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Chinese New Year

YEAR OF THE RABBIT

EAT, SHOP & PLAY 112th Annual Golden Dragon Parade Saturday, Feb. 5, 2011 at 1 p.m.

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CHINATOWN L.A.

www.chinatownla.com

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

January 31, 2011

Volume 40, Number 5

CRA/LA Celebrates Chinese Lunar New Year 4709

INSIDE

Urban Scrawl on Huizar’s lists.

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One Man’s Trash Is Another Man’s

The secrets of political polling.

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JAZZ

PICK THE

PROS Pick football games, win prizes.

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photo by Gary Leonard

Assemblage Artist George Herms Brings a Jazz Opera to REDCAT by Ryan VaillancouRt

Pizza and burgers for Broadway.

staff wRiteR

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obbing in the middle of the ocean, a 600-pound steel buoy might seem so peacefully at home. On a stage in Downtown Los Angeles, the nearly six-foot sphere is just a lifeless piece of metal, riddled with dimples from a lifetime of impacts and discolored by salt and age. Then artist George Herms starts banging on it, in simple rhythms, with mallet-sized pieces of chopped two-by-fours. The hollow metal rings out with a mixture of wobbly, bend-

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The latest Health news.

Love 11 Means

ing high notes and thick, dead thuds. Herms brings the inanimate beast to life, which is his specialty. Herms, who is 80, has been collecting detritus and using it as fodder for art since the 1950s. Over the decades, he’s become known as the veritable godfather of the California assemblage movement, a sort of Dr. Frankenstein of Los Angeles’ junkyards. His whimsical sculptures fashioned from pieces collected on beaches and in alleys have landed in galleries, museums and in the private estates of notable see Herms, page 14

More Filming, More Money, More Problems

ExprEss your amour in our romantic LovE LinEs Edition — February 8 dEadLinE for EntriEs — February 3

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A box of chocolates, a dozen roses and your message in Downtown News.

With Downtown Production Days Spiking, An Old Conflict Rears Its Head Again Elin... Not counting the others, you’re the only one...Tiger NFL... I’m a team player, now give me a team...L.A. Joe... I waited and waited, I’m sorry but I’ve met someone else. His name is Ralph... Downtown

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ith waits as long as 30 minutes on Saturday mornings at the Nickel Diner, the last thing co-owner Monica May needs is calls from frustrated customers who can’t find a place to park. But that’s what happened on a recent weekend when a film shoot took over a chunk of the Old Bank District. The production, for a GMC commercial, sequestered a portion of Main Street in front of May’s restaurant and had patrons scrambling for a parking spot. May blamed the shoot for a 20% drop in sales that day, compared to a normal Saturday.

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L.A. Downtown News  •  1264 W. First Street, L.A., CA 90026  •  fax: (213) 250-4617  •  email: lovelines@DowntownNews.com  •  office hours: M-F, 8:30-5

15 CALENDAR LISTINGS 17 MAP 18 CLASSIFIEDS

Such complaints are nothing new. Residents and merchants have grumbled for years about the studios’ use of the community as a veritable Hollywood back lot, from the Financial District to the Arts District. But the conversation seems poised for a revival in 2011, with productions on the rise after two years of a relative slump for the industry. According to FilmL.A., which coordinates permitting in the region, local onlocation production jumped 15% in 2010. In Downtown zip codes, the increase was 20%, and industry observers see that trend continuing this year. That leads to problems for May and ownsee Filming, page 10

The Voice of Downtown Los Angeles

photo by Gary Leonard

Downtown filming jumped 20% last year, and complaints were down. However, some stakeholders still say production crews hamper their lives and hurt their bottom line.

2 Downtown News

January 31, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

AROUNDTOWN Chrysler-Fiat Dealership To Open Jan. 31

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new car dealership featuring five brands under the Chrysler umbrella, including Fiat, is set to open on Monday, Jan. 31, said Ralph Kisiel, spokesman for The Chrysler Group. The dealership at 2025 S. Figueroa St. includes showrooms for Chrysler, Fiat, Dodge, Ram Truck and Jeep, and will create more than 100 jobs. Chrysler officials said the building, which has sat empty since 2004, will function as a “showplace” for new concepts and vehicles under the Chrysler Group umbrella. The site will also hold one of the first North American Fiat outlets. The Italian carmaker in 2009 took a 20% ownership stake in the Detroit company, helping it to emerge from bankruptcy. The Chrysler building is perhaps most eye-catching from the rear: It backs up against the 110 Freeway and features a five-story, LED-lit, glass-encased podium displaying cars. The dealership is one of a series of additions that could change the look and activity level of the Figueroa Corridor. A headquarters for Chinese automaker Build Your Dreams is scheduled to open in April at 1800 S. Figueroa St.

Last Chance for Love Lines

you can get a feature box, a photo and 35 words. To prove your undying love, see the ad on page 12 or email loveliness@downtownnews.com.

President Palmer Joins Music Center Board

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he President has joined the board of directors of the Music Center. OK, not President Obama, but Dennis Haysbert, who played President David Palmer on several seasons of the Fox action show “24.” The actor, who also has appeared in the CBS program “The Unit” and is seen frequently in Allstate TV commercials, was one of five people recently appointed to the board that oversees the Downtown performing arts complex. Also joining the panel are Colleen Bell of Bell-Phillip Television, William Hagelstein of advertising and marketing agency Rubin Postaer and Associates, philanthropist Joyce Kresa and Susan Wegleitner of J.P. Morgan Securities.

Chamber Dinner To Honor Three

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ou only have a couple more days to send a free message of amour to your significant other. The submission deadline for Los Angeles Downtown News’ annual Love Lines is Wednesday, Feb. 2, at 5 p.m. Love Lines, those missives of affection and pet names, will be published in the Feb. 7 issue. The first 20 words of a message are free and for $25

he Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce will welcome a new board chairman, and give out some big prizes, at a dinner on Feb. 10. The event will install Joseph Czyzyk, the chairman and CEO of Mercury Air Group, as the chair of the chamber board. The Chamber will also present the Civic Medal of Honor to Barry Sanders of Latham and Watkins, the Distinguished Business Leader award to Ed Roski of Majestic Realty, and the Corporate

photo by Gary Leonard

Fans clamored for autographs from Luke Walton and other current and former Lakers at the Lakers All Access All-Star Edition on Thursday, Jan. 27. The event at Staples Center was organized by the Los Angeles Sports & Entertainment Commission.

Leadership Award to the San Manuel Indian Bingo & Casino. The event starts at 5:30 p.m. at the JW Marriott at L.A. Live, 900 W. Olympic Blvd. Tickets are $500. Registration at lachamber.com.

Police Seek Shooting Suspect

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APD detectives are searching for a suspect who shot a man in the face on Wednesday, Jan. 26, in the Fashion District. The suspect is believed to be about 18 years old and Hispanic and was last seen wear-

ing a baseball cap and a white shirt with gray writing, “similar to an Ed Hardy style shirt,” police said in a statement. The suspect approached a 25-year-old man on a Pico Boulevard sidewalk, between Main and Los Angeles streets, and shot him, Lt. Paul Vernon said in a statement. “Our victim was sipping on his cup of coffee, like he does every day, waiting for his boss to pick him up,” Vernon said. “The suspect came out of nowhere and shot him point blank in the face.” The victim, who was shot in the side of the face near the jaw, was taken to a hospital and was later reported to be in stable condition.

