmers can tap content management systems to build highly customized websites, but usually for a high fee. Skild went to NationBuilder for its sister business, the website InnovationChallenge.com. The site pairs Fortune 500 companies in need of solutions to an array of problems with InnovationChallenge members. Skild founder Anil Rathi said NationBuilder has allowed him to more effectively grow his business and understand a larger community of users, for a lower price than paying for a custom site. “After you look at a custom build website, for what you get from NationBuilder, it’s a no brainer,” Rathi said. “You can customize anything for a fraction of the cost, with more functionality and more analytics. Not Just Campaigns NationBuilder was founded in 2009 by Gilliam, who has an extensive background in technology and organizing. He is perhaps best known for a June 2011 speech given at the Personal Democracy Forum titled “The Internet Is My Religion.” In the talk, Gilliam, 35, explained how upon being diagnosed with cancer, he harnessed the organizing power of the Internet. After getting a bone marrow transplant, he needed a new pair of lungs to replace his own chemotherapy-scorched organs. UCLA surgeons at first declined to perform the surgery, prompting Gilliam to blog his frustration. That propelled a pile of online activists to flood the web with pleas on Gilliam’s behalf. UCLA eventually relented and performed the transplant. A Downtown resident since 2001, when he was among the

first residents of the Old Bank District, Gilliam chose to open NationBuilder in the area because it was home, but also because it’s accessible for his staff. Initial growth was slow, and in early 2012 the firm had just five employees and a small office in its current home at the Pershing Square Building. Then in March of that year Gilliam secured $6.25 million from Silicon Valley venture capital fund Andreessen Horowitz. The staff quickly swelled to the current level and took over an entire floor of the building. Since late 2011, it has grown its customer base, or number of “nations,” from 300 to 1,500. Setting roots in Downtown bucks the conventional wisdom that an Internet start-up should be closer to Silicon Valley to access engineering talent and investor pools. Tech start-ups that insist on L.A. have generally located in the “Silicon Beach” section of Santa Monica. Gilliam sees it differently. “I think being not on the Westside has been really helpful to us,” he said. “People thought you had to be on the Westside in order to get engineers. But if you look commuting wise, we can pull from the entire region.” The firm is growing, and while political campaigns represent the largest user-category of NationBuilder, it is looking to sign up more business, government and nonprofit customers. In addition to Skild, its local clients include the DTLA Resident Program, a free membership-based benefits system for Downtown dwellers, and the MyFigueroa streetscape improvement project. Joseph Conte, a senior organizer for NationBuilder, cautioned that while the system aims to streamline and facilitate community organizing, it’s not a magic fix. Dedicated staffers still have to do the work. “We’re not just saying use the software,” Conte said. “It’s ‘Hey, you have to also start thinking like an organizer.’” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

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April 22, 2013

Downtown News 19

Celebrating 40 Years

Around Town Continued from page 2

Jenni Rivera Exhibit Coming to Grammy Museum

S

he was a well-known performer at the Nokia Theater, and she sold out the 7,100-seat space multiple times. Now the life and career of the Mexican American singer Jenni Rivera, who died in a plane crash last December, will be celebrated at the Grammy Museum at L.A. Live. The exhibit Jenni Rivera, La Gran Señora will open May 12. It will include stage costumes worn by Rivera, photographs, handwritten notes and video footage tracing her legacy. Rivera sold more than 20 million albums and was nominated for Latin Grammy awards in 2003, 2008 and 2010.

Get Your ‘Last Remaining Seats’

T

he Los Angeles Conservancy is selling tickets for the 27th installment of its Last Remaining Seats series of films in historic venues. The preservationist organization’s signature summer event usually screens classic films in Broadway venues such as the Orpheum, Palace and Los Angeles theaters, and while those three are in play this year, they are joined by a new Downtown location: The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion will host My Fair Lady on June 12. The screenings are generally accompanied by live entertainment, vintage cartoons and newsreels. Ticket sales to the public follow a three-week period in which they have been available to Conservancy members. The opening night screening of Alfred Hitchcock’s To Catch a Thief at the Orpheum Theatre is sold out, but seats remain for La Bamba on June 5 at the Palace, All About Eve on June 19 at the Los Angeles Theatre, and My Fair Lady. Tickets are $16 and are available via laconservancy.org. Even for sold-out shows some tickets are often available at the door.

Headquarters Prizes to Be Handed Out This Week

A

major Downtown developer and a prominent museum are among the local entities that will be honored this week. On Wednesday, April 24, the Los Angeles Headquarters Association will host its 52nd annual awards luncheon. Developer Wayne Ratkovitch, who is currently working on acquiring and renovating Macy’s Plaza, will receive the LAHQ’s Spirit of Los Angeles Award. The California Science Center, which made a splash last year when it opened a display featuring the Space Shuttle Endeavour, will get the Cultural Award. Additionally, the organization with 450 members representing 150 companies will hand the Community Award to the Girl Scouts of Los Angeles and DirecTV will receive the Outstanding Corporation prize. The luncheon begins at noon at the California Club. Tickets and additional information are at laheadquarters.com.

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IP H S R E L A E ND E G A D R W S A K W L A O V S I Y THE ONL ORNIA TO WIN TH IN CALIF

Edmunds.com presented its inaugural Edmunds.com Five Star Premier Dealer Awards and Volkswagen of Downtown was the ONLY VW dealer in the state of California to be honored. Only participants in Edmunds.com’s Premier Dealer program were considered for the 2013 Five Star Premier Dealer Awards. To be eligible for the award, the dealership must have earned an average customer review rating of five stars on Edmunds.com during the previous two years. For more information go to: www.edmunds.com/industry-center/analysis/edmundscom-presents-first-

Special section publishes May 13, 2013 You must reserve space by May 8, 2013

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20 Downtown News

April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONALS WEEK Taking Care of Business A Look at What It Takes to Be an Administrative Professional by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

T

hey anticipate problems before they happen. They set up meetings. They connect important calls. They are sounding boards and may even have influence in important decisions. They are known by many names, among them executive assistants, administrative coordinators, secretaries or

administrative professionals. But they all do one essential thing: They make sure business gets done. This week, they move out from behind the desk and get some of the credit and attention they deserve. Administrative Professionals Week is sponsored by the International Association of Administrative Professionals, which has 45,000 members in 600 chapters worldwide. The recognition takes place April 21-27, with Wednesday, April

How the Pros Do It Meet Two of Downtown’s Administrative Professionals by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

T

he job is never the same for a Downtown administrative professional. What happens in one company one day may have nothing to do with what occurs in another business the next. To find out a little more about what the job involves, Los Angeles Downtown News spoke to a pair of experienced Downtown administrative professionals.

Sergio Huidor Works For: The Capital Group Companies Title: Administrative Coordinator for the head of Talent Management Becoming an Administrative Professional: Huidor started in the entertainment industry as a freelancer working in the production of

music videos. While he was editing film he also worked as a temp. He said he kind of fell into the administrative professional field. “I just kind of grew into it. I got married, had kids, bought a house and by the time I looked around I had a lot of experience,” he said. He joined the Capital Group in 2007 after spending five years working at UCLA, first as an administrative assistant for the OB/GYN department and later as assistant to the chairman of the department. Rewards of the Job: Huidor notes that there are common tasks such as scheduling meetings and filing documents. Still, he says the job has something new to offer every day. He likes the fast-paced environment and learning new things. “I like that every day is not the same,” he said. “You’re always doing something different. There are always weird little things that come up.”

