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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

NEWS

13

2

Foodie openings at the Alexandria, and other happenings Around Town.

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A real estate veteran makes a big move in the Downtown brokerage community.

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

January 10, 2010

Volume 40, Number 2

INSIDE

Berzerk Is Back

The Veil, the Vault and the Victory Eli Broad Lifts the Shroud on the Designs for His $100 Million Art Museum

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by Ryan Vaillancourt staff writer

E

li Broad and the architects working on his planned $100 million contemporary art museum lifted the veil on the project last week, giving the first public views of the facility expected to open in about two years. The future neighbor of Walt Disney Concert Hall looks like a honeycomb or a porous white

With Football Stadium Dreams, AEG Chief Goes Where Many of L.A.’s Rich and Powerful Have Tried and Failed by Jon Regardie

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15 CALENDAR LISTINGS 17 MAP 18 CLASSIFIEDS

web that will encase the museum on five sides, including the roof, letting diffuse light inside and providing the primary structural support for the building, Diller said. Nearly half of the 93,000-square-foot museum will house Broad’s collection in archive and storage space, with most of it set on the second of three floors rising over Grand Avenue (the musee Museum, page 10

Tim Leiweke and the Super Bowl Shuffle executive editor

A whale tail in Exposition Park.

sponge pulled up at two corners to let the public inside. It will be the most distinct architectural icon on Grand Avenue since Disney Hall debuted in 2003. Liz Diller, a principal with New York architecture firm Diller, Scofidio + Renfro, attended the Disney Hall presentation on Thursday, Jan. 5, to explain the design the firm has dubbed “the vault and the veil.” The veil is a pre-cast concrete

T

he subject of bringing NFL football to Los Angeles is sort of like the movie Showgirls. It never seems to end, and throughout the excruciating observation process you simultaneously want to laugh and THE REGARDIE REPORT

cry, while also feeling the pain of all those involved. Southern California has had numerous football flubs since the region managed the wondrous feat of losing two teams following the 1994 season. For the record, Justin Bieber was 9 months old the last time the Raiders played in the Coliseum. When the Rams’ had their final

contest in Anaheim, no one except a few eggheads used the Internet. This was before Lewis and Clark College student Monica Lewinsky had begun her White house internship. When the season ended, O.J. Simpson’s murder trial hadn’t yet begun and Tim Leiweke was working for basketball’s Denver Nuggets. A lot has changed in 16 years. Bieber grew up, Lewinsky met Clinton and O.J. was O.J., and I’m not sure which of the three is the most frightening. Meanwhile, the Rams and Raiders made Super Bowl appearances in Oakland and St. Louis, respectively, and Leiweke became the unelected emperor of Los Angeles. In the period that is, depending on how you see Football, page 11

The Voice of Downtown Los Angeles

photo by Gary Leonard

In pushing football in Los Angeles, AEG President and CEO Tim Leiweke is following failed efforts by figures including Peter O’Malley, Mike Ovitz, Eli Broad and Ron Burkle.


2 Downtown News

January 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

AROUNDTOWN Developer Challenges Thrift Store

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ith more than 80,000 square feet of retail space to fill at his recently opened Medallion complex, Downtown developer Saeed Farkhondehpour is hoping to head off some competition. Farkhondehpour is appealing the approval of a secondhand goods store to be run by the Downtown Women’s Center at 325 S. Los Angeles St., on the same block as the developer’s approximately $125 million mixed-use development. On January 25, Farkhondehpour plans to appear before the Central Area Planning Commission to argue that the area, which includes Toy District merchants that sell discount goods, should not allow a secondhand store to open. “That’s not what the area is zoned for,” he said. “I think a lot of people will not want to come shop near secondhand stores.” The store is one of two the DWC hopes to open. A shop with handcrafted goods made by women enrolled in the organization’s program — the DWC helps formerly homeless women stay off the streets — is slated for the DWC’s new home at San Pedro and Sixth streets. The Los Angeles Street building was the DWC’s original home and is being renovated. DWC officials said are reviewing the complaint and will not comment until the hearing.

Market, Restaurant Open in Alexandria

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here was no Christmas vacation at The Alexandria this year, as the Historic Core building was active with new additions throughout the holidays. Two Bits Market began serving on the ground floor of the building at 501 S. Spring St. on New Year’s Day. Owner Brandi Lozano said hours are being finalized, but for now the market is open from 10 a.m.10 p.m. seven days a week. The 1,000-square-foot spot will offer organic produce and non-processed foods along with specialty cheeses and wines. There will also be a deli, which will arrive in time for the grand opening in February. She added that she signed a 15-year lease for the space. She joins her new next-door neighbor Coronado’s Mexican Restaurant and Bar, which uprooted from its longtime San Gabriel Valley

home to open at The Alexandria in mid-December. “This area just seems to have a lot of traffic in the day and at night, decent nightlife. Everything fell in place for us to open here,” said Robert Coronado, who with his father Gilbert owns the 3,000-square-foot restaurant. He said the establishment offers a fresh take on typical Mexican dishes such as tacos, burritos and chile rellenos. Coronado’s, which also signed a 15-yearlease, is open 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Monday through Wednesday and 11 a.m. -2 a.m. Thursday through Sunday.

Perry Looks to Jumpstart NFL Stadium Talks

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inth District Councilwoman Jan Perry hopes to initiate official talks with Anschutz Entertainment Group about their proposal to build an NFL stadium next to Staples Center. Perry last week submitted a motion to the City Council’s Trade, Commerce and Tourism Committee that the city form a group to begin formal discussions with AEG. The motion needs committee approval and then a green light from the full council before Perry’s plan can proceed. AEG President and CEO Tim Leiweke has been pushing a $1 billion plan that involves razing the existing West Hall of the Convention Center and building a stadium in its place. The plan would also build a replacement convention facility adjacent to the existing South Hall. While AEG has unveiled early designs submitted by three potential architects, the company has not submitted a formal proposal to the city.

Feds Give Preliminary OK to Regional Connector

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he Federal Transit Administration last week gave Metro the green light to begin preliminary engineering work on the Downtown Regional Connector and the Westside Subway Extension. The notification is important because it indicates that the two projects will likely be approved for funding through the federal New Starts program,

photo by Gary Leonard

Members of Los Lobos and Cirque du Soleil appeared at the Music Center Plaza on Wednesday, Jan. 5, to kick off L.A. Arts Month. The event intended to encourage people to indulge in the city’s cultural attractions runs through January. The slate includes numerous Downtown activities, among them exhibits at MOCA, performances by the L.A. Phil and theater in the Alexandria Hotel.

according to Metro’s news blog The Source. The Regional Connector is a two-mile light-rail link that will add at least three new underground stations Downtown, and reduce the number of transfers for riders traveling long distances on the county’s rail system. The Westside Subway Extension would stretch the Purple Line from Wilshire and Western to Westwood. Both projects are undergoing final environmental review. Preliminary engineering work on the Regional Connector is scheduled for completion in early 2012, and for the Westside Subway in late 2011, according to The Source.

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4 Downtown News

January 10, 2011

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EDITORIALS Another Year of Change and Opportunity

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aying that 2011 is a year of change and opportunity in Downtown Los Angeles is, we admit, par for the course. Ever since the residential revolution began in 2000, “change” and “opportunity” have been something between watchwords and clichés. With the housing stock increasing every year, Downtown saw new restaurants, bars, cultural entities and service businesses rush in in anticipation of new customers, some of them now, some of them later. This produced more additions to the streetscape and the skyline. Conventional wisdom says that during the recession and its aftermath (it’s officially over, even if it doesn’t necessarily feel that way), the community would be in a lull. That’s the case in many cities across the nation, but during the past two years, even as local unemployment soared and lending withered under the uncertainty of the economy, Downtown saw the completion of projects launched back when everyone was eager and confident. Debuts such as the $1 billion Convention Center hotel and the $165 million California

Science Center expansion meant, yes, more change and opportunity. As 2011 dawns, most of the projects planned before the downturn have either opened or died. Yet a plethora of other cultural, residential and business developments have moved into the pipeline. With everything from housing projects to a $100 million Grand Avenue art museum to a proposed $1.35 billion stadium and convention complex expected to grab attention during the next 12 months, it’s back to, you guessed it, change and opportunity. Last week, Los Angeles Downtown News detailed 62 faces, places, plans and projects to watch in 2011. In addition to the big money deals and developments (for example, the long-delayed $80 million Metropolitan Detention Center opens in February), the community has its collective eye on the February retirement of Cardinal Roger Mahony and the appointment of his successor as the head of the Los Angeles Archdiocese, Archbishop Jose Gomez. Other new leaders

whose impact will be felt, in varying degrees in Downtown and beyond, include Community Redevelopment Agency CEO Chris Essel (Jerry Brown plans to slash redevelopment agencies) and Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council President Patti Berman. In some instances the happenings bring more questions than answers. Joe Moller takes over as director of the Downtown Art Walk, but will he be able to rein in a popular event whose party atmosphere frustrates many? During July Downtown will host its biggest convention ever, a Microsoft confab expected to generate $45 million in local spending, but will organizers be impressed enough with the community to return rather than flock to other convention city standards such as San Diego or Anaheim? In short, 2011 is transition year for Downtown. It’s a time to build upon the gains of the past, but it is also a time when more planning has to take place for the future. It’s a year of, all together now, change and opportunity.

The Ugly Walk Between 7+Fig and L.A. Live

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here are a lot of important pedestrian-oriented corridors in Downtown Los Angeles. There is Broadway, which has attracted generations of shoppers and which is at a crossroads due to changing demographics and a proposed streetcar. However, it is not currently an attractive place to walk. There is Seventh Street, which in the past couple years has erupted into a Restaurant Row between Figueroa and Olive streets, and it does qualify as a comfortable place to check out the storefronts. There is Grand Avenue, which despite expensive additions like the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels and Walt Disney Concert Hall has, to date, failed to become a vibrant area in which to stroll. It feels adequately safe, but not lively. Hopefully Eli Broad’s coming art museum will help change that. Now, another stretch is taking on importance in the Downtown pedestrian landscape. Unfortunately, the portion of Figueroa between Seventh Street and Olympic Boulevard

does not live up to expectations, and has several underutilized stretches, among them one block that is downright grim after darkness falls. The stretch should have been enlivened years ago. Now, with plans for a trio of major projects along the corridor, it is imperative that city and business leaders come up with a plan to lighten and activate the stretch, especially at night. One needs to see the street not just today, but to envision it years into the future. The southern hub is already a destination with the bars and restaurants of L.A. Live and, on the block south of that, Staples Center. The northern hook is active too, with the 7+Fig shopping center, the Wilshire Grand hotel, the Metro station and nearby office buildings. The problem is what lies between. Activity at each end will shoot up significantly. A Target is slated to open in 7+Fig in late 2012, and upscale retailers and restaurants will likely follow. The aging Wilshire Grand will be razed and replaced by a new hotel that also

contains 100 condominiums, as well as ancillary restaurants and service businesses. The hotel is scheduled to open in 2015 (another office tower on the hotel site has been announced, but no schedule exists to build it). At L.A. Live, meanwhile, Anschutz Entertainment Group is pushing its stadium and Convention Center expansion. If it comes to fruition, there would be a $1 billion venue for NFL football that could also hold large conventions. The current West Hall of the Convention Center would be razed and replaced. Large hotels may follow, too. Whether or not the stadium/convention project happens, there is a need for an inviting pedestrian environment, something that makes diners on the north want to walk to a game, club or concert at L.A. Live, and that invites conventioneers to stroll to a hotel or shopping mall at Seventh Street. Right now, the walk is a sometimes unpleasant patchwork. The east side of the block between Ninth Street and Olympic

Boulevard contains the shuttered fronts of the Variety Arts Center and the Concerto housing complex. Concerto may open in the relatively near future, but the point is, much of the block has been dead for years. The most distressing stretch is the west side of the block between Eighth Street and Eighth Place. At night, the lighting is terrible and only Zucca restaurant gives a brief reprieve; the other side of the street isn’t much better, with the highlight being a Denny’s. It’s not a walk one wants to take, and it has to interfere with business at both ends of the stretch since it’s natural to resist going there. Some simple street lighting would be a good start, though more has to occur. Considering the active Convention Center and the 200-plus events a year at Staples Center, this should be a lively stretch. It is only about a 10-minute stroll between 7+Fig and L.A. Live, and people will take if it is pleasant. If it’s not inviting, they’ll climb into their cars and probably head home.

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com • email: realpeople@downtownnews.com facebook: L.A. Downtown News

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Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editors: David Friedman, Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Pamela Albanese, Jay Berman, Jim Farber, Jeff Favre, Michael X. Ferraro, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Rod Riggs, Marc Porter Zasada Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard AccouNtiNG: Ashley Schmidt AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin sAlEs AssistANt: Annette Cruz clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Catherine Holloway, Brenda Stevens, Billy Wright, Lon Wahlberg circulAtioN: Norma Rodas distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

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January 10, 2011

Downtown News 5

DowntownNews.com

Metro, High-Speed Rail Group Bank of America May Buy Union Station Retains Brockman Deal Could Be Completed by February

photo by Gary Leonard

Bank Considering How to Sell Building, Though No Opening Is Scheduled

by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

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he Metropolitan Transportation Author ity, in partnership with the California High Speed Rail Authority, is in talks to purchase historic Union Station. A deal could close next month, a Metro official said last week. Roger Moliere, chief of real property management and development for Metro, said talks have been underway for about four months. He would not discuss a sale price for the 1939 transportation hub, since negotiations are still ongoing. “We are in discussions with the owner and also in discussions with the High-Speed Rail who may be a participant,” he said. The deal could include either a co-purchase with the rail group of the 38-acre property, or another type of partnership that has not yet been determined, Moliere said. One possibility, he said, would be the formation of a Joints Power Authority, with Metro operating the station. “We think it makes a lot of sense for us. It is clearly the transportation hub of Southern California with a lot of increasing activity and

by Ryan VaillancouRt

vidual units in the building. Typically, banks opt to unload foreclosed properties in a single deal. Bank of America lent developer West Millennium Group $35 million to finance the renovation of the 1921 Brockman Building, and costs later escalated to $44 million. West Millennium filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy on the project in April 2009, a month before the company itself went bankrupt. The $11 million paid by Wickliffe at the auction does not necessarily indicate a loss for the bank, or the value of the property, Russak said. “It is not at all uncommon for a bank to start well below what it thinks the fair price of the building is to see if they can’t generate bids and test the market even at the auction sale,” Russak said. “So the bank starts low, and with no other bidders, there’s no reason to advance the bidding.” The building is not the only stalled structure on Seventh Street. The 222unit Roosevelt Lofts, at 727 W. Seventh St., has long been only partially open as developer Milbank Real Estate has endured financial troubles. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

staff wRiteR

T

he long-awaited 80-unit Brockman Building went on the auction block on Dec. 30, but nobody offered a bid, except for an affiliate of project lender Bank of America, N.A. Wickliffe A., a Virginia-based affiliate of lender Bank of America, acquired the $44 million project at 530 W. Seventh St. for $11 million at the foreclosure sale. While the property technically changed hands, in effect the bank remains the owner and now has a clear path toward unloading the Brockman via a traditional sale. The sale is a milestone on the path toward opening the long-vacant Brockman — the building that houses popular restaurant Bottega Louie on its ground floor — because the bank, through its affiliate, is now free to sell the property. But there remains no timeline for unloading or having move-ins at the property. Bank of America and Wickliffe officials are considering two strategies for selling the Brockman, said Kenneth N. Russak, attorney for Bank of America. The owner will either market the entire property for sale, or sell or lease indi-

more to come,” he said. Current Union Station owner ProLogis is in the midst of selling all of its assets to Texasbased investment firm TPG Capital. Moliere said once that transaction, which is in the final stage, is complete, TPG Capital will then turn around and sell the station to Metro. TPG would sell the facility because it is not a core part of their business, said Moliere. Moliere said the purchase would allow the transit authority to better deal with increased bus and rail traffic through Los Angeles. “There’s a lot of need to restructure stuff and make it run better,” he said. A partnership with the High-Speed Rail Authority may also facilitate the construction of the planned $40 billion high-speed train that would link Southern California to San Francisco, since Union Station is a key component of that plan. “They’ve always planned to come through Union Station. They will need to have rights to do that,” he said. “At one point or another they’ll have to get the rights to come through…. They can get them now rather than later.”

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A Big Move for a Big Mover Mark Tarczynski, a Broker Who Spent 23 Years With CB Richard Ellis, Jumps to Colliers by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

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ver the past 23 years, Mark Tarczynski has been one of the most familiar figures in Downtown Los Angeles real estate. His name has been splashed on signs for CB Richard Ellis across the Central City. His deals include leasing the space that Ralphs now occupies in South Park, and selling the Eastern Columbia building, 1100 Wilshire and the property that was developed into 717 Olympic. This week, Tarczynski and Adam Tischer, his partner of seven years at CBRE, are moving to rival Colliers. In search of a smaller, more nimble firm, Tarczynski says he has one more major real estate cycle in him. Los Angeles Downtown News spoke with him about the past, present and future of Downtown real estate. Los Angeles Downtown News: After more than two decades as a broker with CB Richard Ellis, you’re moving to Colliers. Why change now? Mark Tarczynski: I spent the last 23 years with CBRE and I went through one major cycle with them. I’m just looking to make one more change and want to be with a different place that I can help grow into a major international firm and go through one more major cycle. CBRE is a fine firm, but they are the biggest and the biggest sometimes can’t maneuver and be as nimble as a smaller firm. I’d like to be more nimble and more maneuverable than the large behemoth that CBRE has become. Q: What can you do at Colliers that you couldn’t do at CBRE? A: Nothing. My core business has always been urban redevelopment in Downtown Los Angeles and will remain that.

tor to me that things were getting a lot better and a lot of the reason why was because the pricing that we were able to get on that project far exceeded our expectations. Q: What kind of investors are testing the market right now? A: I’m seeing two different kinds of investors. The first is the multifamily Real Estate Investment Trusts who are projecting higher than inflation rent growth because there’s going to be more demand and no new supply, as well as low financing costs. So those factors have the multifamily REITs out in droves looking for product. The second type of investor is the land speculator. They’re excited about the things going on in Downtown and they’re looking to purchase land for future development. Q: In this market, what’s the primary hurdle keeping buyers out? A: I think that the biggest concern is nobody wants to be caught catching a falling knife, and I think we’re past that. When the market was in free fall in 2009, nobody moved. Very few people moved in 2010. So I think there is still the concern, is there a second down leg in real estate? You see these projections out there saying home prices are going to continue to fall in 2011. We’re just not seeing that in Downtown L.A. Prices have stabilized, if not moved up. Q: Do you believe that big box retail is the next frontier in Downtown redevelopment? A: No. I don’t. I actually think that the next big development wave is going to be hotel. Already, occupancy rates and Average Daily Rates have been increasing at a faster rate in Downtown L.A. than anywhere else across the U.S. That’s due in large part to the opening of the JW Marriott, where occupancy is running in the 80s. If the stadium comes in, we will increase the number of citywide conventions from 16 to 30, which will further put demand pressure on Downtown L.A. hotels. That demand pressure has to go somewhere, so

photo by Gary Leonard

Mark Tarczynski has left CB Richard Ellis after 23 years. He’ll continue to focus on Downtown commercial real estate with Colliers, located in the TCW Building on Figueroa Street.

eventually you’ll see more supply. It’s very difficult to squeeze big box retailers into expensive real estate and Downtown is expensive real estate. So they have to be a part of a larger development. Certainly the demand is there. We’ve demonstrated that with Ralphs and with Target. But it’s dependent on larger new developments. There’s no way you can do a mall of big box retailers in Downtown. The real estate is just too expensive, unless the city, state or some entity comes in and subsidizes the land. But the last I looked those entities were bankrupt.

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8 Downtown News

January 10, 2011

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A League That Packs a Punch The Ultimate One-on-One Sport Gets a Team Spin With Nokia Theatre’s L.A. Matadors by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

I

nside a sprawling gymnasium in Carson, boxers swirl around their sparring partners like ballerinas with an attitude, grunting with every thrust of the hand. Outside the rings, fists and punching bags collide at a rapid clip. The scent of sweat hangs heavy in the air. Evander Holyfield, a 48-year-old former heavyweight champ whose picture is painted larger than life on one wall, mills about, talking to people about an upcoming comeback fight. Inside the center ring, 28-year-old Russell Lamour is hard at work, rapping his gloves against two puffy red pads held by trainer Roberto Luno. The middleweight deftly shifts his head to the side, dodging clean out of the way as Luno throws a jab. Lamour, whose boxing nickname is “The Haitian Sensation,” is training for a Jan. 13 fight inside Nokia Theatre at L.A. Live. It will be the first of four local appearances in the next two months for the team Lamour is part of, the L.A. Matadors. The 13-member Matadors are part of the World Series of Boxing, a new project of the International Boxing Association, which governs Olympic boxing and regulates the sport at the amateur level. It is looking to put pure pugilism back in the American spotlight at a time when the sport is losing popularity to

the rise of mixed martial arts. The league has 12 teams on three continents. The Matadors share a North American conference with teams in Memphis, Miami and Mexico City. The European conference has squads in Paris, Milan, Istanbul and Moscow while the Asian conference features franchises from Beijing, Incheon (South Korea), Astana (Kazakhstan) and Baku (Azerbaijan). Fighters earn from $25,000-$60,000 (in the Americas), plus healthcare, housing and bonuses for wins. It’s not quite a Lakers salary, but it’s a major jump from the typical career of an amateur boxer, who has to sacrifice meaningful pay to pursue his path, said Lamour. In the ultimate one-on-one sport, the WSB adds a team spin, which league officials hope will build loyalty by city. But the main difference between a WSB fight and any other amateur bout is that the rules in the ring are based on professional boxing standards and scoring guidelines. That means the WSB eschews the headgear, and fighters wear the smaller gloves that are customary in professional fights. Knockouts are frequent. Essentially, a WSB match is a professional fight featuring amateur boxers. Benz likens it more to pugilism in ancient Greece, the competitions in the earliest Olympics, than to the softer, less exciting nature of what amateur

photo by Gary Leonard

General Manager Jeff Benz oversees the Matadors, which fight as often as three times per month. The team, including Russell “The Haitian Sensation” Lamour, appears at the Nokia Theatre on Thursday, Jan. 13.

boxing has become. “I think [the regulators] lost site of what was going on when they started introducing headgear, heavier weight gloves and with the controlled access to the Olympics,” Benz said. “It became two guys hitting each other with pillows, and how many times you hit the guy, not how well you hit him.” A Boxing Show When Benz talks about a home fight for his team, he doesn’t call it a match. He labels it a show. Whereas professional boxing matches feature a special brand of entertainment, the goal with the WSB is to keep the audience’s attention not just with the competition. At the Nokia Theatre, the women who hold up cards between rounds are known as Matador girls. Many of them are former professional cheerleaders in the NBA or NFL and they also interact with fans, handing out promotions and ticket upgrades. Two giant screens that flank the ring on the Nokia Theatre stage show close-ups of the fighting action. In addition to a traditional ring announcer, fans can offer color commentary when an usher brings them a microphone. “We have an active program,” Benz said. Every match features five fights with five, three-minute rounds. Teams earn up to three

points for winning a match. Teams that win their conference get one of four slots in the playoffs (the Matadors currently sit atop the North American conference). A fourth slot is reserved for the highest ranking team to finish second in their conference. Tickets range from $20-$150. So far attendance has been mediocre. The first home fight for the Matadors at Nokia Theatre filled about 1,200 of the theater’s 2,500 seats made available for the fight. The second card moved to the smaller Club Nokia due to a scheduling conflict and drew about 700. All the remaining fights this year will be at Nokia Theatre. Still, there are some signs that the league is catching on. It signed a rights deal with Versus, the television network that also shows the Tour De France and the NBA D League. The WSB is also shown on the Spanish language network Vme. “We’ve struggled like any new start-up does in terms of fan attendance and educating fans to what this new league is about and what they’re seeing,” said Kevin Newendorf, spokesman for WSB Americas. “What we’ve seen is we have a great night of entertainment. We just got to get people to realize that.” Still Going for Gold While many boxers pursue an amateur career as a means to make the Olympics,

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January 10, 2011

Downtown News 9

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Canvas L.A. Sells for $62.5 Million Pension Fund Advisor Buys City West Apartment Complex by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

R photo by Gary Leonard

Lamour, with a record of 2-0, is one of 13 fighters with the Matadors, part of the new World Series of Boxing league.

in recent years some of the sport’s brightest young talent has ditched Team USA at the first chance of fighting professionally. Pro fights come with the chance for serious money, but at the cost of the opportunity to fight for one’s country. But Lamour, a native of New York, hasn’t given up his Olympic dream. In fact, the main reason he joined the Matadors was because of an enticing carrot that the WSB dangles in front of its fighters: Individuals who win their weight class earn a ticket to the Olympics to fight for their country. “We’ve always struggled with the idea of how do you pay the boxers the right way and allow them to maintain their amateur status, yet groom them to be better boxers, in particular better amateur boxers, to compete in the Olympics and really excel in that environment?” said Newendorf.

The Olympic reward for WSB fighters will be available every four years, timed to the third year of the Olympic games’ offseason. That means much is at stake in the current season, which runs through March. The playoffs continue through May. Lamour said the salary he earns with the Matadors is nice, but his sights are still focused on the Olympics. That’s why this week’s match in Downtown is bigger than just the five rounds. “If you go to the Olympics, you go down in history,” Lamour said. “Who wouldn’t want to have that in their background?” The L.A. Matadors fight at Nokia Theatre, 800 W. Olympic Blvd. Home fights are Jan. 13 and 27, Feb. 24 and March 11. Information and tickets at lamatadors.com. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

eal estate investor LaSalle Investment Management has purchased Canvas L.A., a 204-unit apartment complex in City West, for $62.5 million. The five-story project at 138 N. Beaudry Ave. was developed by Arizona-based Alliance Residential. It opened in spring 2008. LaSalle was drawn to the property in part because of its proximity to major transportation corridors — it sits in the cradle of the Hollywood (101) and Harbor (110) freeways — and the prospect of rising rents, said broker Tyler Anderson, vice chairman of CB Richard Ellis, who along with CBRE Executive Vice President Laurie LustigBower represented the seller in the deal. LaSalle was represented in-house “Because of the downturn in single-family [homes], people do anticipate a pretty big rent spike in the next couple years, so there should be a nice return when those rent spikes occur,” Anderson said. LaSalle declined to comment on the deal, but Anderson said the firm, which manages investments largely on behalf of pension funds, paid all cash. There were more than 20 offers for the property, “many in the

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Less than three years after opening, the 204-unit Canvas L.A. has been sold. The five-story City West building includes a gym and a pool.

same price range,” Anderson said. According to the building’s website, rents at the property average nearly $3 per square foot. The building also includes a gym and a pool. Anderson said that Alliance is typically a build-and-sell developer, and wasn’t facing the kind of urgent debt-related circumstances that have forced many property owners to liquidate assets. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.


10 Downtown News

January 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Museum Continued from page 1 seum itself will sit atop a three-level parking garage). This is the so-called vault. DSR considered the storage and archive space a “protagonist” in the design, Diller said. Instead of placing it in a basement, there are windows along a staircase from the third floor gallery to the first floor lobby that offers glimpses at the artwork not on display. The concrete veil is a lattice-like cover, with pores that vary in shape and geometric design. On Grand Avenue, the veil’s holes are jagged and diagonal, whereas on the Second Street side they will be softer, more cellular patterns that blow a symbolic kiss to Disney Hall, Diller said. If the white concrete looks as if it will be easily dirtied by dust and exhaust, Diller said the structure is designed to have no horizontal ledges, so there are no places for dust to settle that can’t be easily washed away through rain or regular cleanings. The museum will house the Broad Art Foundation and its collection of 2,000 postWar works. The facility will be known simply as “The Broad,” Broad said Thursday. The unveiling comes about six months after Broad started proclaiming that he wanted to build the museum Downtown. He had also considered Santa Monica and Beverly Hills. Ultimately, he said Downtown, and Grand Avenue in particular, offer the chance to add to an existing array of architectural icons

rendering by Diller, Scofidio + Renfro

The museum would feature a glass-encased lobby. An escalator would take visitors to the gallery on the third floor.

that will collectively draw more visitors to the area. Getting to the museum will be easier in the future too, since the site sits a block from the planned underground light rail station for the Metro Regional Connector at Second and Hope streets. It could also be

close to a stop for a proposed Downtown streetcar. “We’re convinced that Grand Avenue is where it’s at,” Broad said. A Formidable Neighbor When DSR threw its hat in Broad’s private design competition for the museum, the partners knew their project would be defined in part by its “formidable neighbor” — Frank Gehry’s Disney Hall, Diller said. “Disney Hall, it’s large, it’s exuberant and works so beautifully spatially with its masses,” she said. “Our site is much smaller.” DSR’s design for the Broad is intended to be a sort of foil for the metallic, smooth concert hall structure. It came after Diller and her team found themselves wondering how to compete with Disney Hall. “I think the answer is you don’t even try,” she said. “You just talk another language, play another game. It’s about differences. In some very specific ways it aspires to make a relationship with Disney Hall through difference.” Where Disney Hall is shiny and smooth and reflects light, The Broad will be matte and porous, and will invite natural light in on all sides. Whereas Gehry’s building is iconic for its irregular shapes and wavy walls, DSR’s building is essentially a box, even if its skin is riddled with holes and patterns. DSR hopes to borrow one key design element from Disney Hall that starts outside either structure’s footprint. Diller and Broad are working with the Community Redevelopment Agency to widen Grand Avenue between Second and Fourth streets, to mimic the pedestrian-friendly wide sidewalks in front of the concert hall. Broad and company also hope to get approval to convert adjacent land to the south and to the west of the museum into a public plaza. Bill Witte, president of Related California, which maintains the development rights for

photo by Gary Leonard

Elizabeth Diller (at podium) said warnings that working with Eli Broad (seated) would be difficult have proved untrue, at least “so far.”

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the property, said he is on board with the plaza idea. The company’s plan to build a residential tower on a plot just south of the proposed plaza remains, though it is still hamstrung by a lack of financing. Enter the Museum A visit to The Broad will start in the glassencased lobby that fronts Grand Avenue, with entrances on Second and Third streets. At those entrances, the concrete veil is lifted, almost like a lace window shade starting to be drawn up. A single escalator whisks visitors straight to the third floor gallery, a 38,000-squarefoot space with no vertical beams — an architectural and engineering feat allowed by the design of the veil, Diller said. Those bound for the second floor, either to visit administrative offices or a 200-seat lecture hall overlooking Grand Avenue, will take stairs or the elevator. Visitors will return to the ground level via stairs (there is an elevator for those who cannot or choose not to walk) that offer glimpses into the second floor vault. That’s where the Broad-owned pieces not currently on display will be stored. “It’s an important coda for the experience, for the collection, because that notion that you’re always just seeing a part of a great massive material that’s under you is important,” Diller said. Construction on the garage is expected to begin in 60-90 days, and the museum could open its first exhibition in early 2013, Broad said. That timeline is based on Broad’s expectation that the design will go before the CRA on Jan. 20, said Broad Foundation spokeswoman Karen Denne. Diller told the audience at Thursday’s event that she had been warned that working with Broad would be difficult. “But I have to say, it’s been really good,” she said. “So far.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.


January 10, 2011

Downtown News 11

Football Continued from page 1 look at it, either L.A.’s football Dark Ages or its Renaissance — the rise of Pete Carroll’s USC Trojans plus the era of getting a lot of good games on TV — there have been repeated attempts to bring the country’s most popular sport to the nation’s second-largest market. Every few years, someone else tries and fails to join the world’s most exclusive club. It’s been stated before, but it’s worth remembering all the local sites that have been touted as possible homes for a state-of-the-art football stadium. They include (take a breath): the Coliseum (a few different plans), South Park (several times and various locations), the Dodger Stadium parking lot (at least twice), the City of Industry, the city of Carson, Hollywood Park, Anaheim and the Rose Bowl. In that period, more than one-quarter of the league’s 32 franchises have been reported or rumored to be considering a move to Los Angeles. Though current suspects are the San Diego Chargers, Minnesota Vikings, Buffalo Bills and Jacksonville Jaguars, past candidates include the Raiders, Rams, New Orleans Saints, Seattle Seahawks, Indianapolis Colts and the Irish Potato Phantoms (oops, the last one was my fantasy football team) There have also been some prominent and seriously rich folks who have backed or offered to help finance football in L.A. The elected leaders involved in the efforts include Mayors Richard Riordan, Jim Hahn and Antonio Villaraigosa, County Supervisors Zev Yaroslavsky and Yvonne Burke and City Councilmen Bernard Parks and Mark RidleyThomas. The big-money business backers,

meanwhile, include Peter O’Malley, Mike Ovitz, Ron Burkle, Casey Wasserman, Eli Broad, Ed Roski and Frank McCourt. Sorry, on that last one I confused my princes with my paupers. All of which raises an important question as Leiweke (again partnered with the quiet Wasserman) holds up some hoops he wants local officials to jump through as he slam bangs his proposal for a $1 billion retractable roof stadium at L.A. Live coupled with a $350 million new Convention Center wing. Is this plan really any more feasible than the past failures? Poker Face Leiweke, the president and CEO of Anschutz Entertainment Group, will be the first to tell you the L.A. Live stadium/convention center/ water park (one can dream, and who wouldn’t pay big money to see Dennis Zine and his many lady friends be the first ones down the slide) will happen. In fact, Leiweke has been the first, second, third, fourth and 19th to say that this time, things are different. He wants the stadium to open in fall 2015 and host three Super Bowls in 10 years. To be sure, AEG has a solid, shiny silver record of accomplishment in Downtown Los Angeles. The firm worked with Roski to develop Staples and, having learned from that project, got the support of labor, business, City Hall and even the homeless services community when it came time to push L.A. Live. Although the Convention Center hotel was delayed a couple times when done deals became undone, the $1 billion project opened last year and has been more adored than Halle Berry at an Oscar party. Parts of the effort will be relatively easy. Leiweke has said he wants to reach agreement by March with city officials on a plan to

photo by Gary Leonard

DowntownNews.com

The football stadium game returns to L.A. every few years. In 2006, local leaders appeared at a rah rah press conference for a Coliseum proposal. The 2010 on the shirts referred to the year they hoped an NFL team would begin playing in the venue.

raze the current West Hall of the Convention Center and then build the 72,000-seat stadium and the new convention wing on a 15-acre plot next to Staples. Expect no more than minor protest on Spring Street. The biggest questions from the outside concern the feasibility of the billion-dollar budget and AEG’s pledge to back the bonds on the convention project: Will it be a watertight guaranty that really protects the city in case something unforeseen happens, or will it be full of lawyerly wiggle room? While the city rolls over, the bigger concern is the NFL. Although league brass have stated for more than a decade that returning football to the city is a priority, the 32 owners have shown no desire to actually accomplish that mission. Instead, with boatloads of money already provided by television contracts, they’ve repeatedly fomented competition between local stadium developers, getting them to sweeten their offer under the auspices of claiming that they want to ensure football here doesn’t fail again. Thus

few who follow the proceedings are surprised that Leiweke’s scheme is the second local one to arise — Roski has spent years working on and securing approvals for an $800 million venue in the City of Industry. It’s hard to tell where things are really. AEG is expected to choose an architect this month. Leiweke has said he wants the NFL to indicate if it would back a stadium and know which team would move here by March, even though he told the Los Angeles Times that Phil Anschutz himself hasn’t yet committed to football. You can’t be sure whether Emperor Tim has an ace in the hole in terms of a secret handshake agreement with a team owner, or if his confident appearances before Downtown business groups are part of a bluff to win all the chips. Will football come to South Park? Who knows? But if Dennis Zine can become the Hugh Hefner of the City Council, anything can happen. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.

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January 10, 2011

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RESTAURANTS

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Josh Newman got the idea for Swill Automatic after seeing a similar winedispensing system in Honolulu. Swill offers about 80 wines. by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

I

t’s easy to miss the entrance to Swill Automatic. One of the only things that marks the recently opened wine bar in the Arts District is the image of a wine bottle on a circular sign outside a small brick building. The sign is often obscured by the trees in front. If you don’t walk right past the bar and make it inside, you’ll have no trouble finding the wines you like, even if you don’t know what you like, or know anything about wine. Located just down Industrial Street from the popular Church & State, Swill Automatic opened in mid-October. The 1,600-square-foot spot is aimed at those just learning about wine and who may be intimidated by the pomp and seriousness often associated with the scene. Co-owner Josh Newman, a longtime Downtown resident, hopes to create new wine aficionados with his “enomatic” wine system, which after a two-month delay was finally installed last week. The system is similar to the soft drink dispensers at places such as 7-Eleven, although with bottles of Chardonnay and Merlot instead of, say, Sprite or Coke. Customers purchase a card, which they insert into either the two circular dispensers in the middle of the bar or the machines along the walls. Wine bottles are displayed with the cost of every two-ounce serving, or about half a glass. Prices range from $2.50 to about $7 per pour. The customer chooses a bottle, presses the button and out comes the wine. If you like what you taste, you can stick with it or move on to another choice. “A lot of people really never get to know wine,” Newman said. “Beer is easy, hard liquor is easy. Wine at a restaurant can be one of the most intimidating things you can do. “You have to talk to the sommelier, they bring you the wine,

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show it to you and there’s a lot of ceremony, etiquette and protocol, which is just intimidating enough that I think a lot of people wind up not getting a real appreciation for wine.” The benefit of the Swill system, he said, is that it is easy, interactive, and you don’t have to be guided by a sommelier or follow any protocol. “It’s a fun way to drink wine. There’s nobody between you and the wine, you can try a bunch of things,” he said. Easy to Learn The concept is not new or unique to Downtown. The restaurant First and Hope on Bunker Hill uses a similar enomatic system while wine aficionados have other local choices in Corkbar and Bottlerock. Newman learned about the scene while on vacation in Hawaii two years ago with his wife and business partner Darcy Lewis. They went to a wine bar in Honolulu that used an enomatic system and saw a lot of young people learning about wine and trying different bottles. “I thought it was a very interesting concept,” he said. When he returned, Newman, whose professional background is in digital technology and Internet media, began talking with Yuval Bar-Zemer of Linear City, the developer of the Toy Factory and Biscuit Company Lofts, about his desire to open a similar wine bar, even though he had no background in the bar business. “I was mostly kidding when I was chatting with Yuval about this great idea for a wine bar,” he said. Bar-Zemer encouraged him to do it and keep it in the neighborhood. He is pleased with the results. “It’s great to see residents of this street take an initiative and create this nice environment where they just get up and walk downstairs to work, or for lunch, and now we have another great place that adds to the neighborhood,” Bar-Zemer said.

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Bar Manager Leandro DiMonriva, who helps Newman select the approximately 80 wines available at Swill, said many of their clients are residents of the nearby Toy and Biscuit Company buildings, as well as those who come to the area for Church & State. Around the World The offerings at Swill come from all over the world, with an emphasis on bottles from unexpected places. “We have a very deliberate strategy of trying to get as many different varieties as possible from as many different places as possible,” said Newman. “There are wine producing places that people may not think of as wine destinations like Uruguay, Central Europe, Bosnia and Israel.” Wine highlights at Swill include the Gauchezo 2008 Malbec and Manos Negras Pinot Noir from Argentina; the Tishbi 2009 Cabernet Petit Syrah from Israel; and California choices like a Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon and 3CV 2009 Viognier from Santa Ynez. DiMonriva said the selections are directed at the neighborhood’s demographics. “We cater to a younger clientele, so the first thing I look for in a wine is something they would like, something medium body, with a little spice, a bit dry on the finish or a pop of fruit right on the nose,” he said. Swill also offers a menu to complement the wines. Dinner selections include braised beef shanks ($16), seafood pasta ($16) and vegan quinoa risotto ($13). There are sandwiches at lunch as well as breakfast options and cheese selections. The bar is a bright, modern space, with a light blue concrete floor, white communal tables and bottles of wine displayed on the walls. A wall-to-wall chalkboard covers one side of the bar and is open for anyone who is inspired to draw after a few sips. There is also a small patio. Although the wine dispensing system is Swill’s principal draw, it took a while for it to arrive. Newman acquired the wine-dispensing machines after they were repossessed from a similar bar in San Francisco. “Because they were used they had to have a bunch of new parts, we had to redo the software,” he said. Before they arrived last week, the bar was pouring by hand. That is still available for those who want their wine with a little more pomp and seriousness. Swill Automatic is at 1820 Industrial St., (213) 239-9088 or swillautomatic.com. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

Bring on the Baco Lazy Ox Canteen Chef Plans Historic Core Restaurant by RichaRd Guzman city editoR

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hile he has delighted Downtown audiences with the adventurous menu at his Little Tokyo restaurant, chef Josef Centeno isn’t resting on the success of the Lazy Ox Canteen. Centeno said he plans to open a second Downtown restaurant, called Baco, at the space that housed the just-closed Banquette Café and The Last Bookstore on Main Street just south of Fourth Street. He said, however, that he has no plans to leave Lazy Ox once he opens the new restaurant. Derrick Moore, vice president of brokerage services at real estate firm CB Richard Ellis, said a lease was signed in late December for the spaces with Old Bank District owner Gilmore & Associates. The 10-year deal with options will provide a 1,750-square-foot space. “The menu is still in development but will feature various bacos and beer and wine,” Centeno said in an email to Los Angeles Downtown News. The baco, Centeno’s creation and his signature dish, is a combination of a gyro, pizza and taco, said the 36-year-old Centeno, whose Lazy Ox cooking recently earned him a spot on Los Angeles magazine’s list of the city’s best new restaurants. “There will be a menu with items to complement the baco,” said Centeno. “This is something that I have been wanting to do for many years.” Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.


January 10, 2011

Downtown News 13

DowntownNews.com

CALENDAR Bringing Sexy Circus Back

Cirque Berzerk Moves Its Dark and Dusty Vision to the Bright Lights of L.A. Live by Ryan VaillancouRt

a trend for future programming at Club Nokia. Cirque Berzerk takes over at the same time that the club last year ark. Gritty. Sexy. hosted the Pee-wee Herman stage show. The month is Those are some of the go-to adjectives that normally slow, because few big music acts are touring, so critics invariably jot in their notebook when the venue will be looking for theatrical-type events that describing Cirque Berzerk. This year, the show’s cocan set up shop for a few weeks, Rosenbluth said. founders warn (or is it an enticing promise?) that the The move is a game changer for Cirque Berzerk. At experience will only get darker, grittier and sexier. Los Angeles State Historic Park, the organizers proNow in its third installment in Downtown Los duced the event on the strength of “credit cards and Angeles, the macabre cabaret centers around a woman savings,” Bourque said. They had to scrape resources who makes a deal with Death that submerges her into a together and do everything themselves. They rigged vaudevillian underworld. The show, which opened Jan. lighting, tweaked speaker placement in an acoustic en7, is a place where a group of guys spring on and off walls vironment notorious for bad sound, painted fences and and trampolines like human popcorn; where creepy conmended costumes. Sitting in their rehearsal space in tortionists mix with fire breathers; where sculpted aerialLos Feliz, Bernel, Everett and Bourque collectively lost ists dance a homoerotic ballet in the sky; and where a their breath listing their shared roles in assembling the black-clad clown pulls a hat out of a rabbit. All the while, show in previous years. a live band strums and bangs out a demented Dust Bowl Now, they have a state of the art sound system. They meets old Berlin soundtrack. have a costumer. They brought in two-time Tony Award The show was a hit when it rooted down at Los nominated choreographer John Carrafa and American Angeles State Historic Park in the summer of 2008. The Theater for Actors award winner Barry Primus to direct. next year, the big top grew from 450 seats to 1,750. The Everett, an aerialist who has worked with Cirque du 3,000 people who saw Cirque Berzerk in its debut run Soleil, said that with many of the nuts and bolts taken increased tenfold in 2009. care of, the founders have been able to focus on sculptBut if darkness and sexiness, grit and mystique lured ing their artistic vision, even if the vision itself hasn’t the crowds before, this year the circus has a challenge changed much. that threatens to give the experience a cleaner, shinier The narrative, entitled Beneath, is essentially the same, and more sterile veneer. Cirque Berzerk has moved from and many of the circus acts that have been audience faa dusty big top at the park to the bright lights of Club vorites will return. Only a few new acts have been added. Nokia at L.A. Live. This year, however, the founders say the acts are “One of our challenges is to create our vibe in… a more tied in with the theater. Whereas the narrative Blade Runner, Tron world of L.A. Live,” said Suzanne might have paused at times for a certain circus spectacle, Bernel, who founded Cirque Berzerk with her husband the spectacles are now woven in tighter with the story, Kevin Bourque and their friend Neal Everett. Bourque said. Additionally, the recognizable acts are, To accomplish that, they’re focusing on more than you know, darker, edgier and sexier. So a memorable just what occurs on stage. They’re taking the club owned two-man aerial act performed in part by Everett will add by Anschutz Entertainment Group and booked by more bodies, and more lust. This year it’s less a suggesGoldenvoice and dressing it up to mimic the feel of their tive love story and more of an orgy. big top, going so far as to costume the normal club barThe experience has been billed as many things, but tenders and ushers. Goodbye Club Nokia-branded vest, most reviews have dubbed it an adults only show. The hello striped socks. Bernel said they’re even replacing creators disagree, and while the circus is undoubtedly light bulbs at the bars with old Edison bulbs, which cast a risqué and erotic, Bernel is quick to point out that there’s warmer glow than modern fluorescents. no nudity and no swearing. “AEG and Goldenvoice are bringing us to the venue, “We’re not the Pussycat Dolls,” she said. but they’ve given us the reins,” Bernel said. Added Bourque: “I would totally take my kids to the Grown Up Circus show. Cirque Berzerk, whose run continues through Jan. If your kid loves The Nightmare Before Christmas or 30, grew out of humble Downtown beginnings. Bernel, shops at Hot Topic, they’re going to eat this up.” Bourque and Everett started the group as a variety show Bourque, Bernel and Everett liken the evolution of that performed at underground dinner theater events at Cirque Berzerk to a child who spent their formative years the Brewery Arts Complex. In 2005, they took it to the at underground dinner theater shows, hit puberty at fabled desert party Burning Man. Man and began their teens at the Los Angeles Starts Burning ews.com or In a way, the move to Club Nokia iscoarnsign the State Historic Park. wntownN Dothat at er hand Jan.7/Jan.14As the show gets more mainstream with the Club upper right for s/maillis once ramshackle operation a/form party int the l in thedesigned nnews.com ow E-NEWS Look for this symbo nt w do .la www P the desert, where middle drugs, alcohol and neon Nokia run, they’re not exactly sure where their child is SIGN Uof lights hold currency, has grown up. The show used to developmentally. wooing a steampunk, hipster crowd is now casting its net “We’re still teenagers,” Everett said. to a far wider audience. Bernel interjected, “I think we just turned 21.” After the founders approached Goldenvoice, said Bourque was not ready to proclaim being of age. Susan Rosenbluth, a talent buyer for the booking firm, “I “I think we’re 18,” he said. “We’re still shoulder tapbecame more aware of them by asking people, ‘Have you ping.” Check Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com seen them?’ And I found out that many people had and Cirque Berzerk runs through Jan. 30 at Club Nokia, 800 photos by Gary Leonard really enjoyed the performance. I did my homework and (top) A scene from Cirque Berzerk. (bottom) Neil Everett, Suzanne Bernel and W. Olympic Blvd., cirqueberzerk.com. saw what a great piece of programming it is.” Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at Kevin Bourque take their show indoors this year, leaving the Los Angeles State The three-and-a-half-week January run could signal Historic Park for a run at Club Nokia. ryan@downtownnews.com.

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Whale of a Donation

January 10, 2011

Rockin’ With the Toddlers

Natural History Museum’s $13 Million Gift Will Lead to New Entry Exhibit

Little Barn Offers Music Classes for the Pre- Pre-School Set by Jon Regardie executive editor

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by Richard Guzmán city editor

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he Natural History Museum last week announced a whale of a gift — in all meanings of the word. On Wednesday, Jan. 5, officials with the Exposition Park facility said they have received a $13 million donation from The Otis Booth Foundation. It is the largest private gift in the museum’s nearly century-long history and will go toward the creation of a glass entrance pavilion showcasing a 63-foot-long fin whale. The three-story entrance will be named the Otis Booth Pavilion and will connect to Exposition Boulevard via a pedestrian bridge. “Our mission is to inspire wonder and this is certainly something that’s going to inspire wonder,” said Paul Haaga, president of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Board of Trustees. The fin whale is one of the NHM’s signature specimens. Haaga said it will be brightly lit and look as if it is swimming. “It will be architecturally significant but also an active exhibit,” he said. The Booth Foundation is named after Franklin Otis Booth, Jr., the great-grandson of General Harrison Gray Otis, who founded the Los Angeles Times. Otis Booth was a member of the NHM’s Board of Governors in 1972 and went on to serve as a Trustee and Trustee Emeritus. The pavilion is scheduled for completion by November 2013, in time for the celebration of the Natural History Museum’s 100th anniversary. To mark the milestone, the museum is in the midst of a major renovation. Part of that, known as the North Campus, is a 3.5-acre project that will cre-

image courtesy of Natural History Museum

The Natural History Museum received a $13 million gift from The Otis Booth Foundation. The money will be used to build a three-story glass pavilion entrance with a fin whale exhibit.

ate a new “front yard” for the facility in the form of a series of interactive outdoor exhibits. The $30 million plan, which includes $10 million from the County, is set to open in 2012. The Booth Foundation donation is not part of that original campaign. Overall, the museum is engaged in a six-year, $135 million upgrade. That includes the renovation of the museum’s 1913 building, which was completed in July, as well as the Age of Mammals exhibit, which also came online that month. A Dinosaur Hall will arrive this July and a new exhibition exploring the natural and cultural history of Los Angeles and Southern California will debut in 2012. The pavilion will complement the museum’s goal of bringing science outside the facility, Haaga said. “It’s really part of our inside-out theme that has infused everything we’ve done in the museum with the goal of bringing science to the people,” Haaga said. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

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ome people in the music business say they’re doing it “for the kids.” Julie Ingram takes it a step further: She does it for the really little kids. Ingram runs Scruffin Rock, a series of music classes for the 9-month to 3-year-old set that take place every Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at the Little Barn in City West. During the 45-minute sessions, she leads the kids in classical, folk, rock and pop tunes, strumming on an acoustic guitar and rolling out a suitcase full of shakers, banging sticks and even a parachute the young’uns can dart under. The kids engulf it, sitting in a circle and following Ingram in song and, sometimes, marching around the room. The biggest challenge, she said, is getting the parents to let loose and not be afraid to wiggle and sing about animals and other things that toddlers love. “Parent participation is the most important thing,” said Ingram, a Long Beach native who also runs Scruffin Rock classes in Glendale, Santa Monica and the MidWilshire area. “It’s important that people do this for their kid and not be so self conscious, because it’s fun and there is a good payoff for it. “The more exposure to music a

photo courtesy of Scruffin Rock

Julie Ingram leads weekly music classes at the Little Barn in City West for kids aged 9 months to 3 years. Parents are expected to participate.

child can get, the more you can set the blueprint for more music making in the future.” Scruffin Rock runs Saturdays at 9:30 a.m., Jan. 8-March 12. Cost for the full session is $150. Classes are at the Little Barn, 130 S. Beaudry Ave. For information contact Ingram at julcat2000@yahoo.com. Class registration at littlebarn.org or email info@littlebarn.org. Contact Jon Regardie at regardie@downtownnews.com.


January 10, 2011

Downtown News 15

DowntownNews.com

LISTINGS EVENTS SPONSORED LISTINGS Black Truffle Dinners Patina Restaurant, 141 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-3331 or patinarestaurant.com. Jan. 11 and 12: Patina’s Black Truffle Dinners present the season’s finest black truffles, hand-selected and imported from France. Guests will savor executive chef Tony Esnault’s tantalizing menus with black truffles in every dish. Celebrate these elusive gems of the culinary world at Downtown’s 4-star restaurant Patina. Three-courses $95; Five-courses $135; Seven-courses $175. Live Church LA Club Nokia, 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 4934329 or livechurchla.com. 10 a.m.: Every Sunday, Live Church L.A. takes over the VIP Lounge at Club Nokia, bringing great music, people and inspiring messages.

Wednesday, Jan. 12 Grammy Museum L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. 10 a.m.: In conjunction with its Crossroads exhibit, The Crossroads of Music: How Genres Connect explores the shared characteristics of rock, soul and other genres, and how the music of the past intertwines with popular songs today. ALOUD at the Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org. 7 p.m.: Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish discusses I Shall Not Hate: A Gaza Doctor’s Journey on the Road to Peace, his response to losing four family members to an Israeli shelling. Club Nokia 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-7000 or clubnokia.com. 8 p.m.; Jan. 13, 8 p.m.; Jan. 14-15, 8 and 11 p.m.; Jan. 16, 8 p.m.: Cirque Berzerk, the edgy face of contemporary circus theater, offers what it considers a darker, sexier phantasmagoric experience. The show runs through Jan. 30. Thursday, Jan. 13 Grammy Museum L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. 10 a.m.: In anticipation of the museum’s upcoming rap oriented exhibit, Hip Hop: A Cultural Odyssey takes an in-depth look at the artists, songs and styles of the genre’s heyday, and gives participants the opportunity to form groups and write socially conscious rap. Downtown L.A. Art Walk Info and map at downtownartwalk.com. Noon-10 p.m.: The Downtown Art Walk is a selfguided tour that showcases the many art exhibition venues in Downtown Los Angeles — art galleries, museums and nonprofit art venues — as well as plenty of musical entertainment and food trucks. MOCA Grand Avenue Art Talk Ahmanson Auditorium, 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-1745 or moca.org. 6:30 p.m.: Artist Richard Jackson, represented in The Artist’s Museum exhibit, discusses his practice and his work as an educator. Free; no reservations required. Friday, Jan. 14 Pershing Square 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/

Continued on next page

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ancy yourself the next Nigel Lythgoe or Bruno Tonioli? If you’ve got an eye for contemporary dance, The A.W.A.R.D. Show! gives you the chance to participate in an alternative “So You Think You Can Dance”-style competition at REDCAT. Each night from Jan. 13-15 at 8:30 p.m., four regional dance artists will present their work, followed by a conversation between the performers and the audience, and a vote to advance one company to the final round. The whole shebang climaxes on Jan. 16 at 7 p.m. when the finalists perform and a panel of judges and the audience choose a winner. Your vote counts! At 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org.

photo courtesy of Aloud

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ational Public Radio first hit the airwaves in April 1971 with live coverage of the Senate hearings on the Vietnam War. A month later it debuted its weekday newsmagazine “All Things Considered.” That program and NPR are still going strong as the independent, self-supporting media organization turns 40 this year. So what does the future hold for middle-aged public radio? The Aloud series welcomes Susan Stamberg (left), an NPR special correspondent, and Geneva Overholser, director of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, to the Central Library on Tuesday, Jan. 11, at 7 p.m., to discuss how public radio might respond to an ever-shifting media landscape. At 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org.

ené Pape has a reputation, and you’ve got one night only to hear him live up to it. The dude (our word) known as “the greatest operatic bass in the world” appears Saturday, Jan. 15, at 7:30 p.m. at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The German singer has won raves at every major opera house in the world and returns to L.A. Opera (his company debut was in Verdi’s Requiem in 2007) to perform a program of German lieder. That is, songs composed to German poems of high literary standing, mostly in the 19th century, and arranged for a single voice and piano. Pape’s recital will feature some of the most celebrated lieder from Schubert, Schumann and Wolf, accompanied by pianist Brian Zeger. At 135 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-8001 or laopera.com.

3 photo by Lenny’s Studio

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an you say “Wurlitzer Weekend” three times, fast? The Los Angeles Theatre Organ Society kicks off a celebration of the world’s first synthesizers on Friday, Jan. 14, at 8 p.m., at the Orpheum Theater with a screening of the 1927 silent comedy Her Wild Oat accompanied by organist Bob Salisbury. He’ll be playing the movie palace’s “Mighty Wurlitzer” (one of only three original theater pipe organs still in Southern California) while silent film star Colleen Moore plays a waitress who sows her oats on a wild, rollicking ride into high society. At 832 S. Broadway, (888) 528-6722 or latos.org. Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.

as there a deadly curse on 19th century Germanic composers? Bohemiaborn Gustav Mahler thought so because both Beethoven and Schubert had died before completing their tenths. Thus, he conspired to trick the reaper by not titling his ninth symphonic work a “symphony,” but rather The Song of the Earth. The L.A. Philharmonic takes on the horse-by-any-other-nameis-still-a-symphony with another passionate Gustav(o) at the reigns — Dudamel — at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Thursday, Jan. 13, at 8 p.m. Additional performances of Mahler’s Ninth Symphony are Jan. 14-15. Alas, the reaper wasn’t fooled and Mahler died before he could finish his next, actual tenth, symphony. At 111 S. Grand Ave., musiccenter.org.

photo by by Mark Stevens

by Lauren CampedeLLi, Listings editor | calendar@downtownnews.com

photo courtesy LATOS

Tuesday, Jan. 11 ALOUD at the Central Library 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or aloudla.org. 7 p.m.: NPR special correspondent Susan Stamberg and Geneva Overholser, director of the School of Journalism at the USC Annenberg School, discuss the future of public radio. Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. 7-11 p.m.: Projectfresh presents Conscious Capitalism and the Brain, a discussion of purpose, profit and the planet as the triple bottom line in the entrepreneurial business model. Grammy Museum L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. 7:30 p.m.: Dude, get schooled in rock ‘n’ roll history with the tuition-free, five-part master class “What a Long Strange Trip It’s Been: A Review of Rock’s Greatest Decade.” It’s all about the ’60s, of course. Tuesdays through Feb. 1; attend one, attend them all.

Judging dance, considering nPr and rocking the Wurlitzer


16 Downtown News

January 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

Listings Continued from previous page pershingsquare/. 8-10 p.m.: Downtown On Ice goes the tribute band route with The Cars cover act Candy O. It’s just what you needed. You can grab your best friend’s girl, and shake it up. Sunday, Jan. 16 Los Angeles Comic Book and Science Fiction Convention Shrine Auditorium Expo Center, 700 W. 32nd St., (818) 954-8432 or comicbookscifi.com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Paraphernalia for fans and collectors including vintage and new comic books, graphic novels, toys, action figures, movie memorabilia, trading cards, DVDs and an appearance by Star Wars’ Billy Dee Williams. Pershing Square 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/ pershingsquare/. 2 p.m.: The Downtown On Ice winter concert series continues with rockabilly blues band Hank Deluxe & The Elbow Benders. Not that elbow bending is all that hard.

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

7 p.m.: Journey cover band Escape caps off the free classic rock tribute concerts in the square. They’ll play it anyway you want it, so don’t stop believing. MOCA Grand Avenue: Screening and Panel Ahmanson Auditorium, 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-1745 or moca.org. 3 p.m.: Jeffrey Deitch presents the documentary Robert Williams Mr. Bitchin’ followed by a panel discussion with artist Robert Williams. Free with museum admission.

FILM Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. Jan. 13, 6-9 p.m.: The Latin American Cinematique Los Angeles presents its 2010 Latino Student Film Festival. Jan. 14-16: The Graphation Film Festival combines graphics and the concept of adaptation from literary or digital creative works to create new motion pictures. IMAX Theater California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 7442019 or californiasciencecenter.org. Through Jan. 27: Featuring nine-time world surfing champion Kelly Slater, The Ultimate Wave Tahiti 3D will immerse audiences in the story of an ocean wave and the lives it impacts and transforms. Hubble 3D takes movie-goers on a journey through distant galaxies to explore the grandeur and mysteries of our celestial surroundings and accompany space-walking astronauts as they attempt the most difficult and important tasks in NASA’s history. Under The Sea 3D explores the exotic waters and creatures of the Indo-Pacific as well as the impact of climate change on the ocean wilderness. Regal Cinema L.A. Live 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (877) 835-5734 or lalive.com. Through Jan. 13: Season of the Witch (12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:10, 7:50, 9:40 and 10:20 p.m.); Gulliver’s Travels 3D (12, 2:20, 4:30, 6:50 and 9 p.m.); Country Strong (1:30, 4:40, 7:40 and 10:30 p.m.); Little Fockers (12, 1:50, 2:40, 4:10, 5, 6:40, 7:30, 9:10 and 10 p.m.); True Grit (12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 8 and 10:50 p.m.); The Fighter (1:30, 4:30, 7:20 and 10:20 p.m.); Tron: Legacy 3D (12:40, 3:50, 7 and 10:10 p.m.); Yogi Bear 3D (12:10, 2:30, 4:50 and 7:10 p.m.); The

Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader 3D (1:40, 4:40, 7:40 and 10:40 p.m.); The Tourist (1:50, 4:20, 7 and 9:30 p.m.); Black Swan (1:20, 4, 6:40 and 9:20 p.m.); The King’s Speech (12:30, 3:40, 6:50 and 9:50 p.m.); Tangled (1:40 and 4:20 p.m.); Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (9:30 p.m.). Jan. 14 (partial list): The Dilemma (1:30, 4:20, 7:10 and 10 p.m.); The Green Hornet 3D (1:20, 4:30, 7:40 and 10:50 p.m.).

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Café Metropol 923 E. Third St., (213) 613-1537 or cafemetropol.com. Jan. 12, 6:30-10 p.m.: The Spotlight Cabaret promotes local jazz the second Sunday of the month. The show is anchored by the Spotlight Trio. Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. Jan. 15, 10 p.m.: Rob Campanella of the Brian Jonestown Massacre kicks off a January residency with side project The Quarter After. Grammy Museum L.A. Live, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org. Jan. 14, 8 p.m.: Break on through to the other side of the Grammy Museum as guitar-master Robby Krieger of The Doors discuss his new pop instrumental album Singularity. He’ll play some songs and take audience questions. Nokia Theatre 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6000 or nokiatheatrelalive.com. Jan. 15, 7:30 p.m.: Maze featuring Frankie Beverly with Patti Labelle. Orpheum Theatre 842 S. Broadway, (213) 622-1939 or laorpheum.com. Jan. 16, 8 p.m.: Those who worship at the guitar god altar have a special shrine for Joe Satriani. Don’t expect a lot of single ladies in the house for this one. Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com. Jan. 10, 10 p.m.: Phil Alvin and Friends and bluegrass from NYC with The Birdhive Boys. Jan. 11, 10 p.m.: Cinderella Motel, Lightnin’ Woodcock and Blackleg. Jan. 12, 10 p.m.: Untitled We Stand and Behold the Great Throne.

Jan. 13, 10 p.m.: Jake La Botz & Friends. Jan. 14, 10 p.m.: Beatnik-on-the-Mexican-border blues from the Jake La Botz Band. Jan. 15, 10 p.m.: Rock out with The Black Watch and The Furious Seasons. Jan. 16, 10 p.m.: Vicky & The Vengents get down and dirty with their psychedelic malt-shop punk rock. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., sevengrand.la. Jan. 11, 10 p.m.: Get a groove goin’ with The Makers. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. Jan. 12, 9 p.m.: Sean Solomon, The Finches, The Dining Dead and Old Lumps. Jan. 13, 9 p.m.: Joseph Hammer (no relation to MC), Sean McCann, Orbless and Terrors. Jan. 14, 9 p.m.: NAR, Dunes, The Babies and White Fence. Jan. 15, 9 p.m.: From New York, USAISAMONSTER, Colin L. Orchestra and CSC Funk Band. Jan. 16, 9 p.m.: Graf Orlock, Touché Amoré, Ghostlimb and Death Hymn Nine.

MORE LISTINGS Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

2

Easy ways to submit Your

Event Info

4 WEB: LADowntownNews.com/calendar/submit 4 EMAIL: Calendar@DowntownNews.com

Email: Send a brief description, street address and public phone number. Submissions must be received 10 days prior to publication date to be considered for print.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


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18 Downtown News

January 10, 2011

Twitters/DowntownNews

CLASSIFIED

place your ad online at www.ladowntownnews.com

FOR RENT

l.a. downtown news classifieds call: 213-481-1448 Classified Display & Line ad Deadlines: thursday 12 pm

“Be wary of out of area companies. Check with the local Better Business Bureau before you send any money for fees or services. Read and understand any contracts before you sign. Shop around for rates.”

All submissions are subject to federal and California fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate in any advertisement any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disability. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

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Available Immediately Top floor of 11 story historical building available now! We have approximately 2,868 square feet of contiguous exterior space facing Olympic Blvd. Stunning views of L.A. Two blocks away from the Staples Center and adjacent to the new L.A. Live Complex. The building also has other beautiful contiguous space & some small offices available. This space can be viewed by appointment. Information available to qualified prospective tenants.

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COMpANY DRIVERS (Solos & Hazmat Teams) * Great pay * Great Miles * CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated & regional positions available. Call 866-789-8947. Swift. (CalSCAN) DRIVERS - 100% Tuition paid CDL Training. No Credit Check. No Experience required! Trainers earn 49c/Mile! 1-888-4177564. Crst Expedited www.JoinCRST.com (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS/CDL Training - Career Central. We Train and Employ You. Company Drivers up to 40K First Year. New Team pay! Up to 48c/mile Class A CDL Training Regional Locations! 1-877-3697091 www.CentralDrivingJobs. net (Cal-SCAN) REGIONAL WEST Coast - Up to $0.36 per Mile- Company Drivers! Class A CDL. 1 year OTR required. Steady freight. Great Benefits. Apply 1.888.619.6845 or www.NationalCarriers.com (Cal-SCAN) SEEKING 10 Year or newer 3/4 ton or larger Trucks to deliver RVs from California to dealers across the Western U.S. and Canada. No Force Dispatch! 1-866-764-1601 or www.QualityDriveAway.com (Cal-SCAN) office/clerical HELp WANTED Administration, entry level open, travel agency 213-612-3700

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Business opportunities ALL CASH VENDING Route! Be Your Own Boss! 25 Machines + Candy All for $9995. Vend3, 880 Grand Blvd., Deer park, NY. 1- 877-915-8222. Major CC accepted! (Cal-SCAN) help Wanted ATTN: COMpUTER Work. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 part Time to $7,500/ mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.KTpGlobal.com or call 1-888-304-2847. (Cal-SCAN)

SERVICES attorneys

ABOGADO DE IMMIGRACION! Family, Criminal, p.I. for more than 20 yrs! Child Support / Custody necesita permiso de trabajo? tagalog / español / Korean

Get your GREEN CARD or CITIZENSHIP Law Office of H. Douglas Daniel Esq., (213) 689-1710

ATTORNEY JOHN BENSON Your Local Downtown Attorney Bankruptcy and Divorce best rates in town www.attorneyjohnrbenson.com (213) 9059364 education

sales SALES pEOpLE NEEDED Interface with Downtown corporations for lunch planning - sell our menu. 10% Commission! 626-435-7726

Children’s Performing Group

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January 10, 2011

Downtown News 19

DowntownNews.com

SERVICES

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2007 AUDI A6 Low miles. Loaded! Manager special. # 151076 vin ZA9770 $26,815 Call 888583-0981

ITEMS FOR SALE

2009 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S Certified, air with power pkg # NI3609 / 9N487053 $14,999, call 888-838-5089.

Clothing/Jewelry

2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX Low Mileage, Black/Black stk # UC562R/221046 $20,990 Call 888-879-9608.

Men’s Medium Hot Air Sweater. Moon Gray. $30 with this ad only. Brand new with tags. 818.304. 1995

For a complete list of our pre-owned inventory, go to www.DTLAMOTORS.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Autos Wanted DONATE YOUR Vehicle! Receive Free Vacation Voucher. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Free Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.ubcf.info Free Towing, Tax Deductible, NonRunners Accepted, 1-888-4685964. (Cal-SCAN) DONATE YOUR CAR: Children’s Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child’s Life Through Research & Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy & Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. (CalSCAN)

Notices WANTED DIABETIC Test Strips. Cash Paid. Unopened, Unexpired Boxes Only. All Brands Considered. Help others, don’t throw boxes away. For more information, Call 888-491-1168. (Cal-SCAN) CHURCHES THE BRIDGE / Little Tokyo: Contemporary worship, 4:00pm Sundays, 401 E Third St. www. thebridgewired.org.

LEGAL Civil Summons

We've got what you're searching for! DowntownNews.com

LOS ANGELES COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT No. BC439535 Plaintiff:

Seoung Sik Shin vs Defendants: Pok Soon Yu, an individual and Michael Kim, an individual and Does 1 through 20, inclusive You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form, if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal

requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, Cantral District 111 North Hill Street, Los Angeles CA 90012 Case number: BC439535 Dated: June 11, 2010 John A Clarke, Clerk M. Garcia, Deputy The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaitiff without an attorney is: Joshua J Richman 1940 Garnet Ave., Suite #230 San Diego, CA 92109 Telephone: 858-483-3082 Fax: 858-274-3588 Pub. 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31

2007 INFINITY G35 Stock C110085-1 vin 706331 Silver, Great condition! $23,782 call 888-203-2967.

Fictitious Business Name Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 20101677916 The following person is doing business as: SAVOIR WINES, 600 W. Ninth Street, Suite #1102, Los Angeles CA 90015, are hereby registered by the following registrant: STEPHANIE BADEN, 600 W. Ninth Street, Suite #1102, Los Angeles CA 90015. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein on November 15, 2010. This statement was filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los Angeles County Clerk on November 19, 2010. NOTICE—This fictitious name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before that time. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et. seq. Business and Professions Code). Pub. 12/6, 12/13, 12/20, 12/27/10

The Downtown Renaissance Collection

2007 MERCEDES BENZ ML350 Pewter/Black, 3.5 Liter, leather, $28,999 4JGBB86E77A260898 Call 888-319-8762. 2007 VOLKSWAGEN NEW BEETLE 2.5 Certified. Manager’s Special. #ZV998 vin 515774 $12,988 Call 888-781-8102.

Be Inspired...

2008 PORSCHE 911 Targa 4 Tiptronic, Bose, Navigation, only 27K miles, certified, #745077. $72,988. Call 888-685-5426.

Best Downtown Locations! On Spring St.

Premiere Towers:

2 bdrm/2 bath, $1600/mo • Rooftop garden terrace/ GYM w/city view • 24 hr. doorman • Free (1) parking

City Lofts:

I c o n i c B e au t y

860 sqft, 13ft ceilings, $1500/mo. Stainless steel appliances/refrigerator etc. Pet friendly We are located in a prime area in Downtown LA nice neighborhood w/ salon, market, café etc. Wired for high speed internet & cable, central heat & A/C

S e e k s S t y l i s h M at e

Please call 213.627.6913 www.cityloftsquare.com

Elegant World Class Resort Apartment Homes

Orsini 550 NORTH FIGUEROA ST.

877-231-9362

WWW.THEORSINI.COM

Medici 725 SOUTH BIXEL ST.

877-239-8256

WWW.THEMEDICI.COM

Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills

Beautiful Fully Furnished Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Beautiful Fully FurnishedAvailable Offices Starting at $500 y Flexible Terms y Corporate ID Programs Available Services Include:

Reception y Mail y Fiber Optic Internet y TelephoneServices & Voice Include: Mail y West Law y Reception y& Mail Optic Internet y Photocopy FaxyyFiber Video Conferencing

Is your teen experiencing:

• School problems? • Conflict at home or with friends?

Telephone & Voice Mail y West Law y Photocopy & Fax y Video Conferencing

Adolescent support group now forming Ages 13-17 Low fee

Additional Features: Kitchen Additional Facilities, Mail/Copy Features: Room, Conference Rooms, Mail/Copy Spectacular Views, Kitchen Facilities, Room, Fully Trained Staff Views, Conference Rooms, Spectacular Fully Trained Staff

Call Marney Stofflet, LCSW

(323) 662-9797

JENNY AHN JENNY AHN (213) 996-8301

4344 Fountain Ave. (at Sunset), Suite A Los Angeles, CA 90029

Fully furnished with TV, telephone, microwave, refrigerator. Full bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly maid service.

(213) 996-8301

Monthly from $595 utilities paid. (213) 627-1151

Furnished single unit with kitchenette, bathroom. Excellent location. Downtown LA. Weekly rate $275 inc.

laleads@regentbc.com

laleads@regentbc.com

www.regentbc.com

www.regentbc.com

Monthly from $550 utilities paid. (213) 612-0348

• Free Resident/Guest Parking in Gated Garage • Private Library, Business Center & Conference Rooms • Free Wi-Fi & DSL Computer Use • Resident Karaoke Lounge • Directors Screening Room • Lavish Fountains & Sculptures • On-Site Private Resident Park with Sand Volleyball, BBQ’s and Jogging Track • Night Light Tennis Courts • Indoor Basketball

877-235-6012

WWW.THEPIERO.COM

Visconti 1221 WEST THIRD ST.

866-690-2888

WWW.THEVISCONTI.COM

• Brunswick Four-Lane Virtual Bowling • Full Swing Virtual Golf • 3100 Square Foot Cybex Fitness Facility • Free Tanning Rooms • Massage Room, Sauna & Steam Room • Rooftop Pools with Dressing Rooms • Concierge Service • 24-Hour Doorman • 24/7 On-Site Management • Magnificent City Views

For Sale

Charming Victorian completely renovated

*Amenities vary among communities

206 S. Chicago Street, Los Angeles, CA 90033

Version 3

THAI MASSAGE SPECIALIST

x

VIP Room Available. The Best Way For Business Meetings & Entertainment

2 bed, 1.5 bath, approx 982 sq. ft.

x

NEW electrical, copper

For Sale

Charming Victorian plumbing, double-pane Professional massage for men dows & women. Services include Completely Renovated Client: x NEW modernG.H. with kitchen Palmer Thai Massage, