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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

40

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NEWS Volume 42, Number 12

EBRATING EL

YEARS

Since 1972

A Filming Fight at Grand Park

Celebrate Easter in Downtown

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16

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

March 25, 2013

The Big CrossFit Battle Suddenly, Downtown Has Six Gyms Specializing in the Rigorous Exercise Regimen

photo by Gary Leonard

Downtowners work out at Trojan CrossFit, which opened in the Arts District in November. The intense exercise program involves an ever-changing regimen of weight lifting with agility and circuit training. by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

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rossFit, a burgeoning fitness craze that drives participants to compete against their last performance in the gym, is about to introduce a new kind of competition in Downtown. This test, however, is strictly business. Downtown is now home to four licensed CrossFit gyms. In a one-mile radius, there are more CrossFit gyms than there are grocery stores, movie theaters or bookshops. A fifth gym

planning to open April 1 is seeking affiliation. Another new facility doesn’t label itself as a CrossFit gym, but it offers a workout based on the same routines. The gyms are opening as more young customers are drawn to CrossFit’s intense strength and endurance-building regimen. The routine revolves around ever-changing “Workouts of the Day,” or WODs, that incorporate elements of Olympic weight lifting with agility and circuit training. Although only 10 years old, CrossFit has grown rapidly since ESPN started broadcasting the Reebok-sponsored CrossFit Games competition in 2011.

The new arrivals include Cameron Prestwich, who partnered with Matthew Newhouse — both of them are L.A. County Deputy Sheriffs — to open the 9,000-square-foot Trojan CrossFit in the Arts District in November. He’s banking on the trend’s rapid growth and Downtown’s central location. “It’s more mainstream than you might realize,” said Prestwich. “All you’re going to see is more and more. It’s a big word of mouth thing and CrossFit works.” It remains to be seen, however, whether Downtown is big see CrossFit, page 11

Blowing Up and Melting Down AEG Leadership Flap Is Just One of Seven Unexpected Downtown Twists by Jon RegaRdie executiVe editoR

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n March 14, Downtown was blindsided by the news that Anschutz Entertainment Group President and CEO Tim Leiweke was out the door. People treated it as the biggest surprise since the time that a gaggle of Greek soldiers hid in the belly of a wooden horse. Maybe we should not have been surprised at all. Although no one foresaw The Great Leiweke Exit of 2013, it fits in perfectly THE REGARDIE REPORT

in a year in which seven prominent local businesses, institutions or offices are blowing up or melting down. Wherever you look,

a leading Downtown-based entity is enmeshed in a struggle for supremacy or even survival. The Leiweke-Anschutz continental-sized divide is only the start. Downtown’s leading museum, MOCA is under financial duress. Then there’s the community’s biggest media property, the Los Angeles Times, which faces an uncertain future as hawks (and some vultures) circle a publication that is being sold. That’s not the end of it. The community’s two biggest political jobs are up for grabs, the most powerful religious institution is dogged by controversy and even a tall building is under attack. Here’s how it all shakes out. Mayoral Muck: The March 5 city election didn’t clear up much see Melting Down, page 13

photo by Gary Leonard

Tim Leiweke’s departure from Anschutz Entertainment Group was so thorny that company chair Phil Anschutz (shown here) actually decided to speak to the media. He had not done an interview in about 30 years.


2 Downtown News

AROUNDTOWN Fill Out the Demographic Survey and Help Bring Trader Joe’s Downtown

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very couple years, Los Angeles Downtown News partners with the Downtown Center Business Improve­ ment District to compile the Downtown L.A. Demographic Study. Before the comprehensive guide to the residential and employee makeup of the community is released, however, something important is needed: Your input. The information gathering stage for the study has started, and all Downtown stakeholders are being asked to fill out the survey at downtownla. com. The numbers will be crunched to detail who lives and works in Downtown and, more importantly, it will be used to help lure stores, restaurants and other needed businesses to the Central City. According to BID officials, past surveys helped bring Ralphs and City Target to Downtown. There are even questions on the survey about Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods. Surveys take about 10 minutes and can be filled out through April 14. Entries can be anonymous, though those who provide their name and contact information are entered in a drawing to win prizes from Downtown businesses.

Terrifying Sleepover At State Park

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March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

he peaceful tranquility of Los Angeles State Historic Park will turn into a 12hour nightmare on June 7-8. Last week, the company Ten Thirty One Productions an-

TAKE MY PICTURE GARY LEONARD

nounced plans to hold the Great Horror Campout at the park on the edge of Chinatown. Inspired by 1980s slasher films and with a slogan that states “Only the Dawning Sun Will Save You,” the event will start at 8 p.m. with horror movies and bonfires. Then, things get freaky with activities such as a macabre scavenger hunt called the Hell Hunt; it will include a sacrificial voodoo ritual and digging through roadkill. Organizers warn that Campout performers can, and likely will, touch the participants, which may mean people being bound, chained and subjected to simulated torture — all in the name of fun, of course. “The first rule is that we can change the rules… when we want, for any reason we want, and without notice,” said Melissa Carbone, president of Ten Thirty One Productions, in a statement Tickets are $149 per person and include a one-night stay in a tent, parking, dinner and, for those who survive, breakfast.

Apartment Complex Near L.A. Live Sells

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RG, a Century City real estate services firm, has purchased a three-story apartment complex near L.A. Live that it plans to turn into luxury rentals. The firm paid $3.05 million for what it said is a 100-year-old building at 916 Georgia St. The 18,000-square-foot structure is on the same block as the under-construction Marriott hotels complex, north of Olympic Boulevard. TRG said in a statement that it plans to spend $1 million on upgrades to the building by March 2014. The acquisition marks the first of what the firm pledges will be several Downtown buys. The

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Ending Coal in L.A.

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Al Gore and Mayor Villaraigosa

company is in escrow to buy another 68 Downtown units (officials declined to identify the property) as part of a plan to invest $50 million in the local market. TRG was represented in the deal by broker Guillermo Ma of Concord Real Estate Services.

Chinatown ‘Nuisance’ Liquor Store Quietly Closes

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acy Liquor, a Chinatown shop that many community stakeholders long complained about, quietly closed about a month ago. The departure of the store at Cesar Chavez Avenue and Spring Street comes eight months after area leaders urged a city zoning administrator to revoke Macy’s permit to sell alcohol, partly on the grounds that the shop’s penchant for selling single cans of beer

March 22, 2013

exacerbated the struggles of area homeless individuals. The zoning official did not revoke Macy’s permit, but did issue a prohibition against single can sales. David Gee, the son of property owner Faye Gee, who had advocated on behalf of Macy Liquor owner Wah Tung Fong, declined to comment. According to a host of Chinatown and El Pueblo-area businesses and community organizations, Macy had long been a go-to spot for area homeless individuals seeking single servings of beer, liquor and wine. Those same people, stakeholders complained, panhandled, appeared drunk in public, urinated on sidewalks and harassed tourists. Last year, Gee said it was unfair to blame Fong for the behavior of panhandlers, who he argued would not go away if Macy were shuttered. No plans for a future occupant of the space at 111 Cesar Chavez Ave. have been announced. see Around Town, page 12


March 25, 2013

Downtown News 3

Celebrating 40 Years

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4 Downtown News

Celebrating 40 Years

March 25, 2013

EDITORIALS Late Is Better Than Never

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis

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n January, the Metro at Chinatown Senior Lofts opened. A couple things set the project at 808 N. Spring St. apart from the scores of housing and other developments unfolding in Downtown Los Angeles: 1) The project, as the name implies, is for senior citizens, though the hip design elements destroy any clichés of what a complex for older people should look like, and 2) this is one of a handful of Downtown projects that, after being delayed for years, finally made it to the finish line, even if the end result is far different than what was originally envisioned. Los Angeles Downtown News recently reported on the opening of the project on the eastern edge of Chinatown near both Los Angeles State Historic Park and the community’s Gold Line station. It is a fantastic effort both for what it delivers to the neighborhood and for what it demonstrates about rebounding from a down economy. The project first generated attention in 2004, when the KOR Group acquired the site with plans to turn it into a market-rate residential complex. This was exciting and seemed doable. KOR, after all, had already recorded a great success in the heart of Downtown by transforming a defunct oil headquarters into the Pegasus Lofts. It was one of the largest adaptive reuse projects in the Central City and helped set the stage for other housing developments. In Chinatown, however, things did not proceed as smoothly. KOR started the project, but then the recession hit. Although much of the interior was gutted, things went no further. Like some other developments in Downtown, the project ground to a halt. In this instance, Downtown was lucky that a local experienced developer eventually stepped up. The Meta Housing Corp. acquired the property in 2011 for $8.8 million. After securing funds from a variety of sources, construction began anew. Now the two-building complex holds 123 apartments for low-income seniors. The project is a testament to numerous things, among them Meta Housing’s sense of the market and willingness to try something different than what others provide. Given the developer’s track record, this is not surprising. The company is one of the few forprofit developers of affordable housing, and its standards are high — before the recession, it opened three top-notch low-income apartment complexes in City West, among them the $25 million Emerald Terrace. In this case, we like the fact that the project is pitched to senior citizens earning less than 60% of the area household median income. Downtown has a wealth of developments that cater to young, fairly affluent individuals. The community benefits by having residents of all ages and income levels. The fact that this project is near a Metro line is another benefit. This is another case of the unexpected working out in Downtown’s favor. The project took a lot longer to open than anyone expected, but in this case, as in a few others, it’s better late than never.

Panel Makes Wrong Choice Rejecting Booze at New Genesis Restaurant

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ne of the most interesting Downtown projects of the past few years is the New Genesis apartments. When the complex on Main just north of Fifth Street opened last November, it seemed to herald a new way of thinking in Central City housing. Although the residential units are directed at lowincome individuals, the building also contains elements that appeal to the surrounding community. Make that, the building is supposed to contain elements that appeal to the surrounding community. That may never come to fruition, as on March 12 a city panel shot down a bid to serve alcohol in a ground-floor restaurant. The ruling throws the viability of the eatery into question. It also sets a potentially damaging precedent for the Historic Core. While the Central Area Planning Commission was trying to do the right thing and watch out for some at-risk members of the community, the rejection of the liquor license for the proposed restaurant Great Balls on Tires (it would specialize in gourmet meatballs) instead is a slap in the face to the wishes of most neighborhood stakeholders. It was the wrong decision and needs to be reversed. This might be a situation where the local council representative or another political leader steps up to right a wrong. Initially, a conditional use permit for alcohol sales was granted to the project developed by Skid Row Housing Trust. SRHT is an experienced provider of low-income housing, having created thousands of residential units for the formerly homeless. All of the developer’s recent projects have included social services such as job training and drug treatment in the building. In the New Genesis those amenities are situated around an interior courtyard. That is important to note because it demonstrates SRHT’s track record and commitment to helping people recover. Yet in this instance, officials felt there was no serious risk in including a restaurant that serves alcohol. The restaurant also was a response to community input — during the development process SRHT worked with the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council and the Historic Downtown Los Angeles Business Improvement District to ensure that the property would fit with the neighborhood. An active streetscape propelled by restaurant patrons would accomplish this, those entities concluded. However, the permit that was initially granted was later appealed. That led to some testimony that, on the surface, sounds reasonable: Opponents argued that in-house booze sales would be

insensitive to any residents who are struggling with sobriety (not all of them are). The opponents also charged that a restaurant with alcohol goes counter to SRHT’s mission. The Central Area Planning Commission bought the claims, but that was a mistake. The opponents’ arguments might make sense in a vacuum, but the panel did not take into account the context of the neighborhood and the developer. First off, SRHT deserves respect for the work it has done. As mentioned above, it has an extensive history, and its executives and employees probably know more about helping people in recovery than most of the well-intentioned opponents of the liquor license. SRHT’s track record should count for a lot. Also, it is not as if rejecting the liquor license changes the neighborhood. The surrounding area is rife with restaurants, bars and liquor stores. Immediately south of the New Genesis is an Italian restaurant that serves alcohol. The Skid Row dive bar King Eddy’s Saloon is only one block away. Anyone who wants a drink can find one in no time. Temptation is part of life for anyone in recovery, whether they live in the New Genesis or an upscale community like the Palisades. People turning their lives around face temptation dozens of times every day and have to be able to resist it. Additionally, one has to consider the make-up of Great Balls on Tires. The restaurant was not slated to have a standalone bar, meaning patrons could not enter and just toss back a shot. Instead, customers would need to sit down and order food. If getting a drink is the goal, there are easier and cheaper ways to do that nearby. Now, it is unknown whether Great Balls will move forward. As in any restaurant, alcohol sales are a key driver of revenue. It is possible this move will doom the street-level space to being empty. One of the dangers here is that this ruling could lead to others. Those who helped kill the Great Balls on Tires liquor license will be emboldened by their victory. They could fight future efforts to open bars or nightclubs in the Historic Core, and maybe next time it will be a restaurant down the block rather than in the same building as a housing complex. This is hardly the type of precedent that should be set — after all, in most instances these are mid-level or upscale establishments, not dive bars selling beer for a buck. These businesses are an important part of the neighborhood’s progress. The wrong move was made here, but it does not have to stand. Reverse this foolish decision and let the meatball establishment open, complete with booze.


March 25, 2013

Downtown News 5

Opinion

The Readers Respond

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must be missing something. One side of this argument is doing things illegally and does not want to compromise. The other side is asking for legal access to their own building and is willing to compromise. Both parties could come out of this as winners. So why is this even a discussion? —Patricia Berman, Feb. 8, 12:14 p.m.

Website Comments on Redesigning Pershing Square, The Battle at St. Vincent Court and More

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very week Los Angeles Downtown News gets online comments to the stories we publish. These are some of the most interesting responses. Additional comments are welcome at ladowntownnews.com. Regarding the editorial “The Future of Pershing Square,” which includes suggested design changes, published Feb. 25

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lease don’t forget the growing community of families Downtown who are badly in need of more childfriendly park space. Right now the only playground serving all of Downtown is at Grand Hope Park next to FIDM in South Park — not convenient for families in the Historic Core, Little Tokyo and the Arts District. The Grand Hope Park playground is where parents came together to launch Downtown’s first charter elementary school. Playgrounds serve as community hubs, bringing together families and creating strong ties between neighbors. A playground at Pershing Square could help make it a true community center for DTLA. —Alisa Rivera, Feb. 26, 12:36 p.m.

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agree with Alisa completely! We have too many dog parks Downtown and no place for the kids to play. —L.A. Love, Feb. 26, 8:33 p.m.

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he city could do worse than follow the lead of Grand Park, which, like Pershing Square, is built over parking garages. Put it back at street level, add a lot more green and open space and return it to the look of a more traditional park. Keep the historic monuments, however, but perhaps not all clumped together. —Randy Henderson, Feb. 27, 3:54 p.m.

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e’re not New York or Toronto — this is L.A.! Come up to ground level, cross the street and enjoy our great weather as Downtown evolves into a great city. This is the sort of development we need and, BTW, the architects should go to the maximum height possible. —Cary Adams, March 2, 8:35 p.m. Regarding the article “The Battle for St. Vincent Court,” about the city’s order to remove the outdoor tables and chairs, published online Feb. 7, by Ryan Vaillancourt

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atricia, one side is trying to widen the sidewalk to keep the tables out of the alley, while the other side only wants parking spaces for two trucks on a public street. Nobody even mentions that there is another access on the other side of the theater where the alley on that side is completely empty. Should a dozen or so hard-working merchants be driven out of business because of the ambition of one man who owns several other buildings nearby and doesn’t even need the income that comes from filming several times a year? —Arek Demirkiran, Feb. 11, 11:52 p.m.

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recall the pre-[1994 design by Ricardo] Legorreta Pershing Square with some fondness. Yes, it was populated by some derelicts, but also by residents of the nearby Bunker Hill neighborhood. I walked through it as a youngster holding my father’s hand and saw a park that reflected the active life of the city. With all its characteristics as well as its questionable visitors, the place was still more peoplefriendly than it is now. For successful park ideas within a city, one can look to Chicago or New York, Paris or Mexico City. Less cement and more green space is a must. A small fountain and General John Pershing’s statue would be nice. As in all the cities mentioned, a police presence keeps the place safe for everyone. —Rafa Chavez, March 1, 8:30 a.m.

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or those who witnessed and had to flee from gang violence in Pershing Square in the mid-1980s, a return to suburbanoid sylvan turf would only bring back the good old days, ha-ha. Make the place an altar of conviviality, a place of transcendence. A combination of art and magic is the only way forward. —Juanito Crandello, March 2, 9:44 p.m.

7 Eleven Afternoon Staff (above left to right): Angel, Frank and Marco. (left): Manuel, Propane Manager.

Our 7-Eleven / 76 / Propane staff is here for you 24/7. We take pride in our store and it shows. Stop in and say hi, we look forward to seeing you!

Regarding the article “The Buildings That Shaped Downtown,” part of Downtown News’ 40th anniversary issue, published Feb. 18, by Ryan Vaillancourt

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he building looks great, with the exception of the tacky giant toothpick added to the top to pretend that it is taller. I wonder, how huge and obnoxious is the lit-up advertising going to be? That aspect was left out of the illustrations shown with the story. Downtown doesn’t need a garish, thousand-foot tall Times Square electronic billboard —Travis Sky, Feb. 11, 11:52 p.m.

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trange that the rather monumental rebuilding of the Central Library, completed in 1993, is not mentioned in the cultural section of the story. Is the Orpheum Theatre really more important than the second largest library in the U.S.? —Glen Creason, Feb. 20, 3:58 p.m.

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6 Downtown News

March 25, 2013

Opinion

Dorfman Does Downtown A Housing Developer Rediscovers His Past as a Film Producer, and a Star Community Is Born by Leonard HiLL

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t started slightly over two years ago. I was having lunch at Church and State. At first I didn’t recognize the attractive, dark-haired woman who was walking toward my table. But the reunion that followed changed my life. Twelve years prior to that fateful day, I had abandoned a 30-year career in television and started a real estate development partnership called Linear City. Thanks in large part GUEST OPINION

to the tenacity of my partner, Yuval Bar-Zemer, we had successfully repurposed a handful of old Downtown Los Angeles buildings, most notably the Toy Factory and Biscuit Company lofts in the Arts District. It took me a moment to realize that the dark-haired woman was Wendy Kout, a gifted writer who had done a TV pilot for my production company some 20 years before. Wendy was a Valley girl. Though she had travelled the world, Wendy, like so many Angelenos, had never explored Downtown. I offered to show her around. I was reminded of Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz. Wendy was disoriented at first, then mesmerized. Removed from the beige sameness of the San Fernando Valley, my old collaborator was completely captivated by the 24/7 Technicolor vibrancy of Downtown. I was about to leave for a week in Montana. Wendy moved into my loft at the Toy Factory during my absence. By the time I returned, Wendy had converted to orthodox urbanism. Her enthusiasm for the revival of Downtown was infectious. I momentarily forgot that I had left the film world. Wendy and I started to kick around ideas for a movie based on her discoveries. Now, nearly three years later, that movie, Dorfman in Love, is coming out. It debuts this week at the Downtown Independent The movie stars Sara Rue and Elliott Gould. It’s an antic, romantic comedy that follows the transformation of a 20-something girl from the Valley and her deeply depressed father who end up stuck in Downtown for one week.

photo by Gary Leonard

Arts District housing developer Leonard Hill produced the new film Dorfman in Love. It is set almost entirely Downtown and screens this week at the Downtown Independent.

Dorfman in Love is ultimately a story of reinvention. We purposely picked locations that had been brought back to life to underscore the theme of transformation. We wanted to explore how lives, just like old buildings, can be reimagined and repurposed. Dorfman in Love is a tribute to the revitalized buildings that have sparked the Downtown renaissance. Not surprisingly, the key location is the Toy Factory Lofts, a hulking 1923 concrete warehouse on Industrial Street. It was the first building Yuval and I did in Downtown (it opened in 2004). It was the base for the evolution of this portion of the Arts District, and it’s the home base for Rue’s character, Deb Dorfman. Views from the rooftop pool at Toy create the visual compass for the film.