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24, designated as Administrative Professionals Day. All across Downtown Los Angeles this week, bosses will be taking their top aide to lunch and buying them gifts. In the following pages, Los Angeles Downtown News gets a few glimpses at the facets and challenges of the job. From an IAAP expert to a couple people in the trenches, there’s more to being an administrative professional than most people think.

A Day in the Life: Huidor stays busy by scheduling meetings, collecting the materials necessary for meetings and responding to any lastminute changes. He also has to make travel arrangements for executives and prepare travel reports. He helps create presentation materials using Powerpoint and spreadsheets. “And there’s stuff that doesn’t really fit into a category,” he points out. “I’ll do a presentation that might involve manipulating graphics. There’s a lot of desktop publishing.” Challenges: Huidor believes that one of the best things possible is to have a job that challenges you. “I think here at the Capital Group I’m very lucky that I work in a very dynamic environment,” he said. “We’ve gone through a lot of changes in the last few years so we’re always in the process of reinventing ourselves and that keeps it fresh and challenging.” Pet Peeves: “I would give $1 million to the guy who could figure out how to eliminate filing completely. It’s just one of those things that needs to be done, but I just can’t find a way to make it interesting.” Gifts of Gratitude: “I don’t think we need a gift on a certain day. Just get to know your administrative professional, take advantage of what they can do for you and you’ll never regret it.”

Maria gibSon

Maria Gibson

Sergio Huidor

As a child in elementary school she loved the environment in the administration office where people were typing and doing other tasks. “That began my interest. I took typing classes, shorthand, office administration and accounting classes and I have worked in that field ever since I was able to,” she said. Gibson has been at KPMG for 26 years.

Works For: KPMG Title: Executive Administrative Assistant to four executives Becoming an Administrative Professional: For Gibson, becoming an administrative professional was pretty much a life’s calling.

Rewards of the Job: Gibson likes the variety of tasks she handles at the accounting firm. “It’s a wonderful firm to work for and the people are fantastic,” she said. “I get daily stimulation from the projects and the services we provide our clients.” see Profiles, page 22

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Putting the ‘Secret’ in Secretary Tips and Advice From an Administrative Professional Expert by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

Y

ou may think you know what an administrative professional does, and to a degree you’re right. However, there are far more tasks and challenges than most people think. Some of that will be explored on Wednesday, April 24, when members of the Citrus Valley and Pasadena chapters of the International Association of Administrative Professionals hold an event with Dr. Lois P. Frankel, president of Corporate Coaching International. Her talk, which is open to Downtowners, is called “Seven Ways to Get the Respect You Deserve, the Success You’ve Earned, and the Life You Want.” Vicki Hahn, who has more than 30 years of experience in the administrative professional field and is the vice president of the IAAP Citrus Valley chapter, is the co-organizer of the event. She spoke with Los Angeles Downtown News about the organization and the career.

Downtown News 21

Administrative Professionals Celebrating 40 Years Week

them to continue to grow and learn. If that means getting involved with a professional association, to support them in those efforts, then do it. The Citrus Valley and Pasadena IAAP Chapter event is Wednesday, April 24, at Dave & Buster’s Westfield Mall, 400 South Baldwin Ave., Arcadia. Register at iaap-citrusvalley.org or call (951) 205-2245. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

photo courtesy of Vicki Hahn

April 22, 2013

To be a successful administrative professional, says Vicki Hahn of the International Association of Administrative Professionals, “You need to be honest and trustworthy. You need to be flexible. You need to be a good communicator and you need to be willing to step outside of your comfort zone.”

Los Angeles Downtown News: What does the IAAP do? Vicki Hahn: The International Association of Administrative Professionals is an association that is available to any administrative professional. They have been around for more than 70 years. We’ve been working toward identifying a new purpose, and the new purpose we’re looking to identify is that today’s global community has the opportunity to connect, learn, lead and excel. Q: What is happening at your event this week? A: We are very excited. We were able to book Dr. Lois T. Frankel. She’s an internationally acclaimed author. She’s written several books in the Nice Girl series: Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office, Nice Girls Just Don’t Get It. But even though her titles are relative to the female gender, her principals are not; they’re relative to everybody and that’s what we’re really trying to get everyone to understand. What she’s talking about is empowerment in the workplace, learning to ask for what you need to get the job done effectively and efficiently at the lowest possible cost and the most effective manner. Her philosophies and principles will help one learn that. Q: What challenges do administrative professionals face in the workplace? A: One of the biggest challenges is we do so many things in the background to make things happen seamlessly. People don’t really recognize the integral role we play in getting things done. We are actually the bridge builders of today, tomorrow and the future. The challenge is we do it behind the scenes and we don’t get the recognition. Q: What are some of the rewards of the field? A: Knowing that you contributed to getting a job done well, being part of the inner circle of what’s happening in business. Sometimes you’re aware of different things that are in the conceptual stage but not released yet, so it’s kind of fun to be part of that inner circle. We refer to ourselves as administrative professionals but there are 100 different titles that fall in that category, one of which is secretary. While a lot of people don’t like to be called secretary anymore, I always like to look at the root word of secretary, which is secret. Q: What are the most important things you can do as an administrative professional to be successful in your career? A: You need to be honest and trustworthy. You need to be flexible. You need to be a good communicator and you need to be willing to step outside of your comfort zone. Q: What advice do you give to an administrative professional who has a demanding boss? A: Even if somebody treats you abrasively, the time to address it is not at that moment because you’re not going to win and you’re only going to end up frustrated. If you’re faced with an uncomfortable situation, I think always have a smile on your face and show poise in the period of adversity. Then, separately and privately when you have an opportunity you might say, “Can we maybe deal with these kinds of situations this way?”’ Come as a solution giver and not a problem reporter. I think that’s really important. Q: What would be a good gift for a boss to give to an administrative professional this week? A: I think supporting them in their learning efforts, so it’s not a one-day thing. Personally, I think the best gift any boss can give to their administrative professional staff is to encourage

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22 Downtown News

April 22, 2013

Administrative Professionals Week

A Professional Reward There Are Many Ways to Say Thank You During Administrative Professionals Week by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

800 W 7th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90017 213.623.2288 | WokcanoRestaurant.com

E

veryone knows that administrative professionals make the office run smoother and more efficiently. Everyone knows that any decent boss will try to reward his or her top aides during Administrative Professional Week, which falls April 21-27. What everyone does not know, however, is exactly how to say thanks. What is the right gift for a standout gatekeeper? There is no single answer, as obviously, everyone likes different things. Below are five of the many choices available in Downtown Los Angeles. Whatever you do, make sure you do something. Otherwise, you may find out how hard life in an office can be without someone watching over it. Lunch Power: The Palm Restaurant in South Park is known as a place where Downtown Los Angeles business leaders like to eat, mingle and be seen. But it doesn’t have to be a place just for CEOs, especially during Administrative Professionals Week. A lunch to celebrate those who work behind the scenes doesn’t have to break the bank either, thanks to the Palm’s three course Power Lunch menu. For $25.90, the restaurant offers a starter choice that includes salad or soup. The entrée selections include chicken parmigiana, salmon filet and filet mignon. Dessert is also included with two choices: cheesecake and flourless chocolate cake. It’s usually more than enough for one meal, meaning that your administrative professional may have dinner too. The Palm is at 1100 S. Flower St., (213) 763-4600 or thepalm.com. Gift of Food: While a lunch with the boss is always appreciated, sometimes the gatekeeper needs a break from everyone at work. So treat your administrative professional to a nice lunch where they can bring family or a friend. Drago Centro, the high-end Italian restaurant at City National Plaza, offers a personalized gift certificate that resembles a certificate of recognition. It’s easy to order on the restaurant’s website. There are three gift certificate designs and amounts range from $25 to $250 (suggestion: don’t be the boss who does $25). All one needs to do is type in the name of the recipient, pay with a credit card, and the gift certificate can be emailed either directly to the administrative assistant or to the boss so it can be printed out and given in an envelop. Suggestion #2: Print it out and put it in a nice