2011 Annual:Downtown 1/26/2011 11:14 AM Page 1

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LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA Public Comment Period: February 4, 2011 to March 7, 2011 WHAT IS BEING PROPOSED? The California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) invites public comment on the draft Removal Action Workplan (RAW) for the Los Angeles Unified School District’s (LAUSD) proposed Central Region 9th Street K-8 Span School Redevelopment. The RAW describes the removal and off-site disposal of approximately 1,120 cubic yards (1,680 tons) of soil from the site. The site is 3.23-acres and consists of the former 9th Street Elementary School property and parking lot (Area A) and an adjacent hardware store (Area B). The Site is bordered by East 8th Street to the northeast, Towne Avenue to the northwest, East 9th Street to the southwest, and Stanford Avenue to the southeast in downtown Los Angeles. During environmental investigations, concentrations of lead, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil and volatile organic compounds (benzene, ethylbenzene, and PCE) in soil gas exceeding DTSC health risk levels for school sites were detected in Area A. In addition, four metallic subsurface anomalies and a former auto wash rack and an oil/gas storage area were identified in Area B, which will be addressed in a separate investigation. Therefore, DTSC recommended that LAUSD remove the contaminated soils and transport them to a permitted offsite disposal facility. DTSC also recommended LAUSD dig up and remove, if necessary, the subsurface anomalies, former wash rack, and oil/gas areas. The DTSC has prepared a Responsible Agency Checklist (Checklist) and an Addendum based on the Final Environmental Impact Report dated August 31, 2010 and prepared by LAUSD. The Checklist and Addendum states that the proposed cleanup will not have a significant negative impact on the human health and the environment because of the defined amount of contaminated soil to be removed, the removal’s short duration, and the controlled manner in which the contaminated soils will be removed, loaded onto trucks and taken away to an approved/permitted off-site facility for lawful disposal/treatment. HOW DO I PARTICIPATE? This notice is to provide the interested community an opportunity to learn more about the project and provide comments to the DTSC about the proposed cleanup during a thirty (30) day public comment period that starts on February 4, 2011, and ends on March 7, 2011. Your participation is encouraged. Comments concerning the draft RAW may be submitted in writing to Angela Garcia, Project Manager, DTSC, 5796 Corporate Avenue, Cypress, CA 90630, and must be postmarked by March 7, 2011. WHERE DO I GET MORE INFORMATION? A copy of the draft RAW and other project documents are available at the Little Tokyo Branch Library, 203 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles; Plasencia Elementary School, 1321 Cortez St., Los Angeles; Para Los Niños Middle School, 1617 E. 7th St., Los Angeles; LAUSD Office of Environmental Health and Safety, 333 S. Beaudry Ave., 27th Floor, Los Angeles, and at www.laschools.org/find-a-school. Also, all site documents and the Administrative Record pertaining to this project are available for review during office hours at the DTSC Regional Records Office, 5796 Corporate Avenue, Cypress, CA 90630. Contact: Angela Garcia at (714) 484-5490 for an appointment. Project documents can also be found at http://www.envirostor.dtsc.ca.gov/public/. CONTACT: If you have any questions or wish to discuss the removal activities, please contact Jeanne Matsumoto, DTSC Public Participation Specialist, at (714) 484-5338 or email: jmatsumo@dtsc.ca.gov; or Angela Garcia, DTSC Project Manager, at (714) 484-5490 or email: agarcia@dtsc.ca.gov. Media queries contact: Jeanne Garcia at (818) 717-6573 or email: jgarcia1@dtsc.ca.gov. TDD users can use the California Relay Service at 1-888-877-5378 and ask to speak to Jeanne Matsumoto at (714) 484-5338. For information on the DTSC, visit our web site: www.dtsc.ca.gov. Si desea información en español, comuníquese con: Jeanne Garcia al (818) 717-6573

January 31, 2011

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EDITORIALS Kudos to Bait Bike Donors

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis

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hen it comes to the concept of business helping the community, one naturally thinks of large corporations or organizations doing something to “give back.” Most often this occurs in the form of a charitable fundraiser, or perhaps the foundation arm of a large for-profit company provides some sort of benefit to a grass-roots organization. When that happens, it’s usually a good thing. This type of enlightened capitalism generally pays dividends for all involved: The big business looks like a positive and proactive corporate citizen, while the charity/recipient gets something it usually can’t afford on its own. A recent, much smaller donation by a local bicycle shop generated far less attention, but it is no less important. In fact, it could provide a template for a new type of community participation from the smallest of businesses, the ones that might not think they too can make a difference. Hopefully it will be emulated and expanded upon by others. Los Angeles Downtown News last week reported on how a Main Street bike shop called El Maestro donated a two-wheeler to the Los Angeles Police Department. The LAPD is using it for a good cause: as “bait” to sting would-be thieves. Bike theft has been a growing problem in Downtown in the past few years, in some instances leading to situations where bike messengers act as a sort of vigilante force, nabbing those they catch in the act. While we can’t help cheering on any form of justice, there are risks involved when vigilantes have to take the lead. Of course, there’s no danger to the public if the police do the catching before anyone is robbed of their property — it is worth noting that many of the bicycles taken cost hundreds of dollars. Some are more than $1,000. Thus, the LAPD has been staging stings, leaving a bike unlocked and then watching to see who pounces. When they brought the bicycle they were using into El Maestro for repairs, the staff and store owner Jorge Sosa were skeptical — they said it didn’t look like anything anyone would want to take. With that realization, El Maestro took a bike worth $900 and donated it to the department. Sosa didn’t ask for anything in return. As members of the two-wheeled community, he and the shop’s staff only hoped to stop crimes that frustrate and endanger cyclists. In the grand scheme of things, a $900 in-kind donation is small potatoes. But it is also inspiring. These members of the community saw a problem and, in their own way, did something to address it. They are role models in a way we can all emulate. This is a nice reminder that there are a lot more ways to help out than just by writing a check (though that’s nothing to be dismissed). Hopefully it will prompt other business owners to think of unconventional ways that they too can give back. Whether by donating to the LAPD or other entities across Downtown, there are many ways to help.

Council Disrespects Los Angeles With Lack of Quorum

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ast week, the City Council canceled a regularly scheduled meeting when not enough people showed up. You read that right: At a time of great fiscal crisis, the people elected to, by and for the citizens of Los Angeles just couldn’t pull it together to do the city’s business. There were plenty of regular folks waiting in council chambers on the morning of Tuesday, Jan. 25. There was also an ample number of city support staff, the people who make sure everything proceeds smoothly during a council meeting. They showed up, even the ones being furloughed as many as 26 days a year. However, 15 minutes after the 10 a.m. start time, only eight council members were around the horseshoe, and 10 are needed for a quorum. At 10:17, Council President Eric Garcetti apologized to the community and canceled the meeting. We don’t think it is an overstatement to say that the inability to achieve a quorum is disrespectful and irresponsible behavior on the part of the Council. It’s completely unacceptable. Even worse, it was the second time in four months a council meeting was canceled because of a lack of a quorum. Getting there on time is not a complex matter. These meetings do not arise unexpectedly. Everyone in City Hall, and thousands of people beyond the building, know that the council is scheduled to meet every Tuesday,

Wednesday and Friday at 10 a.m. on the third floor of the pretty white building on Spring Street. The start time doesn’t seem onerous — even on the days when a council committee meets beforehand, there remains plenty of time for sleepyheads to wake up and get to Downtown. At a time when Los Angeles is facing a deficit of hundreds of millions of dollars, the council’s inability to get a quorum is a smack in the face of the citizenry (not that it would be any less disrespectful if L.A. had a healthy surplus). People sitting in the chambers hoping to hear the day’s business or address the lawmakers had presumably arranged their schedules, agreed to miss work, hired babysitters or performed other acts of personal sacrifice to get there. In fact, last Tuesday seemed to be a pretty important day. On the agenda (among many other things) was a proposal to keep nearly $1 billion worth of CRA money within the city. One might think the council would deem that important enough to discuss. The council has been late to its own meetings a lot in the past few years. When Garcetti canceled a meeting in October, it was only after repeated frustrations over council members being tardy. Presumably at that first instance, no one thought he would live up to his threat. Presumably, months later, no one thought he would do it again. He was right to

act in both instances — the public should not have to wait around for people given the privilege to make decisions for the city. Last Tuesday, five council members were given excuses to miss the meeting: Janice Hahn, Bernard Parks, Dennis Zine, Herb Wesson and Bill Rosendahl. Missing in action at the 10 a.m. start time were Paul Koretz and Downtown’s José Huizar. The only one we’ll give a pass to is Rosendahl, who is recovering from surgery. Rightly slammed in the wake of the cancellation were Huizar (who was late coming back from a Downtown press conference) and Koretz (who was stuck in traffic). Both apologized profusely and said it won’t happen again, but who knows? While Huizar and Koretz deserve the brunt of the blame, those who requested and received permission to miss the meeting don’t get completely off the hook. As elected representatives, they should all ensure that there will always be a quorum. They should know who and how many people are going to miss a meeting and should plan accordingly so the quorum is not put in jeopardy. They should act like the leaders they are, and not force Garcetti to play daddy and punish them when they don’t show up. The council let Los Angeles down last week. It’s time for the members to meet their responsibilities and get to work on time.

January 31, 2011

Downtown News 5

DowntownNews.com

WHAT’S FOR SALE

A Small Loft With a Key Location $6,825 down payment. The bank is open to other means of financing, said listing agent Andrew Rhodes. Walk to Work, Grab a Taco: People who work in the Civic Center or Bunker Hill would be hard-pressed to find a better location than Third and Broadway. Angels Flight, which delivers riders to Cal Plaza and upper Grand Avenue, is a block away. City Hall is three blocks away. The Pershing Square Metro stop is one block away. Grand Central Market is across the street, which makes the famous carnitas at the Las Morelianas taco stand frighteningly convenient. photos courtesy Andrew Rhodes

Unit #405 in the Pan American Lofts. It measures 750 square feet and is listed at $227,500. by Ryan Vaillancourt staff writer

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n the new column “What’s for Sale,” Los Angeles Downtown News is looking at everything from condos to multi-family buildings to vacant lots now on the market. We’ll look at the high end, the low end and everything in between. We hope that regular snapshots of individual properties will make for a wide-ranging survey of the overall Downtown market. This week, the focus is on a foreclosed studio at the Pan American Lofts. The Unit: Pan American Lofts unit #405, at 253 S. Broadway, is a 750-square-foot studio priced at $227,500. It overlooks the intersection of Third Street and Broadway, through

floor-to-ceiling windows set in original brick walls of the 1897 building. Homeowners association dues are about $370 per month. The History: You read that right — the structure went up in 1897, and was the second office building in Los Angeles. It followed the Bradbury Building, which sits kitty corner to the Pan American (it was originally known as the Irvine Byrne Block, and sat directly across from the old City Hall). It was home to the Mexican consulate during World War II, and later housed a Giant Penny discount store that moved out in 2004. In 2006, developer Urban Pacific Builders spent $20 million to convert the mostly vacant five-story complex into 40 lofts.