Then there is The Edison, the remarkable conversion of an abandoned power station that is a tribute to the imagination of Andrew Meieran. He turned the cavernous space in the basement of the converted Higgins Building into a bar in 2007. The “industrial cathedral,” as Meieran once termed it, has helped people connect with Downtown after dark. Similarly, it is the setting for a pivotal scene that leads to a reconnection between father and daughter. The Flower Market provides the visually vibrant background that introduces Rue’s character to the extraordinary ethnic diversity of Downtown. From there the film moves to Santee Alley, the wildly colorful and bizarre bazaar that is the antithesis of the plastic and not-so-fantastic malls of suburbia. Pershing Square, an iconic if not completely successful landmark, appears three different times in the movie. The fountains and walkways provided our director, Brad Leong, with a compelling visual backdrop against which to film some of the expository scenes that might otherwise have lacked cinematic dimension. The litany of locations that Deb explores, and that give life and breadth to the film, continues. Deb emerges from Shareen’s Vintage, an easy-to-miss clothing store on Spring Street near Los Angeles State Historic Park, with a completely reconceived wardrobe. Angels Flight, the Central Library and Little Tokyo all appear in supporting roles. Then there is Chinatown, where Hop Louie, the restaurant and bar with the pagoda design, is the setting for the film’s climax. It seems appropriate that Dorfman in Love is premiering at the Downtown Independent. After all, the Main Street venue once known as the Linda Lea Theater had its own transformation, reopening in 2007. It has become an architecturally unique showcase that is committed to supporting filmmakers who choose to work outside the studio system. Hopefully, Dorfman in Love will engage the Downtown community and, as it travels the country and the globe, introduce millions to the remarkably remade place we call home. Leonard Hill is a partner in Linear City. Information on the film is at dorfmaninlove.com.

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March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Downtown News 7


8 Downtown News

March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Madness Descends on Downtown NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament Is in Los Angeles For the First Time in 20 Years by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

photo by Gary Leonard

L.A. Live has lured huge crowds for basketball events such as the 2010 Finals between the Lakers and Boston Celtics. This week, Staples Center will have a similar vibe as it hosts the NCAA tournament Sweet 16 and Elite Eight games.

are L.A.-based,” Herold said. “We’ll have a good presence down there and we have a marketing plan for the week to get our name out in front of our visitors.” If USC and UCLA seem like more natural fits, they may have been dissuaded by an NCAA rule that forbids teams from playing in regions that are hosted by their school. Of course, that conflict would not have come into play this year, as USC didn’t qualify for the tournament and UCLA is playing in the Southern region. Hosting also requires a serious commitment of resources. In addition to helping organize the tournament, Pepperdine will have some 100 employees and volunteers staffing the events, Herold said. While the regional finals are considered high-profile attractions, Schloessman and Zeidman said the real prize would be a Final Four and Championship. Those are unlikely to come to Los Angeles any time soon, however, because the NCAA insists on using domed football stadiums, which have far larger capacities. AEG has indicated that it would aggressively court the Final Four if Farmers Field, the proposed Downtown football stadium, ever gets built. More information on fan festivities on March 28-30 are at lalive.com. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

metro.net

We can’t go anywhere without you. With over one million boardings a day, Metro moves a lot of people, including Andrea Cole. A Metro customer since 2005, Andrea commutes with her child every day on Line 442 to get to work and school. She also rides the system often to visit family and to have fun at downtown destinations like LA Live. She enjoys Metro’s easy access from home, convenient service and helpful operators. Metro bus operator Walter Aguilar, who nominated Andrea for recognition, said, “Andrea always takes the time to express her gratitude for Metro service and is also very helpful to other riders.” Metro salutes Andrea and all of our valued customers.

“I ride Metro every day because it really helps me get around town, and also cuts down on parking costs and the stress of being stuck in tra;c.” – andrea cole

13-1663rb ©2013 lacmta

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os Angeles may be a premier sports city, but when it comes to March Madness, the NCAA college basketball tournament has long steered clear of Lakerland. Now, nearly 20 years after USC last hosted the regional finals at the Sports Arena, the tournament is landing in Downtown. The West Region Sweet 16 games take place Thursday, March 28, and the Elite Eight contest follows on Saturday. The winner of that game advances to the Final Four. While Staples Center hosted the PAC-12 tournament for 11 years before it decamped to Las Vegas this year, the 14year old venue has never held March Madness games. Staples also secured the bid for the West Regionals in 2015. Hosting the regional finals is considered a boon for the area because it means national television exposure, plus thousands of traveling fans. Visitors from four schools will rent hotel rooms, patronize restaurants and shop at local businesses. “A lot of people bid on this and it’s very competitive,” said Kathryn Schloessman, president of the Los Angeles Sports and Entertainment Commission, which prepared the bid with Staples Center owner Anschutz Entertainment Group in 2008. “It was a big coup to get it.” Per NCAA guidelines, 25% of the tickets are reserved for schools that make the Sweet 16. That means at least one quarter of the approximately 20,000 seats in Staples will be filled with fans from out of state (ironically, none of the 16 teams in the West Region hail from California). Officials expect more out-of-town fans to buy tickets through the venue, the NCAA’s ticket exchange (accessible via ncaa.com) or secondary market sellers such as StubHub. Four local hotels — the Omni, Westin Bonaventure, Sheraton Los Angeles Downtown and Radisson USC — have blocks of 100-150 rooms set aside for qualifying schools, Schloessman said. “It’s a nice piece of business, especially over a holiday weekend, when typically it’s a little quieter,” said Michael

Czarcinski, managing director of the Westin Bonaventure. Another 250 rooms are blocked out at the J.W. Marriott, which is serving as the event headquarters hotel. Moneyball In some ways, Schloessman said the event is actually a sacrifice for AEG. Whereas Staples Center normally generates an important segment of its revenue from concessions, NCAA rules prohibit alcohol sales during the games. There are also strict rules that limit ticket pricing, she said. Still, what revenue is lost on concessions may be made up through increased sales at L.A. Live’s 19 restaurants and other entertainment venues. “It may not be a money maker for Staples, but it is a money maker for L.A. Live,” Schloessman said. Lee Zeidman, Staples Center’s general manager, said the venue also accounts for lost concession sales through deals for its suites, where it can sell alcohol as part of ticket packages. But Zeidman echoed the idea that L.A. Live and surrounding restaurants are a big focus. AEG is planning a slate of fanoriented events at Nokia Plaza both game days, as well as on Friday, when no games take place. “Our mantra for the tournament is come early, stay late,” Zeidman said. “It will have a huge impact on L.A. Live and all of Downtown because you’re going to have more people during this time staying at local hotels and eating at other restaurants, certainly more so than you’d have for a Clipper or Laker game.” Hosted by… Pepperdine? When fans descend on L.A. Live for the tournament, one might expect to see a healthy dose of USC Trojan attire, or perhaps some UCLA garb. Instead, the local school that will be featured most prominently will be Pepperdine. The Malibu institution is the official event host. Pepperdine agreed to the hosting responsibilities to gain exposure, said tournament manager Karina Herold, Pepperdine’s associate athletic director for marketing. “It’s a great way for us to market our institution to college basketball fans and to fans that have purchased tickets that


March 25, 2013

Downtown News 9

Celebrating 40 Years

los angeles conservancy presents

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CLASSIC FILMS • LIVE ENTERTAINMENT • HISTORIC VENUES

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la BaMBa (1987)

My FaIr laDy (1964)

Orpheum Theatre (1926)

Palace Theatre (1911)

The Music Center’s Dorothy Chandler Pavilion (1964)

Co-presented with the Latin American Cinemateca of Los Angeles

Cary Grant and Grace Kelly star in Alfred Hitchcock’s “whodunit” caper set in the stunning French Riviera

Lou Diamond Phillips stars as Richie Valens, one of America’s first Latino pop stars who had a Top 40 hit at age 17

Presented as part of Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.

Audrey Hepburn dazzles as Eliza Doolittle in this beloved musical, at our first-ever screening at this venue

wEdNESdAy, JUNE 19, 8pm

wEdNESdAy, JUNE 26, 8pm

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all aBoUt eve (1950)

e o F tH e Ben-HUr: ac Htal r I st( 19 2 5 )

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(Silent; accompanied live on the Mighty Wurlitzer organ)

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We travel to Beverly Hills for matinee and evening screenings of what many consider the ultimate American film, starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Claude Rains

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3/19/13 8:47:12 PM


10 Downtown News

March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

At Grand Park, No Lights, Camera, Action High Film Fees at New Attraction to Come Down, but Industry Officials Say It’s Not Enough by Ryan Vaillancourt staff writer

I

n several places around Grand Park, signs inscribed with the motto “the park for everyone” in dozens of languages beckon Angelenos and visitors. The all-inclusive welcome falls on deaf ears, however, to at least one big Los Angeles constituency: the film industry. Since its opening last July, it has cost $20,000 a day to rent a quarter of the park, and $80,000 for the entire expanse between the Music Center and City Hall. That price, say entertainment industry officials, has effectively shut out film productions. In fact, only one production has rented the facility, which location experts say would otherwise be an extremely attractive site for filming. It also represents an almost necessary perch from which to shoot the iconic City Hall steps that descend to Spring Street, industry officials say. Now, the rates are set to come down, and though that might seem like a good thing for the film industry, not everyone is happy. Officials at the $56 million park had resisted calls for slashing the film fees so as not to open the floodgates for crews at the 12-acre facility. If more productions can afford to shoot there, it increases the potential impact on the park’s raison d’etre — public access, said Alma Martinez, chief of staff to First District Supervisor Gloria Molina. Molina was the key county official in getting the park built.

Still, after months of talks among park and county officials and industry advocates, those rates appear set to come down by 74%. The Board of Supervisors is slated to vote this week on a modified fee structure. In a statement, park officials say the proposed reductions constitute what they consider a compromise. “We have been in discussions with the film industry on filming rates for the park and believe we have an approach that will address the needs of all parties,” the statement reads in part. Despite the significant decrease in rates, industry players believe the proposed fees “are still way too high,” said Paul Audley, president of FilmL.A., the nonprofit that coordinates film permitting in the region. Seventy-four percent doesn’t mean much when the starting figure is “fictitious,” he said. Pilot Season The proposed new rate would be about $15,000 a day for the entire park between April and October (for all other months that would drop to $12,000). Individual blocks would rent for $2,400-$5,120 per day, or $840-$1,792 for four-hour chunks. The rates still represent premiums over similar government-owned properties in the region, said Ed Duffy, a spokesman for the Teamsters Local 399, which represents location managers. Comparable county-owned facilities such as Descanso Gardens or the Arboretum cost about $6,400 for the whole day, according to a county report.

photo by Gary Leonard

Location managers see Grand Park as a fresh site for filming movies, commercials and TV shows — if only the fees to shoot there weren’t so high.