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Continued from page 20 A Day in the Life: Like most people who work in an office, Gibson spends a lot of time in front of a computer. “My day consists of a lot of email,” she said. Gibson also responds to various requests from executives, edits documents and prepares them for clients. Additionally, she handles billing and makes travel arrangements. Pet Peeves: “No pet peeves. Everyone here is a joy to work for. They’re all friendly, they communicate their needs and expectations. I’m kept informed so that makes my job easier.” Surprises About the Profession: Gibson said many people are unaware that for

card. And buy some flowers too. Drago Centro is at 525 S. Flower St., (213) 228-8998 or dragocentro.com. Relaxation Compensation: Stress is a bad thing. It can lead to an inability to concentrate, poor judgment and even procrastination. So it’s wise for executives to invest in the well being of administrative professionals, and a day at the spa can alleviate a whole lot of stress. The Omni Hotel on Olive Street is one place where an administrative professional can relax for a day. Prices range from $100 for a one-hour facial to $250 for a two-hour river rock massage that utilizes warm stones to melt away the stress. At the Yolanda Aguilar Spa at the FIGat7th shopping center, an administrative professional can get the “Head to Toe” treatment for $129. This includes a back massage, facial, scalp, foot and ankle massage, as well as a collagen mask treatment. A third choice is Pho-Siam Thai Spa in City West. Its menu includes the one-hour All About the Feet massage for $50, and the Total Thai Relaxation Massage, which can last up to three hours! It’s $150. The Omni Hotel is at 251 S. Olive St., (213) 617-3300 or omnihotels.com. Yolanda Aguilar Spa is at 735 S. Figueroa St., (213) 687-6683 or yabeauty.com. Pho-Siam is at 1525 Pizarro St., (213) 484-8484 or phosiam.com. Bowling Party: Get the administrative assistant out of the office and onto some cool bowling lanes, and if one or four drinks flow, so be it. Lucky Strike Lanes and Lounge is a good place to go, as it has a club-like vibe to make the game more fun. If you have a whole team of gatekeepers you can rent a private lane or a room for your party. At 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 542-4880 or bowlluckystrike.com. Last Remaining Tickets: The Los Angeles Conservancy’s Last Remaining Seats series, where classic films are screened in historic movie houses, is a hot show in Downtown. It’s a hot ticket too, as many events sell out. So an administrative assistant would feel like a red carpet VIP with a pair of passes to one of the upcoming films. They’re on sale at the Conservancy website and include La Bamba on June 5 at the Palace Theatre, My Fair Lady at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion June 12, and Ben-Hur at the Orpheum June 26. Tickets at laconservancy.org. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

more than 70 years there has been an organization called the International Association of Administrative Professionals that focuses on the needs of those in the field. “I have been a member since 1998,” she said. “It has been a fantastic organization. I have met a lot of colleagues from different companies and industries. It really enhances the knowledge base of what the standards are and what the new trends are in terms of technology. It’s a really tightknit network that supports each other and mentors each other.” Gifts of Gratitude: Instead of a physical gift, a little recognition is what most administrative professionals want, Gibson said. “I believe instead of things like flowers, just being thankful and appreciative on a daily basis is definitely sufficient.” Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.


April 22, 2013

Downtown News 23

Celebrating 40 Years

CALENDAR Art Spawned by Dark Times

REDCAT Plays Look at Chile’s Brutal Past

by RichaRd Guzmán

city EditoR hilean playwright and director Guillermo Calderon was only 2 in 1973 when Gen. Augusto Pinochet, with the support of the United States government, took control of the South American coun-

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Sign Up for Our E-News Blasts & Be Entered to Win Movie Tickets! Three actresses star in the two plays that make up Villa + Discurso, written by Guillermo Calderon. The shows at REDCAT on April 25-28 look at Chile in the years after the brutal regime of dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet.

try in a bloody coup. Chile. He also studied at the Dell’Arte School of Physical During Pinochet’s brutal, nearly two-decade dictator- Theater in Northern California. ship, more than 3,000 people were executed or simply His first play, Neva, was about Anton Chekhov’s widow, disappeared. Thousands more were tortured. the actress Olga Knipper. Diciembre looks at a soldier who It was a time Calderon and millions of his fellow is visiting his home during a war and contemplates going Chileans will never forget. Now, on the 40th anniversary AWOL. Another of Calderon’s plays, Clase, tells the story of the coup, two of his plays that delve into the deeper of student protesters and their political frustrations. question of how his country’s past should be rememVilla + Discurso is in large part aimed at the generation bered are coming to Downtown Los Angeles. of Chileans who may not remember the atrocities of the Although the performance, titled Villa Pinochet regime. Its message is direct and unsparing. + Discurso, is about a specific place and its “The next generation must take charge of the problem, history, the story should resonate beyond not just symbolically, but in concrete terms, demanding Chile’s borders, said Mark Murphy, ex- truth and justice,” Calderon said by phone from Chile. ecutive director of REDCAT. “But this is very hard and what we want to do with the“It’s a very engaging story and the nar- ater is speak to the younger generation and bring this up rative, the themes are indeed universal to public discussion again.” about the role of art in a troubled world,” Villa starts with the women sitting around an archihe said. “It’s so beautifully written.” tectural model of the Villa Grimaldi. They must decide Villa + Discurso runs Thursday- what to do with the site and discuss a few choices, such Sunday, April 25-28, at the Downtown as turning it into a museum, a park, or even rebuilding Los Angeles theater. It marks Calderon’s the torture complex to remind people of how brutal the third appearance at REDCAT, follow- era was. Starts ing Diciembre in 2010 and Neva in Mar.29/Apr.5 Calderon said there is meaning in every option the 2011. Both of those plays were also women consider. politically charged. Building a museum, he said, would try to make sense The new show, which is performed of what happened there; re-creating the complex would in Spanish shock people into remembering the pain. Leaving it as Check Our Website for with FullEnglish Moviesupertitles, ListingsisLADowntownNews.com a double bill that debuted in 2011 in a park would demonstrate how hard it is to confront Chile. The first shows were on the site the past. of Villa Grimaldi, a complex where Chile’s reaction to its past has been the equivalent of about 5,000 people were detained, building a museum, the 42-year-old playwright stated. with many of them tortured and “They’ve left it in the past,” he said. “I don’t agree with killed. The complex provides the that, and a lot of people don’t agree with that. In order to “Villa” for the show title. “Discurso” get past it there must be real justice and truth.” means “discussion.” Calderon said the fictional speech delivered by former The infamous location inspired president Bachelet in Discurso is what he wishes she the storyline. would12 have said at the end of her term. Starts April “It’s a heavy, serious story, and “We hoped she would have done more in terms of huwhen it was performed at that lo- man rights,” he said. cation they read a list of some of Bachelet may get another chance, since she is running the names of people that had been for president of Chile again. Calderon said this time her tortured there and disappeared,” said agenda appears much more liberal and progressive. Murphy, who traveled to Chile for the Pinochet died in 2006 under house arrest in Chile while Check Our Website foronFull Movie debut. “Being the site was anListings emotionalLADowntownNews.com facing hundreds of criminal charges, but he was never experience.” convicted. Very few of those involved with the crimes of In Villa, the first play, three women his regime were ever brought to justice, Calderon said. who are descendants of some of the vicDespite that, Calderon said he wants his plays to spark tims have been tasked with deciding what conversations about what happened, and to encourage to do with the site where the building once dialogue about other events that deserve attention, even stood. In Discurso the same three actresses those beyond his homeland’s borders. portray Michelle Bachelet, Chile’s president “The problem of memory and remembering the vioStarts April 19 from 2006-2010, who along with other mem- lence is in all parts of the world,” he said. “I would like for bers of her family was tortured at Villa Grimaldi. the public to be able to connect this story with something Calderon’s story is an imagined farewell speech more universal.” from the former president (all three women deliver Murphy thinks the REDCAT audience, thousands of parts of the speech). miles removed form Santiago, won’t have a problem relating. Politics and People “I hope they are as engaged by the material as I was,” he Calderon, one of the most respected directors and playwrights in his country, has a history of exploring said. “I’m optimistic people will respond that way.” political issues. REDCAT is at 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or Check Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com He earned a degree in Arts from the Universidad de redcat.org.

