Page 1

LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS

Send your Love Lines

dEadLinE for EntriEs — February 3

Target... Meet me at 7+FIG, I would love to swipe my card in your check-out line... Downtown

downtownPUBLICARTwalkingtours Elin... Not counting the others, you’re the only one...Tiger NFL... I’m a team player, now give me a team...L.A. Joe... I waited and waited, I’m sorry but I’ve met someone else. His name is Ralph... Downtown

For more information and to download Love Line Message: the tours visit

The First 12 Words Are FREE! (Limited to one FREE message per reader.)

My ne Valenti Print or type

8

crala.org/art

Total Words in Message

Free up to here

Continue on another sheet if necessary

(First 12 words are FREE!)

Name*

Just fill out the Love Lines form and mail, fax, email or deliver before Wdnesday, February 3.

Address* City*

Phone*

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M The first 12 words are free.

January 17, 2010

Volume 40, Number 3

A box of chocolates, a dozen roses and your message in Downtown News.

ExprEss your amour in our romantic LovE LinEs Edition — February 8

PODCASTS

Love Means

Pay just $1 for each word exceeding the first FREE 12. All messages must be prepaid.

Number of words over 12:

x $1 per word = $

Total amount enclosed: $

*Required Fields (All messages must be prepaid)

L.A. Downtown News  •  1264 W. First Street, L.A., CA 90026  •  fax: (213) 250-4617  •  email: lovelines@DowntownNews.com  •  office hours: M-F, 8:30-5

INSIDE

A Budget Bomb for Downtown Officials Fear Brown’s Cuts Will Kill Plans For Cleantech Corridor and More Affordable Housing

Goodbye to L.A. diesel buses.

2

PICK THE

PROS Pick football games, win prizes.

6

Charter school coming to Downtown.

7

photo by Gary Leonard

Jerry Brown at a Downtown appearance last September during the gubernatorial campaign. The new governor’s bold plan to close a $25 billion deficit would eliminate the Community Redevelopment Agency, which for decades has been a major player in Downtown redevelopment. by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

Tweaks for the Regional Connector.

8

Fond memories of Jack Kyser.

9

L

ast Monday, Gov. Jerry Brown dropped a budget bombshell that threatens to derail a slew of Downtown redevelopment projects and eliminate an agency that keyed the area’s commercial resurgence. At risk are projects including affordable housing and a green tech hub. Brown’s bold budget spares no public service, from education to healthcare, but Downtown stakeholders are mostly keyed in on his proposal to eliminate redevelopment agencies. The Los Angeles

More Than 100 Galleries and 15,000 Pieces of Work Are on Display at This Week’s Los Angeles Art Show by RichaRd Guzmán

14

15 CALENDAR LISTINGS 17 MAP 18 CLASSIFIEDS

investments in affordable housing have created or preserved thousands of apartments for low income and homeless individuals, just in Downtown. Like redevelopment agencies statewide, the CRA reinvests a portion of local property taxes known as “tax increment” into economic development projects and affordable housing in blighted areas. By investing in depressed corners of the urban fabric, the agency works to stimulate additional private investment in the same area. “The only way for us to really generate revenue see Budget, page 10

A Big Time for Big Art city editoR

John Lithgow’s heartfelt stories.

Community Redevelopment Agency re-invests property tax revenues in depressed neighborhoods as a means to drive economic development. The move would save California $1.7 billion in the next fiscal year. But in inching the state closer to the black, critics of the plan say it would siphon away a critical fuel source in Downtown’s redevelopment engine. The CRA was the leading force behind the building of office towers on Bunker Hill in the 1970s and ’80s. In the ’90s, it played a key role in assembling the land where Staples Center was developed. Its

T

his is an interesting time for art in Downtown Los Angeles. Last Thursday, new Art Walk Director Joe Moller oversaw his first installment of the popular and sometimes chaotic monthly event. In December, the local creative community went into a tizzy after MOCA whitewashed an antiwar mural on the side of the Geffen Contemporary. The big art happenings continue this weekend. The Convention Center will be site of an art show expected to draw 50,000 people and generate more than $25 million in sales. A smaller effort, the debut of Art Weekend L.A., is anticipated to bring a few thousand people to some Downtown galleries (see story p. 13)

The South Park event is the 16th annual Los Angeles Art Show, which runs Jan. 19-23. It will feature more than 100 galleries and 15,000 works covering all genres and periods from old masters to contemporary creations. Event producer Kim Martindale said the show, which will fill 150,000 square feet of Convention Center space, appeals to both art newbies and collectors. “Novices can come to this show and get a great education about art,” said Martindale. “If you’re a serious buyer or if you’re looking to form a collection of art, then this will also give you the opportunity to come and see what’s available on the market.” The show is organized by the Fine Art Dealers Association and KR Martindale Show see Art, page 13

The Voice of Downtown Los Angeles

photo by David Koizumi

About 50,000 people are expected to attend the Los Angeles Art Show. Organizers anticipate that the event, which runs Jan. 19-23 at the Convention Center, will generate more than $25 million in sales.


2 Downtown News

January 17, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

AROUNDTOWN Huizar Takes Fundraising Lead in Council Race

W

ith less than two months until the election for the 14th District City Council seat, incumbent José Huizar has taken a large lead in fundraising over his competitor, restaurateur and reality TV personality Rudy Martinez. According to documents filed with the City Ethics Commission and posted online last week, Huizar raised $113,961 in the reporting period between October and December 2010. In that same timeframe, Martinez raised $7,200. The figures give Huizar a sizeable lead in cash on hand. The councilman first elected in 2005 and re-elected two years later currently has more than $320,000 at his disposal; Martinez has $133,000 available, according to the Ethics Commission. Huizar also out-spent Martinez, who has appeared in the A&E series “Flip This House,” in the recent reporting period, $84,000 to $52,000. Huizar has accepted nearly $90,000 in city matching funds, while Martinez has rejected matching funds, according to the commission. The next fundraising statements are due Jan. 27. The election for CD 14, which includes portions of Downtown as well as Boyle Heights, Eagle Rock and other neighborhoods, is March 8.

Love Is in the Air, And It’s Free

D

o you have a husband, wife, partner, special friend, pet or someone else who is the apple of your eye? Do you want to send them a message of love for Valentine’s Day? Do you want all of Downtown Los Angeles to read that message? If you answered yes to all three, then a Downtown Love Line is for you.

Los Angeles Downtown News is inviting readers to submit a message sharing those special feelings (and those kooky nicknames). Love Lines will be published in the Feb. 7 issue. The best part: The first 20 words are free. New this year, for $25 you can get a feature box, a photo and 35 words. To get a Love Line, see ad on page 8 or email lovelines@downtownnews.com.

Metro Retires Last Diesel Bus

photo by Gary Leonard

On Wednesday, Jan. 12, Metro retired and hauled away its last diesel bus. See story this page.

L

os Angeles and its infamous smog have one less polluted vehicle to deal with, as the last diesel bus in Metro’s fleet was hauled away last week. The occasion was marked at an event at a Metro maintenance yard on Lyon Street on Wednesday, Jan. 12. Metro directors have been ordering only alternative fuel clean air vehicles since 1993, said County Supervisor Don Knabe, who chairs Metro’s board of directors. After trying methanol and ethanol, Metro decided on compressed natural gas buses and currently has 2,221 of those in its fleet, along with six gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles and one electric bus. “CNG buses to date have logged 1 billion miles, which adds up to a lot of pollutants that did not hit the air,” Knabe said. “This reduces cancer-causing particulate matter by more than 80% and avoids nearly 300,000 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions each and every day.” Although CNG buses, at $450,000, cost $50,000 more to make than diesel buses, it only costs CNG buses 40 cents to operate per mile, versus 80 cents for diesel buses due to CNG’s fuel efficiency, said Supervisor Mike Antonovich. After the diesel bus was hauled away and a new CNG bus drove in to replace it, MTA spokesman Marc Littman said the diesel vehicle would be “scrapped.”

Digging Halted at La Plaza

O

fficials with the under-construction La Plaza de Cultura y Artes halted excavation on the former camposanto area of the project Friday afternoon. The move followed protests from groups concerned that human remains found at the site during digging may belong to Native Americans. Since late October, remains have been found on what will become the outdoor plaza for the $20 million center at 501 N. Main St.; the excavation is taking place at the site of a former Catholic cemetery. Although La Plaza President and CEO Miguel Angel Corzo maintained that excavation has followed archeological standards, he said in a statement, “We believe it is in the best interest of both La Plaza and the larger community to put this section of our project on hold. Moving forward, we will continue to work with all interested parties and proceed with the rest of our construction as planned.” On Jan. 6, Dave Singleton, a program analyst with the Sacramento-based Native American Heritage Commission,

The Art Program of the Community Redevelopment Agency of the City of Los Angeles (CRA/LA) developed these tours to introduce residents and visitors to their collection of public art created by a broad range of artists, in a variety of forms and neighborhood contexts. The tours available include:

Financial District Historic Core Bunker Hill Little Tokyo

H O N D A We will meet or beAt any other authorized Honda coupon!

Lube, OiL & FrONt Wiper FiLter SpeciaL bLaDe iNSert repLaceMeNt

• Replace engine oil • Replace oil filter with Genuine Honda oil filter • Free 21 points multi-point inspection • Inspect all fluid levels & adjust (as necessary) • Lube chassis • Adjust tire pressure • Test battery

19

$

95 +TAX

Prices may vary by model. Plus taxes and fees where applicable. Please present coupon during write-up. Not to be combined with any other discounts. Expires 2/15/2011. Our Honda-trained technicians use Honda Genuine oil and filter, and perform a free Multi-point inspection with every oil change. All this at a very competitive price! *Additional charge for Hybrids, S2000s & Synthetic oil. Additional charge for haz. waste. Honda cars only.

of Downtown Los Angeles

1540 S. Figueroa St. Los Angeles, CA 90015

Offer includes installations cost - only on original equipped Honda wiper blades.

12

$

00 +TAX

Per Pair installed Coupon must be presented when order is written. Not good in conjunction with any other coupon or offer. One coupon per service item. Valid only at Honda of Downtown Los Angeles. HONDA ONLY. Expires 2/15/2011.

888-802-4218

WWW.HONDAOLA.COM

Complimentary shuttle to and from your work! (within 5 mile radius)

sent a letter to the Los Angeles Coroner’s office asking that the project be halted. The statement did not indicate if the project will still open on April 9 as scheduled.

Film Industry Sees Increased Production

I

f the streets of Downtown seemed more clogged with production crews last year, that’s because they were. Last week, permitting agency FilmL.A. reported a 15% hike in onlocation filming in Los Angeles in 2010 compared to the year before. In total, FilmL.A. recorded 43,646 production days in 2010, while in 2009 the figure was 37,979. “On balance, the numbers are positive, and I’m cautiously optimistic about 2011,” said FilmL.A. President Paul Hadley in a statement. Commercial production last year increased 28.1% over 2009; the 6,778 commercial days was close to the record 6,983 days recorded in 2005. Feature film production days last year increased 8.1%, while television production saw an 11.9% bounce over the previous year.

downtown

PUBLICART walkingtour PODCASTS

The Art Program is integral to CRA/LA’s mission to eliminate blight and to revitalize Los Angeles through focused redevelopment activities in designated project areas.

DOWNLOAD FREE AUDIO TOURS to your personal MP3 player and explore the public art of Los Angeles like never before. Printable maps direct you to each stop as you listen to the artists’ stories.

For more information on the artwork shown here and to download the tours please visit crala.org/art


January 17, 2011

FELIX CHEVROLET

Downtown News 3

DowntownNews.com

Downtown L.A. Auto Group www.DTLAMOTORS.com

3330 S. Figueroa St. felixchevrolet.com 888-879-9608

PORSCHE OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

Servicing Downtown’s Vehicles since 1955

1900 S. Figueroa St. porschedowntownla.com 888-685-5426

The Downtown L.A. Auto Group knows that you have high expectations when it comes to servicing your vehicles and our commitment to you is to exceed those expectations each and every time we have the privilege having you visit one of our dealerships. Here’s some of the ways we demonstrate the commitment to you:

NISSAN OF DOWNTOWN L.A. CARSON NISSAN

635 W. Washington Blvd. downtownnissan.com 888-838-5089 1505 E. 223rd St. nissanincarson.com 888-203-2967

20OFF 50OFF

$

$

Any Service of $100 or More

Any Service of $250 or More

Cannot be combined with any other offer or coupon. Limit one discount per service order. Some restrictions may apply. Offer expires March 31, 2011. Must present coupon at time of service.

VOLKSWAGEN OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

1900 S. Figueroa St. audidtla.com 888-583-0981

Chic k

N

WP ico B

Her n

Ct

pic

Blvd .

LA LIVE

STAPLES

lvd.

CONVENTION CENTER Ven ice B lvd.

Shuttle service to and from your workplace or home.

10 W1

8th

Was h

ingt on B

FREE

W2

3rd

8 110

St.

St.

8 88 8

WA dam

FACTORY WJ

effe

1801 S. Figueroa St. mbzla.com 888-319-8762

rson

vd.

n St .

Trained and authorized service technicians.

s Bl

Blvd .

USC

8

Mai

DOWNTOWN L.A. MOTORS MBZ

S Gr and

Ave .

Deluxe wash with every service.

lvd.

S Flo wer St.

a St .

FREE

lym

uero

AUDI OF DOWNTOWN L.A.

WO

S Fig

1900 S. Figueroa St. vwdowntownla.com 888-781-8102

YOUR DOWNTOWN SERVICE HEADQUARTERS


4 Downtown News

January 17, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

EDITORIALS

Exciting Designs, Optimistic Future for Grand Avenue

O

n Jan. 6, philanthropist Eli Broad and Elizabeth Diller, the chief architect of his $100 million contemporary art museum, unveiled the designs for the Grand Avenue project. While plenty can go wrong between the presentation of renderings and the opening of a building (just ask, among many others, Related Cos., developer of the still-stalled Grand Avenue plan), the current mood is excitement. If the building ends up looking like the designs, if there are no financial or other disasters, and if the notoriously tough Broad can keep his architectural meddling to a minimum, then the street stands to gain another worthy project. If these and a few other things all fall into place, then finally Grand Avenue may begin to look, feel and function like the thoroughfare many have long dreamed it would be. Although it is just one building, a lot is riding on the development now known as The Broad. While Grand Avenue already boasts numerous projects by world-class architects, neither José Rafael Moneo’s Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall nor Arata Isozaki’s Museum of Contemporary Art has elevated the street into a true destination. Instead, the corridor continues to be hindered by long stretches that fail to engage pedestrians or create a pleasant walking environment. To use a phrase uttered many times, Grand is still not yet grand. The Broad could draw hundreds of thousands of people

a year and, if the building engages and the sidewalks are widened (discussions for doing so are underway with the Community Redevelopment Agency) and then activated, the community experience could be much improved. This is an opportunity to better both the quantity of visitors and the

Finally Grand Avenue may begin to look, feel and function like the thoroughfare many have long dreamed it would be. quality of the street. It is worth noting that Broad’s project comes at the same time as work progresses on the Civic Park, where the western edge starts at the Music Center. With that project set to debut in summer 2012, and with The Broad coming online in early 2013, there is another opportunity to alter the public’s experience of the street.