“The rates they’re proposing still will not allow many productions to actually film there,” Duffy said. “I feel the park should be seen and utilized and it should be a statement for the city and county for how film-friendly they are.” The Grand Park Advisory Committee, a group appointed mainly by the five supervisors to counsel the park operator, considered a six-month pilot program during which film companies would pay nothing to use the park. That would mimic state policy, which in an effort to facilitate the film industry and the jobs it generates does not charge rental fees for shooting on its properties. The pilot concept, which was proposed by

Supervisor Michael Antonovich appointee Kathryn Barger Leibrich in February, has since been dropped. Jessica Wethington McClean, who represents 14th District Councilman José Huizar on the committee, said in a statement that she supported the pilot proposal, but only if there were protections for public access. “I do want to make sure any film use at Grand Park is closely monitored so that filming does not disproportionately limit downtown residents and visitors’ access to the park,” she said in the statement. “Whatever fee structure is selected, we want to strike a see Park, page 11

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March 25, 2013

CrossFit Continued from page 1 enough to support so many CrossFit gyms. There will soon be three gyms alone in the Arts District. Trojan CrossFit is a short walk from The Rec Center CrossFit, a facility at 588 Mateo St., and a block from District 36, which is seeking CrossFit affiliation and plans to open April 1. The competition doesn’t scare Prestwich, nor does it intimidate Aaron Thieme, who opened CrossFit 213 at 903 S. Hill St. in December. “There are a lot of gyms in Downtown but it’s a densely populated city,” said Thieme, who said he signed up 55 members in his first two months. “We’ve had members that have changed from another gym in Downtown just because it’s closer.” If the newcomers to the Downtown CrossFit scene are convinced that there are enough customers to go around, the relative veteran of the area isn’t so sure. Ronnie Teasdale opened CrossFit Mean Streets at 265 S. Main St. in 2010. He now has about 250 members. “I feel like we’re going to have to compete,” Teasdale said. “Downtown is a growing market so hopefully we can all survive. But we’re all unequal and when there is unequal competition, somebody has to lose and somebody has to win.” Hunger Games The competition already prompted one group to change their business plan. Last year, the owners of The Brick CrossFit were looking for new members as they built a space in the Medallion apartment complex at Fourth and Main streets, a block from Teasdale’s facility. Then they abruptly changed course, opting instead to open Krav Maga Unyted, which focuses on the martial art developed by the Israeli Special Forces (it debuted in January). It also offers courses in SpeedX, the gym’s own trademarked regimen that is largely inspired by CrossFit, said Hooman Ghaffari, a partner in Krav Maga Unyted. “We didn’t think the financials for CrossFit were sustainable,” Ghaffari said. “While the Downtown demographic is perfect for CrossFit, at the end of the day there’s not enough room to sustain all of these businesses.” Opening a CrossFit gym requires a relatively small investment, in part because the sport uses a limited array of basic equipment. Think pull-up bars, kettle bells and old tractor tires as opposed to treadmills, Nautilus machines and endless rows of dumbbells. “I think the reason there are so many of the gyms opening is that the barrier to entry is really low,” said Cory Hathaway, assistant manager of the Los Angeles Athletic Club. “All you have to do is basically get a warehouse and $10,000 worth of equipment on the low end and you can be in business, and they’re charging rates that are really high.” All four Downtown CrossFit gyms charge around $200 per month for unlimited memberships (at $220, CrossFit Mean Streets is the most expensive). The price is well above most large gyms, but Hathaway expects that CrossFit rates will come down, at least locally. “Eventually the low barrier of entry will catch up to them and the competition will start to drive the rates down,” he said. Prestwich said it cost about $40,000 to open Trojan see CrossFit, page 12

Downtown News 11

Celebrating 40 Years

Where to Get Your CrossFit On CrossFit Mean Streets

Crossfit 213

District 36

Downtown’s CrossFit veteran, known for tough attitude and paleo power. 265 S. Main St. (213) 290-2367 crossfitmeanstreets.com.

A South Park gym with a shower, catering to a Financial District crowd. 903 S. Hill St.   (213) 222-8067 crossfit213.com.

Aspiring CrossFit affiliate, with plans to include traditional fitness equipment. 453 Colyton St. (323) 321-3501

Trojan CrossFit

The Rec Center Crossfit

Krav Maga Unyted

Big Arts District space run by two L.A. County Sheriff’s Deputies. 431 S. Hewitt St. (213) 537-0446 trojancrossfit.com.

No frills Arts District gym with emphasis on building community. 588 Mateo St. (213) 621-2964 thereccentercrossfit.com

Serious fitness with a self-defense bent, with CrossFit inspired workouts. 334 S. Main St. (213) 223-6233 Unytedfitness.com

Park Continued from page 10 balance of supporting one of our City’s main economic industries, while also preserving the park’s intended purpose for the residents of Los Angeles.” Industry advocates also say they hope to find the same elusive middle ground. Duffy said fears of the park being overrun by productions are unwarranted. Even when film crews rent out facilities like the Arboretum, the venue doesn’t usually close to the public. Visitors are sometimes asked to wait during a shot or avoid a certain section of a site, but they’re rarely barred from entry, Duffy said. “I know it can infringe on some people at times, but it is what Los Angeles is,” he said. “We are still the film capital of the world and we’re trying to keep it that way so this work can stay here.” Fees collected from future productions would support operations and programming at the park. As of now, there is no limit on how many productions would be allowed during a set period, but Martinez said such a cap could be instituted at a later time. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com. 7971_LA_ NCAA Fan Fest Ad_DT News_6.75x12_FNL.indd 1

3/21/13 5:02 PM


12 Downtown News

March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

CrossFit Continued from page 11 CrossFit. Thieme said he spent close to $100,000 at 213 CrossFit, which includes showers to cater to Downtown lawyers and bankers who prefer to work out in the early morning, then head to the office. In order to include CrossFit in their name, gyms must pay a licensing fee to CrossFit Inc., the 10-year-old Washington, D.C.-based company. To qualify for a license, operators must be certified in CrossFit training. The application process includes an essay. CrossFit Inc. does not consider an applicant’s location when granting affiliations. In fact, the parent company gives practically no mandatory directions to affiliate gyms, said company spokesman Russell Berger, who stressed that CrossFit is not a franchise. “Our view is that having a few gyms in close proximity really can’t do anything but incentivize them to improve their product,” Berger said. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com. ULI 2013-Ad Quarter-PR.pdf

1

Around Town Continued from page 2

photo by Gary Leonard

Aaron Thieme invested about $100,000 in CrossFit 213 at 903 S. Hill St. The facility includes showers so Downtown workers can get cleaned up and then head to the office after an early morning workout.

3/19/13

3:01 PM

U.S. Bank Tower To Be Sold

Metro to Drivers: Every Lane Is a Bike Lane

D

D

owntown office giant MPG Office Trust is selling the trophy of its Central City portfolio, U.S. Bank Tower. An affiliate of Overseas Union Enterprise Limited, a Singapore-based company, is in escrow to purchase the 72-story tower for $367.5 million, according to an MPG statement. The pending sale of the tallest building west of the Mississippi River comes as MPG has long been struggling to reduce its debt load by selling or defaulting on properties. Last year it defaulted on Two California Plaza, freeing the company of a $470 million mortgage on the tower, and it sold its 20% interest in the partnership that owns One Cal Plaza. The U.S. Bank Tower sale, which includes the parking facility at Fifth and Flower streets that services the Central Library, is expected to turn a $103 million profit for MPG, according to the statement. The firm is expected to use the proceeds in part to restructure loans on its other properties, which include Downtown’s Wells Fargo Center, Gas Company Tower, KPMG Tower and 777 Tower. The deal with Overseas Union is slated to close on June 28.

owntown may be equipped with a small network of bike lanes, but county officials have an urgent message for drivers: “Every lane is a bike lane.” That’s the motto of a new marketing campaign Metro launched last week to increase bicycle traffic safety. “The breakneck pace of bikeway construction demonstrates that Los Angeles is riding fast on its way to becoming a truly bike-friendly city,” said Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa in a statement. “As more cyclists take to our streets we need to ensure that safety and awareness are of utmost importance as our riders share the road.” While some drivers assume that streets are for motor vehicles only, state law gives cyclists the same rights as cars. Cyclists are supposed to stay as far to the right as possible, but can take up the full lane when traveling as fast or faster than car traffic, or to avoid hazards. Of course, the rule goes both ways — cyclists must obey the same traffic rules as cars. That means no rolling through red lights or against one-way traffic. As part of its campaign, Metro plans to begin offering traffic skills courses for bicyclists.