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24 Downtown News

April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Planes, Trains and a Downtown Auto Dealer Remembering the Very Early Days of Cross-Country Travel by Jay berman contributing writer

N

ot even Charles Lindbergh, Mary Pickford or a prominent Downtown Ford dealer could save the country’s first coast-to-coast air system — such as it was — from failing, but they were major players at the start of the pioneering enterprise, nearly 85 years ago. Lindbergh was only a year removed from his 1927 solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic when he, financier Clement Keys and other investors formed Transcontinental Air Transport. The company was short lived under that name, but it eventually evolved into TWA, a major air carrier until it was acquired by American Airlines in 2001. The Keys-Lindbergh plan was to combine daytime air travel and overnight sleeping car train service to cross the country in an unprecedented 48 hours. Planes could not yet fly at night because navigational systems lacked the sophistication. Passenger air travel was regional and somewhat of an adventure, often involving open-cockpit planes and sharing a seat with a sack of mail. At the time the fastest Los Angeles to New York train trip took at least 72 hours. Keys, Lindbergh and the others met in New York in May 1928. Soon, the presidents of the Pennsylvania and Santa Fe railroads agreed to join them. The Fred Harvey Co., which placed its restaurants adjacent to railroad stations, also committed to the idea. With Lindbergh’s popularity and the support of investment bankers, Keys was able to buy 10 Ford Trimotor planes. The Trimotor could seat up to 13 passengers and cruise at

110 miles per hour. Both figures were state of the art for the time. TAT established a network of ticket offices, including one in the busy business hub of Downtown at 636 S. Olive St. The air-rail route began on July 8, 1929. Lindbergh piloted the first west-to-east leg, while Pickford, possibly the most popular actress of the time, christened the plane “City of Los Angeles” at a well-attended press conference. The western terminus of the route was Glendale’s Grand Central Airport, as Los Angeles International Airport did not yet exist. The east-to-west trip originated at Manhattan’s Pennsylvania Station. Eastbound passengers boarded a Trimotor in Glendale shortly after 8 a.m., stopping in Kingman and Winslow, Ariz., and Albuquerque, N.M., before arriving in Clovis, N.M., a few minutes before 7 p.m. After dinner at the adjacent Fred Harvey restaurant, passengers boarded an overnight Santa Fe train which took them to Waynoka, a small town in North-Central Oklahoma. The next morning, they got onto a second Trimotor, which stopped in Wichita, Indianapolis and other cities before wrapping up the day in Columbus, Ohio. A second train pulled into Penn Station in Manhattan 48 hours after the trip had started. In all, the route covered about 2,000 miles in the air and 1,000 miles by rail. The Trimotor could fly up to six hours without refueling, but TAT tried to choose its stops 200 to 300 miles apart in an attempt to boost intercity travel. TAT called itself The Lindbergh Line and advertised that its service was “for those whose

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The executive offices of TAT Maddux Air Lines opened at 530 W. Sixth St. in 1929. The company offered a combination rail-train system that would get people across the United States in 48 hours. Here is what the building looks like today.

time is too important to waste.” Another ad slogan was “Harnessing the Plane and the Iron Horse.” A sales brochure, utilizing the elaborate prose of the time, read: “Such a combination of speed, luxury and convenience has never before been offered to the American public. The best features of rail and air travel are united in this system. You sleep in a luxurious train at night… on the wings of the morning you swoop into the air.” Although one TAT magazine ad boasted “moderate rates” and another promised “The Speed of the Plane at the Cost of the Train,”

neither was entirely true. The cost from Los Angeles to New York, including meals served on the planes, was $340, or about $4,500 today and approximately 50% higher than the most expensive all-rail accommodation. Despite the cost, TAT wasn’t bringing in enough money to break even. George E. Hopkins, in a 1975 article in American Heritage magazine, wrote that TAT lost money from the start. Keeping his eye on the situation was Jack Maddux, a Downtown Los Angeles Fordsee Travel, page 32


April 22, 2013

Downtown News 25

Celebrating 40 Years

EVENTS

photo by Carol Rosegg

THE

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Tuesday, april 23 Granta Night at Aloud Mark Taper Auditorium, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 2287500 or lfla.org. 7:15 p.m.: John Freeman, editor of the prophetic literary magazine Granta, comes to Aloud in the Central Library with an evening dubbed “Granta’s Best Young British Novelists.”

Hello to Fela!, Goodbye to Costumes and a Strings Thing

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by Dan Johnson, listings eDitor | calendar@downtownnews.com

f you missed Fela! when it played at the Ahmanson Theatre last year, you may have been sad. Now, you can turn that Afrobeat frown upside down, as the Music Center venue this week has a brief reprise of the performance about the life and music of Fela Kuti. Through the ’60s and ’70s, Kuti’s music embodied the sonic roots of his native Nigeria with a popular sensibility mar-

photo courtesy Geoff Glass for Center Stage Strings

Thursday, april 25 Trevor Paglen at Aloud Mark Taper Auditorium, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 2287500 or lfla.org. 7:15 p.m.: Paglen dedicated five years of his life to compiling a comprehensive visual catalog of our generation to be sent into space as a floating time capsule. Really. Come ask what other hobbies pique his interest.

ried to the rhythmic possibilities of contemporary jazz, funk and highlife. Today, Kuti lives on as musical inspiration and a theatrical luminary. Fela! opens at the Ahmanson on Friday, April 26, but continues only through May 5. This special run features former Destiny’s Child member Michelle Williams as Sandra. At 601 W. Temple St., (213) 628-2772 or centertheatregroup.org.