Compared to What?: At $303 per square foot, the unit is significantly less than the average condo in the Historic Core — two blocks away, lofts in the recently opened El Dorado building are selling for close to $400 per square foot, according to real estate research firm The Mark Company. But the unit is right around the price of a few recent sales in the Pan Am building: Loft #505, which sits above and is the same size as #405, sold in July for $227,002. A 940-square-foot residence on the fourth floor sold in August for $240,002, or $255 per square foot. Financy Pants: As a Fannie Mae “Homepath Recovery” property, there is financing available allowing buyers to put as little as 3% down — that translates to a

It Might Get Loud: Being close to everything can have a downside for those new to city living: Downtown Los Angeles is no Manhattan, but it gets loud. Broadway, especially on weekend days, bustles with shoppers, and many stores try to lure people in with pulsating reggaeton or banda music. Darkness does not always bring serenity: Even at night, cars and other sounds of an urban environment — we’re looking at you, Mr.-I-Just-Stumbled-Out-of-LaCita-After-Last-Call-and-Really-Feel-LikeShouting — can be a surprise. In a unit this small, there’s not much place to escape the noise. Creature Features: The unit comes with a stackable washer and dryer and a dishwasher, but residents will have to bring their own fridge. It also comes with one parking space. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

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Poll Position When It Comes to Bruising Questions in the 14th District Election, What Matters Is Not Who You Ask, But How You Ask by Jon RegaRdie executive editoR

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n the five weeks remaining until the March 8 election, voters in the 14th District may be repeatedly hit with three messages from the campaign of challenger Rudy Martinez: THE REGARDIE REPORT

1) Martinez is the greatest American hero since Obamaman, having saved an entire family from a burning car while the rest of the huddled masses sat and watched, doing nothing. It’s a bird! It’s a politician! It’s SuperRudy! 2) Incumbent José Huizar is just a shade shy of Beelzebub, with a propensity for using taxpayer money for his own benefit and for a Grinch-like pilfering of thousands of dollars from poor angelic nonprofits. 3) One of the most pressing issues in the district is the need for more ducks in public parks, and SuperRudy is the one to make that happen. I hold these thingamajigs to be self-evident, because on Tuesday, Jan. 25, I spent about 20 minutes on the phone answering questions, many of them incredibly leading, for a pollster working for the Martinez campaign (I live in the district, and, lucky me, got a call). While

the questioner never said he was part of Team Martinez — he only identified himself as with the firm California Opinion Research — the 19 zillion queries about Rudy as a guy who created hundreds of jobs, and the fiercely negative Huizar questions (more on those later), made it clear who the queries will ultimately benefit. Actually, everything wasn’t crystal clear at first. The questioner sounded bored and uninformed. He started by asking if I would vote and then whether I had a positive, negative, neutral or no opinion of the two candidates, the City Council, former 14th District rep Nick Pacheco and “Major” Antonio Villaraigosa. Major? I know dealing with L.A.’s economy and media masses is grueling, but I didn’t realize AnVil had advanced beyond lieutenant. Ask and Ye Shall Receive When it comes to campaigns, polls with leading questions are de rigueur. You generally pay a firm a lot of money to provide whatever answers you hope to spin in a press release, while using the rest of the results to determine what to include in hit piece mailers. Huizar was the first one to strike with a poll. Over five days in late December, 400 district voters answered questions, leading to a Jan. 4 press release giving Huizar a 58%-15% lead over Martinez, with 27% of voters un-

A new poll for CD14 challenger Rudy Martinez (standing) asks some pretty harsh questions about Councilman José Huizar (seated). Pollsters were calling around the district last week.

decided. It ranked Huizar high in a number of demographic categories and basically said people love him as much as they do puppies and the movie Babe. Then again, he’s paying a Santa Monica polling firm $28,500 (according to campaign disclosure statements filed with the City Ethics Commission — and couldn’t he find someone in the city of Los Angeles for the job?), meaning he got what he paid for, or paid for what he got, whichever way you want to put it. Some anti-Martinez stories also smack of polling. So far Huizar’s campaign has dribbled out that Martinez has been arrested four times

and lobbied for the tobacco industry. The trips to the pokey are a couple decades old and the lobbying gig is what some call making a living, but getting busted by the cops and shilling for Big Tobacco poll terribly. The new Martinez poll points to directions the race may go. Early on, the questioner asked what issue I think has the highest priority in the district. Because I’m occasionally a wiseacre (others might use a stronger word), I answered, “More ducks in public parks!” I can only hope six dozen other people said the same thing, so that when Team Martinez continued on next page

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analyzes the results, they’ll scratch their heads and say, “Well, it seems odd, but if the people want ducks, we’ll be the campaign of ducks.” When I told my wife how I answered, she shook her head disparagingly and told me that’ll make me a -3 on the ranking list. Wrong campaign, I responded. The lists are Huizar territory. Here Comes the Mud The questioner asked three times who I’ll vote for, once near the beginning, once after giving some positive statements about each candidate, and then, finally, after some ferocious Huizar negatives (I never said who I’ll choose). Expect the most pro-Martinez numbers to make the press release. They asked repeatedly for my take on Martinez’s record of job creation as a restaurateur, his overcoming hurdles such as losing a brother to gang violence and a sister to drugs, and how he “recently pulled a family from a burning car while dozens of others stood by doing nothing.” I’m sure it went down exactly this way, because if it didn’t, they couldn’t say it, right? SuperRudy! Then came the mud. They asked if I am concerned that Huizar was the target of a federal investigation for taking thousands of dollars from nonprofits (say what?!), a scenario that ultimately led to jail time for a labor leader. They asked about lists his office made ranking people in the district based on their influence, and that he “withheld city services” from low rankers and then, egads (my word), had city inspectors harass them, “a clear abuse of power” (questioner’s words). They wanted to know my thoughts on his supposedly spending $40,000 in taxpayer money on restaurants, bars and clubs, to which my response is, well, if a guy with four young children and a crazily demanding City Council job can actually do tequila shooters and dance till 3 a.m. at a party where Daft Punk is spinning, then more power to him. Then they got to the really ugly questions, which I won’t go into, because I already feel dirty enough having written about the above. They also asked whether I’d learned about the race through the Internet, the L.A. Times or La Opinion. For whatever reason, they didn’t mention Los Angeles Downtown News. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.

Film Sites Ready Follow the Leading Questions For Their Close-Up

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ere’s how the old poll game works: They ask a bunch of questions, most of which have simple multiple choice answers intended to uncover your feelings toward certain figures or statements. In the new Rudy Martinez poll, for example, they asked whether respondents feel positive, negative, neutral or have not heard about figures including Martinez, Councilman José Huizar and the L.A. City Council. There are also “positive” questions, such as: Are the following statements reasons to vote for, or not vote for, someone: n The person is committed to listening and being responsive and representing all people in the district. n As a business owner he has created jobs, and he will fight to make the city a better place. After the positives come the negatives. While last week’s poll had some harsh Martinez statements, many more were directed at Huizar. They included: Are you very concerned, somewhat concerned, not that concerned or not concerned at all about the following statements about José Huziar: n He does nothing for people unless an election is coming. n He has missed nearly 9,000 council votes. Near the end, the pollsters asked respondents to pick one statement that concerns you most, even if you are planning to vote for Huizar. They said: 1) He is arrogant and expects special privileges. 2) He abuses power to punish people and for personal gain. 3) He misuses taxpayer money for personal benefit. This, as the adage goes, is how they make the sausage. —Jon Regardie

photo courtesy Bison Archives

Lloyd Hamilton on a ledge in front of the old Los Angeles Times building, a shot from the 1922 film Mermaid Comedies. It is featured in the new book Location Filming in Los Angeles.

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ans of film, fans of Downtown, and fans of Downtown in film will be out in force on Saturday, Feb. 5. That’s when there will be a party, walking tour and screening celebrating the publication of the book Location Filming in Los Angeles. The photo history (it has more than 200 images, many of them in Downtown) came out around Thanksgiving, but sold out its first run by Christmas, said Harry Medved of Fandango, who co-authored the book with Marc Wanamaker and Karie Bible. More copies have been printed and will be available at an event at Metropolis Books. The evening, known as Downtown L.A. Movie History Night, will include a book signing at 6 p.m. At 8 p.m., Medved, along with several veteran location managers, will lead a free tour of Downtown spots that have appeared in films such as Inception and (500) Days of Summer. “Just within this square-shaped area between Fourth and Fifth and Spring and Main streets, at least 200 movies have been shot,” said Medved. “There’s so much film history here.” Downtown L.A. Movie History Night is Feb. 5 at 6 p.m. at 440 S. Main St. More information at filmtripping.com. —Jon Regardie

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Burgers, Pizza Coming to Broadway Umamicatessen and Two Boots Expected to Create 70 Jobs by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

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roadway could be less than a year away from getting a pair of new restaurants that will bring not only burgers and pizza to the street, but also up to 70 jobs. City and business officials last week gathered to formally announce the new businesses. The Umamicatessen, a venture by the owners of the popular Umami Burger, is slated for a 7,000-square-foot space at 852-854 S. Broadway. The New York-based Two Boots Pizza is set to open in a 1,000-square-foot spot at 828 S. Broadway. City officials expect the renovation of the currently vacant spaces to take about 18 months, but landlord Steve Needleman, who appeared at a press conference on Tuesday, Jan. 25, along with 14th District City Councilman José Huizar and restaurant owners, said they may arrive sooner. “The goal is to have both venues open by the end of this year,” Needleman said. The restaurants will flank the Broadway Bar and Orpheum Theater and cater to residents and tourists, Huizar said. They were lured in part by his ongoing Bringing Back Broadway initiative, an attempt to revi-

talize the street. “I think it’s going to attract people from all over that know about these specialty, good-quality known food venues,” Huizar said. “Hopefully more and more people who also work Downtown will venture down to Broadway with these two venues.” The Umamicatessen will include a burger restaurant, a bar, deli and dessert items. It will be the sixth Umami spot and the largest among the small chain eatery. “We want to make this the flagship of Umami burger in L.A.,” said Adam Fleishman, CEO of Umami Burger. The restaurant will seat up to 80 people and operate seven days a week until 2 a.m., although Fleishman said he eventually hopes to be open 24 hours a day. Umami will create 35-50 jobs. Two Boots Pizza, which has a location in Echo Park, expects to hire 15-25 people. The restaurant is known for blending traditional Italian flavors with Cajun flair. The Broadway location will include a large window providing a view of pizza dough being tossed. It will display local artwork and offer street-side service and delivery. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

The Da Camera Society presenter of

photo by Gary Leonard

Landlord Steve Needleman (left) with Adam Fleishman, CEO of Umami Burger. Fleishman last week announced that his 7,000-square-foot restaurant will create up to 50 jobs.

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Filming Continued from page 1 ers of other small businesses on Main Street and throughout Downtown who say that production is a hassle for patrons. “We’re the backbone of the street,” said May. “And we’re systematically — to put it mildly — looked over.” The conflict presents a double-edged sword: Civic officials could limit filming to appease community stakeholders, but they would lose the economic impact that comes with shoots, including the fees that studios pay to take over public streets. The GMC shoot, one of more than 8,000 production days projected to take place Downtown in 2011, generated $2,720 in direct fees for the city. City Hall could, on the flip side, push for more access for film crews in order to stimulate job growth and preserve a crucial California industry. Most commercials have scores if not hundreds of well-paid workers, from directors to lighting and art crews to production assistants. Feature films can have even more employees. That approach, however, comes at the risk of alienating residents and hurting the small businesses that remain in the same spot all year long. Central City Changes The growing residential and small business communities Downtown have had a major effect on how production works in the area, said FilmL.A. CEO Paul Audley. Last March, FilmL.A. adopted new conditions for location filming Downtown. The move came three years after the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council started lobbying for more community-friendly policies. Stakeholders were upset over productions such as a late-night shoot that employed a helicopter. The conditions brought tighter restrictions on hours, lighting, rush-hour shoots and equipment placement. There is also a 2-year-old unit within the LAPD that goes after rogue productions and visits permitted shoots to ensure they comply with conditions on the permit. There is evidence that those efforts are working, Audley said, pointing to a decrease in complaints. Last year, Downtown saw 7,951 production days, up 20% from the 6,372 production days in 2009. During that time,

complaints dropped slightly, from 432 to 423. That came after annual complaints increased in 2010. “It’s absolutely better in the Old Bank District,” said Tom Gilmore, the largest owner of properties around Fourth and Main streets. Gilmore sometimes finds himself in the middle of the filming conundrum. As a landlord he’s accountable to residents who have to deal with the potential inconveniences posed by film crews. On the other hand, production is a lucrative revenue stream for his company. The Farmers and Merchants Bank building is a regularly used location. Gilmore’s company has its own special conditions that get worked into its contracts with production companies, which add another layer of regulations over the rules adopted last year for Downtown. While the industry has bristled — the Motion Picture and Theatrical Trade Teamsters Local 399 rated Farmers and Merchants one of the 10 most difficult places to film in Los Angeles in 2009 — Gilmore said residents are better protected than they were three years ago. “I think the relationship between the residential community and landlords and the film industry was a lot more contentious back then because it was kind of the Wild West, and now I think it’s just incrementally getting better all the time,” Gilmore said. Divided Opinion Even in the Old Bank District, opinion is divided. May believes the drop in complaints is not especially meaningful. She said she doesn’t reach out to FilmL.A. anymore because she’s found the organization slow to respond. The decrease could be more reflective of a sense of helplessness among area residents and businesses, she said. “I feel like, I can sit out here and stamp my feet and have a hissy fit about this, but ultimately the money is going to go where the money is going to go,” May said. “Money is what always talks. It always has.” Audley stressed that, by calling FilmL.A. (there is a 24-hour hotline at 213-977-8600), community members can get their problems solved when the issue is rooted in a permit violation or excessive inconvenience. But they have to call while the violation is occurring. A day or two after the shoot, there’s not much FilmL.A. can do, Audley said. “We have a 24/7 service, so while it’s happening they should call us so we can correct it then,” Audley said. “If we’re unable, we contact the LAPD unit to go out and enforce it for

us. We take that responsibility very seriously.” Gilmore said that the drop in complaints could also reflect a more entrenched residential community that has come to expect filming as part of the Downtown way of life. “I do think that filming is part of the DNA in Downtown, that people after they get used to it realize that it is a daily reality in Downtown,” he said. “For better or for worse, it is there.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

Dealing With Downtown Filming n Have a gripe about an ongoing production? Call FilmL.A., while the problem is occurring, at (213) 9778600. During off hours, press “2” to be connected to an on-duty employee. n To stay aware of upcoming shoots in your neighborhood, sign up for FilmL.A.’s e-alerts. They’re sent daily and include information about where a production is planned and whether it involves inconveniences such as street or lane closures. n The Special Conditions for Location Filming in Downtown were passed by the City Council last year. They prohibit filming beyond the hours of 6 a.m.-11 p.m. within 100 feet of a residential building. In the Old Bank District, filming is allowed only between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. Productions can shoot outside normal hours if they submit a signature survey of area residents and businesses. n No permits are issued for outside production on Spring or Main streets, between Second and Ninth streets, during the monthly Art Walk. n In most instances, a permit may include no more than 300 feet of curb lane per city block for the parking of production vehicles, crew or equipment. n Film production companies are required to remove all trash, food and cardboard boxes at the end of each day. Production companies are responsible for the actions of catering companies they employ. —Ryan Vaillancourt

Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin

Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com • email: realpeople@downtownnews.com facebook: L.A. Downtown News

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Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: David Friedman, Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Pamela Albanese, Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, Michael X. Ferraro, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt

ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: David Friedman, Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Pamela Albanese, Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, Michael X. Ferraro, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Catherine Holloway, Brenda Stevens, Billy Wright, Lon Wahlberg circulAtioN: Norma Rodas distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla

Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com email: realpeople@downtownnews.com facebook: L.A. Downtown News twitter: DowntownNews The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

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Downtown News 11

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HEALTH NFL Grant Lets USC Study Athletes’ Heart Rate League Gives $100,000 to Examine Pro and College Players

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FL Charities has awarded a $100,000 medical research grant to the USC Keck School of Medicine to study heart rate behavior in National Football League players and USC student-athletes. The study will be the first to investigate the heart rate response of NFL players under dynamic stress, including during games. “We hope that this study will create a safer playing field for all athletes,” said Leslie Saxon, the principal investigator for the study and the chief of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, and executive director of the USC Center for Body Computing. To better understand the spectrum of normal heart responses in elite football players, researchers will study heart data by body mass index, player position and age. They also will do a comparative study with USC football players. The USC grant is part of more than $1.6 million in grants to support sports-related medical research awarded this year by NFL Charities, the charitable foundation of the NFL owners. “We are proud to support sports-related medical research proposals through NFL

Charities Medical Research Grants,” said league Commissioner Roger Goodell, who is also president of the NFL Charities Board. “These grants will help to address risk factors for football players and all athletes, and make the game safer.” The risk of sudden death in persons with undiagnosed cardiovascular disease increases twofold among competitive athletes, said Saxon. Unfortunately, currently recommended cardiovascular pre-participation screening procedures for athletes to determine risk of sudden death may both fail to detect the subjects at risk and falsely identify other healthy athletes as at-risk, said Saxon. A team of USC physicians will apply a small patch to pre-screened NFL and USC players to obtain heart rate and other data during practice and game situations. The data will be analyzed at USC. “We’re excited to take part in this worthwhile heart study, and we look forward to evaluating the results,” said USC head athletic trainer Russ Romano. “I know it will provide valuable input in our quest to provide the best possible health care to our student-athletes.”

photo by Gary Leonard

With a grant from NFL Charities, the USC Keck School of Medicine will study the heart rate response of NFL players and student athletes at the university.

Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, which is affiliated with the Keck School of Medicine of USC, also received a grant in the amount of $100,000 to conduct research on red blood cell metabolism in carriers of sickle cell trait and its consequences for athletes. The grants will go to 16 organizations including USC and Childrens Hospital Los Angeles. Since 2000, NFL Charities has com-

mitted grants to medical facilities nationwide, including studies on brain injury, ACL injury prevention and heat stress risks. The USC study will be administered through the division of cardiovascular medicine at the USC Cardiovascular and Thoracic Institute and the Center for Body Computing. Article courtesy USC HSC Weekly.

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The Label Game Experts Suggest Paying Attention to the Fine Print on Food Packages by Ginny Frizzi

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f you are what you eat, then it’s probably a good idea to read food labels. Americans have become more health-conscious, with many people reducing their caloric intake in order to lose weight and monitoring the use of certain ingredients, such as salt, because of medical conditions. They also are looking for ways to make better food choices and to develop healthier eating habits. One of the best ways to start, according to experts, is by reading food labels, which often contain surprises. What appears to be a healthy food may turn out to be anything but. The first thing is not to be fooled by what is on the front of the package, says Manuel Villacorta, a registered dietitian and national media spokesman for the American Dietetic Association. “For example, you can pick up a multi-grain bar and see that it says it contains ‘more whole grain’ on the front, but when you look at the list of ingredients on the back, you’ll see it’s high in fructose,” he says. “You need to be an Inspector Gadget and read the fine print.” Personal trainer Kelli Calabrese concurs. “Read the food label rather than the claims on the front of the package, which can be deceptive with pictures or words,” she says. Though she stresses the importance of reading food labels, Calabrese points out that most of the food the average person

buys should be fresh — such as fish, fruits and vegetables — and not packages with labels. “Fresh food is always best. Frozen is second-best, and canned is last,” she instructs. Ingredients on labels are listed from the largest to the smallest in quantity. Special attention should be paid to the first one listed. “If the first ingredient is sugar, the whole thing is likely to be mainly sugar,” Villacorta says. Calabrese believes that the fewer ingredients there are, the better. “Be sure you recognize and can pronounce and identify all ingredients. If it sounds foreign to you, it should not be in your body,” she says. She believes it is useful to identify all of the potential names for sugar, which include sucrose, molasses, corn syrup, cocoa, inulin, maltitol and maltose. When it comes to fats, it is important to be aware that they are not all created equal, points out Villacorta. “Look to pick products with polymers and monomers, which are heart-healthy. Watch the saturated fats,” he says. “Trans fats are a problem. Think twice before eating them.” It is also important to remember that the human body needs such ingredients as sodium. “No one is asking people to go totally salt-free, because sodium is needed for electrolytes and for the heart,” Villacorta says. He adds that the sodium content might be 150 milligrams in a snack, between

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400 and 500 milligrams in a frozen meal, and 1,000 or more milligrams in just one tablespoon of soy sauce. When it comes to carbohydrates, the listings on packages and labels are often misleading because there are no breakdowns, Villacorta says. “Fiber and sugar are carbohydrates, but most manufacturers don’t list them in the carbohydrate total.” Calabrese recommends avoiding foods that say they are enriched or fortified because they are typically very low in nutritional value. She suggests looking for high sources of fiber, specifically foods with 16 or more grams per serving. Another important thing is to read the servings per container, which enables a person to calculate how much of the package he or she should consume. It is a common mistake to overlook this when reading labels, says Villacorta. “Someone might read a label on a sugary drink that says 300 calories and 15 grams of sugar per serving. That doesn’t sound too bad, except the bottle contains three servings and the person thinks it is just one serving.” she says. “This is a common mistake because most people don’t know sizes or how much eight ounces is. They will drink the whole bottle and think that is the whole serving.” Reading food labels may seem confusing at first, but Villacorta encourages people to keep with it. “Get used to reading labels so you can make sense of it,” he says. Article copyright 2011 creators.com.

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A Hopping new YeAr Chinatown Celebrates the Year of the Rabbit

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he dragons and Shaolin warriors are once again ready for the streets of Chinatown. This year, there’s going to be a rabbit in the mix too. The Chinese New Year celebrations are set to take place in Chinatown Feb. 2-13. Area residents, businesses and visitors will celebrate the Year of the Rabbit with a parade, performers, a race, a scavenger hunt and a crafts fair. Of course, area restaurants and bars will be hives (or are they hutches?) of activity. “We’re expecting a great crowd. There’s a tremendous amount of excitement with Chinese New Year,” said George Yu, executive director of the Chinatown Business Improvement District, one of the festival organizers. “We’re ready for the Year of the Rabbit.” The year 4709 on the Chinese calendar will start with a ceremony at Thien Hau Temple, at 750 N. Yale St., on Wednesday, Feb. 2 from 11 p.m.-1 a.m. Thousands of people are expected to gather to make offerings to

the deities. They will also set off firecrackers to awaken the spirits while burning incense, which is believed to usher in good fortune. The ceremony will include lion dancers. Most of the festivities will take place on two weekends, Feb. 5-6 and Feb. 12-13. The highlight of the first weekend will be the 112th annual Golden Dragon Parade. More than 100 floats, marching bands, dragons and martial arts groups will proceed down Hill Street and Broadway on Saturday starting at 1 p.m. About 100,000 people are expected to line the parade route, which will end on Broadway and Cesar Chavez Avenue with a literal and very loud bang. “We’ve got a big old firecracker display set for the end of the parade,” said Bob Gin, chair of the Golden Dragon Parade, which is organized by the Chinese Chamber of Commerce. While it is not as crowded as the Rose Parade, many people still claim spaces along the street hours before the procession starts. “This whole event is something that attracts the entire community, including kids,

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Plaza Parties Central Plaza will be the spot to catch performers over the first weekend. Highlights include Shaolin warriors, lion dancers, contortionists and Chinese acrobats. The plaza will also house the L.A. Craft Experience, an outdoor market with more than 40 vendors selling art, clothing, jewelry, home decor and even handmade books. see New Year, page 20

parents, nearby residents and many that come here from other areas,” Gin said. There will be two honorary parade marshals this year: Winston Wu, a longtime community youth activist, and Al Soo-Hoo, president of the board of directors of the Chinese American Museum. “They’ve both done so much for the community so we wanted to honor them,” Gin said.

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Colorful creatures will be seen along Broadway as part of the Golden Dragon Parade on Feb. 5. It is the highlight of the Chinese New Year celebration.

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Herms Continued from page 1 collectors such as the late Dennis Hopper. Whenever possible, Herms animates his recovered shopping carts, rusty saxophones and plastic jewel cases with sound, a practice that stems from his deep connection to and appreciation for jazz. He’s not a professional musician, but jazz has been a key inspiration since he was a young man. “I’ve been sitting in the front row of jazz clubs for 50 years,” he said. Now, Herms is getting out of the front row and onto the stage to marry his assemblage craft with his jazz passion. From Feb. 3-5, he’ll appear at REDCAT, with the help of some real instrumental heavyweights. “The Artist’s Life: A Free Jazz Opera” is essentially a performance art production of Herms’ autobiography. He’ll be joined by the acclaimed Bobby Bradford Mo’Tet and the Theo Saunders Group. At the center of it all, both physically and figuratively, will be Herms and his array of found percussion instruments, including a rusty tin can adorned with a shiny, reflective and warped CD. It’s warped because Herms burned it. “People nowadays, they say, ‘I’ll burn you a CD,’” he said. “Well, so I burned a CD.” The Artist Live Several years ago, Herms was sitting in the Valley jazz club Charlie O’s, listening to pianist Theo Saunders play Thelonious Monk’s “In Walked Bud.” The tune was Monk’s 1947 tribute to the pianist Bud Powell, and decades later, Saunders was offering his own tribute to the late keyboard master. Herms was jealous — not of Saunders’ piano chops, but rather his visceral connection with the audience. The relationship was

simple: Saunders played and people sighed, clapped and smiled. He made music and they reacted. Performing live, Herms thought, seemed like a rush that offered instant gratification. It was a bit ironic, considering that Herms isn’t exactly lacking for attention. In fact, his name is almost synonymous with the California assemblage movement. He had his first retrospective in 1979 at the Newport Harbor Art Museum (now the Orange County Museum of Art). In 2005, the renowned curator Walter Hopps oversaw a review of Herms’ work at the Santa Monica Museum of Art. Herms’ archive was acquired in 2009 by the Getty, which is planning another show on the artist in October. “George Herms is really at the center of all that was happening in the California assemblage movement,” said Rani Singh, a Getty curator working on Pacific Standard Time, an exhibition of Los Angeles art from 1945 to 1980 that debuts in October. “Not only is he the missing link between the beats and the hippies, but he’s really the essential cog in the machine.” Despite his acclaim and stature in the art world, Herms felt something was missing from his sculptural work — that aforementioned instant gratification. After that show in the Valley, Herms approached Saunders and expressed his envy. He was surprised by the reaction. “He disagreed,” Herms said. Jazzmen might get instant gratification, Saunders said, but that’s all they get — that one night in the club, and its fleeting moments of beauty. With visual arts, Saunders told Herms, “They keep your [expletive] in the museum for 500 years.” In a way, the artist friends will get the best of both worlds at the REDCAT shows. Herms will share the stage with some of his

January 31, 2011

image courtesy of George Herms

George Herms rehearses for his free jazz opera, which will involve a floating spiral staircase rising to the soundtrack of live jazz. It runs Feb. 3-5.

jazz idols and create in front of an audience. He gets the full experience, as much of the performance is improvisational. Last week, Herms was still working out details on pieces of paper scattered at his feet in the REDCAT theater. For the musicians, joining Herms in a performance gives them more of a shot at history. When the REDCAT event is long over, it will live on in a museum. For 500 years? It’s possible. “The Artist’s Life” is a five-act multimedia opera that blends live musical performance with projected video and the singing of a libretto comprised of 50 years of Herms’ diary musings. Herms maintains a long white beard, an overt reminder of his age. Otherwise, his

spirit is youthful and his presence alert. After meeting with stage directors at REDCAT, he took his cappuccino with four sugars. The show deals prominently with death. In one act, there is a tribute to John Coltrane that involves a sort of ritual raising of the spirit, and in another, the performance deals with the loss of a close friend. But don’t expect a morose affair. “What I do is so alive,” said Herms as he stirred his sugar into his coffee. “I tear up the joint. The only way I know is to go out swinging.” The Artist Live: A Free Jazz Opera is at 8:30 p.m., Feb. 3-5, at REDCAT, 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.com. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

CELEBRATE Chinese New YearYEAR OF THE RABBIT

Feb. 5 & 6, 2011

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CHINA TOWN 2011

(2/2) Begin the celebration with a Midnight Ceremony to usher in the New Year at Thien Hau Temple (2/5) 112th Annual Golden Dragon Parade (2/5-2/6) • Lunar New Year Festival • Entertainment and Cultural activities at Central and West Plazas • LA Craft Experience (2/6) “The Great Chinatown Hunt" with RaceLA The following weekend 2/12 & 2/13 33rd Annual Firecracker 5K/10K Run/Walk

More information at www.ChinatownLA.com or call (213) 680-0243

January 31, 2011

Downtown News 15

DowntownNews.com

LISTINGS EVENTS SPONSORED LISTINGS Live Church LA Club Nokia, 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 4934329 or livechurchla.com. 10 a.m.: Every Sunday, Live Church L.A. takes over the VIP Lounge at Club Nokia, bringing great music, people and inspiring messages. On February 6, come hear firsthand about “Home for Good,” the plan to end chronic homelessness in Los Angeles, straight from the task force co-chair Jerry Neuman.

Thursday, Feb. 3 TOWN HALL Los Angeles Millennium Biltmore Hotel, 506 S. Grand Ave., (213) 628-8141 or townhall-la.org. 5:30-8:45 p.m.; Feb. 4, 7:45 a.m-4:30 p.m.: A two-day conference designed for teachers to discuss classroom techniques that work regardless of changes in funding or legislation. Free registration for K-12 public school teachers. Central Library Meeting Room A, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org. 12:15-1 p.m.: The California Department of Corporations’ Language of Money program will cover how to deal with financial difficulties. Learn about the pitfalls of cash advances and payday loans, and how to get help with credit problems and bankruptcy. ALOUD at the Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org. 7 p.m.: What’s the matter with capitalism? Entrepreneur Peter Barnes and historian Joyce Appleby discuss whether the market can serve both private interests and the public good. MOCA Engagement Party The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, 152 N. Central Ave., (213) 621-1745 or moca.org. 7-10 p.m.: Art collective The League of Imaginary Scientists unveils its invention, The Automatoggler, which will help save humanity and make toast, too. It’s a free art party. Friday, Feb. 4 Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-DINO or nhm.org. 5-10 p.m.: Once a month, the entire Natural History Museum stays open late and features live music, scientific discussion and behind-the-scenes curatorial tours. See the Don’t Miss List.

FILM Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. Feb. 4, 6 p.m.: Zenith is a retro-futuristic steampunk thriller about two men in two different time periods whose search for the same grand conspiracy leads them to question their own humanity. Through Feb. 10. Feb. 5, 7-11 p.m.: Folk-rock duo/filmmakers Bright Blue Gorilla perform live before the U.S. premiere of their latest comedy, Lose With English. See the Don’t Miss List. Regal Cinema L.A. Live 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (877) 835-5734 or lalive.com. Through Feb. 3: From Prada to Nada (12:10, 1:30, 2:40, 5:10, 7, 7:40 and 10:20 p.m.); The Mechanic (12, 2:30, 4:20, 5:10, 7:50, 9:40 and 10:40 p.m.); The Rite (12, 1:40, 2:40, 5:20, 7:10, 8, 9:50 and 10:50 p.m.); No Strings Attached (1, 1:50, 3:50, 4:40, 6:40, 7:30, 9:20 and 10:10 p.m.); The Way Back (1:10 and 7:20 p.m.); The Dilemma (12:50, 3:40, 6:30 and 9:10 p.m.); The Green Hornet 3D (1:40, 4:50, 7:40 and 10:30 p.m.); True Grit (1:20, 4, 6:50 and 9:30 p.m.); The Fighter (1:10, 4:10, 7:10 and 10 p.m.); Tron: Legacy 3D (4:20 and 10:30 p.m.); Black Swan (1:20, 4:10, 6:40 and 9:10 p.m.); The King’s Speech (12:40, 3:50, 6:50 and 9:40 p.m.). Feb. 4 (partial list): Santum 3D (12, 2:40, 5:20, 8 and 10:50 p.m.).

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Conga Room L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic, (213) 749-0445 or

Continued on next page

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calendar@downtownnews.com

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ews flash: Brigh t Blue Gorilla m ak ies about Amer ica’s health craz es wacky move… too. For the un and plays guita initiated r, primates: the hu sband-and-wife , the Gorilla is actually two folk-pop duo M Robyn Rosenkr antz, who have ichael Glover an been d making music and movies sinc traveling the world minstrel-lik e, e 1990. Lose W entrepreneur En ith English, abou glish Jones an d hi t feature film, sh ot “gorilla”-style s Rubberciser, is their four th on will receive its U the streets of Lo .S. premiere at s Angeles. It the Downtown Saturday, Feb. Independent on 5, at 8 p.m. BBG will perform as their non-simia well, offering n mix of voca l harm edy improvisat ion, acoustic gu onies and comitars drums. At 251 S. Main St., (213 and bongo ) 617-1033 or downtownind ependent.com.

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rt and law, past and present, fiction and fact, and a Supreme Court justice collide when The Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles holds The Trial of Hamlet. On Monday, Jan. 31, at 7:30 p.m., Justice Anthony Kennedy will preside over a mock trial to determine the competency of the young Prince of Denmark to stand trial for the murder of Polonius: to deem sane, or not to deem sane, that is the question. The event includes real-life lawyers presenting their cases and actual psychiatrists testifying for the defense and prosecution at Bovard Auditorium on the USC campus. A jury made up of — well, perhaps not exactly peers of a prince — actors Helen Hunt and Tom Irwin and civilians like real estate developers, arts patrons and students will deliberate. At 3551 Trousdale Parkway, (800) 838-3006 or shakespearecenter.org.

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photo by Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging

irst Fridays are back at the Natural History Museum, where once a month the Exposition Park facility stays open until 10 p.m. and features live music, DJs, scientific discussion and behind-the-scenes tours. This year’s series is called the “Nostradamus Edition” and explores what science has in store for our future. On Feb. 4 at 6:30 p.m., the topic is immortality — the latest research and the centuries-old history of the search for eternal life in art, science and literature. Then rest your brain while you dance your body to the sounds of instrumentalist Miguel AtwoodFerguson performing in the Diorama Hall at 8 p.m. and KCRW DJs Anthony Valadez and Aaron Byrd spinning all night long in the lounge. At 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-3466 or nhm.org.

photo copyright Bob Baker Marionette Theater n 2009, the Bob Baker Ma rionette Theater in City We st was declared a historic-cultural monument by the city, and the togenarian string master ochimself is a cultural pheno menon. He got interested in puppets at 5 years old, and by high sch ool he was manufacturing marionettes that were sold in America and Europe. Now, 100 of his fantastica l creations “perform” the variety revue Magic Strings. Frolicking carousel horses, a roller skating opera diva, a circus troupe and dancing guitars might ins pire the next great L.A. puppet-master. The show is Tuesdays-Fr idays at 10:30 a.m. and Saturdays and Su ndays at 2:30 p.m. At 1345 W. First St., (213) 250-9995 or bobbake rmarionettes.com.

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hotographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe began documenting the people and culture of Daufuskie Island in 1977. The island off the coast of South Carolina was home to a large population of Gullah, descendents of freed slaves, from the Civil War until recent development and tourism “urbanized” the com community. The Gullah had kept alive African and African-American traditions in this isolated bastion. The California African American Museum is now featuring Moutoussamy-Ashe’s black and white photographs in an exhibit that captures the islanders in transforma transformation. By the way, the next time you munch on Goobers candy at the movies, chew on this: Its name comes from the Gullah word for peanut, guber, derived from the KiKongo African word N’guba. The show continues through June 5 at 600 State Dr., (213) 744-7432 or caamuseum.org. Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.

photo copyright Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe

Wednesday, Feb. 2 SCI-Arc Lecture Series W. M. Keck Lecture Hall, 960 E. Third St., (213) 3565328 or sciarc.edu. 7 p.m.: A talk with Hernan Diaz Alonso, principal of Los Angeles-based Xefirotarch.

by Lauren CampedeLLi, Listings editor

16 Downtown News

January 31, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Listings Continued from previous page congaroom.com. Feb. 1, 8 p.m.: The Delta Mirror opens for electronic pop band School of Seven Bells. Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com. Jan. 31, 10 p.m.: Phil Alvin and friends. He has a lot of friends. Feb. 1, 10 p.m.: Les Aus, Qa’a, Swords of Fatima and Deglet Noor Fakirs. Feb. 2, 10 p.m.: Gravel Road and Rumble King. Feb. 3, 10 p.m.: Los Bodysnatchers, Adam Bones and Richard Ross. Feb. 4, 10 p.m.: Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys bring their roots music and western swing to Downtown. Feb. 5, 10 p.m.: The Detroit proto-punk-inspired hard rock of L.A.’s The Super Bees, with Fantastic Harlan Jones and Soft White 60s. Feb. 6, 10 p.m.: The B-Noirs, The Sweater Girls and Ingenue. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., sevengrand.la.

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

Feb. 1, 10 p.m.: House band The Makers rock their stuff good. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. Feb. 3, 9 p.m.: ParallaxScroll, Snorlax, Protectme, and Cat 500. Everyone likes cats. Feb. 4, 9 p.m.: Neverever, Black Elephant, Sea Lions and Canyons. Feb. 5, 9 p.m.: Religious Girls, and more. Feb. 6, 9 p.m.: Jon Barba, Hermit Convention, Rachel Fannan and Parkford. The Varnish 118 E. Sixth St., (213) 622-9999 or thevarnishbar.com Jan. 31, 9 p.m.: Drink in great jazz piano every Monday with Jamie Elman serenading live on The Varnish keys. Feb. 1, 8:30 p.m.: Jazzman Mark Bosserman entertains on the house piano every Tuesday. Walt Disney Concert Hall 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850.2000 or laphil.com. Feb. 5, 8 p.m.: Michael Feinstein, the multi-platinum selling, five-time Grammy nominated master of the American Songbook, performs an evening of popular standards. “Who Let the Dogs Out?” will not be performed.

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE 33 Variations Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 6282772 or centertheatregroup.org. Feb. 1-4, 8 p.m.; Feb. 5, 2 and 8 p.m.; Feb. 6, 1 p.m.: In the Tony Award-winning play, Jane Fonda plays a Beethoven scholar driven to solve the genius’ greatest mystery, while her own life crumbles around her. Through Mar. 6. The Artist’s Life: A Free Jazz Opera REDCAT, 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. Feb. 3-5, 8:30 p.m.: Known as one of the founders of California assemblage and an influential figure of the Beat generation, George Herms premieres a new free-jazz opera that features large-scale sculptural instruments, live and recorded video, and featuring the Bobby Bradford Mo’tet, the Theo Saunders group and the voice of Diana Briscoe. As The Globe Warms Bootleg Theater, 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856

We Got Games The NBA’s Best Come to Downtown Los Angeles Lakers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/lakers. Feb. 1 and 3, 7:30 p.m.: The Lake Show plays host to the Rockets, followed by a showdown with the NBA-leading San Antonio Spurs. Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker are all playing quality ball under coach Gregg Popovich and his perma-scowl. Phil Jackson will have to mastermind a strategy to slow down the Spurs’ machine. Maybe he should just stare at Popovich and smile? Then the Lakers head to New Orleans (Feb. 5) to start a seven-game road trip.   Los Angeles Clippers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/clippers. Jan. 31, Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m.: It appears We Got Games was snookered again by the Clippers. They got our hopes up with their big win streak, which led to talk of a rejuveor bootlegtheater.com. Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m.: The final season of Heather Woodbury’s weekly dramatic serial is a one-of-akind solo performance narrative about God, sex and ecological disaster. Through April 5.

MORE LISTINGS Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

nated Baron Davis, Blake Griffin as a rookie All-Star and the mathematical possibility of the team actually sneaking into the playoffs. Well, shame on us. Eric Gordon is now out for a month with a sprained wrist, and the Clippers dropped two games in Texas last week. Things aren’t getting easier, as after hosting the Milwaukee Bucks and Chicago Bulls, they head out on a brutal 11-game road trip.   Los Angeles Kings Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., 1 (888) KINGS-LA or kings.nhl.com. The Kings seem to be back on track. They are winners of their last three (as of press time), including a 2-0 victory over the Bruins, and one-goal squeakers over Phoenix and San Jose. The skaters are on the road all week, visiting Minnesota (Feb. 1), Edmonton (Feb. 2) and Calgary (Feb. 5). —Ryan Vaillancourt

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Email: Send a brief description, street address and public phone number. Submissions must be received 10 days prior to publication date to be considered for print.

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Contact Cartifact for the full-color, every-building version of this map and others. Available as a poster and in print, web, and mobile media.

700 S. Flower St, Ste. 1940 Los Angeles, CA 90017 213.327.0200 maps�cartifact.com

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18 Downtown News

January 31, 2011

Twitters/DowntownNews

CLASSIFIED

place your ad online at www.ladowntownnews.com

FOR RENT

l.a. downtown news classifieds call: 213-481-1448

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

“Be wary of out of area companies. Check with the local Better Business Bureau before you send any money for fees or services. Read and understand any contracts before you sign. Shop around for rates.”

Classified Display & Line ad Deadlines: thursday 12 pm

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COMPANY Drivers (Solos & Hazmat Teams) *Great Pay *Great Miles *CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated & regional positions available. Call: 866-448-1055 SWIFT. (CalSCAN)

old Bank District The original Live/Work Lofts from $1,100 Cafes, Bars, Shops, Galleries, Parking adjacent. Pets no charge call 213.253.4777 laloft.com

COMPANY SOLOS & Teams - Western US! National Pay for Regional Work! Great home time. 1-year OTR or recent grad. Hazmat required. 1-888-9059879 or www.AndrusTrans.com. (Cal-SCAN)

REAL ARTIST LOFTS High ceilings, hardwood/concrete floors, kitchen, fireplace, pool/spa, gated parking, laundry, sorry no dogs. Open House Sundays 12-3pm. Leasing office @1250 Long Beach Ave. & 14th St. 213629-5539

DRIVERS - 100% Tuition paid CDL Training. No Credit Check. No Experience required! Trainers earn 49c/Mile! 1-888-4177564. Crst Expedited www.JoinCRST.com. (Cal-SCAN)

condominiums/unfurnished WITHIN WALKING distance of LA LIVE, FIDM, USC, shopping, dinning, bus routes, i-110 24 security monitoring Swimming pool/Jacuzzi 1 Bed/Bath appx 750 squarefeet Washer in unit Ask about pets 2133270597

DRIVERS - Over the Road Company Sponsored Class A Commercial Drivers License training & a Job! No credit checks. Minimum 21 yrs old. 1-800-781-2778. (Cal-SCAN)

the loft expert! group

family, criminal, p.i. for more than 20 yrs! child support / custody necesita permiso de trabajo? tagalog / español / Korean Law Office of H. Douglas Daniel Esq., (213) 689-1710

SALES PEOPLE NEEDED Interface with Downtown corporations for lunch planning - sell our menu. 10% Commission! 626-435-7726

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Business opportunities ALL CASH VENDING Route! Be Your Own Boss! 25 Machines + Candy All for $9995. Vend3, 880 Grand Blvd., Deer Park, NY. 1- 877-915-8222. Major CC accepted! (Cal-SCAN) help Wanted ABLE TO TRAVEL. Hiring 8 people. No experience necessary. Transportation & lodging furnished. Paid training. Work and travel entire USA. Start today. www.ProtekChemical. com 1-208-590-0365. (CalSCAN)

SERVICES legal TODO ALESPANOL Conference Interpretation, Express Translation in by 8 done by 4 213-924-8646. psychic Astrology Readings In person or telephone. Straightforward, no-nonsense. Call Malcolm 323244-9906. Email for link to my podcasts: EchoParkAstrology@ yahoo.com (323) 244-9906

Casaloma L.A. Apartments

Business Attorney All Litigation Matters Transactions & Contracts 20 Years Experience Ivy League Background

Paul Bloom, Esq. (805) 984-8375 ATTORNEY JOHN BENSON Your Local Downtown Attorney Bankruptcy and Divorce best rates in town www.attorneyjohnrbenson.com (213) 9059364. childcare

Infant - Pre-K full-day care 2-5 days, some subsidies Near Little Tokyo Metro Station Harry Pregerson Center 213-894-1556 Joy Picus Center 213-978-0026 mtwashingtonpreschools.org education ATTEND COLLEGE Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.Centura.us.com. (Cal-SCAN) HIGH SCHOOL Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www.SouthEasternHS.com. (Cal-SCAN) health NOT FEELING any joy? Overwhelmed by stress and emotional overload? Professional counseling helps! www.drannewarman. vpweb.com, Downtown Wilshire Office, reasonable rates, insurance accepted, 310-281-9797.

Clean unfurnished bachelor rooms with shared bath at $550/mo. with private bath at $695/mo.

TM

Sec. Deposit Special @$100 Downtown since 2002

Voted Best Downtown Residential Real estate Agent

Email request to ghollis@shammasgroup.com or call (213) 746-6300 x1455

all applications can either be mailed in or dropped off to: 206 West 6th st., la ca 90014 or 423 West 8th st., la ca 90014

EMPLOYMENT

CALL FOR SPECIALS @ The Visconti. Free parking, free tanning, free wi-fi + biz center avail. Cardio Salon, pool, Spa, steamroom, sauna. Call us today. 866742-0992.

ABOGADO DE IMMIGRACION!

get your green card or citiZenship

sales

REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL

attorneys

Call us today! Bill Cooper • 213.598.7555 • TheLoftExpertGroup.com

Includes utilities, basic cable channels, laundry room on site. Gated building in a good area. 208 W. 14th St. at Hill St. Downtown LA

For English Call Pierre or Terri 213.744.9911 For Spanish Call Susana 213.749.0306

madison hotel Clean furnished single rooms. 24-hour desk clerk service. •Daily, $30.00 •Weekly, $109.00 •Monthly, $310.00 (213) 622-1508 423 East 7th St.

(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.) Starting Jan. 1, 2011

Do you have something to sell?

Ad Copy: _________________________________________

Ad Prices

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(Marketplace and Automotive Categories ONLY) • Items under $300 • Items $301 to $500 • Items $501 to $1200 • Items $1201 to $2000 • Items $2001+…

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Restrictions: Offer good on private party ads only. Ads must be pre-paid by cash, check or credit card. Certain classifications excluded. Deadline: Thursday at noon for next issue.

January 31, 2011

Downtown News 19

DowntownNews.com

Business services ADVERTISING- Best Kept Secret. A business card sized display ad 140 California community newspapers. Reach 3 million+ Californians. Cost $1,550.$1.33 cost per thousand. Free brochure (916)288-6019; www.CalSDAN.com. (Cal-SCAN) cleaning CONCEPTO’S CLEANING Crew. Professional, experienced, cleans apartments, homes, offices and restaurants. Call for a quote. 323-459-3067 or 818-409-9183. Misc. services HIP REPLACEMENT Surgery: If you had hip replacement surgery between 2005 -present and suffered problems requiring a second revision surgery you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727. (Cal-SCAN)

AUTOS Pre-OWneD

DOWntOWn l.a. autO grOuP Porsche Volkswagen audi Mercedes-Benz nissan cheVrolet cadillac

2007 AUDI A6 Low miles. Loaded! Manager special. # 151076 vin ZA9770 $26,815. Call 888583-0981 2007 INFINITY G35 Stock C110085-1 vin 706331 Silver, Great condition! $23,782 call 888-203-2967.

2007 VOLKSWAGEN NEW BEETLE 2.5 Certified. Manager’s Special. # zv1002 vin 516243 $12,494 Call 888-7818102. 2008 PORSCHE LIMITED EDITION BOXSTER Tiptronic, Bose, Navigation Sport Chrono, 31K miles, certified, #710470. $38,888. Call 888-685-5426. 2009 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S Certified, air with power pkg # NI3609 / 9N487053 $14,999, call 888-838-5089. 2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX Low Mileage, Black/Black stk # UC562R/221046 $20,990 Call 888-879-9608.

For a complete list of our pre-owned inventory, go to www.DTLAMOTORS.com

autOs WanteD DONATE YOUR Vehicle! Receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, NonRunners Accepted, 1-888-4685964. (Cal-SCAN) DONATE YOUR CAR, Truck or boat to heritage for the blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-9026851. (Cal-SCAN)

ITEMS FOR SALE

WWW.CHIEFROCKER.TK MUSIC & FASHION - Brand new clothing apparel for Men and Women. Free delivery! $25-60 (213) 842-0232

WANTED DIABETIC Test Strips. Cash Paid. Unopened, Unexpired Boxes Only. All Brands Considered. Help others, don’t throw boxes away. For more information, Call 888-491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

Misc. iteMs SHARI’S BERRIES Mouthwatering gourmet strawberry gifts fresh for your Valentine! 100% satisfaction guaranteed. Delivered nationwide. Save 20% on Dipped Berries! Visit www.berries.com/ berries or Call 1-888-903-2988. (Cal-SCAN)

churches THE BRIDGE / Little Tokyo: Contemporary worship, 4:00pm Sundays, 401 E Third St. www. thebridgewired.org.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

LEGAL

vOlunteer OPPOrtunities

civil suMMOns

HELPING KIDS heal. Free Arts for Abused Children is looking for volunteers to integrate the healing power of the arts into the lives of abused and at-risk children and their families. Today is the day to get involved! Contact Annie at volunteers@freearts. org or 310-313-4278 for more information.

LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT NO. BC439535 PLAINTIff: SEOUNG SIk ShIN vS DEfENDANTS: POk SOON YU, AN INDIvIDUAL AND MIChAEL kIM, AN INDIvIDUAL AND DOES 1 THROUGH 20,

INCLUSIVE You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form, if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot

afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, Cantral District 111 North Hill Street, Los Angeles CA 90012 Case number: BC439535 Dated: June 11, 2010 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaitiff without an attorney is: Joshua J Richman 1940 Garnet Ave., Suite #230 San Diego, CA 92109 Telephone: 858-483-3082 Fax: 858-274-3588 Pub. 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31 FictitiOus Business naMe fICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 20101677916 The following person is doing business as: SAVOIR WINES, 600 W. Ninth Street, Suite #1102, Los Angeles CA 90015, are hereby registered by the following registrant: STEPHANIE BADEN, 600 W. Ninth Street, Suite #1102, Los Angeles CA 90015. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein on November 15, 2010. This statement was filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on November 19, 2010. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 12/6, 12/13, 12/20, 12/27/10

The Downtown Renaissance Collection

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clOthing/JeWelry

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Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

is your teen experiencing:

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adolescent support group now forming ages 13-17 low fee

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hOllyWOOD

call Marney stofflet, lcsW

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Professional Nail Care & Waxing for Ladies & Gentlemen 323.662.2718 • 4335 W. Sunset Blvd. Walk-in Welcome • GIft Certificate Available M.-F. 9:30am - 7:30pm Sat. 9am - 7:30pm • Sun. 10am - 7pm

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FREE Rent Specials On Select Floor Plans • Free Resident/Guest Parking in Gated Garage • Private Library, Business Center & Conference Rooms • Free Wi-Fi & DSL Computer Use • Resident Karaoke Lounge • Directors Screening Room • Lavish Fountains & Sculptures • On-Site Private Resident Park with Sand Volleyball, BBQ’s and Jogging Track • Night Light Tennis Courts • Indoor Basketball

Version 1

• Brunswick Four-Lane Virtual Bowling • Full Swing Virtual Golf • 3100 Square Foot Cybex Fitness Facility • Free Tanning Rooms • Massage Room, Sauna & Steam Room • Rooftop Pools with Dressing Rooms • Concierge Service • 24-Hour Doorman • 24/7 On-Site Management • Magnificent City Views *Amenities vary among communities

Children’s Performing Group

Real Estate Specialist of Sunshine Generation Singing, dancing, San Gabriel Valley Client: G.H. Palmer Associates performing and fun!

Publication: LADT News For boys & Proudly serving the communities of Size/Color: 4.3125” x 8” 4C girls ages 3 San Gabriel, Alhambra, Monterey and up! Park, Montebello and El Monte. Design by: apluscreative@yahoo.com

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English/Japanes/Chinese speaking emiterauchi@yahoo.com • (626) 786-9086

SunshineGenerationLA.com 909-861-4433

20 Downtown News

January 31, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

New Year Continued from page 13 It will be similar to the scenes glimpsed over the summer during the Chinatown Summer Nights gatherings. “These vendors are all juried in, so people will get traditional crafts and high-fashion items,” Yu said. Central Plaza will also be home to several food trucks. Over at West Plaza, people can check out a ping-pong tournament, sculpture demonstrations, face painting and Chinese arts and crafts. A more active option is “The Great Chinatown Hunt,” organized by Race/LA. The urban scavenger hunt, on Feb. 6 at 11 a.m., will pit teams of two to four players against each other in a three-hour competition to solve a series of clues around Chinatown.

A stage and booths will also be set up near the vacant Little Joe’s restaurant at 900 N. Broadway. “It’s exciting for us to be able to use that site and have everything more centrally located, and it’s in the heart of Chinatown,” Yu said. The 33rd annual Los Angeles Chinatown Firecracker Run will be a highlight of the second weekend. It includes a 5K and 10K run, a shorter race for kids 12 and under, and also bicycle events. While there are plenty of activities scheduled to celebrate the event, for many Chinese Americans like Gin, the new year is a time to celebrate with loved ones. “For me, the celebration is also about being with family, having a quiet dinner and looking forward to the next year,” he said. More information is at (213) 680-0243 or chinatownla.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

New Year at the Museum T

hose looking to add a little history to their Chinese new year celebration don’t have far to go. The Chinese American Museum, at 425 N. Los Angeles St. near Olvera Street, has several exhibits that touch on the Chinese American experience. The exhibit Dreams Deferred: Artists Respond to Immigration Reform, features work from 18 local artists exploring the topic of immigration. While the subject is often seen as an issue of Latinos in the United States, museum officials point to the fact that Asian Americans make up 40% of the undocumented population in the University of California system, with Chinese-American students representing the second largest number in that group. Also up at CAM is Remembering Angel

Island. The show commemorates the 100th anniversary of the opening of the notorious Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco. It processed more than 1 million immigrants, including 175,000 Chinese, before it was shut down in 1940. For a look back in time, check out Sun Wing Wo General Store and Herb Shop. The exhibition is a recreation of a store that was housed in the Garnier Building near Olvera Street in the 1890s. The actual store closed in 1948 and, while it primarily served the Chinese American community, it also had European, Japanese and Latino customers. The Chinese American Museum is at 425 N. Los Angeles St., (213) 485-8567 or camla.org. —Richard Guzmán

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For l l a C n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM


01-31-11