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March 25, 2013

Melting Down Continued from page 1 except to remind us that four out of five Angelenos don’t give a hoot about local politics. Instead, the vote confirmed what most observers long predicted: That Councilman Eric Garcetti and Controller Wendy Greuel would wind up in a one-on-one runoff. Now, the race for the Downtown-based job is gonna get extra messy. During the primary Team Greuel proved they’re ready to bring a bazooka to a knife fight, sending out vicious mailers attacking both Garcetti and Downtown Councilwoman Jan Perry. Considering that a batch of labor groups are raising gazillions for Greuel and will likely launch broadsides at Garcetti, his squad may have no choice but to retaliate. Get ready for some of the ugliest tactics since Wile E. Coyote went after the Road Runner. Nasty in the Ninth: Perry’s 12 years as a Downtown council rep were defined by political stability and progress. We won’t see either during the next two months as the race to fill her seat flares. Although former council aide Ana Cubas and State Sen. Curren Price both had nice homes in other parts of Los Angeles, each decided a few months before the election that it would be lovely (and politically expedient) to start living in the Ninth. Now, having survived the seven-person primary, the two new residents are trying to convince longtime district inhabitants that they honestly, truly, deeply care about and understand everyone’s concerns. But what will really make this race tricky are a couple little things — race and gender. Cubas has taken every opportunity to point out that only one of 15 L.A. council seats is occupied by a woman, and in the weeks lead-

ing up to the May 21 election she’ll probably mention it no less than 2,471,379 times. Then there’s the fact that Price is African-American and Cubas is from El Salvador. Although the district is increasingly Latino, the council seat has been held by an African American for 50 years. This type of change doesn’t come easily. Designs on the Times: In 1995 BC (Before Craigslist), the L.A. Times made so much money that reporters reportedly flew Business class. Though circulation, advertising and the editorial staff have since plummeted, plenty of folks still want to buy the paper. They have that opportunity now that the parent Tribune Company has emerged from the Zellacious bankruptcy and its holdings are being sold. Although no one knows what will happen, the chase is taking on a Batman-vs.-Bane quality. On the “good” side, according to reports, is a bid headed up by Austin Beutner and Eli Broad. They’d buy the Times, establish local control, create a nonprofit and give every reporter a unicorn. On the “bad” side, at least according to the, ahem “liberal media,” are the GOP-funding Koch brothers. As the process moves forward, expect plenty of reporters to write plenty of stories with plenty of anonymous sources. Making a Mess of MOCA: Is it symbolic or ironic that “Deitch” is only one letter removed from “ditch”? Whatever the case, MOCA has tumbled financially since even before Jeffrey Deitch became the institution’s director in 2010. Three of the five curators have left in the past year, including the only one most people knew, Paul Schimmel. Even more frightening is that museum officials last year were considering an entire exhibit based on disco. Deitchtastic! Now, fundraising is so anemic that some wonder if MOCA can survive on its own. The museum last week rejected a takeover

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licly admit it, there are huge doubts about whether the NFL deal will come to fruition. Why else would Villaraigosa and Perry, two of the project’s staunchest supporters, release separate statements about focusing on upgrading the aged Convention Center? I think the breaking news is this: After 19 years, L.A. still doesn’t have a football team.

photo by Gary Leonard

It’s not only Downtown people and businesses that are under duress. After decades of being the tallest building west of the Mississippi, U.S. Bank Tower is set to be surpassed by the coming replacement for the Wilshire Grand hotel.

offer from LACMA, but there’s still a tiny problem — MOCA’s endowment is about $75 million too light. Hey, maybe a dissolving MOCA is a Deitch-driven large-scale performance art piece commenting on how the public applies money and power concerns to the synergistic exigencies of art curating and cultural connection. No, probably not. TIM+AEG=E-X-I-T: The abrupt departure of dealmaker-in-chief Leiweke created havoc in Downtown business, political and sports circles. It also put Phil Anschutz himself under the microscope, and after three decades of ignoring the media Anschutz actually did a few interviews this month. He tried to convince the world that he wants to reassert control of the company and pursue the Farmers Field project. Although no one in City Hall will pub-

Catholic Collision: The Los Angeles Archdiocese is the most powerful and influential religious institution in Southern California. It’s also the most troubled. In February an unprecedented fracas erupted when Archbishop Jose Gomez stripped Cardinal Roger Mahony of some duties (even if the stripping was mostly symbolic) as the scandal over shuffling pedophile priests to unsuspecting parishes kept surging. The cardinal caboodle ratcheted higher when Mahony — who in his day played politics as skillfully as anyone in L.A. — flew to Rome to participate in the papal conclave. As time ticks on and more details on the past spill, this may get uglier than Greuel-Garcetti. Tower Losing Power: The tallest structure west of the Mississippi is in a state of flux. This month U.S. Bank Tower was sold for $367 million to investors from Singapore. Additionally, the 72-story structure is no longer so appealing to white-collar law and banking firms — approximately 550,000 square feet of space in the 1.375 millionsquare-foot edifice is vacant. It’s even under threat from the future, as designs for the coming $1 billion Wilshire Grand replacement call for an uninhabited spire that will sneakily stretch higher than the roof of U.S. Bank Tower. On the bright side, the building has faced worse — in the 1996 movie Independence Day, aliens blew it sky high. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.


photo courtesy of UglyRhino

CALENDAR Big Plays

photo courtesy of UglyRhino

on little stages

Arts District Productions Rely on Passion, not Size

photo by Gary Leonard

March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

photo by Gary Leonard

14 Downtown News

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little-known comedy film from the 1970s. Cold Turkey, a play Norbitz. “We think that the audience is very hungry for Check Ourtown Website fortoFull Listings LADowntownNews.com about an entire that tries quitMovie smoking in order to things that are dynamic and multidimensional.” win a $25 million prize, runs on the weekends from March Party Play 28-April 20. Mindspin marks the first Downtown Los Angeles show Meanwhile, New York-based theater purveyor UglyRhino for the three-year-old Brooklyn-based company. In addition is presenting Mindspin at the Red Loft. The play on Fourth to producing plays, UglyRhino holds concerts and throws Street incorporates the audience into the story of two women parties in its New York headquarters, a 10,000-square-foot at a party whose run-in with a man forces them to address former bathhouse. Each event contains an element of one of some volatile issues. It debuted last weekend and continues the others, said Norbitz, which could mean live music during through April 6. a play, or a performance during a party. Just as there is an audience for End of the Rainbow, there For Mindspin, all the elements are combined. Starts is a crowd eager for productions like Mindspin, said Bryce March The15 play, written by Norbitz and Nicole Rosner, artistic diNorbitz, the executive director and producer of UglyRhino. rector of UglyRhino, is set at a party where two women, who see Theater, page 24 “Our mission is affordable, social theatrical events,” said

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Loft Ensemble Has a Dark Comedy in ‘The Assistants’ MAR 18 by RichaRd Guzmán

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he Archway and the Red Loft aren’t the only Arts District venues doing small but notable plays. The Loft ntownNews .A.Dowalso /L m o .c k Ensemble on Second Street gets in on the action with o o Faceb The Assistants. The dark comedy about a reality show and its crew that Like Newsgo onterribly Facebook fallsDowntown apart when things wrong is written by Joel &Sinensky Be Entered to Win Movie Tickets! and directed by Annabeth Bondor-Stone. It debuted last week and runs through May 5. Performances are at 8 p.m. on Saturdays and 7 p.m. on Sundays. The story concerns a hit reality series called “Love House.” Everything is fine until an unexpected and shock-

ing act of violence hits the set. It upends the lives of everyone involved with the show, including the host, a TV executive intent on protecting her reputation, and the underpaid young assistants. The Assistants is set in the high-rises and seedier parts of Hollywood. Ultimately, it’s about the lengths people will go to to reach the top. In other words, it’s a Hollywood story. Starts March 22 Loft Ensemble, led by Artistic Director Adam Chambers, has presented more than a dozen original plays and revivals. Loft Ensemble is at 929 E. Second St., (213) 680-0392 or photo courtesy of Loft Ensemble loftensemble.com. Things go terribly wrong on the set of a reality TV show in the Loft Check Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com —Richard Guzmán Ensemble’s new play The Assistants.

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March 25, 2013

Downtown News 15

Celebrating 40 Years

In Search of a Place Where Skies Are Blue Judy Garland Story ‘End of the Rainbow’ Is Entertaining if Not Accurate by Jeff Favre contributing writer

P

eter Quilter’s idea for a play about a somewhat famous celebrity singer who becomes a washed-up alcoholic performing on a cruise ship doesn’t exactly scream hit. Instead, Quilter tweaked his idea, substituting a run-of-themill celebrity with icon Judy Garland. Then he found perhaps the only actress who could pull off the required acting and vocal rigors. Thus, a star show was born. End of the Rainbow, appearing through April 21 at the Ahmanson Theatre in Downtown Los Angeles after runs in London’s West End and on Broadway, proves that a script that rarely rises beyond the level of overwrought bio-play with music can be transfixing and deeply moving with the right actress. In this case it’s Tracie Bennett, whose tiny stature, big voice and total devotion to exuding the essence of Garland easily overcomes Quilter’s one-track plot built on pill-popping, booze swilling and an overwhelming fear of going on stage. Just don’t come expecting a documentary-style treatment of the troubled entertainer. Instead, Garland’s life and time serve as inspiration for the play. The best way to enjoy the two-plus hour production is to push aside facts and accept that Quilter, Bennett and director Terry Johnson are aiming for entertainment, not accuracy. Fortunately, there’s plenty of the former, as well as some dark humor. It starts, fittingly, with the show’s opening moment, when Garland and soon-to-be husband number five, Mickey Deans (Erik Heger), enter a suite at a London hotel room. She’s there for a five-week concert series, created by Deans with the apparent idea of helping get her out of debt. Deans has relieved his famed fiancé of the pills and alcohol on which she has relied. Naturally, this leads to irritable, curse-filled tantrums between the couple. The voice of reason is Anthony (Michael Cumpsty) as Garland’s pianist. He’s a fictional but multidimensional character, one whose empathy and love for Garland is meant as a stand-in for a significant segment of the gay community.

photo by Craig Schwartz

Though small in stature, Tracie Bennett delivers a huge performance as troubled Judy Garland in End of the Rainbow. It’s at the Ahmanson Theatre through April 21.

Sandwiched between the hotel scenes are musical snapshots of Garland at her The Talk of the Town shows — a seamless transition thanks to Johnson’s crisp blocking and set designer William Dudley’s rear wall that retracts to reveal a live band. Matching Garland’s late career performances, Bennett’s voice

is strained and overloaded with vibrato, yet still filled with passion and power. It’s in the songs that Bennett’s portrayal reaches remarkable heights, in particular a manic, twitch-filled rendition of “Come Rain or Come Shine.” She whips the microphone cord and blitzes through various dance steps, while at the same time varying her phrasing and dropping occasional words. If Bennett actually collapsed it would be understandable. The other musical highlight is the first act finale, “The Man That Got Away,” which has Garland crumbling before a mirror as she fears that Deans will be the latest in a long line of men to leave her. Mania and palpable despair, though fascinating, are not sustainable as entertainment for too long, which is why Cumpsty’s steady-handed, in-control Anthony serves as a crucial balance. He delivers a sense of gentleness and unspoken sadness, which is best exemplified in two scenes, one in which Anthony expresses his desire to take care of Garland, and another simple moment when he applies her makeup. Heger is adequate at handling the unenviable task of conveying this version of Deans, which is a self-serving, abusive man who would go so far as to forcibly shove pills down his fiancé’s throat. Was Deans, who died in 2003, truly that evil? Would Garland, who spoke frequently in public about her children, act in private as though they didn’t exist? Accuracy isn’t necessary for entertainment, but adding an icon to your story is a good way to boost attention, as witnessed by three consecutive Ahmanson shows (Backbeat about The Beatles preceded Rainbow and the return of Fela! follows it). Still, even with Garland, Under the Rainbow would be a hapless melodrama, hard-pressed to survive without Bennett. She is mesmerizing from the first scene to the last moment. End of the Rainbow runs through April 21 at the Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or centertheatregroup.org.

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16 Downtown News

March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Follow the Rabbit There Are Plenty of Ways to Celebrate Easter in Downtown by RichaRd Guzmán

latter special will be served starting at 11 a.m. WP24 is 900 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 7438824 or wolfgangpuck.com. LA Market is at 900 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-8630 or lalivemarriott.com.

city editoR

S

pring has arrived, and with it comes a white rabbit and Easter. The holiday falls on Sunday, March 31, and there are numerous ways to celebrate in Downtown Los Angeles. A number of restaurants are offering breakfasts, brunches or other ways to bring the family together. There are kid-oriented activities, including several chances to search the landscape for eggs. Or, those who want to pay heed to the higher calling of the day can do some community service. Whatever your Easter desire, there is an option for you in Downtown. Hop to it. Eat Up Eggs-cellent Feast: Don’t worry kids, there’s no rabbit on the menu at a pair of prix-fixe Easter Sunday meals in South Park. Instead, get ready to fill up on plenty of pork, lamb and chicken. WP24 and LA Market, both in the JW Marriott hotel at L.A. Live, are offering options for locals and visitors. The $70 four-course dinner at WP24 includes Szechuan-style chicken, “Dan Dan” dumplings, honey drizzled BBQ pork buns and Singapore Style chili prawns. It will be served from 5:30-9 p.m. At LA Market, the $52 meal will include poached lobster and herb-crusted lamb chops. The

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Go Grand: The folks at Grand Café in the Omni Hotel know that men, women and children cannot live on eggs alone. That’s why they are offering a wide-ranging Easter buffet on March 31 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. The cost is $49 for adults and $10 for the 12-and-under set. Choices include eggs benedict, Belgian waffles, glazed ham and smoked salmon. A kids’ station offers mini corn dogs, mac ’n cheese and peanut butter and jelly sliders. The Easter Bunny, or at least someone dressed in a rabbit suit, will hand out balloons and take pictures with the wee ones. The adults get their fun with bottomless mimosas. At 251 S. Olive St., (213) 617-3300 or omnihotels.com. Sweet Easter: The Millennium Biltmore Hotel isn’t just the grandest of the Downtown hotels. It is also the sweetest of them all, thanks to the candy jar buffet included in the threecourse Sunday Easter meal ($65 for adults and $35 for kids). After filling up on traditional

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The 83rd annual Blessing of the Animals takes place at Olvera Street on March 30. Archbishop Jose Gomez will sprinkle hundreds of dogs, cats, birds, reptiles and other animals with Holy Water. The event thanks animals for their service to people.

foodstuffs at the hotel’s Smeraldi’s restaurant, diners get all the sweets they can eat. Work off the sugar with an egg hunt or, if you’re in a chocolate coma, sit still while a caricature artist draws you. Those who book a room for two in the hotel get the Easter brunch for free. At 506 S. Grand Ave., (213) 612-1562 or millenniumhotels.com. Bonjour Bunny: Add a French twist to your Easter with a brunch at Kendall’s Brassiere

and Bar, the restaurant at the Music Center. A three-course meal ($38 per adult, $18 for those 12 and under) includes French toast with caramelized apples and whipped cream, rotisserie chicken, roasted barramundi and, for dessert, a choice of pina colada bavarious (with coconut rum sauce) or chocolate espresso cake. You can bring your little dog too, since Kendall’s patio is pooch friendly. Food will be served from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. on March 31.

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March 25, 2013

Downtown News 17

Celebrating 40 Years

At 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-7322 or kendallsbrassiere.com. Choose Chaya: It’s always good to have choices. At Japanese fusion joint Chaya, you get plenty of them. The $42 Easter brunch includes starters such as a warm asparagus salad, wild arugula and strawberry salad and white corn puree soup. Among the entree options are grilled New York steak and fries and pan roasted Scottish salmon. A kids’ menu features a mini cheeseburger with fries, mac ’n cheese Bolognese or French toast. Then come desserts. The meal runs from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. At 525 S. Flower St., (213) 236-9577 or thechaya.com. Families and Festivals An Early Square Deal: Get a jump on Easter at Pershing Square. On Saturday, March 30, the park in the Financial District will host a festival with an appearance from the big bunny. The celebration, which runs from noon-5 p.m., includes arts and crafts booths, live music and egg hunts for kids 12 and under. Don’t worry parents, your 2-year-old won’t have to compete with feisty pre-teens for eggs, since the hunts are divided by age. The first one, for those under 4, is at 12:30 p.m. The last hunt is at 3:30 p.m. for the big kids. At 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. Retro Arts: Put down the iPad and log off the Disney website. The Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising is going old school with a Spring Retro Arts for Kids Easter event on March 30. Using ancient technology like glue, glitter and construction paper, kids will decorate eggs, make bunny

ears and assemble other holiday crafts at the FIDM Museum Shop from 10 a.m.-noon. Who knows, the free event at the fashion school may even inspire the young ones to choose a design career one day. At 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 623-5821 or fidmmuseumshop.org. Beatified Beasts: Dogs, cats, birds, frogs, lizards and even a few fish and snakes have been known to make the pilgrimage to Olvera Street for the Blessing of the Animals. The 83rd annual event takes place March 30 from noon-5 p.m. (the procession itself starts at 2 p.m.). The event is like a pop-up zoo without the cages, as hundreds of pets are paraded through the plaza and then blessed by Archbishop Jose Gomez, who sprinkles them with Holy Water. There is also a petting zoo and pony rides. At 125 Paseo De La Plaza, (213) 625-7074 or elpueblo.lacity.org. Grand Festival: The park at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising may be one of the most popular destinations in Downtown on Easter Sunday. Some 1,000 people are expected for the fifth annual Easter Fest at Grand Hope Park. Organized by New City Church of L.A., the celebration will include an egg hunt, bounce houses, face painting and other crafts. Some may want to skip breakfast since there will be a pie-eating contest. The celebration runs from noon-3 p.m. At 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 471-2415 or newcitychurchla.com. Live Bunny: Fresh off the St. Patrick’s Day celebration, L.A. Live is going from green

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One of the biggest holiday celebrations will take place on Easter Sunday in Grand Hope Park. The Easter Fest organized by the New City Church of L.A. is expected to attract about 1,000 people.

beer to bunny ears with an Easter festival on March 31 from noon-2:30 p.m. Nokia Plaza will be the site of an egg hunt for kids 6 and under. Free Easter baskets will be handed out to hold all of the prized eggs. After the hunt, the Easter Bunny will sit for pictures and balloon artists and face painters will do their thing. At 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 493-4329 or lalive.com. Helping Others On a Mission: Easter isn’t all about finding eggs and meeting the rabbit. It’s also about helping others. Be reminded of that on Friday, March 29, with the Los Angeles Mission’s Skid Row Easter event that includes free meals, Easter baskets, a foot wash

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and even free shoes for the needy. The day begins early, with volunteers preparing about 3,500 meals and more than 1,000 Easter baskets starting at 4:30 a.m. At 6 a.m., Fifth Street between Wall and San Pedro streets will be closed to traffic to make room for tables and chairs. The day includes the Mission’s foot washing stations for the homeless while the athletic shoe company Etnies will hand out more than 2,000 pairs of shoes to the homeless. Breakfast will be served at 6 a.m. and lunch starts at 11 a.m. The event ends at 3 p.m. At 303 E. Fifth St. or (213) 629-1227. Volunteer registration at losangelesmission.org. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

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18 Downtown News

March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

EVENTS

The Don't Miss List

SPONSORED LISTINGS Bar 107 107 W. Fourth St., (213) 625-7382 or twitter. com/bar107 or facebook.com/bar107 Mon.-Fri., 4-8 p.m.: Happy hour means $2 beers, $3 wells and $5 anything in the bar, except JWB. Free pizza every week night at 5:30 p.m. Bar 107 believes you won’t get a better deal anywhere in the city. March 27, 10 p.m.: Gong Show Karaoke is back. The bar will buy shots for anyone who gets gonged. See if you have what it takes to get past 3 D-list celebrity judges and claim the coveted prize...18 inches of sweet sweet glass. Last Wednesday of every month. More info at rockthegong.com.

STrange SounDS, CLaSSiCaL SounDS anD KubriCK SounDS FiLL DownTown ThiS weeK by Dan Johnson, listings eDitor | calendar@downtownnews.com

Wednesday, March 27 Listening to Stanley Kubrick Last Bookstore, 453 S. Spring St., (213) 488 0599 or lastbookstorela.com. 7:30 p.m.: Christine Gengaro, author of Listening to Stanley Kubrick, drops by for a discussion of film sound and the great director. SCI-Arc Lecture Series 960 E. Third St., (213) 613-2200 or sciarc.edu. 7 p.m.: Architect Todd Gannon stops by in advance of his exhibition at SCI-Arc this summer.

Friday, March 29 Prayer Breakfast Westin Bonaventure Hotel, 404 S. Figueroa St., (213) 351-2205 or ymcala.org. 8 a.m.: The YMCA of Metropolitan Los Angeles hosts its 55th Annual Good Friday Breakfast, with hundreds of local business and community leaders. The speaker is Jack Scott, chancellor emeritus of the California Community Colleges and a former California state senator.

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Blue Whale 123 Astronaut E. S. Onizuka St., (213) 620-0908 or bluewhalemusic.com. March 26: Aditya Prakash Ensemble. March 27: V.O.C.E. March 28: Michael Mull Octet. Can you count to eight? March 29: Dwight Trible. March 30: Rez Abbasi Trio with Mark Dresser and Satoshi Takeishi. Bootleg Bar 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.org. March 25, 8 p.m.: Once Hunter Hunted’s residency at the Bootleg is over, the venue will have to be fumigated to prevent the duo’s overly bubbly and optimistic synth pop from nesting in the rafters. March 27, 8 p.m.: Electro R&B outfit Inc. is not to be held responsible in any paternity suits resulting from the performance of their baby making music. March 28, 8 p.m.: Guy Blakeslee is still living in the ’70s, despite the fact that he was born in 1981. March 29, 8 p.m.: Fol Chen, we don’t understand — your electronic music is innovative and pleasant and not infatuated with a genre that had its heyday in the last century. March 31, 7 p.m.: Neo-soul from ever so silky Moonchild. Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. March 30, 10 p.m.: The Orange Tulip Conspiracy is the only jazz fusion band we’ve heard that might

one

Just as the United States celebrates the distant musical folkways with acoustic bluegrass music, so too do the people of South America commemorate the traditions of their heartland with Joropo music. On Saturday, March 30, Colombia’s Cimarron moseys into the W.M. Keck Amphitheatre atop Walt Disney Concert Hall for two shows presented by the Music Center’s World City program. Cimarron’s instrumentation and songwriting harken back to the diverse confluence of musical cultures in central South America. The molted patchwork of immigrant populations and stalwart indigenous traditions will ring proud at 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Free tickets are dispensed at 10 a.m. for the first show and 11 a.m. for the second. At 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-0777 or musiccenter.org.

three

photo courtesy of Kim Richmond

Thursday, March 28 NCAA West Regional Championship Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7326 or staplescenter.com. March 28-30: Check out four of the finest teams in college basketball to see who can foul each other more in the last two minutes of the Sweet 16 and Elite Eight games. Before, after and between the contests there is a “fan fest” on Nokia Plaza with basketball clinics, giveaways, pep rallies and more.

photo Courtesy of The Music Center

Tuesday, March 26 Inside the Music Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil.com. March 26-27, 7:30 p.m.: KUSC’s Alan Chapman hosts two nights of music theory and appreciation classes, using examples from the L.A. Phil’s 2012/13 season as source material, to help edify the otherwise uninitiated to classical music. Tickets are $3.

2 On Friday, March 29, REDCAT hosts a tribute to an entertainer who helped define what it meant to hold it down for the West Coast. Sorry NWA fans, we’re talking about Stan Kenton, the jazz bandleader whose interlacing arrangements and thick slabs of sound helped redefine the genre in the 1950s and ’60s. At REDCAT Kim Richmond brings his contemporary 29-piece jazz orchestra to play selections from Artistry, his latest homage to Kenton. Progressive swing with a Latin flourish promises to fill the space with that California love sound. Grab a ticket and arrive early to down a cocktail before the 8:30 p.m. show. At 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org.

4

Stanley Kubrick had a gift for understanding music. The scoring of his films combined sound and image to forge mystic scenes that are seemingly irreproducible. Think A Clockwork Orange, or just ask anyone who has tried to host a legitimate adult party with the creepy backwards chant song from Eyes Wide Shut. On Wednesday, March 27, at 7:30 p.m. the Last Bookstore hosts Christine Gengaro,, the author of Listening to Stanley Kubrick.. Gengaro will be discussing the potent employment of aural imagery in Kubrick’s films and its ability to re-con-textualize sound. She’ll probably sell copies of her book too. At 453 S. Spring St., (213) 488-0599 or lastbookstorela.com.

Though classical music may be genteel, it can also be difficult for those who know little about it. What’s the difference between a crescendo and a suite? What’s a minor chord? Do I sound like an idiot for asking these basic questions? On TuesdayWednesday, March 26-27, the Los Angeles Philharmonic hosts the informative program “Inside the Music.” Alan Chapman, a KUSC DJ and classical music Einstein, hosts the indoctrination into the history and form of classical music. Tickets are $3 each for Tuesday’s beginner session and the Wednesday intermediate course. Both start at 7:30 p.m. at the Walt Disney Concert Hall auditorium. At 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil.com.

five

There’ll be no shortage of whimsical pastiche on Saturday, March, 30 as the Alexandria Hotel’s Mezz Bar plays host to a night of electronica with a vintage 1980s sound and a 1920s aesthetic. The Beats Soiree features the rhythmic synthetic effusions of local groove pushers Sleeper, J. Labs and Lou E. Bagels. In a refreshing change of pace, the party is themed around former Alexandria occupant Charlie Chaplin. Thus, attendees are invited to dress up in their finest Jazz Age duds. Costumes aren’t mandatory, but the chance to give your fluffy panda hat and neon tights a week off to air out the scent of body and other odors is an opportunity you don’t want to miss. At 501 S. Spring St. or mindshare.la.

Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.


March 25, 2013

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One-Eyed Gypsy 901 E. First St., (626) 340-3529 or one-eyedgypsy.com. March 27: RT N the 44s. March 29: Will Magid. Redwood Bar and Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 652-4444 or theredwoodbar.com. March 26: FU Mary Lou, No Small Children, Interstellar and Deux Sons. March 27: Kid Little and The Ghost. March 28: The Zoo. March 29: Stalins of Sound, Way to Go Genius, The Leeches and Shirley Rolls. March 30: The Bad Daddys, Maniac, Shark Toys and Magic Trash. Seven Grand

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515 W. Seventh St., (213) 614-0737 or sevengrand.la. David Scott Stone. March 25: Sly Robby Marshall tried to sneak in a March 29: Continues, Black Jeans, Eyeless Sight date at Seven Grand with his new outfit The Shoe- and Databomb. Y string Trio. March 30: Foot Village, Female Dogs, Clipping March 26: Patrons often wonder how the Mak- and Peter Pants. O ers combine ingenious arrangement with lock tight improv jazz cohesion. The secret is a “band house” Tortas $5.95 complete with bunk beds and matching Nike trackJalapeño Chicken Teriyak Downtown Independent suits. Pork Chops $7.25 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or March 27: Darryl Holter drives up the Figueroa BREAKFAST 251 • LUNCH • CATERING Corridor to deliver his delightful roots rock and downtownindependent.com. Validated parking 25-28, 5 and 7 p.m.: Dorfman in Love tells country western sounds. With any orderMarch of $20 or more. the story ofaVailable a young single suburbanite who volunThe Smell Free local deliVery $15to minimum purchase teers cat sit at her unrequited love’s Downtown 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and MainFrom 10am-2pm with L.A. loft. See story streets, thesmell.org. 213-221-7978 765 p.S.6. Wall Street HourS: M Continued on next page March 28: High Places, DJ Suzanne Kraft and DJ

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— March 27 and 30 at 7:30 p.m. — under the baton of the L.A. Opera’s James Conlon. Icelandic baritone Tómas Tómasson and Portuguese soprano Elisabete Matos make their debuts with the company. At the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-0711 or laopera.com.

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Highbrow Jack Sparrow photo by Robert Millard

also be a sleeper cell in a vast Dutch plot to take over the world. Club Nokia 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-7000 or clubnokia.com. March 28, 7 p.m.: If you haven’t stepped inside a Hot Topic in the last couple years you may have forgotten that the Vans Warped Tour is still making the rounds. Tonight’s kickoff party features Chiodos, New Beat Fund and Big Chocolate. March 29, 7 p.m.: It’s heavy, it’s loud, it’s been on the receiving end of a lot of black hair dye. That’s right. Coal Chamber and Sevendust have arrived. March 30, 8 p.m.: Lalah Hathaway is the child of soul legend Donny Hathaway, who you may remember as the father of Lalah Hathaway. March 31, 7 p.m.: Lee Eun Mi is Korea’s answer to Michelle Branch. You show ’em Lee! Escondite 410 Boyd St., (213) 626-1800 or theescondite.com. March 25, 10 p.m.: Yonatan and friends will inject their brand of infectious jazz into your psyche. March 26, 10 p.m.: When Jamiroqui dreams at night, he has recurring nightmares of Boom Boom Boom and Bunny West coming to steal his career. March 27, 10 p.m.: Smooth Hound Smith and Fiddle & Pine don’t appreciate you dividing your attention between their act and the Addams Family pinball machine. March 28, 10 p.m.: Ocha La Rocha’s name translates roughly to “he who likes Bob Seger.” March 29, 10 p.m.: Trevor Menear and Johnny Moezzi will infuse their blues sounds with fine whiskey in a sinister conspiracy to help you forget the week. March 30, 10 p.m.: Charlie Chan and the S.O.B.’s — a blues band and rejected title for a Roald Dahl book. March 31, 11 p.m.: Honkytonk Sunday finds RT N the 44s complementing the already flavorful soundscape of the 400 block of Boyd. Exchange LA 618 S. Spring St., (213) 627-8070 or exchangela.com. March 29, 10 p.m.: Despite what it reads like, Alex M.O.R.P.H. spinning at Awakening is in fact a DJ night, not a trendy exercise class. March 30, 10 p.m.: Finally, Max Vangeli makes an appearance at Inception. We’ve been waiting with bated breath Max. Grammy Museum 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. March 27, 8 p.m.: Prodigious bass skills foretell of the manifest wonders waiting for those who have tickets to see Earth Wind and Fire bass player Verdine White. Nola’s 734 E. Third St., (213) 680-3003 or nolasla.com. March 26, 7:30 p.m.: Reggy Woods Trio. March 27, 7 p.m.: N’Tense. March 29, 7 p.m.: The Gary Negbaur Group.

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20 Downtown News

March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Continued from previous page March 25, 9 p.m.: The monthly short film screening Shorts Block. March 29, 8 p.m., March 30, 2 and 4 p.m., March 31, 5:30 and 7:30 p.m.: Set amid the noisy outskirts of some unnamed Mexican metropolis, Los Chidos tells the story of the Gonzales family, proprietors of a tire repair junkyard sandwiched between two freeways. IMAX California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 7442019 or californiasciencecenter.org. Explore the remnants and wisdom of an ancient empire in Mysteries of Egypt. Ice and polar bear enthusiasts will likely dig To the Arctic 3D. Experience the gripping story full of hope, crushing disappointment and triumph in Hubble 3D. Regal Cinemas 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 763-6070 or lalive.com/ movies. Through March 28: G.I. Joe Retaliation 3D (11:20 a.m., 2:10, 5, 8 and 11 p.m.); The Host (10 p.m.); A Deeper Shade of Blue (7:30 p.m.); Murph: The Protector (12, 2:20, 4:40, 7 and 9:30 p.m.); Admission (11:30 a.m. and 2:10, 4:50, 7:30 and 10:30 p.m.); The Croods 3D (1:20 and 7 p.m.); The Croods 3D (4:10 and 9:40 p.m.); Olympus Has Fallen (11:20 a.m. and 1:10, 2:10, 4:10, 5:10, 7:20, 8,

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10:20 and 11 p.m.); The Call (11:30 a.m. and 12:10, 2, 2:30, 4:30, 5, 7:10, 7:30, 9:50 and 10:20 p.m.); The Incredible Burt Wondersome (1:30, 4:20, 7 and 9:30 p.m.); Spring Breakers (12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50 and 10:30 p.m.); Oz The Great and Powerful 3D (11:40 a.m. and 1:20, 3, 4:30, 6:10, 7:40, 9:20 and 11 p.m.); 21 and Over (7:35 and 10:10 p.m.); Jack the Giant Slayer (11:40 a.m. and 2:20 and 5 p.m.).

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE Bob Baker’s Something To Crow About The Bob Baker Marionette Theater, 1345 W. First St., (213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com. March 26-29, 10:30 a.m. and March 30-31, 2:30 p.m.: Come join Mama and Papa Goat and 100 more of the Bob Baker marionettes for a musical “day on the farm.” Expect everything from dancing scarecrows to tap dancing bullfrogs warbling “Shine on Harvest Moon.” Call for reservations. Cinderella L.A. Opera, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave., 9213) 972-0711 or laopera.com. March 28, 7:30 p.m. and March 31, 4 p.m.: In her impoverished father’s castle, a kindhearted girl dreams of escaping the tyranny of her vain stepsisters. When the prince announces that he will choose his bride at a glamorous ball, she seizes the opportunity to take control of her own destiny. All this, and music from Giochino Rossini. Cold Turkey Archway Studio/Theatre, 305 S. Hewitt St., (213) 2379933 or archwayla.com. March 28-30, 8 p.m.: Cold Turkey dusts off a 1971 film that starred Dick Van Dyke. It’s about a small Iowa town where the inhabitants are offered $25 million if they all quit smoking for one month. Troubles brews when it starts to look like they can accomplish the task. End of the Rainbow Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. March 26-29, 8 p.m., March 30, 2 and 8 p.m. and March 31, 1 p.m.: Tracie Bennett stars as Judy Garland in this musical tale of the film star’s 1968 attempted comeback. Through April 21. See review p. 15. Mindspin Red Loft, 604 E. Fourth St., (213) 880-3780 or uglyrhino.com.

March 28, 29, 30, 9 p.m.: What if you went to a party and a play suddenly broke out? That’s what happens in the “interactive” show from Brooklyn’s Ugly Rhino theater. You’re having drinks with some nice men and women one moment, and the next the music is muffled and they break into conversation or song. You’ve been warned. The Assistants Loft Ensemble, 929 E. Second St., (213) 680-0392 or loftensemble.com. March 30, 8 p.m., March 31, 7 p.m.: Everything is just peachy on the set of the hit reality series “Love House.” Well, it is until there’s an ugly act of violence. Watch the fur fly in the dark comedy from the Art District theater purveyor. Through May 5. The Flying Dutchman L.A. Opera, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave., 9213) 972-0711 or laopera.com. March 27 and 30, 7:30 p.m.: The legend of the ghostly ship condemned to wander the oceans has fascinated opera lovers for hundreds of years. In a production from the Lyric Opera of Chicago and San Francisco Opera, Richard Wagner’s score comes to spooky life under the baton of James Conlon. Icelandic baritone Tómas Tómasson and Portuguese soprano Elisabete Matos make their L.A. Opera debuts. Melancholia 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org. March 28-30, 8 p.m. and March 31, 3 p.m.: In Melancholia, the shock and trauma of PTSD comes home as a young Latino Marine returns from war. Tribes Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. March 27-30, 8 p.m. and March 31, 1 and 6:30 p.m.: Billy, who is deaf, is in love. He has found Sylvia, who in her way “listens” to him. All’s good, right? Of course not, as Billy and his family face a big question: Why did they never learn sign language? Through April 24.

CLASSICAL MUSIC Tuesday, March 26 Colburn School Student Recital Thayer Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu. 5 p.m.: Percussionist Joe Beribak takes center stage in tonight’s in-house spotlight.

Wednesday, March 27 Colburn School Student Recital Thayer Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu. 5 p.m.: Colburn student Anna Kolotylina would be the perfect person to ask what the difference is between a violin and a viola. Thursday, March 28 Rush Hour Concert Thayer Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu. 5:30 p.m.: The stars that burn brightest in the Colburn night sky of pure talent will be out to play tonight. Registration required. Conservatory Student Recital Thayer Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu. 8 p.m.: Pasha Tseitlin breaks out his violin. Friday, March 29 Conservatory Student Recital Thayer Hall, 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu. 5 p.m.: Double bass extraordinaire Mariya Andonova wisely selected the only instrument in the classical canon to have the distinct title of “double.”

MORE LISTINGS Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

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4 WEB: LADowntownNews.com/calendar 4 EMAIL: Calendar@DowntownNews.com

Email: Send a brief description, street address and public phone number. Submissions must be received 10 days prior to publication date to be considered for print.

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22 Downtown News

March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

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All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

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Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin

Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com email: realpeople@downtownnews.com

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ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editor: Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Dave Denholm, Jeff Favre, Greg Fischer, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Ryan E. Smith, Marc Porter Zasada

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Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins

The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard

One copy per person.


March 25, 2013

Downtown News 23

Celebrating 40 Years MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-800-945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

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LEGAL Fictitious BusiNess Name Fictitious Business name statement File no. 2013040221 The following person is doing business as: (1) ORTHOPAEDIC INSTITUTE FOR CHILDREN, (2) ORTHOPAEDIC AND SPINE INSTITUTE FOR

PersoNals CHAT WITH Local Men - Local Men are waiting for you! Call Livelinks now. 800-291-3969. Women talk free! (Cal-SCAN)

CHILDREN, 2400 S. Flower St., Los Angeles, CA 900072697, are hereby registered by the following registrant: ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL, 2400 S. Flower St., Los Angeles, CA 90007-2697. This business is conducted by a corporation. Registrants has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on February 28, 2013. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does

not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 3/11, 3/18, 3/25, 4/1/13

Fictitious Business name statement File no. 2013031510 The following person is doing business as: (1) LOS ANGELES ORTHOPAEDIC MEDICAL CENTER, (2) LA ORTHOPAEDIC MEDICAL CENTER, 2400 S. Flower St., Los Angeles, CA 90007-2697, are hereby registered by the following registrant: ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL, 2400 S.

Flower St., Los Angeles, CA 90007-2697. This business is conducted by a corporation. Registrant began to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein on 11/14/2005. This statement was filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on February 14, 2013. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section

14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 3/11, 3/18, 3/25, 4/1/13

Fictitious Business name statement File no. 2013039350 The following person is doing business as: PRAISE CHAPEL LOS ANGELES, 335 Glendale Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90026, are hereby registered by the following registrant: PRAISE CHAPEL WESTLAKE, 335 GLENDALE BLVD., LOS ANGELES, CA 90026. This business is conducted by a corporation. Registrants has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or

names listed herein. This statement was filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on February 27, 2013. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 3/18, 3/25, 4/1, 4/8/13

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24 Downtown News

March 25, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Theater Continued from page 14 happen to organize artistic parties and perform in a band together, are hanging out. They are looking into expanding their business by purchasing the Red Loft and having a permanent location for parties. Their conversation exposes their complicated relationship, especially after they meet a man. “There’s romance, it gets kind of sexy and we kind of follow a night in their lives,” Rosner said. The story of women and a man isn’t groundbreaking. Instead, what is unique is how it is presented. When audience members walk into the Downtown loft, they basically walk into a party. A DJ will be spinning tunes as people, including the seven-person cast, are socializing. There will be games, a fortuneteller and cocktails (the $20 tickets include two drinks). Then, in a moment that Rosner describes as “quite filmic,” the music is muffled and the actors begin their scripted conversations. Later they break out into song. Rosner said the interactive elements are intended to break some of the boundaries that usually happen in theater. At

Mindspin, it’s more than enter, sit down, watch passively, applaud and then leave. “This will feel like they’re part of it,” Rosner said. The interaction continues even after the curtain falls. The audience is encouraged to hang out and continue the party. No Smoking The Archway show is a more traditional presentation, though with an obscure past. Cold Turkey is based on a 1971 film of the same name that starred Dick Van Dyke. In the film and the play, a tobacco company executive looking for some positive publicity decides to offer the residents of Eagle Rock, Iowa, $25 million if the entire town quits smoking for 30 days. Mike Funt, who adapted the screenplay for the stage and directs the piece, explained that the offer is made because the tobacco executives believe that this will allow them to be remembered not for the perils of smoking, but for one good deed. Their template is Alfred Nobel, who despite inventing dynamite is more frequently known for instituting the Nobel Peace Prize. Tobacco officials also figure the townspeople won’t pull it off and claim the money. When it starts to look like they will succeed, the company’s PR man tries to sabotage their efforts. The movie fared poorly at the box office and is remem-

bered by very few people. Still, it had an impact on Funt. “I’ve always been a fan of the film,” he said. “It was never released on DVD so I’ve had this copy that I taped off the television when I was a kid. I always thought it would be a really cool, kind of immersive theater show.” On a deeper level, Cold Turkey is about sacrifices and hardships that individuals go through for the greater good, Funt said. “The story is a lot of fun,” said Funt, who is also a member of a clown troupe. “All the characters are broad and silly and funny, but they also have this grain of heart since they’re all banding together to do this thing for their town.” The story also had an impact on the 14-member cast. In the quest to get closer to their characters, some of the actors decided to give up their vices during the rehearsal process. More importantly, none of the actors had to take up smoking for the play. Instead, they use fake cigarettes during the show, which is a good thing, especially since the Archway is such a small venue. Cold Turkey runs Fridays-Sundays, March 28-April 20, at the Archway, 305 S. Hewitt St., (213) 237-9933 or archwayla.com. Mindspin runs Friday-Saturday, through April 6, at Red Loft, 604 E. Fourth St., (213) 880-3780. Tickets at uglyrhino.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

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MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM

03-25-13  

Los Angeles Downtown News is a free weekly newspaper distributed in and around downtown Los Angeles.

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