Friday, april 26 Le Grand Fooding Crush Paris-L.A. 2013 MOCA Geffen Contemporary, 152 N. Central Ave., (213) 621-1745 or moca.org. April 26-27, 6 p.m.: A symbiosis of cultural infatuation and culinary delights connects the two cities in this two-day outdoor picnic with top chefs, DJs and graphic designers from both towns.

sunday, april 28 Afro Cuban Dance Workshop California African American Museum, 600 State Dr., (213) 744-7432 or caamuseum.org. 2 p.m.: Rogelio Lorda leads a free tutorial in the ways of Cuban dance.

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Blue Whale 123 Astronaut E. S. Onizuka St., (213) 620-0908 or bluewhalemusic.com. April 23: Something called the All Star Band, with musicians interpreting David Bowie’s ’70s Berlin period. April 24: The Scorpion Decides with Keith Kelly, Branson Nejame, Jerome Salazar and Nathan Hubbard. April 25: Brandon Bernstein Trio. April 26: Sole Sisters. April 28: Leni Stern Trio. Bootleg Bar 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.org. April 22, 8 p.m.: This month’s resident performer Gavin Turek will be joined by Ross Sea Party and Moses Sumney. April 23, 7 p.m.: Gidget meets the machinations of the blogosphere with Florida surf rock outfit Beach Day.

Continued on next page

THREE

photo by Alex J. Berliner/ABI Images

saTurday, april 27 K-Chung Radio Broadcasts Live Last Bookstore, 453 S. Spring St., (213) 488-0599 or lastbookstorela.com. 12 p.m.: This inaugural remote broadcast from Chinatown station K-Chung marks the first in a series of K-Chung events at the Last Bookstore the last Saturday of each month. Music programming complements literary content, interviews and discussion. MOCA Teen Night MOCA Grand Avenue, 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 6211745 or moca.org. 6:30 p.m.: Specially geared for high school students only, this night of interactive art and live performances calls into question ideals of identity and reality in the cyber age. Hey, don’t those teens like that Facetwitter thing?

Any filmmaker worth his or her salt will tell you that costume design and sound are the often overlooked parts of the cinematic experience. Downtown Los Angeles gives short shrift to the audio, but over at the FIDM Museum & Galleries in South Park, it’s all about the clothing. The 21st annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design exhibit has some of the finest paragons from the past year of film wardrobe, including outfits from Lincoln (shown here), Les Miserables, The Avengers and recent Oscar winner Anna Karenina. The show, which closes Saturday, April 27, has outfits from these and more than a dozen other films. See ’em up close at 919 S. Grand Ave., (800) 624-1200 or fidmmuseum.org.

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One part nostalgia for the movie viewing experience of yesteryear and one part cinematic best-of series, the Electric Dusk Drive-In returns Saturday, April 27, at 8 p.m. with a screening of Scorcese’s gangsterland classic Goodfellas. This screening at the corner of Olympic Boulevard and San Julian Street on the City Market site promises

The study of music is intimately related to mathematics, composition, narrative structure and art. Find out precisely how at the Colburn School’s Zipper Hall, where faculty member Danielle Belen keeps the dream of symphony literate children alive and well with her Center Stage Strings music camp each summer. On Friday, April 26, at 7:30 p.m., the school will play host to a gala benefit for the summer program. Violinist James Ehnes will join Belen and some of her students and faculty in a world class concert in the key of altruism. Tickets are only $30. At 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or centerstagestrings.com.

FOUR

They’ll be lining up around the block on Tuesday, April 23, as Guy Blakeslee of the Entrance Band hosts a special “surreal variety” show at the Last Bookstore. If you’ve ever wondered what they’re into over in Charm City, the Baltimore native is here to stun and delight with musical performances featuring his stylish tunes and the work of fellow Entrant and sometime Zwan/A Perfect Circle bassist Paz Lenchantin. You may be accustomed to the bevy of free events at the Last Bookstore, but tonight’s event is closed to the browsing public. You can purchase a $12 ticket online or buy one at the door after they’ve swept the dollar section for nesting bibliophiles. At 453 S. Spring St., (213) 4880599 or lastbookstorela.com.

to amuse you, not like a clown per se, but most definitely in that simultaneously disturbing and captivating way that Ray Liotta and Joe Pesci do when they share screen time. Tickets are available online for both the Astroturf section and the reserved car area. Bonus: It’s the first Electric Dusk show in their new location. Huzzah! At 1000 San Julian St., or electricduskdrivein.com.

Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.


26 Downtown News

April 24, 7:30 p.m.: Flogging Molly bassist Nathan Maxwell strikes out on his own as the Bunny Gang. April 24, 9 p.m.: Grinding fuzz rock from Bass Drum of Death. April 25, 8 p.m.: Dear Boy simultaneously claims L.A. and London roots while peddling his smoothly produced indie rock. April 26, 8 p.m.: Seattle is relieved to have nasal indie rockers the Cave Singers out of town for a week. The constant self-branding had become a little much. April 27, 8 p.m.: D.I.Y. music meets amateur ironic Satanism as TV Girl hits the stage. April 28, 7 p.m.: Derde Verde is here to prove that indie rock is the new face of indie rock. Broadway Bar 830 S. Broadway, (213) 614-9909 or broadwaybar.la. April 25, 10 p.m.: H.M. Soundsystem/Broader Than Broadway headache/much regret Friday. Electro minded haikus. Club Nokia 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-7000 or clubnokia.com. April 25, 8 p.m.: Rodney Atkins is the most lyrically potent bard ever to come out of Tennessee Technological University. April 26, 8:30 p.m.: D.C. folk reggae from SOJA. April 27, 9 p.m.: This week’s global sampler of dub influenced music continues with New Zealand’s all Maori Katchafire. Escondite 410 Boyd St., (213) 626-1800 or theescondite.com. April 22, 10 p.m.: Just in case you didn’t know, improv jazz musician Yonatan has friends. April 23, 10 p.m.: Bask in the hip stylings of Boom Boom Boom and Bunny West. April 24, 10 p.m.: Fiddle & Pine with For the Kings in honor of hump day. April 25, 10 p.m.: The blues onslaught begins with Trip Rezac and Downtown Train. April 26, 9 p.m.: Trevor Menear and Johnny Moezzi, blues brothers from (presumably) other mothers. April 27, 10 p.m.: Charlie Chan & the S.O.B.s, a reminder that age is just a number. April 18, 9 p.m.: Groovy Rednecks, an opening band whose name accurately sums up RT N the 44s. Exchange LA 618 S. Spring St., (213) 627-8070 or exchangela.com. April 25, 10 p.m.: The electronica will be eclectic with Stanton Warriors. April 26, 10 p.m.: W&W is a duo comprised of Ward van der Harst and Willem van Hanegem. We’re guessing they’re European. April 27, 10 p.m.: Manufactured Superstars guarantees to transform your cover charge into music. Like magic! Grammy Museum 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. April 24, 8 p.m.: The Blue Sky Riders will be stopping by to showcase the musical stylings of Gary Burr, Georgia Middleman and the eternal Kenny Loggins. Last Bookstore 453 S. Spring St., (213) 488-0599 or lastbookstorela.com. April 23, 9 p.m.: The Entrance Band veterans Guy Blakeslee and Paz Lechantin drop by for a night of biblio-garnished music. Nokia Theater 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6020 or nokiatheatrelalive.com. April 27, 5 p.m.: The stars will be out tonight for the Radio Disney Music Awards. April 28, 5 p.m.: Go deep at L.A. Live the Amazing Grace Gospel Fest. Nola’s 734 E. Third St., (213) 680-3003 or nolasla.com. April 22, 7:30 p.m.: Cornerius Herring. April 23, 7:30 p.m.: Down Home Blues Jam Session. April 24, 7 p.m.: N’Tense Soul. April 25, 7 p.m.: Cal State L.A. Jazz Band. One-Eyed Gypsy 901 E. First St., (626) 340-3529 or one-eyedgypsy.com. April 23: Kyle Crane Jazz Group. April 24: RT N the 44s. Redwood Bar and Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 652-4444 or

Wild Circus

theredwoodbar.com. April 22: The Burning Dolls, The Vigils and Cardboard Lamb. April 23: Black Boots, Thee Teepees and Sonic Angels. April 24: Dave Gleason. April 26: The Checkers, Savage Gospel, White Murder and At it Again. April 27: The Cornfed Project, The King Cheetah, The Probe and Interstellar. April 28, 3 p.m.: Smellveteen, Ramirez, Mecolodiacs and Backbiter. April 28: Brandon Lee Harris, Dawn Oberg and Sleeping Car. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., (213) 614-0737 or sevengrand.la. April 23: The Makers tried to get out of the improvised jazz game, but they got pulled back in. April 24, 10 p.m.: Angela Vicente Revival, because the local jazz scene needed its own Lazarus. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. April 22: A big night with Wavves, Fidlar and Cheatahs. April 25: Luke Jenner, DJ David Scott Stone and DJ Dane Chadwick. April 26: Signals, Sacred Destines, Norse Horse and Ezra Buchla. April 27: The Lovely Bad Things, Moses Campbell, Peter Pants and Surf Curse. Walt Disney Concert Hall 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil.com. April 22, 8 p.m.: They came from near and far, from Highland Park and Echo Park and some parts of Silver Lake, but not Los Feliz because that’s played out. They came to celebrate their Valhalla, Brooklyn, in an event wisely marketed as a “festival” and featuring Sufjan Stevens, Brice Dessner and Nico Mulhy. April 23, 8 p.m.: For the hipsters who thought it would be ironic to stay at the venue longer than they’re welcome, you should know that tonight’s Herbie Hancock-led tribute is dedicated to the memory of Miles Davis. He was like the Lou Reed of jazz to put it all in perspective.

photos © Michael Meseke 2010

Continued from previous page

FILM Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. April 22-25, 5 and 7:05 p.m.: Unmade in China follows the experience of a Los Angeles filmmaker who finds himself in Xiamen, China, trying to direct a thriller, in Chinese, using a translator. April 22-25, 5:05 p.m.: Antiviral tells the story of Syd March, an employee at a clinic that sells injections of live viruses harvested from sick celebrities to obsessed fans. April 26, 6 p.m.: No, starring Gael Garcia Bernal, tells the story of attempts in Chile circa 1988 to defeat Augusto Pinochet in an election. August 26, 7 p.m.: Complete with a Q&A with director Shunji Iwai, this screening of Vampire will have you positively lusting for the story of a vampire teacher on the search for suicidal female students to provide their blood. April 28, 8 p.m.: Director Dan Kapelovitz tags along for this screening of Triple Fisher: The Lethal Lolitas of Long Island. IMAX California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 7442019 or californiasciencecenter.org. Explore the remnants and wisdom of an ancient empire in Mysteries of Egypt. Ice and polar bear enthusiasts will likely dig To the Arctic 3D. Experience the gripping story full of hope, crushing disappointment and triumph in Hubble 3D. Regal Cinemas 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 763-6070 or lalive.com/ movies. Through April 25: Filly Brown (11:20 a.m. and 1:50, 4:30, 7:10 and 9:50 p.m.); The Lords of Salem (11:50 a.m. and 2:30, 5:10, 8 and 10:50 p.m.); Oblivion (12:10, 1:10, 3:30, 4:20, 7, 7:40, 10:20 and 11 p.m.); 42 (11:50 a.m. and 12:40, 3:10, 4, 6:40, 7:20, 10 and 10:40 p.m.); Scary Movie V (11:40 a.m. and 2:10, 4:40, 7:10 and 9:40 p.m.); Evil Dead (12:20,

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April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

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o skateboarding and basketball belong on the stage of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. They do when they’re fused with acrobatics, theater and contemporary dance which, fittingly, all takes place in Traces. The circus-like production created by the Montreal-based troupe 7 Fingers lands at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion April 26-28 as part of the Dorothy Kaufman Presents Dance at the Music Center series. Expect to see elements of street performances fused with crazy physicality, all set to the music of Radiohead, Blackalicious and more. It’s safe to say the Chandler stage has never seen anything like it. At 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-0711 or musiccenter.org.

2:50, 5:20, 7:50 and 10:30 p.m.); Jurassic Park 3D (1:30, 4:30, 7:30 and 10:30 p.m.); Tyler Perry’s Temptation (12:50, 3:40, 6:30 and 9:20 p.m.); G.I. Joe: Retaliation (1:20, 6:50 and 9:30 p.m.); G.I. Joe Retaliation 3D (4:10 p.m.); The Croods 3D (1:40 and 6:30 p.m.); The Croods (11:20 a.m. and 4 and 9:10 p.m.); Olympus Has Fallen (1:40, 4:50, 7:50 and 10:50 p.m.); Girl Rising (11:30 a.m. and 2:10, 4:50, 7:30 and 10:10 p.m.).

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE The Assistants Loft Ensemble, 929 E. Second St., (213) 680-0392 or loftensemble.com. April 27, 8 p.m., April 28, 7 p.m.: Everything is just peachy on the set of the hit reality series “Love House.” Well, it is until there’s an ugly act of violence. Watch the fur fly in the dark comedy from the Art District theater purveyor. Through May 5.

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Bob Baker’s Something To Crow About The Bob Baker Marionette Theater, 1345 W. First St., (213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com. April 23-25, 10:30 a.m. and April 27-28, 2:30 p.m.: Come join Mama and Papa Goat and 100 more of the Bob Baker marionettes for a musical “day on the farm.” Expect everything from dancing scarecrows to tap dancing bullfrogs warbling “Shine on Harvest Moon.” Call for reservations. Dance + Design II Gensler, 500 S. Figueroa St. or dacamera.org. April 27, 2, 7 and 9 p.m.: The Da Camera society presents choreographer Lincoln Jones in an informative program of ballet demonstrations and routine premieres. Fela! Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. April 26, 8 p.m., April 27, 2 and 8 p.m. and April 28, 1 and 6:30 p.m.: Michelle Williams stars in the

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April 22, 2013

Downtown News 27

Celebrating 40 Years

A Piano Master Holds Court photot by Decca/Felix Broede

returning musical retelling of Afrobeat legend Fela Kuti’s life. Through May 5. Habitat L.A. Theater Center, 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. April 25-27, 8 p.m. and April 28, 3 p.m.: Janet and her mother Margaret live on Mapleview Lane. It’s the perfect neighborhood until Lewis Chance buys a house on their street with the intent to open a group home for troubled adolescents. Raine, unable to respond emotionally when her mother dies, finds herself at this group home, in a community that has little tolerance for its newest residents. Doh! Joe Turner’s Come and Gone Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. April 24-26, 8 p.m., April 27, 2:30 and 8 p.m. and April 28, 1 and 6:30 p.m.: With so many forces at work — mystical, emotional, financial — and the looming fear that Joe Turner will spirit them back to the oppressive South, an unlikely family of strangers must forge new identities in this August Wilson play directed by Phylicia Rashad. Through June 9. Shades L.A. Theater Center, 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. April 25-27, 8 p.m. and April 28, 3 p.m.: The politics of war, race and sex collide with echoes of the past in a drama about what happens to family ties when oppositional politics threaten flare. Through May 5. Villa + Discurso REDCAT, 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. April 25-27, 8:30 p.m. and April 28, 7 p.m.: Chilean director Guillermo Calderon’s lean, literary theater works are powerful explorations of political legacies distilled into tightly wrought drama. See story p. 23.

J

ean-Yves Thibaudet, the preeminent French master of the musical ivories, is in town again to play with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Thibaudet will lend his talents to a program at Walt Disney Concert Hall anchored by Maurice Ravel’s La Valse and Daphnis et Chloe, along with Saint Saens’ piano concerto no. 1. The shows are Thursday, April 26, at 8 p.m. and April 27-28 at 2 p.m. If you can’t snag (or afford) tickets to see JYT at Disney Hall, you can observe him school young players for free as part of an open master class he’ll preside over in Zipper Hall at the Colburn School at 3:45 p.m. on April 25. Walt Disney Concert Hall is at 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil. com. The Colburn School is at 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu.

CLASSICAL MUSIC Monday, april 22 Christian Wolff at REDCAT REDCAT, 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. April 22 and 23, 8:30 p.m.: The celebrated avant garde composer plays two nights of material from his own catalog.

April 26, 8 p.m. and April 27-28, 2 p.m.: Lionel Bringuier conducts the L.A. Philharmonic and JeanYves Thibaudet guests on piano through pieces by Saint-Saens and Ravel. Center Stage Strings Gala Concert with James Ehnes Zipper Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu. 7:30 p.m.: Colburn faculty member Danielle Belen hosts a benefit gala to support her summer program for musically gifted children.

Thursday, april 25 Jean-Yves Thibaudet Master Class Zipper Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu. 3:45 p.m.: On the eve of his three featured nights with the L.A. Phil, the master pianist shares the wealth of his knowledge.

sunday, april 28 Anton Smirnoff & Katia Popov Recital Zipper Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu. 7:30 p.m.: Katia Popov, concertmaster for the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, performs with Colburn student Anton Smirnoff.

Friday, april 26 Bringuier and Thibaudet Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil.com.

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April 22, 2013

Downtown News 29

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SCAN) The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles compUters/it lofts/UNfUrNisHeD and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles. MY COMPUTER works. ComOne copy per person. puter problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad fiNaNcial services internet connections - Fix it now! The original Live/Work Lofts Professional, U.S.-based technifrom $1,295 GET FREE of credit card debt cians. $25 off service. Call for imCafes, Bars, Shops, Galleries, now! Cut payments by up to half. mediate help. 1-888-865-0271 Parking adjacent. Pets no charge Stop creditors from calling. 888(Cal-SCAN) call 213.253.4777 416-2691. (Cal-SCAN)

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1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 Continued on next page phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com email: realpeople@downtownnews.com facebook:

the LOFT expert! L.A. Downtown News

AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: YojiFamed Cole,1920’S Catherine Holloway, The Only Stand-Alone Carriage House In The Miramonte Sol Ortasse Terrace. This Renovated Home Is Preserved With Many Original Architectural Details And Features; Wd Flrs, Crwn Mldngs, Vntge Tile, Brkfst Bar, Claw Foot sAlEs AssistANt: Claudia Hernandez Tub & Beautiful Views. 2 bds & 1 bth. $429,000

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Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin

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Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin

EVER CONSIDER a Reverse Mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home & increase cash flow! Safe & Effective! Call Now for your free DVD! Call Now 888-698-3165. (Cal-SCAN)

Los Angeles Downtown News SENIOR APARTMENTS 62 + Studio $810 1 Bedroom $929. 1264 W.sale First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 lofts for 2 bdrm. $1112. Balcony, Full phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 Kitchen, A/C, Clubhouse, BBQ, web: DowntownNews.com • email: realpeople@downtownnews.com Resource room, Laundry, SEC facebook: TheLoftExpertGroup.com

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editor: Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Dave Denholm, Jeff Favre, Greg Fischer, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Ryan E. Smith, Marc Porter Zasada

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

Monthly from $600 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

Heery Intl is seeking qualifications from CBE firms interested in providing admin support, doc ctrl, and PM services for the City of LA RFP for P/CM & SUPPORT SERVICES FOR RANCHO LOS AMIGOS NORTH CAMUS FACILITIES. Please submit quals by 4/29/2013 to Jan Coffindaffer, Fax 206-587-0469, jcoffind@heery.com. This RFQ shall not obligate Heery Intl to contract with, or reimburse costs to, respondents hereto.

AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Yoji Cole, Catherine Holloway, Sol Ortasse sAlEs AssistANt: Claudia Hernandez circulAtioN: Jessica Tarr distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla

Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins

The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard

One copy per person.


30 Downtown News

April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years Continued from previous page

EASY AS

AUTOS PRE-OWNED 2005 NISSAN ARMADA SE 5.6L V8, Silver/Blk, Leather, Only 38K Miles. NI4111 / 5N706134 Only...$15,999 call 888-8385089 www.downtownnissan. com

DowntownNews.com makes placing a classified ad in the L.A. Downtown News is easier than ever. Your ad will appear online and in our publication in a couple of easy steps. • Online ads will appear immediately after they are approved. • Print ads must be received before Thursday at noon PST to be processed for the following Monday's edition. Deadlines subject to change for special issues and holidays.

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ANNOUNCEMENTS PERsONAls CHAT WITH Local Men - Local Men are waiting for you! Call Livelinks now. 800-291-3969. Women talk free! (Cal-SCAN) MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-800945-3392. (Cal-SCAN) sPEciAl GREEtiNGs HYMAN KOSMAN Productions. Pre-Production. “Where are the girl’s I hired?” Drive by comedian.

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________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

Restrictions: Offer good on private party ads only. Ads must be pre-paid by cash, check or credit card. Certain classifications excluded. Deadline: Thursday at noon for next issue.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


April 22, 2013

Downtown News 31

Celebrating 40 Years

Notices CASH BUYER, 1970 and Before, Comic Books, Toys, Sports, entire collections wanted. I travel to you and Buy Everything you have! Call Brian Today: 1-800617-3551 (Cal-SCAN) DID YOU KNOW that Ten Million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million+ Californians. For brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (CalSCAN)

CA$H FOR diabetic test strips!! Don’t throw boxes away-Help others Unopened /Unexpired boxes only. All Brands Considered! Call Anytime! 24hrs/7days

LEGAL civil summoNs IN THE FAMILY COURT OF 13TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FOR COUNTY OF GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA CASE #2012-DR-23-5492 NOTICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION FLORIDALMA MARTINEZ, PLAINTIFF, VS. OSCAR MARTINEZ, DEFENDANT.

writing and signed by you or your attorney and must state your address or address of your attorney, if signed by your attorney. This 6 Day of December, 2012. Kenneth G. Southerlin, Jr., Attorney for Plaintiff SC Bar #71891 P.O. Box 2077 Greer, SC 29650 Telephone: 864-801-0540 Pub. 4/22, 4/29, 5/6/2013

DATE OF FILING: DECEMBER 6, 2012 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT: OSCAR MARTINEZ YOU ARE HEARBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint upon the subscriber at P.O. Box 2077, (915 West Poinsett Street), Greer, South Carolina 29652-2077, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court of judgment by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Your answer must be in

Police Permit NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR POLICE PERMIT Notice is hereby given that application has been made to the Board of Police Commissioners for a permit to conduct a MASSAGE BUSINESS.