Brockman Bummer

S

eventh Street continues to be one of the most frustrating corridors in Downtown Los Angeles. Two points of relief are that a long-awaited new restaurant, Mas Malo, just opened, and another anticipated spot, Mo-Chica, is scheduled to begin serving this spring. Yet just as these culinary advancements arrive, so does the news that the Brockman Building will probably continue to sit empty for who knows how long? Los Angeles Downtown News last week reported on the latest machinations for the 1921 structure at 530 W. Seventh St. The 80-unit property has been in turmoil for years, ever since developer West Millennium Group fell into bankruptcy. Although the

$35 million project was nearly completed, it has never gotten close to opening. On Dec. 30, the property went to auction. Although a developer could have made a purchase and readied the structure for move-ins, the only bidder was an affiliate of lender Bank of America. With the banking giant solidifying its hold on the edifice, there does not seem to be any hurry to get it open. From a business perspective, we know why the bank is following this course. It lent $35 million to the developer and, in a down real estate cycle, is holding the property until the market recovers, housing values increase and they can make back their money. It’s not the first and won’t be the last time a bank

In this early design stage, The Broad appears to engage nicely with its neighbor to the north, Disney Hall. The size and shape of the new museum, and the changing concrete patterns on its exterior, complement the shimmering, shining swirls of Gehry’s landmark. Wisely, there does not seem to be any attempt to compete with Disney Hall. Broad and Diller look to have the community in mind and to understand that the building is important, but so is its role and place on the street. One point of worry concerns timing — and in this case it would, ironically, involve erecting the structure too quickly. We can understand that there might be a desire to do so. After all, Broad is 77, and though he has exhibited no signs of ill health, he is no longer young. As the force behind the project, he certainly wants to have time to experience it once completed. We hope he is there for a long time to guide it — after all, he’s pretty good at running things, having founded two billion-dollar companies and considering his key roles in launching and then saving MOCA. In this case, however, the focus must remain on making the building the best it can be for the long haul. Complex designs are not easily rushed. The next two years will be an exciting time, and the city and its arts and business leaders need to get this one right. After The Broad, it may be years, if not decades, before there is another significant addition to Grand Avenue.

behaves this way. Yet in this case it’s particularly galling because Bank of America touts its support for the revitalization of Downtown Los Angeles in its public service announcements, presenting itself as a stellar corporate citizen. Waiting to lease or sell units in the Brockman may be good for the bank’s bottom line, but in this case it’s at the expense of the community. An attorney for the bank told Downtown News that Bank of America and its affiliate are now trying to decide whether to market the entire building for sale, or to sell or lease individual units. That may sound like a strategy, but it only materializes after the bank has effectively been in control of the property for a long time. Plans could have been made months ago, if there really was a desire for action. In

other words, don’t expect any progress any time soon. We wish this was not the case. The Brockman is in a strategic location (at Grand Avenue) and the street needs even more stakeholders. We’d also like to see some positive activity at the mostly empty Roosevelt Lofts, two blocks to the west. All this occurs when the Downtown housing market is actually beginning to improve. As the slowing of new construction results in backlogged existing units being purchased or leased, one can even see a situation where, if fairly priced and effectively marketed, condos or apartments in the Brockman would go quickly. After all, the location is prime. Sadly, this doesn’t seem to be in the cards. It looks like a time of no action. That’s bad for Downtown.

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com • email: realpeople@downtownnews.com facebook: L.A. Downtown News

twitter: DowntownNews

Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: David Friedman, Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Pamela Albanese, Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, Michael X. Ferraro, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Catherine Holloway, Brenda Stevens, Billy Wright, Lon Wahlberg circulAtioN: Norma Rodas distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

One copy per person.


January 17, 2011

LETTERS Reactions to the MOCA Mural Dear Editor, am absolutely appalled by your editorial “MOCA, the Mural and the C Word” (Dec. 20). It once again tells “the people” what to think, what to consider as art and what “we” can tolerate as art. I do not like for one minute someone telling me what is appropriate (and what is not) when it comes to art and architecture. According to your editorial, neither the Veterans Administration nor the Go For Broke Monument folks complained. It is ludicrous to assume, therefore, that there would be a huge uproar. Making [MOCA Director Jeffrey] Deitch the scapegoat because he didn’t hold [mural artist] Blu’s hand is also rather insulting. It is no wonder that nothing moves forward in this city. Whether talking about public art or a beautiful building that is different than the rest, there will always be people who don’t like it. It makes me wonder what would have happened back in 1889 when the Eiffel Tower was panned and hated by most Parisians. Should they have torn it down or simply whitewashed it? —Mark Sanchez, Downtown

I

Dear Editor, omehow, MOCA’s concern rings hollow that the Blu mural

S

Downtown News 5

Opinion

The Readers Respond would offend the Japanese community around Little Tokyo. Why would they be any more offended than the rest of us are by U.S. soldiers dying, not because our nation was threatened, but for monetary gain? Japanese families were hauled off and imprisoned in camps during WWII, and their young men were lured into serving the very country that demeaned their families. It seems to me Japanese citizens are more sophisticated about this country’s past than our MOCA director might be. Go For Broke veterans had to fight for years for recognition, not to mention veterans’ benefits, upon their return from service. I’d like to have known the community’s thoughts on the MOCA mural before it was covered by whitewash. —Tobi Dragert Los Angeles Downtown News encourages letters. They become the property of Los Angeles Downtown News and may be edited. All letters should be typewritten and include an address and telephone number for verification. Please send them to: Letter to the Editor 1264 W. First St. Los Angeles, CA 90026 Fax to: (213) 250-4617 Email to: realpeople@downtownnews.com

Website Comments on Football, a Dark Walk and More Regarding the column “Tim Leiweke and the Super Bowl Shuffle,” by Jon Regardie, posted online Jan. 7

either rehabilitation or demolition. —posted by Tessa, Jan. 10, 6:56 p.m.

T

F

he only stadium proposal that makes sense is the one in the City of Industry. This would succeed where others have failed because the City of Industry is right in the middle of OC, L.A. and the Inland Empire, so a much larger population would be able to make it to the game. —posted by OC Bear, Jan. 7, 10:24 p.m.

A

s a longtime resident of suburban St. Louis, all I can say is, take the Rams back! They belong in L.A. and the stadium here is a disgrace. No one wants to go downtown, and the city of St. Louis is dead beyond your wildest dreams. The stadium was built without a team, on a tight budget, and is not up to NFL standards. The Rams will always be the L.A. Rams. So don’t steal the Vikings, just put the Rams back where they belong. —posted by Bill Dickinson, Jan. 8, 3:47 p.m. Regarding the Editorial “The Ugly Walk Between 7+Fig and L.A. Live,” posted online Jan. 7

C

ouldn’t agree more. I believe there was a conference a couple months ago about redoing Figueroa from USC all the way to its end in Downtown. Maybe something will come out of that. There should be uniform landscaping, transit options (bike lanes), lighting, kiosks and the street should be made two-way once again. —posted by D, Jan. 7, 5:05 p.m.

W

ho owns the building on the west side of Figueroa south of 801 S. Fig? That stretch of dirty pavement with iron rails along one side is not an invitation to walk. The property has no discernible architectural or historic value and is long overdue for

unny you folks brought this up. I recently made the walk from Little Tokyo to Seventh and Grand, and I realized there are quite a few pockets of activity separated by long stretches of darkness and nothing. This is in stark contrast to my experience in Toronto, where nightlife thrives and street design is inviting to pedestrians. There should be an effort to liven up existing street-level facilities in the evening here in L.A., entice businesses to stay open later, and further remove the excess of parking lots and drab one-story buildings between these areas to create a genuine urban late-night experience. —posted by Numan Parada, Jan. 10, 10:48 a.m.

T

hanks so much for drawing attention to the dark patch between Eighth Street and Eighth Place. It’s outrageous that that building is in its current shape. It appears that the owners draw parking revenue from it in the rear of the building with no intention of reactivating the front. After all, why would they have to if they’re raking in the dough without any investment? Also, the parking lot across from 777 S. Fig is a travesty. There was a hotel project that was in the works, but I’m not sure what happened to that. —posted by Aaron, Jan. 10, 12:53 p.m. Regarding the article “Metro, High-Speed Rail Group May Buy Union Station,” by Richard Guzmán, posted online Jan. 7

H

opefully, this means the current management team overseeing daily operations at Union Station gets an overhaul as well. Improved customer service and better signage should be major concerns for any new management team. —posted by Kevin, Jan. 7, 1:20 p.m.

t

Because Toyota owners deserve more,

we do more for Toyota owners. 29

$

OIL CHANGE*

• TOYOTA Genuine Parts • Rental vehicles available • Service: M- F 6AM -6PM, Sat 6AM-5PM • Sales: 7 days 9AM -10PM

* Up to 5 quarts of oil. Tax and hazardous disposal fees extra. Synthetic oil additional. Toyota vehicles only. Must present 43851 coupon at time of service. Expires 01/31/2011.

Make an appointment today!

1-800-716-1345

FREE shuttle service drop-off & pick-up

110

10

• toyotacentral.com

1600 S. Figueroa (at Venice), LA — 2 blocks south of the Staples Center


1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA, 90026 • 213.481.1448

6 Downtown News

January 17, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA, 90026 • 213.481.1448

$75 GIFT CERTIFICATE

PLuS 4 movIE TIcKETS

PICK THE

PROS

WEEKLY

PRIZES

ThIs wEEkly ConTEsT sponsoREd by 1264 W. 1st Street, Los Angeles, CA, 90026, • 213.481.1448

$50 GIFT CERTIFICATE

PLuS 2 movIE TIcKETS

REGIsTER TodAy

Free • easy • Fun Just go to...

LAdoWnToWnnEWS.com/

Grand Prize: TriP for Two To hawaii!

PIcKTHEPRoS

WEEK

Nd Place

WEEK

1 cHRIS mEnoR 2 mIcHAEL cox 18 1 WInSTon Wu 2 STEvEn LIndSAY 17 football st Place

st Place

20% Off Your Entire Order

Plus Additional 10% Off Late Night Snack

Modern 50’s sstyle diner

Additional 10% between hours of 8pm and 4am. No substitutions. Limit one coupon per customer. At participating locations only. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 2/17/11.

New!

F F O % 0 5 Burger* ChiCken

b. 3, 2011

*expires Fe

nOW Open 8th & Olive 213-228-1200 | 6th & Spring 213-228-0022

Two DownTown LocaTions

WINE DOWN MONDAYS $4

HAPPY HOUR 4-8PM DAILY ALL BEERS ALL NIGHT 50% % OFF ALL HOUSE WINES $4

Watch the game inside or outside on our comfortable patio. All new food menu, served till closing. Live DJ’s 10pm-2am “Fly Mondays” Drink & Bottle Service Specials 21 & Over, No Cover, No Dress Code 404 S. Figueroa St., Los Angeles, CA 90071 213.489.3590 | www.SUEDEBARLA.com

YOUR DOWNTOWN TOYOTA DEALER

WE MAKE IT EASY!

0 0 $ $ 0 0 $

$

DOWN PAYMENT SECURITY DEPOSIT

DUE AT SIGNING

1ST MO. PAYMENT

LEASE A COROLLA • CAMRY • SIENNA LE MATRIX • RAV4 • PRIUS • AND MORE! On approved above average credit. Security deposit waived. 35 monthly payments, from $239/mo plus tax & license. 36K total miles, with 15¢ per excess mile. See dealer for complete details. Expires 1/31/11.

1-800-574-4891 • toyotacentral.com

Nd Place

Strawberry Pancakes or French Toast

Combo with Coffee or a 22oz. Drink

Strawberry French Toast

No Substitutions. Limit one offer per coupon. State sales tax applicable. One coupon per person, per visit at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon, combo meal, advertised special or offer. Expires 2/17/11.

6

$ 99

With this coupon.

213-228-8999 213 228-8999 | farmerboysla.com | 726 Alameda St. (Bay & Alameda) | Open 24/7


January 17, 2011

Downtown News 7

DowntownNews.com

Downtown Getting Charter Middle School Fall 2013 Opening Planned for $31 Million Facility by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

C

amino Nuevo, a 10-year-old charter school organization that runs five campuses in the WestlakeMacArthur Park area, plans to open a 500seat school in City West by 2013. The Los Angeles Unified School District owns the site adjacent to the Miguel Contreras Learning Complex on Third Street just west of the Harbor (110) Freeway. The move is part of the district’s effort to comply with Prop. 39, a state law that requires school districts to make space available to charters. While the $31 million project still requires board approval, district officials are already proceeding with an environmental study, and Camino Nuevo was selected through a public bidding process. The LAUSD first developed plans for the City West site in 2003. It originally envisioned the property as the home of Central Los Angeles High School No. 12, one of four new Downtown public high schools that would help relieve overcrowding in the area. Amid declining enrollment and rising construction costs, the district built only three of the schools, and High School No. 12 was shelved. Facing pressure from charter school advocates to make more space available for

charters, the district is dusting off plans for the 500-seat school and handing the reins to Camino Nuevo. Ana Ponce, Camino Nuevo’s executive director, said they proposed a middle school but actually hope to open a joint middle-high school serving grades six through 12. Camino Nuevo and the district are in negotiations regarding the high school seats. The organization believes there is more of a need for middle school seats in the area, but also maintains there is a demand for a charter high school. Camino Nuevo’s single high school, at Temple Street and Virgil Avenue, has 430 seats. It uses a lottery system for firstyear admissions, and for the current school year 201 students applied for 112 incoming freshmen seats, Ponce said. “The goal is to serve all the students that would like to be part of Camino Nuevo,” she said. Design Head Start The district’s plan to build its own school more than seven years ago has given the Camino Nuevo facility somewhat of a head start. The district already has a design, prepared by architect Quatro Design Group, and the project previously underwent an environmental analysis. However, because several years have passed

rendering by Quatro Design Group

Camino Nuevo has been selected to run a 500-seat charter school in City West. The 55,000-square-foot building is expected to open in 2013.

since the study was completed, the district is now preparing an updated environmental impact report. “We thought it was prudent, obviously since there are new structures in the area, and new potential folks that may be impacted, to do a fresh look at the EIR,” said John Sun, senior charter schools facilities manager for the district. Plans call for a 55,361-square-foot, threestory school on a sliver of land immediately east of the Miguel Contreras Learning Complex athletics fields, near the intersection of Miramar Street and Huntley Drive. The new school will share use of the playing fields. It would include a 47-space, subterranean garage. Charter schools are independently run public schools that are free from most district rules and are not bound by union contracts. They are often praised by supporters for their inherent flexibility and opportunities for education innovation, and opposed by teachers’ unions and many who consider charters to be district interlopers. Charters generally use lottery-based admissions systems, because demand is often higher than

the supply of seats. The California Charter Schools Association is among the advocates who in recent years have pressured the LAUSD to make more space available for the schools. The district has settled multiple lawsuits centering on noncompliance with Prop. 39. “Moving forward, the High School No. 12 is only one of several long-term facilities solutions we’re working on with the district,” said CCSA spokeswoman Vicky Waters. Camino Nuevo has five schools: one high school, two K-8 schools, one K-5 school and one early child development program. Camino Nuevo will use a $26 million grant from the state’s Prop 1D bond measure in 2006 to pay for the project. Ponce said that although most of the money remains tied up in Sacramento as bond funds have been largely frozen during the budget crisis, the organization expects the dollars to be released in increments over the next two years. The school district will cover the approximately $5 million balance on the project with funds from Measure R, K and Y, Sun said. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

THEY’rE IN. ArE YOu?

MEET OuR LENDER SATuRDAY, JANuARY 29, 1 - 3PM LEARN ABOuT AFFORDABLE FINANCING OPTIONS THAT CAN MAkE YOu AN ALTA LOFTS OWNER.

OWN FOR AS LITTLE AS

$1,669 PER MONTH*

Residents have started moving in, adding to the energy and vibe of this singular loft community. Historic. Iconic.

Free Consultation

Contemporary. ALTA Lofts is all this and more. You too could be part of this cool, new scene. Visit today, then get moving.

$0 Down 0% Interest for 24 months

*

Better than buying Dental Insurance! *Restrictions apply.

VOTED BEST DENTIST

In Lincoln Heights near

FHA FINANCING (ONLY 3.5% DOWN)

cafes, shops, the Brewery

Tour 2 fully decorated models. 1 & 2 bedroom lofts Flats and 2-story units

Arts Complex, the Gold Line and Downtown.

From the high $200,000s - the high $500,000s Named one of the top 10 real estate deals**

200 N. San Fernando Rd. | Los Angeles | Sales office unit #101

323.223.3100 | LIVEALTA.COM INVISALIGN PREFERRED PROVIDER

3% broker cooperation

LASER DENTISTRY DIGITAL X-RAYS

Don Mungcal, DDS

213. 620.5777 • DOWNTOWNDENTALLA.COM 255 SOUTH GRAND AVE, SUITE 204 LOS ANGELES, CA 90012 • VALIDATED PARKING

*Advertised monthly payment is for illustrative purposes only and is based on a sales price of $224,312 with a conforming loan amount of $216,461 and may vary based on down payment assistance, borrower’s credit, actual closing costs and other variables. Scenario is based on borrower qualification for a 30year fixed rate loan at 4.750% (4.875% APR.) Monthly payment of $1,669 includes taxes, insurance, and HOA. Borrower down payment is 3.5%. Down payment assistance programs through LAHD and other City assistance are available to qualified buyers based on income qualifications. There are a limited number of moderate income units. Rates effective January 2011 and are subject to change without notice. Scenario assumes the buyer has good credit. Not all buyers will qualify. This offer subject to underwriting guidelines and available only for owner-occupied homes. Pricing and terms subject to change without notice. See salesperson for further details. **toptenrealestate.com, 3/23/10. 11LHA252

10LHA252 • Alta Ad • 5” x 7.625” • Downtown News • 1/??/11 • bw


8 Downtown News

January 17, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Progress and Static on the Regional Connector New Route in Little Tokyo, While Fifth and Flower Station Debate Continues by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

I

n response to concerns from Little Tokyo civic and business leaders, officials planning the Regional Connector have altered the rail link’s route. The new path aims to minimize the impact on area shops and parking. The Regional Connector is an underground light-rail track that will connect the major Metro hub at Seventh Street Metro Center with the Gold Line in Little Tokyo. The latest plan envisions three new stations, including a Little Tokyo stop at the northwest corner of First Street and Central Avenue. Under the latest alignment plan, which was presented to the Little Tokyo Community Council last week, Metro no longer needs to take over the site that houses Office Depot, Starbucks and a host of other shops on Central Avenue, just north of Second Street. Originally, the track that approaches Little Tokyo via Second Street would have traveled past Central Avenue and made a sharp turn north toward First and Alameda streets. The route would have required tearing up a block of Second Street for so-called cut and cover construction. Metro now envisions a route that turns northeast from Second Street with a softer, more gradual curve that will tunnel under Japanese Village Plaza. The cut and cover along Second Street would no longer be necessary, said Metro project director Laura Cornejo. Previously, Metro planned to use the Office Depot property primarily as a construction staging area; it would have served as temporary storage for the hulking tunnel boring machine that will work under Second Street. The agency is now negotiating to move staging to the city-owned “Mangrove” property on the northeast corner of First and Alameda streets. A proposed mixed-use development for that site has long been stalled. The changes reflect preliminary solutions to a host of concerns lodged by Little Tokyo stakeholders in response to the draft environmental impact report that Metro released on the project last year, said Metro spokeswoman Ann Kerman.

Thinking about proposing?

rendering courtesy of Metro

The old alignment for the Regional Connector is depicted by the thin red lines, which curve upward from Second Street just east of Central Avenue. The new route, in green, has a more gradual curve as it approaches First and Alameda streets, marked by the larger red box.

A Senator’s Influence Little Tokyo business owners and civic leaders were instrumental in persuading Metro to adopt an-all underground Regional Connector. The agency had considered several alternatives that involved at-grade tracks, which are less expensive but potentially more dangerous to pedestrians and harmful to local businesses, many argued. Even Hawaii Sen. Daniel Inouye, in a letter to the agency, urged Metro to build underground. Inouye, the highest ranking American elected official of Japanese descent in history, chairs the powerful Senate Committee on Appropriations. In proceeding with the $1.36 billion underground route, however, Metro was forced to scrap a proposed station at Fifth and Flower. Cutting that Financial District stop is expected to

New love in your life?

LOVE LINES Express Your Love in our romantic Love Lines issue publishing February 7.

It’s FREE!

Streetcar... I can’t wait to have you ride all over me... Broadway

All you have to do is… • Email your message to lovelines@downtownnews.com • 20 words or less • Include your contact info (name, phone and email) • Don’t forget the name of the person you are sending the love line to • Limited to 1 FREE message per reader (don’t try to be sneaky, we know)

DeaDline for entries february 2

save the project about $185 million. Planners say the savings are crucial considering they expect to come up about $200 million short on the project’s budget after cobbling together local dollars, Measure R transit tax revenues and a major federal grant. The board voted in October to nix the station from an upcoming environmental study because members said it made little sense to spend $2 million to examine a station that can’t be funded for construction. Some Financial District stakeholders continue to protest the move and want the station re-inserted in the study. Those leaders, which include the Central City Association, are investigating whether it would actually cost the $2 million Metro said it would to examine the station. The CCA and other station supporters are working on a funding plan that draws from public and private sources that would allow the agency to keep Fifth and Flower in the study, said Hilary Norton, vice chair of the CCA’s transportation committee. Norton is also executive director of Fixing Angelenos Stuck in Traffic, a mass transit advocacy group founded by Jim Thomas of Thomas Properties Group, which owns City National Plaza, a key office tower near the proposed station. Norton said the group wants to keep Fifth and Flower in the study even if it means not building the stop until some time far in the future, after the rest of the project is completed. That would allow Metro to engineer the track and take on other infrastructure to facilitate future development. Norton said the group hopes to present its plan to the board when it meets on Jan. 27. Securing support from Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa would be key to any plan to salvage the station, considering that Villaraigosa controls four votes on Metro’s board of directors. When the 13-member panel nixed the station in October, Villaraigosa was not present and his appointees abstained. Metro plans to finish preliminary engineering work on the Regional Connector in early 2012. The schedule call for construction to begin in 2014, with completion by 2019. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

A special valentine for mom?

N

! r a e Y s i h T w e

FOR $25you can get…

• A featured box • 35 words to express your love • A photo (send your .jpg) (sender must have authorization to reprint photo)


January 17, 2011

Downtown News 9

DowntownNews.com

Restaurant Buzz

Celebrating the Life of Jack Kyser

Umami Is Coming, dineLA Returns, and Chinese New Year by RichaRd GuzmĂĄn city editoR

W

ho’s Umami?: Burger lovers rejoice, one of the city’s favorite hamburger restaurants is coming Downtown. Umami Burger, which was recently named “Burger of the Year� by GQ magazine, is heading to Broadway. As first reported by Eater L.A., the four-restaurant chain will open Umamicatessen at 852 S. Broadway. The menu will feature the Umami burger, mini-tapas sandwiches and house-cured deli meats. More details will be released at a press conference Jan. 25. If you absolutely can’t wait for it to open, there are currently locations in Santa Monica, Hollywood, Los Feliz and on La Brea south of Hollywood. n Mobile Munchies: The food truck craze continues, with a new fleet of mobile meal providers rolling into Downtown three days a week. DTLA Food Trucks on 7th, organized by Brookfield Properties and the Southern California Mobile Food Vendors’ Association, will be bringing the trucks to the 7+Fig shopping center every Monday through Wednesday from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Trucks will rotate on a daily basis, and participating eateries on wheels include Ludo Bites and India Jones. More information at socalmfva.com.

H

n Dine Time: The popular and capital-letter challenged dineLA Restaurant Week is back this week, with more than 250 restaurants across the city participating in the two-week food party. As part of the promotion, which runs Jan. 23-28 and, after a Saturday night break, Jan. 30Feb. 4, restaurants will offer three-course lunch specials for $16, $22 or $28, and three-item dinner specials for $26, $34 or $44. Participating Downtown restaurants include Drago Centro, Casa, First & Hope, Soi 7 and Starry Kitchen. More information at discoverlosangeles.com. n Happy New Year, Again: If you’re looking forward to celebrating New Year’s again you’re in luck, because the Year of the Rabbit begins Feb. 3 and the party is already planned at WP24. In honor of the Chinese New Year, the L.A. Live restaurant will offer a $150 per person, sevencourse tasting menu from Feb. 3-18. The menu will include dishes such as clam sycee, winter pumpkin and king crab “Hot and Sourâ€? soup, and Cantonese style roast duck. Each dish will symbolize a blessing for the new year, among them luck, long life and prosperity. WP24 is at 900 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 743-8824. Contact Richard GuzmĂĄn at richard@downtownnews.com.

photo by Gary Leonard

undreds of Angelenos, including a wide swath of the Downtown business community, turned out for a memorial service for Jack Kyser last week. The economist, who passed away in December at the age of 76, was eulogized by friends including Carol Martinez (shown here) and elected leaders such as Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and City Controller Wendy Greuel. The crowd at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel on Wednesday, Jan. 12, smiled, laughed and occasionally teared up at references to Kyser’s pranks, his ability to make complex economic matters comprehensible, and his beloved cat, Tony the Tiger. Officials at the Southern California Association of Governments, where Kyser worked most recently, have established the Jack Kyser Economic College Scholarship at USC, his alma mater. Contribution information will be at scag.ca.gov. —Jon Regardie

A New Year. A New You. A

Get into your best shape with our 6 week challenge 24 TRaining SeSSiOnS!

Scared 499 $

of missing sales opportunities?

We’ve got the solution. Juggling too many projects, deadlines and vendors? Let Limited Time Offer! Reg $1125 PIP manage the creation and re-ordering of all of your business communications. In one location, your PIP consultants bring together all the resources

Downtown Los AngeLes

you need,us including: Train with and:

Fashion District

840 S. Los Angeles St.

213-627-6861 Hours 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Closed Sunday

PC R

    Small Business Development Corporation

3926 Wilshire Blvd. 3rd Floor Los Angeles, CA 90010 Fee: $300.00 (cost includes entire curriculum)

DIsCoUnt PRICes SHOP EARLY FOR BEST SELECTION & PRICES

• Printing

• Copying lose 2 inches from your waist • Graphic design drop a clothing size • have super energy 700 Wilshire Blvd. lose 8lbs ofph:fat • gain muscle 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897

• Signs, posters and banners • Digital printing • Online ordering

piparco@sbcglobal.net

Huge S of Kid election s Wea r

Feb Start rua ing ry 1 Entrepreneurial Strategic Planning (ESP) Program st t Courses are designed to help business owners kick-start growth and achieve success t Low cost business assistance training and classes t One-on-one professional advising and classes in key areas of business management and development including financing options, computerization, new business strategies, planning and expansion, and other changes in the business world t Business Resource Materials t Certificate awarded to each participant upon completion of each class taken $50.00 Topics include: OFF Quantum Leap To Success Business Legal Issues when you Developing Your Business Plan Financing Your Business mention the Recordkeeping/Accounting Marketing Your Business Los Angeles Downtown QuickBooks Managing Your Business Effectively News Business Strategies And Projections Employee Development / Analyzing Your Financial Statements Customer Relations

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT PACIFIC COAST REGIONAL SBDC OR TO REGISTER FOR THE ESP PROGRAM*:

 tXXXQDSTCEDPSH

Limited space is available. *Individual classes may be attended. For more information, please visit our website. The Lead Center for the Los Angeles Regional SBDC Network is operated by Long Beach Community College District. The Small Business Development Centers are funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration, center host institutions, state and local funds, and corporate partners. Funding is not an endorsement of any product, opinion, or service. All Federal and State funded programs are extended to the public on a nondiscriminatory basis. Special arrangements for individuals with disability will be made if requested in advance.

We don’t mess around! We guarantee YOU results!

B Or WE give YOU your money back! Get Ready...

afraid

1. Full analysis (weight, measurements & body fat 2. Goal Setting (clear target of what you want to achieve 3. Action Plan (personalized nutrition and exercise plan)

Get Active...

your customers won’t notice you?

gottrainer the solution. 1. Exercise (24 min vigorous sessionWe’ve with your 4+ times Whether a week) going after just one customer or appealing to atomass market, we’ll help you capture those sales opportunities. In one 2. Change it up (regular consultations fine tune your progress) location, PIP& food consultants bring together all the resources you need, 3. Learn (be educated on the perfect exercise,your nutrition supplements)

Get Results...

including:

• Printing • Copying • Graphic design

1. Results (complete final analysis and and certificate of achievement) 2. Picture (after photos presented700 with yourWilshire before photos) Blvd. ph: 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 piparco@sbcglobal.net

633 W. 5th St., Suite 5750 • 213.617.8229 www.educogym.com • facebook.com/educogym downtownla@educogym.com

C

horrified

• Signs, posters and banners • Digital printing • Online ordering AFTER

BEFORE

by too much to do and too little time?

We’ve got the solution. From simple POS materials to a full-on marketing blitz, we’ll help you get noticed. In one location, your PIP consultants bring together all the resources you need, including:

700 Wilshire Blvd.

• Printing • Copying • Graphic design

ph: 213-489-2333 fax: 213-489-2897 piparco@sbcglobal.net

• Signs, posters and banners • Digital printing • Online ordering


10 Downtown News

January 17, 2011

Budget Continued from page 1 to do serious economic development in areas defined as blighted… is redevelopment,” said Ninth District Councilwoman Jan Perry, who joined the City Council in voting to oppose Brown’s redevelopment proposal. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa is also against the plan. In a statement last week, he called Brown’s proposal to cut redevelopment and state enterprise zones, which give businesses tax breaks for locating in certain areas, a “non-starter.” The CRA’s primary revenue stream is tax increment in the 34 state-recognized redevelopment areas it oversees. Tax increment is the difference in the amount of property taxes between the present and when the redevelopment area was created. In theory, tax increment funding is a winwin for neighborhoods and government. Eyesores become commercially viable properties, benefiting neighborhoods. Property values go up, and so do property taxes, which benefit the state after redevelopment project areas expire. The effort has largely worked in Downtown. When the CRA formed the Central Business District in 1975, property values were at about $300 million. Now the area’s valuation is around $3 billion, said CRA Chief Executive Officer Chris Essel. Unanswered Questions The fact that the CRA has succeeded in generating new investment and upping property values is evidence to some that the agency is no longer needed. In effect, said Dick Carter, a commercial broker and retail expert, the CRA has done its job. “Downtown should be able to now economically be viable because the rents and prices of current product should be in place,” Carter said. “Everyone knows what rents are. There’s enough stats in place. Ten or 15 years ago, there were none. Now we have a basis on which to draw up our economics.” While it has driven economic development Downtown, in recent years the CRA was perceived by many in the private sector as more of an obstacle to business than a

helping hand, said Carol Schatz, president and CEO of the Central City Association. She referenced multiple CRA policies, including a robust green building program, that she believes deterred investment. “Most people who did business with the agency prior to [Essel’s appointment last year] just felt it would be better if it went away,” said Schatz. Brown’s proposal would skim $1.7 billion from new tax increment generated by redevelopment agencies across the state in fiscal year 2011/2012, and phase out the agencies entirely going forward. Successor agencies would administer payments of existing contractual obligations and debt service. The CRA generates about $150 million in new tax increment every year, though that will likely shrink to about $100 million by 2015, when 10 of the agency’s 34 project areas are slated to expire. It has nearly $1 billion in debt obligations, with maturities ranging from 10 to 25 years, Essel said. In theory, Brown’s proposal saves the state money because it frees up more property tax dollars for cities and counties to spend on local services such as education and public safety. If the municipalities have more money to spend on those services, that places less of a burden on the state, according to Brown’s plan. A few days after Brown first detailed the proposal, however, Essel said much remains unclear. Local government is going to have to “perform services that the state performs,” Essel said. “What’s unclear is how much is the state divesting to the localities and is this redevelopment infusion going to be anywhere near enough to cover obligations?” Essel said the agency’s current focus is on determining its contractual obligations going forward, so if Brown’s proposal is implemented, the CRA will have a sound accounting of which dollars are untouchable. Murky Future Across Downtown, stakeholders who depend on the agency’s money are on edge. SRO Housing Corp., one of two leading developers of permanent supportive housing in Skid Row, relies heavily on the CRA for funding to acquire and rehab properties and also for emergency dollars, said Anita Nelson, the nonprofit’s CEO.

CRA funds helped SRO acquire the Rosslyn Hotel and the Ford Hotel, among other affordable housing projects. In 2006, SRO suddenly lost a key $1.55 million grant it had programmed for its James M. Wood Community Center, where hundreds of meals are served every week to seniors. The CRA stepped in and funded those efforts for three years. “This will be a disaster,” said Joseph Corcoran, SRO’s director of acquisitions. “Imagine all the loans reverting to the state’s control. How are they going to do all that? There’s thousands of loans, with all these covenants tied to them.” Essel said the California Redevelopment Association’s legal team is assessing whether Brown’s proposal violates Prop. 22, which voters passed last year to stop state raids on local redevelopment and transportation funds. While Brown’s proposal seems to violate the law in spirit, Essel said, by eliminating redevelopment agencies altogether, it could be argued that those freed-up revenues would no longer be tied to redevelopment. Other Downtown projects that stand to be hampered include the streetcar, which has tapped CRA funds for environmental studies and consultants, said Russell Brown, executive director of the Historic Downtown Business Improvement District. “The streetcar would never [exist] without the CRA being able to provide substantial foundational and support money to get it up and running,” Brown said. Eli Broad’s hope to include a public plaza near his planned Grand Avenue art museum, along with tentative plans to widen the side-

photo by Gary Leonard

Twitter/DowntownNews

Community Redevelopment Agency CEO Chris Essel said elimination of the agency would doom plans for the Cleantech Manufacturing Center.

walks along Grand Avenue between Second and Fourth streets, could be dashed without the CRA’s help. Essel said the CRA’s plans to redevelop the industrial swath of largely underused land along the Los Angeles River into a “Cleantech Corridor” would also be derailed if the agency is eliminated. The highlight of that plan is the Cleantech Manufacturing Center, where the agency hopes to develop a major hub for clean technology that would generate at least 250 jobs. “We have a lot of land laying fallow there that’s been underutilized for a couple of decades now and we have a very aggressive plan to move forward with good quality jobs in that part of the city,” Essel said. “That’ll never happen without the infusion of redevelopment cash.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

Open Saturdays!

FREE

Lifetime Whitening with Your Initial Cleaning, Exam & X-ray Appointment.

experience the difference

Free Valet Parking.

213.234.5576

Yes, we accept all insurances! Comfortable visits with laughing gas.

525 S. Olive St. Downtown www.CalmDental.com

“Everyone is invited Everyone belongs”

CHURCH

LIVE

LA

WEEKDAY WORKSHOP Thursday, January 27, 2011 6–8p.m. WEEKEND WORKSHOP Saturday, January 29, 2011 10a.m.–Noon

All events will be held at: 715 S. Los Angeles Street Los Angeles, CA 90014

BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLE Thursday, January 27, 2011 10–11a.m. A breakfast session conveniently timed for the business community.

Workshops will explore issues and opportunities in LA’s Fashion District. Pick a date that works for you or come to both! Saturday’s workshop will include a walking tour.

Can’t make it? Visit WWW.FASHIONYOURDISTRICT.ORG to complete our online survey available beginning Thursday, January 27, 2011.

SUNDAYS 10AM

Sushi

1

Buy 5 Free Get Bento & Sushi Box

We provide you with professional massage therapist!

Hillhurst Thai Spa

L.A. LIVE

www.livechurchla.com

Japanese Lunch

Visit WWW.FASHIONYOURDISTRICT.ORG for more information

EVERYONE IS INVITED EVERYONE BELONGS

include Sushi Roll, Salad, Steamed Rice, Entrée & Drink

523 W. 7th St. (7th/Grand) (213) 623-6238 Dine In • Take Out • Delivery Chicken Tempura

Chicken Tempura (6pcx.)

$5.99up Free Green Tea or 50¢ Soda $6.

99

$8.99

Sushi Combo

Assorted Sushi (6pcs.)

Sushi Roll & Sashimi $2.99 up Tempura & Sashimi $4.99 up Salad & Sushi $1.99 up

RESTAURANTS

M

1904 Hillhurst Ave., Los Angeles • 323.644.2805 Cross street Franklin

Early Bird Special (Mon.-Thurs. 10am-2pm) $35 (reg. $40) (1 hr.)

TradiTional Thai Massage open daily 10am - 9:30pm

FIND OUT WHAT TO EAT AND WHERE TO EAT

LADOWNTOWNNEWS.COM

@

SPOTLIGHT ON

LA

Re


January 17, 2011

Downtown News 11

DowntownNews.com

HEALTH A Choice Between the Gym and the Living Room Finding the Right Place to Work Out Is a Personal Decision by DiAnne Crown

N

o amount of walking, running on the treadmill or riding the family’s recumbent bicycle could reverse Crystal Sitki’s steady weight gain. By about age 40, the stay-at-home mother of two and community volunteer had put on 70 unwanted pounds. “What I was doing wasn’t working,” Sitki says. Like many, Sitki joined a fitness club and started to see some positive changes. One year later, she is within a few pounds of her goal weight and feels great. It’s not an uncommon result, but it’s also not for everyone. “You have to know yourself,” says Jim Hayes, a certified personal trainer and group exercise instructor. “If you’re an individual who prefers to work out alone and doesn’t like crowds, then a home setting can be beneficial.” On the other hand, Hayes says, “There are individuals who thrive and have their intensity increase by being around other members or just being in the gym setting.” Such is the case with Sitki, who began a program of fitness training, a diet and group classes that Hayes designed and then modified to meet her specific goals. It is possible to achieve a good workout at home, according to Hayes. And there are some distinct benefits. That starts with time. “When you work out at home, the gym is open 24/7 and there’s no travel time to get to it,” he said. “And DVD workouts offer a variety of training options on your schedule versus a live class offered only at certain times at a facility. You have more flexibility.” He cautions, however, that home also has a lot of distractions, such as stopping to check your e-mail, fix supper and so on. “In the gym setting, your mind is entirely on the workout.”

The main drawbacks to exercising only at home are the quality of the workout and not having personal supervision from a trainer, Hayes believes. “Home equipment is typically not at the same level you’ll find at the gym,” he notes. “It is very important to challenge the body with resistance training, and it would be very difficult to match the selection and amount of weight you would have at a gym with a handful of light weights at home. A facility or gym with a wide range of dumbbells, kettlebells and machines would win hands down in producing results with resistance training.” A club with a swimming pool also offers the benefits of lap swimming, water aerobics and flexibility and balance training. This is especially beneficial for older members and people with joint problems and injuries, Hayes says. Additionally, many facilities offer popular * group classes, such as high-

* * nvenientHealthcare. Healthcare. venient * * Healthcare. Healthcare. Convenient Healthcare.

rtDowntown of Downtown Los Angeles. Los Angeles. les.

Convenient Healthcare. * Convenient Healthcare. In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles.

eles.

intensity, high-impact boot camp, Zumba, yoga, Pilates, spinning and kickboxing. Having a trained staff to get you started and monitor your progress is also important, says Hayes. “The problem with fitness training in general is that a lot of new people don’t know what to do,” he says. “At least DVDs give them a starting point. They’ll come into the gym and watch other people to figure out where to begin, but you need a structured workout that’s consistent with your goals.” An accurate profile of your current health, flexibility, background and injuries will help establish your optimal starting regimen. “Fitness should be considered like a game of golf,” Hayes says. “You can read books and watch DVDs, but it also [benefits you] to hire a golf pro.” The trainer also can keep your program advancing at the right pace. “You want to push yourself because the trainer is there working out with you,” says Sitki, whose goals are to maintain her weight loss, increase her muscle mass, and stay fit and healthy. For anyone starting or restarting a fitness program, Sitki suggests, simply, staying with it — even if that is not as easy as it sounds. “Even if you feel tired and worn-out and don’t want to get up that extra hour early in the morning, just do it,” she says. “You can set yourself up for failure if you sign up for a program and finish it but you don’t follow through with it.” Once you work with a personal trainer, Sitki continues, you’ll know when a workout benefits you. But wherever you work out, Hayes adds, “Something is better than nothing — just as long as you do exercise.” Article copyright 2011 creators.com.

*

In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles.

In The Heart of Downtown Los Angeles.

On Grand and Pico. 2 blocks of L.A. On Grand and Pico. Just Just 2 blocks east east of L.A. LIVE!LIVE!

On Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocks east of L.A. LIVE!

On Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocks east of L.A. LIVE!

included. great doctors included. great doctors included. * great doctors included. * great doctors included. * great doctors included. great doctors * 2 blocks *east * Just On Grand and Pico. of L.A. LIVE!

Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocks east of L.A. LIVE! On Grand and Pico. Just 2 blocksOn east of L.A. LIVE!

great doctors included.

*Patient-Centered Medical Care Close to Work, Close to Home: ered Medical Care Close to Work, Close to Home: Medical Care Close to Work, Close to Home: Patient-Centered Medical Care Close to Work, Close to Home: Diagnostic Imaging — MRI, CT, Ultrasound, Interventional Radiology Patient-Centered Medical Care Close to Work, Close to Home: �

omaging Work, Close to Home: � Diagnostic Imaging — MRI, CT, Ultrasound, Interventional Radiology — MRI, CT, Ultrasound, Interventional Radiology ing — MRI, CT, Ultrasound, Interventional Radiology � State-of-the art Cancer Treatment Diagnostic Imaging — MRI, CT, Ultrasound, Interventional Radiology State-of-the art Cancer Treatment

thcare.* ��

— Medical, Radiation�&State-of-the Surgical Treatment options art Cancer Treatment

FLOWER

Orthopedic Services

� Orthopedic Services Joint Replacement / Reconstruction (Hip, Knee, Shoulder) &ment IMRT RT Replacement / Reconstruction (Hip, Knee, Shoulder) options——Joint

Services ices

— Joint Replacement / Reconstruction (Hip, Knee, Shoulder) FLOWER

to Work, Close to Home: Spine disorders —— Spine disorders

— Spine disorders FLOWER

—— Hand, FootFoot and Ankle treatments Hand, and Ankle treatments

Replacement / Reconstruction (Hip, — Hand,Shoulder) Foot and Ankle treatments acement / Reconstruction (Hip, Knee,Knee, Shoulder) nd, Interventional Radiology � Pulmonary Medicine and Respiratory Care �

Pulmonary Medicine and Respiratory Care

FLOWER

We’re Here for We’re You. Here for You.

� Pulmonary Medicine and Respiratory Care � Ear, Nose and Throat Diagnostic and Treatment Services disorders nrders (Hip, Knee, Shoulder) � Ear, Nose and Throat Diagnostic and Treatment Services

� Ear, andCare Throat Diagnostic and Treatment Services � Urology — Diagnostic, Treatment andNose Surgical nd Pico. Just 2 blocks east of L.A. LIVE! ,t Foot and treatments and Ankle treatments Urology — Diagnostic, Treatment and Surgical Care � Ankle � Urology — Diagnostic, Treatment and Surgical Care Here for You. Services � Cardiology — Diagnostic and Testing DIGITAL We’re We’re Here for You.

tment options

We’re Here for You. Women’s & Children’s Services — Level II NICU � 24/7 Women’s & Children’s Services — Level IINOW NICU AVAILABLE � II Emergency Care and Level Trauma Center nd Throat Diagnostic and Treatment Services hroat Diagnostic and Treatment Services included. edoctors

� Cardiology — Diagnostic and Testing Cardiology —Services Diagnostic and Testing Services Medicine and Respiratory Care Women’s & Children’s Services �— Level II NICU cine and �Respiratory Care MAMMOGRAMS �

CALL NOW! Emergency and Level II Trauma Center � 24/7 24/7 Emergency Care and Level II TraumaCare Center

Diagnostic, Treatment and Surgical nostic, Treatment and Surgical Care Care atment Services

FLOWER

Discover what theServices right doctor can do for you ... — Diagnostic and Testing agnostic and Testing Services n (Hip, Knee, Shoulder) rgical Care Discover what the right doctor Home: CALL 1-888-742-CHMC (2462) Discover what the right doctor can do for you can ... do for you ... Children’s Services — Level II NICU dren’s Services — Level II NICU rvices

CALL 1-888-742-CHMC (2462)

adiology

ency and Level II Trauma Center Care and Level II Trauma Center NICUCare CALL 1-888-742-CHMC

(2462)

We’re Here for You.

FLOWER

a Center

re

what right doctor do for atment Services tder)the the right doctor can can do for youyou ... ... can do for you ... urgical Care

LL 1-888-742-CHMC (2462) 1-888-742-CHMC (2462) We’re Here for You. rvices(2462) MC

I NICU

FLOWER

— HDR & IMRT

cal, Radiation & Surgical Treatment options — HDR & IMRT adiation & Surgical Treatment options Services � Orthopedic

FLOWER

— Medical, Radiation & Surgical Treatment options eCancer artInterventional Cancer Treatment Treatment nd, Radiology — Medical, Radiation & Surgical Treatment options — HDR & IMRT

We’re Here for You.

Free Evaluation with this ad


12 Downtown News

January 17, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews Health

Study Links Close Proximity to Freeways With Autism Report Finds Heightened Risks for Families Within 1,000 Feet of Highways by Ellin Kavanagh

L

iving near a freeway may be associated with increased risk of autism, according to a study published by a team of researchers from the USC Keck School of Medicine, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and the UC Davis MIND Institute. The paper appears online in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. Children born to mothers living within 309 meters of a freeway (or just over 1,000 feet) appeared to be twice as likely to have autism, said Heather Volk, first author on the study. Volk holds joint appointments at the Community, Health Outcomes & Intervention Research Program at The Saban Research Institute of Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute and the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School. Autism is a developmental disorder that has long been ascribed to genetic factors. While changes in diagnostic criteria and

increased awareness have been thought to contribute to the rising incidence of the disorder, these factors alone cannot explain the dramatic increase in the number of children affected. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a 57% increase between 2002 and 2006. The new study supports the theory that environmental factors, in conjunction with a strong genetic risk, may be one possible explanation for the increase. Data from children with autism and typically developing children, who served as controls, were drawn from the Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) study, a population-based casecontrol study of preschool children. Children were between the ages of 24 and 60 months at the start of the study and lived in communities around Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sacramento. Population-based controls were recruited from state of California birth files and were

LA’s Hottest Pilates & Indoor Cycling Studio in the Heart of Downtown

A study found that living within 309 meters (about 1,000 feet) of a freeway at birth was associated with a two-fold increase in autism risk.

frequency matched to the autism cases by age, gender and broad geographic area. Each participating family was evaluated in person. All children were assessed for autism using wellvalidated instruments. The study examined the locations where the children’s families lived during the first, second and third trimesters of the mother’s pregnancies, and at the time of the baby’s birth, and looked at the proximity of these homes to a major road or freeway. The participants’ gestational ages were determined using ultrasound measurements and prenatal records. Volk and her colleagues found that living within 309 meters of a freeway at birth was associated with a two-fold increase in autism risk. This association was not altered by adjustment for child gender or ethnicity, maximum education in the home, maternal age or prenatal smoking. The researchers found

no consistent pattern of association of autism with proximity to major roads, as opposed to freeways, however. Traffic-related air pollutants have been observed to induce inflammation and oxidative stress in toxicological and human studies. The emerging evidence that oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of autism supports the findings of this study. “We expect to find many, perhaps dozens, of environmental factors over the next few years, with each of them probably contributing to a fraction of autism cases. It is highly likely that most of them operate in conjunction with other exposures and/or with genes,” said Irva Hertz-Picciotto, chief of the division of environmental and occupational health in the Department of Public Health Sciences at UC Davis, and principal investigator on the CHARGE study. Article courtesy USC HSC Weekly.

First Class FrEE • JOiN ClUB COrE FOr $99

Includes 3 Group Classes • 20% off Standard Group Classes • 10% off Private Training

a NEW DECaDE, a NEW YOU

THE DOCTORS OF USC FAMILY MEDICINE Family Physicians Dedicated to Serving You and Your Family

Save $150 off the 3-month Unlimited Class Prepaid Contract Save $120 off the 6-month Unlimited Class Autopay Contract weekday rise & Shine Series - $149/month (month to month), Access to Downtown LA Weekday 6A Classes

Patient Services

new MeMBer SPeciaLS - caLL or viSit weBSite for inforMation

• Primary Care Providers • On Call Physician 24/7 • Same Day Appointments

Clinical Specialty

213.863.4834 • www.ppdtla.com 845 S. Broadway, downtown La / 301 Pine ave, downtown Long Beach

• Acute and Chronic Care • Infants, Children and Adolescent Care • Adult and Elder Care • Maternity and Gynecology • Weight Management • Minor Procedures

Downtown Location

USC Family Medicine 1400 South Grand Avenue, Suite 101 Los Angeles, CA 90015 The

Doctors

USC

For an Appointment, please call (213) 744-0801 ext. 253 www.doctorsofusc.com

*USC Family Medicine accepts most major insurance companies and cash for service

$6 9U PO L NL UT IM IM ’ to ITE 70 D T ITE 21 IM D 0f E ! o

RE G Te . $1 xt 5 ‘TA 0 -

restaurants

M

r O OF ffe FE r R

FixingSales Downtown LA Bicycle and Service Fixing Downtown LA Since 2001 Since 2001

Sign up on SaturdayS from 9am-3pm

Find out what to eat andtraining where to professional tapout mma

HONDA PLAZA DENTAL

Redeem this offer at your initial examination and cleaning appointment and receive a FREE whitening kit

Kouichi Cliff Itoh, D.D.S.

Cosmetic, Implant & Laser Dentistry

ZOOM WHITENING Only $199*

Offer expires: 1/31/2011

• Digital x-rays • Oral Cancer and Periodontal screening 400 E. Second St., Suite# 207 • Flexible financial options Los Angeles, CA 90012 x |State ofequipment theGraduate art sterilization Silvia Kasparian, D.D.S. USC | A.D.A., C.D.A. Member with equipment tested weekly tocenter, with tested weekly to 213.687.3895 • fax 213.687.1016Complimentary Teeth Whitening WE CARE! with equipment tested weekly to ensure your safety. ensure your safety. 601xW.State 5th St. , #1110 | (213) 892-8172 ensure your safety. of art sterilization x Digital x-rays for minimal expo- expox the Digital x-rays for center, minimal Mail@ItohDDS.com xequipment Digital x-rays for minimal MAKING QUALITY COMFORTABLE AND GENTLE withDENTISTRY tested weekly to exposure and feedback. sureimmediate and immediate feedback. *New Patients Only

eat

@

400 W. Pico Blvd., los angElEs ca 90015 • 877-452-8276 LAD owntown news .com

MAKING QUALITY DENTISTRY COMFORTABLE ANDAND GENTLE MAKING QUALITY DENTISTRY COMFORTABLE GENTLE MAKING QUALITY COMFORTABLE for over 18 years in Downtown LA LA AND GENTLE for DENTISTRY over 18 years in Downtown for over 18 years in Downtown LA Complimentary Whitening WEAND CARE! Complimentary Teeth Whitening WE GENTLE CARE! MAKING QUALITYTeeth DENTISTRY COMFORTABLE Complimentary Teeth Whitening WE CARE! for over 18 years in Downtown LA x State the of artthe sterilization center,center, x of State art sterilization

sure and immediate feedback. LA ensure safety. x over Oral Cancer and Periodontal xyour Oral Cancer andDowntown Periodontal for 18 years in

x x-rays Oral Cancer Periodontal Digital for minimal exposcreening at each examination ap- apscreening atand each examination atfeedback. each sure pointment and screening immediate at no extra charge. pointment at no examination extra charge.appointment at time, no extra charge. x Oral Cancer Periodontal x We your and we seewe see x respect Weand respect your time, and x We respect yourpromptly. time, and screening at each examination ap- we see that you are treated that you are treated promptly. that are treated promptly. pointment at you no extra charge. x Flexible financial options, includ-includx Flexible financial options, x Flexible financial options, includx We respect your time, we see ing uping to 12 interest-free up months to 12 and months interest-free

x

SPOTLIGHT ON

Healthcare

Editorial for advertisers is available in this special section.

Call (213) 481-1448 1264 W. 1st St., LA, CA 90026 (213) 481-1448 • FAX (213) 250-4617

LADowntownNews.com

L

Re on

Ava

LA


January 17, 2011

Downtown News 13

DowntownNews.com

CALENDAR A Kinder, Gentler Art Display

Art Continued from page 1 Management. It began in 1995 at the Pasadena Convention Center before moving to the Barker Hanger in Santa Monica. This marks its third year in the Convention Center. The Downtown location allows all of the art to be on display in one place, rather than divided into different sections, said Martindale. Entrance is $20 and he said he expects last year’s $25 million in sales to increase, due to the addition of 20% more exhibitors. Tickets for an opening night ceremony, which is open to the public, start at $125. The event is also tied in to January’s L.A. Arts Month, which aims to draw attention to cultural opportunities across the city. Asian Connection While Downtown will be the center of art during the show, part of the focus will be on China. The Los Angeles Art Show features a Guest Country Exhibition. Last year’s focus was on Uruguay. This week the spotlight is on China, and a dozen galleries from the Asian nation will show off their work. “The 12 Chinese galleries have never exhibited outside of China and I think that’s extremely exciting and important,” said Betina Tasende, president of the Fine Art Dealers Association. “This not only helps develop our relationships with other countries but also gives a wider range of art to be viewed to the public of Los Angeles.” The Chinese program will be highlighted by an exhibit called Three Walkers — Crossing Over, presented by the 53 Art Museum from the city of Guangzhou. The exhibit is curated by the Asian art publications Art Gallery Magazine and Gallery Sights and will include installations and mixed media pieces by three artists from Guangzhou. “This is just one more aspect of art that the public might not be very well exposed to but has developed a big curiosity about,” said Tasende. “The other option is that you would have to travel to China to view this.” Other exhibitions at the show include Sister-Cities, curated by Nancy Meyer and Peter Mays. It will include work from s.com or ew DowntownN corner at artists who hail from Los Angeles sister throughout the ht handcities t rig r llis ai pe m up s/ e /form l in th nnews.com E-NEWS Look for this symbo world. .ladowntow w w w P SIGN U In fact, the international theme is heavy. Several galleries from Seoul, South Korea are slated to participate. Galleries from Cuba and Venezuela will also attend, and Europe will be represented by exhibitors from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Spain. “People will be able to see 110 galleries from around the world under one roof in one afternoon,” Tasende said. Speaking of Europe, Rarely/Unseen: A Private Collection of Photographs by Henri Cartier-Bresson will debut more than 35 images from the French photographer known as the father of modern photojournalism. Emerging artists will also be on display. The work “Ghost Grove,” by Los Angeles-based Flora Kao, will feature a forest of translucent panels each painted with a leafless black tree and suspended a few feet apart. It is meant to reference Chinese landscape painting. s The curated works will be among the w few pieces not for nNew /L.A.Downto m o .c k o o b ce sale at the show, where Fa prices will range from a few hundred dollars to more than $1 million. Tasende, who owns a gallery on Melrose, will be displaying a couple of Fernando Botero paintings that reach into that upper price level. “There are certainly buyers for his work,” she said. Closer to Home Other exhibitors are equally optimistic about finding buyers, even the ones who don’t have to travel far to the Convention Center. Marisa Caichiolo is the co-owner of Downtown-based

JAN 3

s! w e N E r o f ✔ Sign Up

Sign Up for Our E-News Blasts & Be Entered to Win Movie Tickets!

JAN 10

! n a F a e m o Bec

Fan Downtown News on Facebook & Be Entered to Win Movie Tickets!

JAN 17

ws! e N E r o f p ✔ Sign U

E-NEWS SIGN UP

ews.com or DowntownN nd corner at aillist ha ht rig r s/m e uppe symbol in th ntownnews.com/form Look for this www.ladow

Weekend Happening Focuses on Artwork Rather Than Parties

photo courtesy of Tasende Gallery - Los Angeles

A pair of Fernando Botero paintings, including “Fin de Fiesta,” will be exhibited at the L.A. Art Show. Prices range from a few hundred dollars to north of $1 million.

photo by Gary Leonard

Edgar Varela is one of the organizers of Art Weekend L.A. The daytime affair takes place Jan. 22-23. by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

T

he Downtown art and business communities were aghast last September when then-Art Walk Director Jay Lopez announced that the popular monthly event was ending and would be replaced by a weekend happening focused more on art sales that parties. While predictions of Art Walk’s demise turned out to be premature, and Lopez was relieved of his duties, the more carefully controlled display launches this weekend. In conjunction with the Los Angeles Art Show, Art Weekend L.A. takes place Jan. 22-23 from noon-6 p.m. The event organized by Lopez and gallery owner Edgar Varela will include about 15 galleries located in the Historic Core, Bunker Hill, Chinatown, the Arts District and South Park. Starts Unlike the food truck and drinks-loving Art Walk crowd, the new event is meant for serious art fans, and Jan.7/Jan.14 will take place quarterly. Partiers and temporary or photo by Jana Cruden part-time art exhibitors are not welcome. The Los Angeles Art Show brings together more than 100 galleries “This is a curated gallery tour,” Varela said. “We’ve from throughout the world. specifically gone and seen all the exhibitions we’re touting and we picked out the best ones going on in Downtown. We consolidated them all in a map and a ADC Contemporary Art. Her space in the Factory Place Art guide. We’ve hired shuttles to take people around.” Complex in the Arts District limits the number of visitors she Participants were selected based on criteria includseesCheck — she’sOur not exactly in a high foot-traffic area. Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com ing full-time hours with a focus on curated shows At the Los Angeles Art Show, she notes, thousands of eyes and the visual arts. An advisory panel, which included will see the 25 pieces she is bringing from about 10 internaDowntown Art Walk founder Bert Green, helped tional artists. make some of the selections. “I’ll be looking for some sales but I don’t know what to exParticipating galleries include Bert Green Fine Art, pect. It’s been very challenging with the economy,” she said. Edgar Varela Fine Arts, CB1 Gallery, DRKRM Gallery, Heidi Chang, owner of the PYO Gallery in South Park, will Morono Kiang Gallery, PYO Gallery L.A. and ADC be returning as an exhibitor for the third time. She said that Gallery. while she hopes to sell work, exposure is also an important Starts Contemporary Varela said they expect about 1,200 attendees per aspect of the event. Jan.14/Jan.21 day. The larger boundaries and daytime hours will help She added that events like the Los Angeles Art Show and keep the crowds in check, he said. L.A. Arts Month have helped raise the city’s profile in the art Four shuttles will loop the route continuously from world. While it is not yet up to New York or Chicago levels, noon-6 p.m. Saturday. There will be no shuttle service she noted that there is an increase in perception. on Sunday. An information center inside the LATC at “Even three years ago no one talked about L.A., and now 514 S. Spring St. will have docents available. there’s a lot of talk about the L.A. art scene,” Chang said. “The Additional information and guides are at art scene is getting a lot more active. It’s becoming quite excitartweekendla.com. ing, especially in Downtown.” Contact Richard Guzmán at The Los Angeles Art Show for is Jan. at theListings Los Angeles Check Our Website Full19-23 Movie LADowntownNews.com richard@downtownnews.com. Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa St., laartshow.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

Starts

January 28

Sign Up for Our E-News Blasts & Be Entered to Win Movie Tickets! Check Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com


14 Downtown News

January 17, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Tales With Heart John Lithgow Goes It Alone at the Taper by Jeff Favre contributing writer

W

hy do all of us want to hear stories and why do some of us want to tell them?” John Lithgow poses these questions at the outset of his one-man show, Stories by Heart, which is at the Mark Taper Forum through Feb. 13 as part of a tour. His hope is that the answer will reveal itself through the act of storytelling, which has the power to unite, uplift and transfix an audience. The extent of that power, of course, depends on the story and who is doing the telling. In this case, Lithgow and his long-departed collaborators — P.G. Wodehouse and Ring Lardner — are examples of how years of dedication to one’s craft can lead to the illusion of effortlessness. Though carefully constructed on the page by Wodehouse and Lardner, and conveyed with surgical precision by Lithgow, there’s a charming sense of spontaneity, particularly in the first act, which during its first incarnation in 2008 was the entirety of the production. That first half remains the much stronger section of Stories by Heart, in part because it contains Lithgow’s motivation to create the show in the first place — his father. Lithgow, sharing the stage with only a few pieces of furniture and some Oriental rugs, begins by traveling back to the childhood of his father, Arthur, who grew up in difficult times. Arthur’s greatest joy came from listening to stories and poems recited by his mother, which likely guided him to a life in the theater. Arthur also shared stories with his children. Several years ago, when Arthur was suffering from a deep depression after surgery, John Lithgow continued the family tradition by reading to his father from the same book of short stories that he cherished in his youth. The book is Tellers of Tales, an anthology of stories edited by Somerset Maugham, and Lithgow displays the well-worn copy that he found on his parents’ shelf. The first story he tells — his childhood favorite, and the one his recuperating father

photo by Craig Schwartz

John Lithgow gets familial in Stories by Heart, inspired by tales he grew up hearing.

requested — is Wodehouse’s “Uncle Fred Flits.” “I hope I haven’t promised too much,” Lithgow confides after explaining the transformative powers Wodehouse’s wacky British comedy had on his father. The promise is easily fulfilled, as Lithgow transitions from reading in an easy chair to filling the stage with nearly a dozen characters — including a winking parrot — each defined through slight mannerisms, body positions and vocal intonations. At times, the evening doubles as a kind of acting master class. Lithgow shows that costumes or props are not needed to differentiate characters. What elevates Wodehouse’s tale beyond lighthearted comedy is Lithgow’s personal prologue about his father, which provides a bittersweet subtext. So it’s easy to see how Stories by Heart could have ended there. But selling a one-hour show at full-length prices is a challenge, so practicality calls for a second act. Lithgow doesn’t reach for deeper meaning other than to choose another of his favorites from the same book. Lardner’s “Haircut” was once famous, Lithgow explains, but the story,

“Great Quality food at a great price” Old Fashioned Hamburgers, French-Fries,Ruben Sandwiches, salads and a breakfast menu featuring chorizo, beef sausage, breakfast burritos and traditional breakfast fare

Save $1 Just Bring this Coupon to

Feeding Los Angeles Since 1917

Grand Central Market 317 South Broadway between 3rd and 4th, Broadway and Hill

(213) 624-2378

You’ll save $1 on any purchase of $5 or more

#

With this coupon only. Coupon expires 02-05-11

www.grandcentralsquare.com Open Seven Days a Week 9AM to 6PM Free 1 hr. Parking with $10 Minimum Purchase Courtesy of the City of Los Angeles Dept. of Transportation

as well as its author, have drifted toward obscurity. Differing starkly in style and tone, “Haircut” is a winding monologue spoken by a barber to a customer. Though “Haircut” is less inviting as a spoken word piece, Lithgow’s mime skills are remarkable. He builds an entire barbershop within the empty space, and performs a minutely detailed shave and haircut on the nonexistent customer. No director is listed for this production, but Jack O’Brien held the title during its premiere. The intricacy of each act suggests that the heavy lifting of seamlessly melding the texts with the action was a two-person job — three, if you count Eric Cornwell’s lighting design, The only bump in the road is that the second act seems to be more of an add-on than an expansion of the initial concept. Unlike the return to Lithgow and his father at the end of “Uncle Fred Flits,” the evening concludes abruptly with the last line of “Haircut.” It comes across as an unnecessary encore, yet is entertaining and adds further evidence that Lithgow is an expert storyteller. Stories by Heart runs through Feb. 13 at the Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or centertheatregroup.org.


January 17, 2011

Downtown News 15

DowntownNews.com

LISTINGS EVENTS

Monday, Jan. 17 Pershing Square 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/ pershingsquare. Noon-2 p.m.: Downtown On Ice offers a free lunchtime concert with city loving rastas Urban Dread. Praise Jah and pull a double axel.

Clive Barker’s Back, Puppet Play and Deepak Delivers by Lauren CampedeLLi, Listings editor

Continued on next page

calendar@downtownnews.com

4

Quick, name the 19th century figure who consulted a Ouija-style board before agreeing to design a Downtown L.A. building? That’d be George Wyman, who was fearful about stealing the business from his boss. But his dead brother said “Y-E-S” and The Bradbury Building was erected in 1893 complete with open cage elevators and ornamental cast iron pieces. Now, 117 years later, The Da Camera Society, an organization that stages live classical music in historic Los Angeles landmarks, takes over the building for an afternoon. On Sunday, Jan. 23, at 2 and 4 p.m., the Amsterdam-based Calefax Reed Quintet will fill the structure with 15th century polyphony in a program of Debussy (Syrinx), Britten (Pan), Arvo Part (Summa and Arbos) and Bach (Goldberg Variations excerpts). If you get bored, look around and think about how they filmed part of Blade Runner in the building. At 304 S. Broadway, (213) 477-2929 or dacamera.org.

image by Sandra Yagi

image by Clive Barker,

Although he is best known in the fantasy/horror arena, Clive Barker is quite the Renaissance man. He writes (the Hellraiser series), he directs (Lord of Illusions), he produces (Gods and Monsters). So it should come as no surprise that he’s also a fine artist. Barker’s highly imaginative work is exclusively represented at Bert Green Fine Art, and the gallery recently opened his fourth solo show of new paintings and drawings (such as “The Prayer,” left). In neat and thematically related tandem, the paintings of Sandra Yagi are also featured: skeletons and animal musculature in action, chimerical creatures (“Flying Kangaroo Rat,” right) and S&M scenes enacted by a skeletal dominatrix. Experience their fantastical worlds Wed.-Sat., noon-6 p.m., through Feb. 19. At 102 W. Fifth St., (213) 842-8574 or bgfa.us.

Three

It’s a breakfast for champions on Thursday, Jan. 21, at The Colburn School, when the Drucker Business Forum presents Deepak Chopra. The icon, author, lecturer, scientist, businessman and thought leader will serve up his insights on what kind of leader is most needed today; how a leader can make his/her visions real; and the qualities of a “great” leader. The talk is based on a Chopra book, which he’ll be signing afterwards. Breakfast is served at 7:45 a.m. and the talk begins at 8:30. At 200 S. Grand Ave., (909) 607-9043 or druckerbusinessforum.org.

What do you get when you mix up the big orchestral stuff of Tchaikovsky, Brahms and Strauss with the modern orchestrations of Jacques Brel and Tom Waits? Well, jazz pianist Brad Mehldau took that inspiration and composed the double-CD Highway Rider. In conjunction with its much-anticipated release, Mehldau brings the elegant mash-up of jazz improvisation, classical romanticism and pop to Walt Disney Concert Hall on Friday, Jan. 21, at 8 p.m., performing with his trio, plus drummer Matt Chamberlain, saxophonist Joshua Redman and a chamber orchestra. At 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil.com.

photo courtesy L.A. Phil

photo courtesy Da Camera Society

Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. Jan. 17, 7 p.m.: Moving Magic Media reexamines the modern horror genre with its first feature, Opus. Without a script and with a new media perspective, MMM is creating a new process of filmmaking. Jan. 21, 7 p.m.: Alex Cox follows up his cult classic Repo Man with Repo Chick, not a sequel but a film about a wealthy young woman who finds meaning stealing from the middle class and the poor. Los Angeles Music Video Festival Downtown Independent, 251 S. Main St.,(213) 6171033 or lamvf.com. Jan. 23, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.: The fest brings together the independent music and film communities of L.A. Flagship Theatres University Village 3323 S. Hoover St., (213) 748-6321 or flagshipmovies.com. Through Jan. 20: The Green Hornet 2D (11:30 a.m., 2:15, 5, 7:45 and 10:30 p.m.); Yogi Bear 3D (noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45 and 9 p.m.). REDCAT 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. Jan. 17, 8:30 p.m.: Radical Light features screenings of experimental films from Beat-era San Francisco, including an array of 16mm shorts: Christopher Maclaine’s apocalyptic comic-tragedy The End (1953); Sidney Peterson’s wittily caustic tale of murder and incest The Lead Shoes (1949); Jane Belson Conger Shimane’s playful image and sound arrangement Odds and Ends (1959); Bruce Conner’s pioneering

photo by Jeremiah Sullivan

Wednesday, Jan. 19 SCI-Arc Lecture Series W. M. Keck Lecture Hall, 960 E. Third St., (213) 3565328 or sciarc.edu. 7 p.m.: Jorge Francisco Liernur, an Argentinean art and architecture historian, is known for his comprehensive studies on contemporary architecture in Latin America and Argentina. He brings that knowledge to the Arts District.

FILM

|

You’re probably not flying to Taiwan this weekend to take in the authentic arts of that country. No problem, because they’re coming to you. On Saturday, Jan. 22, the outdoor Keck Amphitheatre at Walt Disney Concert Hall will host the Chen Kuai Le Puppet Theater. The performance, part of the Music Center’s World City series, features classic tales accompanied by live traditional Taiwanese music. The free, family-friendly shows are at 11 a.m. (tickets are distributed starting at 10 a.m.) and 12:30 a.m. (tickets at 11 a.m.). FYI, “Chen Kuai Le” means “really happy,” so be prepared to have some fun. After the shows, kids can participate in art-making workshops. At 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-4396 or musiccenter.org.

Tuesday, Jan. 18 ALOUD at the Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org. 7 p.m.: Tom Rachman talks about his latest novel, The Imperfectionists, about a ragtag staff of an English language newspaper in Rome facing financial oblivion. It’s based on his own experience as a foreign correspondent.

Thursday, Jan. 20 TOWN HALL Los Angeles Millennium Biltmore Hotel, 506 S. Grand Ave., (213) 628-8141 or townhall-la.org. 11:30 a.m.: Wayne Clough of the Smithsonian Institute speaks on “New Perspectives at the Smithsonian” in a luncheon program with Q&A. ALOUD at the Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org. 7 p.m. From autism to basic self-awareness, V.S. Ramachandran, author or The Tell-Tale Brain, traces the links between neurology and behavior and reveals what baffling neurological case studies can teach us about normal brain function and how it evolved. Be sure to bring your awesome brain.

photo courtesy Chen Kuai Le Puppet Theater

The Don’T Don’ Miss LisT Lis

SPONSORED LISTINGS Free Public Talk Meditation: Solution for Stress & Tension Los Angeles Public Library, Silver Lake Branch, 2411 Glendale Blvd., meditateinla.org. Jan. 20, 6:30 p.m.: Learn simple, practical meditations from American Buddhist Monk Gen Kelsang Rigpa. The meditations will help you cultivate a peaceful, calm mind amidst the demands of modern living. Just drop in. Live Church LA Club Nokia, 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 4934329 or livechurchla.com. 10 a.m.: Every Sunday, Live Church L.A. takes over the VIP Lounge at Club Nokia, bringing great music, people and inspiring messages.

FiVe

Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.


16 Downtown News

Listings Continued from previous page found-footage A Movie (1958); Hy Hirsh’s Eneri (1953); and Patricia Marx’s Things to Come (1953). Regal Cinema L.A. Live 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (877) 835-5734 or lalive.com. Through Jan. 20: The Dilemma (12, 1:30, 2:40, 4:20, 5:20, 7:10, 8, 10 and 10:40 p.m.); The Green Hornet 3D (12:40, 1:20, 3:50, 4:30, 7, 7:40, 10:10 and

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

10:50 p.m.); The Green Hornet 2D (6:30 and 9:40 p.m.); Season of the Witch (12:20, 2:30, 5, 7:20 and 9:40 p.m.); Country Strong (1:30, 4:30,7:20 and 10:20 p.m.); Little Fockers (noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7 and 9:20 p.m.); True Grit (1:10, 4:10, 6:40 and 9:20 p.m.); The Fighter (1, 3:50, 6:50 and 9:50 p.m.); Tron: Legacy 3D (1:50, 4:50, 7:50 and 11 p.m.); Yogi Bear 3D (1:40 and 4 p.m.); Black Swan (12:50, 4, 6:50 and 9:30 p.m.); The King’s Speech (1:40, 4:40, 7:30 and 10:30 p.m.). Jan. 21 (partial list): No Strings Attached (1:30, 4:20, 7:10 and 10 p.m.).

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. Jan. 22, 10 p.m.: Rob Campanella from the Brian Jonestown Massacre with his side project The Quarter After. Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com. Jan. 17, 10 p.m.: Phil Alvin of Blasters fame lords over the place, with special guests The Empires. Jan. 19, 10 p.m.: KXLU Live Remote with The Neurotics, The Batbombs and Dirty Eyes. Jan. 20, 10 p.m.: The Silver Chords, VonVeederVeld, Lantvrn and Spirit Vine. Jan. 21, 10 p.m.: Psychedelic rock band VonVeederVeld headlines with Chief Nowhere, Magic Mirror and Ojo Rojos. Jan. 22, 10 p.m.: Kevin K, Pat Todd (of the late, great Lazy Cowgirls) and the Rankoutsiders, Crazy Squeeze and Barrio Tiger.



 Suim nner m i D ch and D Lun 

January 17, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

An Extensive Seafood Menu including Dim Sum at Moderate Prices Relaxed Dining in an Elegant Ambiance Live Lobster Tank

Free Parking Next to Restaurant

700 N. Spring Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012 | Tel: 213.617.2323



Jan. 23, 10 p.m.: Dirty Candy, Interstellar and Hastings 3000. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., sevengrand.la. Jan. 18, 10 p.m.: Get a groove on with house band The Makers. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. Jan. 20, 9 p.m.: Occult Blood, Ivens and Sissy Spacek. Probably not the actress. Jan. 21, 9 p.m.: Physical Forms, Skull Tape, Turrks and Bleak End at Bernie’s. Jan. 22, 9 p.m.: Defiance, Ohio; the beloved and gifted Kimya Dawson; Moses Campbell; and Peter Pants. Jan. 23, 9 p.m.: Another chance to see Defiance, Ohio; Kimya Dawson; and Moses Campbell. The Dining Dead, too. Staples Center 1201 S. Figueroa St., staplescenter.com. Jan. 23, 7 p.m.: The Calibash 2011 festival of Latin hip hop features Daddy Yankee, Don Omar, Alexis Y Fido, Tito El Bambino, Cosculluela, Arcangel, De La Ghetto, Pitbull, Prince Royce, and many more. The Varnish 118 E. Sixth St., (213) 622-9999 or thevarnishbar.com Jan. 18, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.: Jazzman Mark Bosserman entertains on the house piano every Tuesday. Walt Disney Concert Hall 111 S. Grand Ave., (323) 850-2000 or laphil.com.. Jan. 21, 8 p.m.: Jazz pianist/composer Brad Mehldau with backing from a chamber orchestra. Mehldau is equally at home with the American jazz song-

Buy any 2 combos at regular price, receive the 3rd combo *

50% OFF! f at

book as he is covering Radiohead. Teaming with an orchestra is his latest venture outside the box. World City W.M. Keck Amphitheatre, Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-4396 or musiccenter.org. Jan. 22, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Chen Kuai Le Puppet Theater from Taiwan is accompanied by live traditional Taiwanese music.

mORE ListinGs Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

2

wich GET ANOThER SANd

EvEnt infO

4 wEb: LADowntownNews.com/calendar/submit 4 EmAiL: Calendar@DowntownNews.com

Email: Send a brief description, street address and public phone number. Submissions must be received 10 days prior to publication date to be considered for print.

SHIers Original Revolving T SU S ead E R B s ew D VOTE. Downtown N Sushi Counter in LA! by L.A

We Do Catering!

SANdwich, BUY ANY BREAKFAST AT

EAsy wAys tO submit yOuR

50% OFF!

Gourmet Fast Casual Restaurant Since 1973 FREE Parking | 7 Days-7am to 10pm 1657 W. 3rd St. [at Union Ave.] (213) 483-8885 * 3rd order must be of equal or lesser value. Present ad at time of purchase, 1 coupon per customer, per visit. Expires 01-31-11

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Featuring

sashimi, yakitori, Tempura, different kinds of sushi open 7 days a week, 11 am - 10 pm 120 Japanese Village plaza (Little Tokyo)

(213) 680-0567

Validated Parking (Enter on Central Ave.) or use DASH Route A–Bus


B A

HIST

CHAVEZ RAVINE

10 11

R PA

CHINESE HISTORICAL SOCIETY

NA PA

ST

DYNASTY CENTER

AM

N SIO MIS

FW

RD

A

A

AN GE

NT

AN

Y

S

SA

LE

MWD

DE LA SERRA PLAZA PARK

S

HIGH SCHOOL FOR THE VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

RI

BUSINESS MAGNET HIGH SCHOOL

UNION STATION

LO

EL

VE

DOWNTOWN SLO

T

FWY

ST H

ST TH 5

VE LA

ST

SKID ROW HOUSING TRUST INNER CITY ARTS

PRODUCE MARKETS

ORTHOPEDIC HOSPITAL

ST SAN JULIAN

SANTEE

MAPLE AVE

ST

S ST NGELE LOS A

WALL ST

T MAIN S

7

South Figueroa Corridor District

FASHION DISTRICT

MOUNT ST. MARY’S COLLEGE

ADAMS

BLVD

AAA HQ

ANNENBERG RESEARCH PARK

ER

OV

8

FIGUEROA CORRIDOR

ST

BOR

T

RA

AS

NT

H

6T

GLADYS PARK

HO

SOUTH PARK

NORTH UNIVERSITY PARK GRAND AVE

9

AIR & SPACE MUSEUM AFRICAN ROSE AMERICAN GARDEN MUSEUM CALIFORNIA SCIENCE CENTER

VE TA

ON

MEMORIAL COLISEUM

L.A./ SPORTS ARENA

TON BLVD

D

SAN PEDRO STATION

E

D LV

KB

ML

10 G WASHIN

V

RM

17TH ST

O

E X P O S I T I O N PA R K

VE

UNIVERSITY EXPO PARK WEST

H

MAPLE AVE

SANTEE ST

LOS ANGELES ST

MAIN ST

BROADWAY

HILL ST

AVE

OLIVE ST

GRAND

HOPE ST

ST

OA ST

FLOWER

FIGUER

VD BL N TIO NATURAL I S PO HISTORY EX MUSEUM

15TH ST

18TH ST

C

ST

ST

14TH ST

14TH ST

A FWY S A N TA M O N I C

PATRIOTIC HALL

R FWY

CHERRY

14TH PL

FRIEDMAN OCCUPATIONAL CENTER

110

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

PICO BLVD

VENICE BLVD

GALEN CENTER

VD SON BL

JEFFER

CALIFORNIA HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER

OA ST

12TH ST

FLOWER

AT&T CENTER

SHRINE AUDITORIUM

UNIVERSITY VILLAGE

FIGUER

Y SANTEE ALLE

STAPLES CENTER ARENA

HEBREW UNION COLLEGE

HARBO

MAYAN THEATER 11TH ST

B

ED

CE

ST

CALIFORNIA MARKET CENTER

CONVENTION CENTER

110

AM

AL

RO

SPRING ST

HOLIDAY INN

SOUTH EXHIBIT HALL

10

6

ST

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

ORPHEUM THEATER

9TH ST

ST

ET

PARA LOS NINOS

CENTRAL CITY EAST

BROADWAY

STILLWELL HOTEL

O

M

L PA

7TH ST

8TH ST

OL

IN

PED

LAPD

JEWELRY DISTRICT

M

TO

6TH ST

OLYMPIC BLVD

VD PICO BL

A

4TH ST

WHOLESALE SEAFOOD DISTRICT

MERCANTILE ARCADE

HILL ST

RALPHS

OLIVE ST

GRAND AVE

HAR

SAN 4TH ST

SAN JULIAN PARK

HISTORIC CORE

5

RC

ART SHARE 4TH PL

FLOWER MARKET

HOPE ST

FLOWER ST

FIGUEROA ST

FRANCISCO ST

D AVE

GARLAN

O HOTEL

ST

LITTLE TOKYO GALLERIA MARKET

6TH ST

LAAC 7TH ST

D

3R

5TH ST

NEW LATC

BILTMORE PERSHING HOTEL

PICO STATION

10

LOS ANGELES ST

OLD BANK DISTRICT & GALLERY ROW

5TH ST

SQUARE

TRACTION AVE

TOY DISTRICT

MACY'S PLAZA

WEST EXHIBIT HALL

PICO UNION

MAIN ST

SPRING ST

GAS CO TOWER

FIGUEROA HOTEL

MARRIOTT L.A. LIVE & RITZ REGAL NOKIA CARLTON CINEPLEX PLAZA NOKIA THEATRE WEST CT RN GARAGE HEA

12TH ST

BROADWAY

US BANK TOWER

PERSHING SQUARE STATION

T

DS

2N

3RD ST

MUSEUM OF NEON ART

GRAND HOPE FIDM PARK

CHICK

110

MELLON BANK

ARTS DISTRICT

PLAZA

SHERATON HOTEL

777

11TH ST

9

BRADBURY BLDG. RONALD REAGAN BIDDY STATE MASON BLDG PARK

ST

ARATANI NOGUCHI THEATER PLAZA JACCC

OLIVE ST

AVE

BLVD

GRAND AVE

LUCAS

OLYMPIC

GRAND CENTRAL MARKET

CALIFORNIA FLIGHT PLAZA

7TH ST / METRO CENTER STATION

7 + FIG

GARLAND BUILDING

WATER COURT ANGELS

FINANCIAL DISTRICT

725

LOYOLA LAW SCHOOL

HOPE ST

WIL

M

WELLS FARGO CENTER

3RD ST

1ST

2ND ST

LITTLE ST VIBIANA TOKYO LIBRARY

4TH ST

WESTIN YMCA UNION BONAVENTURE HOTEL BANK CITIGROUP PLAZA CENTER

FIGUEROA AT WILSHIRE WILSHIRE BLVD WILSHIRE GRAND HOTEL

VD SHIRE BL

LVD WOOD B

BA PLAZA

MAGUIRE CITY GDNS NATIONAL JONATHAN PLAZA CALIF. CLUB CLUB THE STANDARD

GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL

JAMES

FLOWER ST

MARRIOTT HOTEL BEAUDRY AVE

T

4TH S

MOCA OMNI HOTEL

3RD ST TUNNEL

FIGUEROA ST

LAUSD HQ

3RD ST

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

CITY WEST

8

POLICE ADMIN

COLBURN SCHOOL OF PERF. ARTS

LOS ANGELES CENTER STUDIOS

7TH ST

LITTLE TOKYO

KYOTO CALTRANS GRAND HQ HOTEL

2ND ST

2ND STREET TUNNEL

CROWN HILL

7

LAPD PARKER CENTER

I-A

TIMES MIRROR SQUARE

BUNKER HILL

T

6

CIVIC CENTER STATION

L. A. COUNTY COURTHOUSE

LITTLE TOKYO/ ARTS DISTRICT STATION

MOCA AT GEFFEN UNION CENTER JAPANESE FOR THE ARTS NATIONAL MUSEUM

SC

HARBOR FWY

DOROTHY CHANDLER PAVILION

CENTRAL AVE ART PARK

LOS ANGELES CITY HALL

1ST ST

2ND S

MIGUEL CONTRERAS LEARNING COMPLEX

CIVIC CENTER

EOC-POC-LFD

4

VE EA

1ST ST L.A. DOWNTOWN SHAKESPEARE LA NEWS

TEMPLE ST HALL OF CRIMINAL RECORDS COURTHOUSE

HALL OF ADMINISTRATION

FEDERAL BLDG ROYBAL FEDERAL BLDG

AF NT

EDWARD R. ROYBAL LEARNING CENTER

VISTA HERMOSA PARK

DEPT. OF WATER & POWER

DEPT. OF BUILDING & SAFETY

LOS ANGELES MALL

SA

AHMANSON THEATER MARK TAPER FORUM

FEDERAL COURTHOUSE

4T

CATHEDRAL OF OUR LADY OF THE ANGELS

110

5

R

4

TEMPLE BEAUDRY

101

C. EDWIN PIPER TECHNICAL CENTER

ST

OLVERA ST

LE ST

SAN BERNARDINO SPLIT

101

ST

TEMP

4-LEVEL INTERCHANGE

2

www.cartifact.com

AVE

ST

101

HQ

CHINATOWN GATEWAY

EZ AVE CESAR E. CHAV

H O L LY W O O D F W Y

Gas Stations

S NE VIG

ST HIGH

CHINATOWN LIBRARY

OA ST

EVANS ADULT SCHOOL

Metro Red & Purple Lines

AVEZ

T

ORD

FIGUER

66

Free Parking with validation

AS

ALPINE HILL

HIST

Metro Blue Line

E. CH

R CESA

CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT HQ ING SPR

ANGELINO HEIGHTS

Metro Rail Station Entrances

10

ED

CHINATOWN BL VD

Metro Gold Line

Map © 2010 Cartifact

AL

E ST

ALPIN

NEW

3

ET

HOMEBOY INDUSTRIES

WAY

NS

ST

SU

T

T

EGE S

COLL

CASTELLAR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

EGE S

COLL

CHINATOWN STATION D BROA

SA

DE

PACIFIC ALLIANCE MEDICAL CENTER

Contact Cartifact for the full-color, every-building version of this map and others. Available as a poster and in print, web, and mobile media.

700 S. Flower St, Ste. 1940 Los Angeles, CA 90017 213.327.0200 maps�cartifact.com

HILL

FIGUEROA TERRACE

T

CENTRAL PLAZA

G RD

FW

M WAY

KAISER MENTAL HEALTH CENTER

ANN STREET ELENTARY SCHOOL

BAMBOO PLAZA

G KIN

Y

13

STADIU

1

Los Angeles

ARD S

BERN

14

Downtown

66

N CHU

N

8

RD

K

IA

CASA ITALIANA

P

12

ELYSIAN PARK

YS EL

K

O

LOS ANGELES STATE HISTORIC PARK (CORNFIELD)

F

E

AIN

N F

1

CATHEDRAL HIGH SCHOOL

Y

C

BROAD WAY

M

2

2

L

D

110

W STADIUM

E

1

J

DODGER STADIUM

D

NORTH

3

C

ELYSIAN PARK

NOR TH M

B

NORT H SPR ING S T

A

F


18 Downtown News

January 17, 2011

Twitters/DowntownNews

CLASSIFIED

place your ad online at www.ladowntownnews.com

FOR RENT

L.A. Downtown News Classifieds Call: 213-481-1448

“Be wary of out of area companies. Check with the local Better Business Bureau before you send any money for fees or services. Read and understand any contracts before you sign. Shop around for rates.”

Classified Display & Line ad Deadlines: Thursday 12 pm REAL ESTATE RESIDENTIAL

FOR RENT

Real Estate Services

Buy Sell Lease

lofts for sale

TheLoftExpertGroup.com

323.298.0100

Bill Cooper

CONSIDERING Foreclosure? Are you late in payments? A short sale may be your solution. Call Lady Rodriguez, Realtor 310-600-7534. Represent both buyers and sellers.

213.598.7555 Out of State EVERYTHING MUST Go! $1,000 an acre. Priced less than the developer paid. 90 minutes north of Phoenix. 36 acres with electric, reduced to $36,000. Private peaceful setting, breathtaking mountain views, abundant wildlife. Financing available. Saddle Creek Ranch by AZLR. 1-888-690-8271. (Cal-SCAN)

Call for specials @ the Medici. Penthouse 1 & 2 bdrm apts. Granite kitchens, washer/ dryers, business center, 2 pools, spa! Visit TheMedici.com for a full list of amenities. Call 888886-3731.

Apartments/Unfurnished

BestLARealEstate.com

Downtown since 2002

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Timeshare/Resorts SELL/RENT Your Timeshare For Cash!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for CASH! Over $78 Million Dollars offered in 2010! www.SellaTimeshare.com (877) 554-2098. (Cal-SCAN)

Milano Lofts Now Leasing! • Gorgeous Layouts • 10-15’ Ceilings • Fitness Center • Wi-Fi Rooftop Lounge • Amazing Views 6th + Grand Ave. • 213.627.1900 milanoloftsla.com

BRAND NEW Luxury Apartments Homes. Orsini III. Now open for immediate Occupancy. Call for Specials. Never Lived in, Free Parking, Karaoke Room, Free Wi-Fi, Indoor Basketball, Uncomparable Amenity Package. Call today to schedule a tour - 866-479-1764.

Call for specials @ The Visconti. Free parking, free tanning, free wi-fi + biz center avail. Cardio Salon, pool, Spa, steamroom, sauna. Call us today. 866742-0992.

Loft/Unfurnished

Old Bank District The original Live/Work Lofts from $1,100 Cafes, Bars, Shops, Galleries, Parking adjacent. Pets no charge Call 213.253.4777 LAloft.com

Bristol Apartments

the loft expert! group

Studio apartment now leasing

TM

423 West 8th Street

REAL ARTIST LOFTS High ceilings, hardwood/concrete floors, kitchen, fireplace, pool/spa, gated parking, laundry, sorry no dogs. Open House Sundays 12-3pm. Leasing office @1250 Long Beach Ave. & 14th St. 213629-5539 Duplexes CHARMING 1 bdrm. $995 Hardwood Floors. Private Garage and Patio. Quiet 4-plex 805-7729079.

EMPLOYMENT Drivers COMPANY DRIVERS (Solos & Hazmat Teams) * Great Pay * Great Miles * CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated & regional positions available. Call 866-789-8947. Swift. (CalSCAN) SEEKING 10 Year or newer 3/4 ton or larger Trucks to deliver RVs from California to dealers across the Western U.S. and Canada. No Force Dispatch! 1-866-764-1601 or www.QualityDriveAway.com. (Cal-SCAN)

All Utilities paid

Accepting applications until 1/19/2011

Downtown since 2002

low income | $662/month

Voted Best Downtown Residential Real Estate Agent

income qualifications - under $46,400/year

213-228-3000

Call us today!

All applications can either be mailed in or dropped off to: 206 West 6th st., la ca 90014 or 423 west 8th st., la ca 90014

Bill Cooper • 213.598.7555 • TheLoftExpertGroup.com

CENTRALLY LOCATED

MILANO LOFTS Now Leasing! • Gorgeous Layouts • 10-15’ Ceilings • Fitness Center • Wi-Fi Rooftop Lounge • Amazing Views

• Secured prime development site • Ideal for office or retail • 3,420 sq. ft. office building with ample parking • 1 blk from USC and Harbor Freeway • Immediate access to use 3111 S. Flower Street, Los Angeles

Available Immediately Top floor of 11 story historical building available now! We have approximately 2,868 square feet of contiguous exterior space facing Olympic Blvd. Stunning views of L.A. Two blocks away from the Staples Center and adjacent to the new L.A. Live Complex. The building also has other beautiful contiguous space & some small offices available. This space can be viewed by appointment. Information available to qualified prospective tenants.

Call now 213-746-6300 x1455

6th+Grand Ave. • milanoloftsla.com • 213.627.1900

Email request to ghollis@shammasgroup.com or call (213) 746-6300 x1455

DRIVERS - OVER the Road - Company Sponsored Class A Commercial Drivers License training & a Job! No credit checks. Minimum 21 yrs old. 1-800-781-2778. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS/CDL Training - Career Central. We Train and Employ You. Company Drivers up to 40K First Year. New Team Pay! Up to 48c/mile Class A CDL Training Regional Locations! 1-877-3697091 www.CentralDrivingJobs. net. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVER - DRIVE Knight in 2011. Daily or Weekly Pay. Top Equipment, 27 Service Centers, Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A with 3 months OTR experience. 1-800414-9569. www.DriveKnight. com. (Cal-SCAN) CALL NOW. Top 5% Pay! Excellent Benefits. 300 New T660’s. Need CDL-A & 3 months recent OTR. 1-877-258-8782. www. MeltonTruck.com. (Cal-SCAN) Health Care ACUPUNCTURIST. MASTER’S degree in acupuncture or oriental medicine required. Mail resume to Natural-Bio Care Inc. 2717 W. Olympic Blvd. #202, Los Angeles, CA 90006. Attn: Joon Kyung Suh. ACUPUNCTURIST. MASTER’S degree in acupuncture or oriental medicine required. Send resume to: Apricot Grove Acupuncture Inc. 3321 Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90019 Attn: Eun Jin Park. ACUPUNCTURIST. MASTER’S degree in acupuncture or oriental medicine required. Send resume to: Nazareth Clinic Corp. 2140 W. Olympic Blvd. #321, Los Angeles CA 90006 Attn: Gwang Choi. Sales

Office/Clerical HELP WANTED Administration, entry level open, travel agency 213-612-3700 Seasonal HAP ALASKA*YUKON hiring all positions aboard our exclusive rail cars in Alaska. May-Sept 2011! Customer Service, Food and Beverage experts needed! Apply online: www.alaskatourjobs.com EOE. (Cal-SCAN)

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Business Opportunities ALL CASH VENDING Route! Be Your Own Boss! 25 Machines + Candy All for $9995. Vend3, 880 Grand Blvd., Deer Park, NY. 1- 877-915-8222. Major CC accepted! (Cal-SCAN) Help Wanted ABLE TO TRAVEL. Hiring 8 people. No experience necessary. Transportation & lodging furnished. Paid training. Work and travel entire USA. Start today. www.ProtekChemical.com 1-208-590-0365. (Cal-SCAN) ATTN: COMPUTER Work. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/ mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-888-304-2847. (Cal-SCAN)

SERVICES Attorneys

ABOGADO DE IMMIGRACION!

SALES PEOPLE NEEDED Interface with Downtown corporations for lunch planning - sell our menu. 10% Commission! 626435-7726

madison hotel Clean furnished single rooms. 24-hour desk clerk service. •Daily, $30.00 •Weekly, $109.00 •Monthly, $310.00 (213) 622-1508 423 East 7th St.

Family, Criminal, P.I. for more than 20 yrs! Child Support / Custody Necesita Permiso de trabajo? Tagalog / Español / Korean

Get your GREEN CARD or CITIZENSHIP Law Office of H. Douglas Daniel Esq., (213) 689-1710

Business Attorney All Litigation Matters Transactions & Contracts 20 Years Experience Ivy League Background

Paul Bloom, Esq. (805) 984-8375

(2 blocks west of San Pedro St.) Starting Jan. 1, 2011

Do you have something to sell?

Ad Copy: _________________________________________

Ad Prices

________________________________________________

(Marketplace and Automotive Categories ONLY) • Items under $300 • Items $301 to $500 • Items $501 to $1200 • Items $1201 to $2000 • Items $2001+…

Name: Address: City Phone: Cash $ Credit card #: Exp. Date:

FREE! $11.50 $14.00 $16.50 $19.00

12 words, 2 weeks 15 words 15 words 15 words 15 words

All ads run for 2 weeks. Ads may be renewed after two weeks for 50% off the original price of the ad.

With a circulation of State Check $

Zip Credit Card $

47,000,

our classifieds get results!

________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

Restrictions: Offer good on private party ads only. Ads must be pre-paid by cash, check or credit card. Certain classifications excluded. Deadline: Thursday at noon for next issue.


January 17, 2011

Downtown News 19

DowntownNews.com

ATTORNEY JOHN BENSON Your Local Downtown Attorney Bankruptcy and Divorce best rates in town www.attorneyjohnrbenson.com. (213) 9059364 Business services

Start Your Own Business just

99

$

(323) 829-2434 Aromaticbliss.Scentsy.us ADVERTISING- BEST Kept Secret. A business card sized display ad 140 California community newspapers. Reach 3 million+ Californians. Cost $1,550.$1.33 cost per thousand. Free brochure (916)288-6019; www.CalSDAN.com. (Cal-SCAN) CLASSIFIED Advertising. 240 California community newspapers reaching over 6 million Californians. 25-words $550 works out to 18 cents cost per thousand! Free email brochure. Call (916) 288-6019. www.CalSCAN.com. (Cal-SCAN)

ATTEND COLLEGE Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.Centura.us.com. (Cal-SCAN)

2007 VOLKSWAGEN NEW BEETLE 2.5 Certified. Manager’s Special. #ZV998 vin 515774 $12,988 Call 888-781-8102.

Financial services

2009 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S Certified, air with power pkg # NI3609 / 9N487053 $14,999, call 888-838-5089.

CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-494-9115. Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (Cal-SCAN) HealtH NOT FEELING any joy? Overwhelmed by stress and emotional overload? Professional counseling helps! www.drannewarman.vpweb. com, Downtown Wilshire Office, reasonable rates, insurance accepted, 310-281-9797.

AUTOS Pre-oWned

THE CALIFORNIA Press Release Service distributes news releases electronically to 500 California newspaper editors. www.CaliforniaPressReleaseService.com Questions call (916) 288-6010.(Cal-SCAN)

doWntoWn l.a. auto grouP Porsche Volkswagen audi Mercedes-Benz nissan cheVrolet cadillac

cleaning CONCEPTO’S CLEANING Crew. Professional, experienced, cleans apartments, homes, offices and restaurants. Call for a quote. 323-459-3067 or 818-409-9183. education HIGH SCHOOL Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www.SouthEasternHS.com. (Cal-SCAN)

ANNOUNCEMENTS notices

2008 PORSCHE 911 TARGA 4 Tiptronic, Bose, Navigation, only 27K miles, certified, #745077. $72,988. Call 888-685-5426.

WANTED DIABETIC Test Strips. Cash Paid. Unopened, Unexpired Boxes Only. All Brands Considered. Help others, don’t throw boxes away. For more information, Call 888-491-1168. (Cal-SCAN) volunteer oPPortunities

2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX Low Mileage, Black/Black stk # UC562R/221046 $20,990 Call 888-879-9608.

HELPING KIDS heal. Free Arts for Abused Children is looking for volunteers to integrate the healing power of the arts into the lives of abused and at-risk children and their families. Today is the day to get involved! Contact Annie at volunteers@freearts. org or 310-313-4278 for more information.

For a complete list of our pre-owned inventory, go to www.DTLAMOTORS.com autos Wanted DONATE YOUR Vehicle! Receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, NonRunners Accepted, 1-888-4685964. (Cal-SCAN)

cHurcHes THE BRIDGE / Little Tokyo: Contemporary worship, 4:00pm Sundays, 401 E Third St. www. thebridgewired.org.

LEGAL

DONATE YOUR CAR: Children’s Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child’s Life Through Research & Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy & Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. (CalSCAN)

civil summons

PLAINTIff: SEOUNG SIk ShIN vS DEfENDANTS: POk SOON YU, AN INDIvIDUAL AND MIChAEL kIM, AN INDIvIDUAL AND DOES 1 THROUGH 20, INCLUSIVE You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form, if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want

2007 MERCEDES BENZ ML350 Pewter/Black, 3.5 Liter, leather, $28,999 4JGBB86E77A260898 Call 888-319-8762.

downtownnews.com

Fictitious Business name fICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE NO. 20101677916 The following person is doing business as: SAVOIR WINES, 600 W. Ninth Street, Suite #1102, Los Angeles CA 90015, are hereby registered by the following registrant: STEPHANIE BADEN, 600 W. Ninth Street, Suite #1102, Los Angeles CA 90015. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein on November 15, 2010. This statement was filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on November 19, 2010. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 12/6, 12/13, 12/20, 12/27/10

LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT NO. BC439535

The Downtown Renaissance Collection

2007 AUDI A6 Low miles. Loaded! Manager special. # 151076 vin ZA9770 $26,815. Call 888583-0981 2007 INFINITY G35 Stock C110085-1 vin 706331. Silver, Great condition! $23,782 call 888-203-2967.

to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, Cantral District 111 North Hill Street, Los Angeles CA 90012 Case number: BC439535 Dated: June 11, 2010 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaitiff without an attorney is: Joshua J Richman 1940 Garnet Ave., Suite #230 San Diego, CA 92109 Telephone: 858-483-3082 Fax: 858-274-3588 Pub. 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31

Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills

Be Inspired...

Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills

Best Downtown Locations!

Beautiful Fully Furnished Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Beautiful Fully FurnishedAvailable Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Available Services Include:

Reception y Mail y Fiber Optic Internet y TelephoneServices & Voice Include: Mail y West Law y Reception y& Mail Optic Internet y Photocopy FaxyyFiber Video Conferencing Telephone & Voice Mail y West Law y Photocopy & Fax y Video Conferencing

I c o n I c B e au t y S e e k S S t y l i S h M at e

Additional Features: Kitchen Additional Facilities, Mail/Copy Features: Room, Conference Rooms, Mail/Copy Spectacular Views, Kitchen Facilities, Room, Fully Trained Staff Views, Conference Rooms, Spectacular

JENNY AHN JENNY AHN (213) 996-8301

(213) 996-8301

noW leasing

$1,400’s/mo. Free Parking

laleads@regentbc.com

550 NORTH FIGUEROA ST.

www.regentbc.com

WWW.THEORSINI.COM

laleads@regentbc.com

www.regentbc.com

Monthly from $550 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

ROOFTOP GARDEN RETREAT WITH BBQ AND LOUNGE GRAND LOBBY • FITNESS CENTER • SPA MODERN KITCHEN w/CAESAR COUNTERTOPS HIGH SPEED INTERNET DESIGNER LIVING SPACES • PET FRIENDLY • DRAMATIC VIEWS WALKING DISTANCE TO RALPHS SUPERMARKET

Casaloma L.A. Apartments Clean unfurnished bachelor rooms with shared bath at $550/mo. with private bath at $695/mo.

756 S. Broadway • Downtown Los Angeles 213-892-9100 • chapmanf lats.com

sec. deposit special @$100

Pricing subject to change without notice.

On Spring St.

City Lofts:

860 sqft Loft - $1400 2bdrm/2bath, 900 sqft - $1600 • Prime area in Downtown LA. • Granite/marble tops, S/S kitchen appl. • Wired for high speed internet & cable • Central Heat & Air • Pet friendly

is your teen experiencing:

• School problems? • Conflict at home or with friends?

Includes utilities, basic cable channels, laundry room on site. Gated building in a good area. 208 W. 14th St. at Hill St. Downtown LA

Please call 213.627.6913

adolescent support group now forming ages 13-17 low fee

www.cityloftsquare.com

(323) 662-9797

4344 Fountain ave. (at sunset), suite a los angeles, ca 90029

Fully furnished with TV, telephone, microwave, refrigerator. Full bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly maid service.

For English Call Pierre or Terri 213.744.9911 For Spanish Call Susana 213.749.0306

HollYWood

call marney stofflet, lcsW

Nails & Spa

Monthly from $595 utilities paid. (213) 627-1151

Orsini

Fully Trained Staff

Professional Nail Care & Waxing for Ladies & Gentlemen 323.662.2718 • 4335 W. Sunset Blvd. Walk-in Welcome • GIft Certificate Available M.-F. 9:30am - 7:30pm Sat. 9am - 7:30pm • Sun. 10am - 7pm

877-231-9362

Medici 725 SOUTH BIXEL ST.

877-239-8256

WWW.THEMEDICI.COM

Elegant World Class Resort Apartment Homes

Piero 616 ST. PAUL AVE.

877-235-6012

WWW.THEPIERO.COM

Visconti 1221 WEST THIRD ST.

866-690-2888

WWW.THEVISCONTI.COM

FREE Rent Specials On Select Floor Plans • Free Resident/Guest Parking in Gated Garage • Private Library, Business Center & Conference Rooms • Free Wi-Fi & DSL Computer Use • Resident Karaoke Lounge • Directors Screening Room • Lavish Fountains & Sculptures • On-Site Private Resident Park with Sand Volleyball, BBQ’s and Jogging Track • Night Light Tennis Courts • Indoor Basketball

Version 3

• Brunswick Four-Lane Virtual Bowling • Full Swing Virtual Golf • 3100 Square Foot Cybex Fitness Facility • Free Tanning Rooms • Massage Room, Sauna & Steam Room • Rooftop Pools with Dressing Rooms • Concierge Service • 24-Hour Doorman • 24/7 On-Site Management • Magnificent City Views *Amenities vary among communities

Children’s Perfor

up

ming Gro Real Estate Specialist of Sunshine Generation San Gabriel Valley Singing, Client: G.H. Palmer Associates dancing,

Proudly serving the communities Publication: LADT Newsof performing San Gabriel, Alhambra, Monterey and fun! Size/Color: 4.3125” x 8” 4C Park, Montebello and El Monte.

Cal Best Realty

For boys & girls ages 3 and up!

Design by: apluscreative@yahoo.com Emi Terauchi Realtor / Notary • Lic.No.00810238

English/Japanes/Chinese speaking emiterauchi@yahoo.com • (626) 786-9086

Ph: 323.474.4668

SunshineGenerationLA.com 909-861-4433


20 Downtown News

January 17, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

We Got Games Lakers Are Winning, but the Clippers Steal the Show Los Angeles Lakers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/lakers. Jan. 17, 7:30 p.m.: The Lakers last week beat the Cavaliers by 55 points. Think they wanted to send a message? This week the Lake Show hosts the young guns of Oklahoma City, before taking off for two road games in Dallas (Jan. 19) and Denver (Jan. 21). The Lakers are without the services of the injured Matt Barnes for several weeks, but Andrew Bynum remains healthy. Fingers, toes, arms and legs are crossed on that one. Los Angeles Clippers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/clippers. Jan. 17, 19 and 22, 7:30 p.m.: As of press time the surging Clippers had captured eight of their last 11, including an electric win over the Miami Heat last week at Staples Center. It sounds like a post-game talking point, but it’s true: That win and victories over San Antonio, Denver, Oklahoma City and New Orleans show these Clippers can play with anybody. That’s good news, but it also means Coach

Vinny Del Negro’s job just got a lot harder. Now that we know his team is good enough to win, if they slide back into typical Clipperesque losing streaks, it’s on Del Negro. He’ll try to keep the ship sailing toward consistency in winnable home games this week against Indiana, Minnesota and Golden State, with a mid-week trip to Portland (Jan. 20). Los Angeles Kings Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., 1 (888) KINGS-LA or kings.nhl.com. Jan. 20, 7:30 p.m.: Remember early in the season when the Kings were awesome? No, it wasn’t a dream. Sadly, L.A.’s skate crew isn’t looking very much like NHL royalty these days. They’ve slipped to fourth in their division (eighth in the Western Conference as of press time), so they need to regain the early season magic. They play at Dallas (Jan. 17) and St. Louis (Jan. 18) before returning to host the Coyotes. They finish the week against the Coyotes again, this time in Phoenix (Jan. 22). —Ryan Vaillancourt

photo by Gary Leonard

The Lakers are heating up, and Andrew Bynum is healthy. For now.

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM

01-17-11  

Los Angeles Downtown News is a free weekly newspaper distributed in and around downtown Los Angeles.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you