NAME OF APPLICANT: Syscation, Inc., Jimmy Feng, Deanna Ma DOING BUSINESS AS: Angel Massage LOCATED AT: 2614 Arthur St. Los Angeles, CA 90065 Any person desiring to protest the issuance of this permit shall make a written protest before May 16, 2013, to the: LOS ANGELES POLICE COMMISSION 100 West First Street Los Angeles, CA 90012 Upon receipt of written protests, protesting persons will be notified of date, time and place for hearing. BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS Pub. 4/22, 4/29/2013

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NEW ’13 Chevy Volt Buy for only

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Plus tax, 39 month closed end lease on approved credit. $0 Sec. Dep. $5359 due at Signing. (Excludes taxes, title, other options & dealer fees). Residual $14,280. Model # 13113. $0.15/mile over 12,000 miles/year. 5 At this Price.

Plus tax 36-month closed end lease on approved VW Credit., $1,999 due at signing. (Excludes title, tax, 1st mo. pymt, options and dealer fees). MSRP $17,470 with manual trans. $0 security deposit. $0.20/mile over 30,000 miles. # 277863. Offer ends April 30, 2013.

Plus tax 39-month closed end lease on above average tier approved credit., $2999 due at signing. (Excludes title, tax, 1st mo. pymt, options and dealer fees). $0 security deposit. $0.20/mile over 12,000 miles/yr. 1 at this offer # C130048/008216.

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2002 Nissan Altima Sedan ................

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2011 Chevy Aveo 5 LT .......................

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2007 Nissan Altima Sedan ............... Only 42,000 Miles, Must See, N130227-1/7N418393

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2005 Nissan Armada SE ................... 5.6L V8, Silver/Black, Leather, 38K miles, NI4111/5N706134

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2006 BMW 325i Sedan Auto, Black/Black, 4 Wh. ABS, Alloys, Loaded. V130512-1 / KX38072

2011 Mitsubishi Galant Sedan

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2010 Scion TC Hatchback Auto, Silver/Black, Moonroof, CD, ABS. ZV2088-1 / A0304134

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NEW ’13 Audi A4 2.0T Lease for only

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Plus tax 36-month closed end lease on approved above average credit. In lieu of factory rebate. $2,669 due at signing.. $25,220 MSRP, $15,246 residual. $0.15/mile over 36,000 miles. Model #1223. Offer ends April 30, 2013.

+ tax + Lic, 30 Month closed end lease on approved Tier 1 credit. $2,999 CAP reduction + first payment + acquisition fees. Total due at signing $4,591, $0 security deposit, 10K Miles per year. 25¢ per mile excess. MSRP $38,755. 5 at this price.

2011 Toyota Corolla LE .....................

2010 Mercedes E350 Coupe

2010 Audi A3 2.0T Wagon ................

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2012 Toyota Camry LE ..................... Certified, Black/Gray, Low Miles, Gas Saver! TU0175R/040209

$18,988

2010 Toyota Prius II

Certified, Auto, Blue/Black, Low Miles, Gas Saver. TU0186/420628

Certified, Palladium Silver, Prem Pkg 1, Nav. 6312C / AF013903

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2010 Mercedes S550 Sedan Certified, 5.5L V8, Black/Gray, Only 15K Miles, 1 owner. 6670C / A349056

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NEW ’13 Porsche Boxster Lease for only

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+ tax 42 mo. Closed end lease on approved credit. $0 Sec. Dep. $0 Down plus first month payment, license and registration, and bank acquisition fee. Must qualify for the New Owner Appreciation or Audi Loyalty Rebate of $1000. $0.25 per miles over 10,000 miles/ year. 2 at this offer DA175839, DA175793.

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2010 911 Carrera S Coupe .............. Certified, Silver/Blk, 1 owner, XM Radio, Bose. ZP1564/720527

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2012 Porsche 911 4S Coupe Certified, Blk/Blk, Only 3000 Miles, Fully Loaded. CS720423

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2011 Porsche Panamera Turbo Certified, Blue/Cognac, 20” Wheels, Fully Loaded. BL090588

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Plus 112 More New & Used In Stock & On Sale!


32 Downtown News

April 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Travel Continued from page 24 Lincoln dealer. Maddux, who had his primary dealership at 2300 S. Figueroa St. and a used car lot at 1059 S. Figueroa St., had founded his own air service two years earlier. Also using Ford Trimotor planes, Maddux had one route: Los Angeles to San Diego. In November 1929, TAT and Maddux merged — although nobody officially called it that — to become TAT Maddux Air Lines. An executive office was opened at 530 W. Sixth St. with another office on Hollywood Boulevard. The combined venture now offered, in addition to the plane-train route, air-only service from Glendale to San Francisco, San Diego, Bakersfield and Fresno. The air-rail link continued on, losing money by the day. In July 1930, TAT Maddux merged most of its operations with Western Air Express, forming Transcontinental and Western Air (TWA). Western Air Express retained some routes on its own and became

Western Airlines a decade later. By October 1930, the new TWA abandoned the rail portion of the route and began linking the New York and Los Angeles areas with all-air service.  Hopkins, a former military pilot who wrote two books on the early days of aviation, said TAT lost $2.7 million from the time of its incorporation until the merger. Why didn’t it work? The trip “was fast,” he wrote, “but it wasn’t that fast. It only beat the train by 24 hours, and the train was reliable. A businessman could make an appointment and keep it. With TAT he might be able to keep an appointment one day sooner.” There was also, of course, the Great Depression, which hit the country not long after TAT began operating. Given that it put millions of people out of work, fewer of them needed to travel for business, clearly TAT’s primary target customer. Even if TAT had managed to hang on a bit longer, it might have been done in by the arrival of the Douglas DC-3 in 1936. The twin-engine plane could carry up to 32 passengers — three times the Trimotor’s capacity — and, with a cruising speed of 200 miles an hour, could cross the country in a single day with as few as three fueling stops. 

Clippers Continued from page 7 the rough-and-tumble Memphis Grizzlies, before falling to the Spurs in the second round. This year has been even better. The Clippers won the division title and cuckooed the Lakers, winning four out of four games against their arena-mates. The Lakers are now the seventh seed in the Western Conference and were not even assured of a playoff berth until the last day of the season. The Clippers are fourth and have home-court advantage against the same Grizzlies. I don’t think the Clippers can win it all. LeBron James and the Miami Heat are simply too good to fail. But I honestly believe that if the Clippers play the kind of team ball that they did early in the season when they won 17 games in a row, then they have a legitimate chance to reach the Finals. It’ll be tough to beat the Thunder, but the Clippers have a far better shot than the Lakers. So here I am, hopeful again. Lucy won’t pull the ball away. I believe. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

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Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

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museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

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On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

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04-22-13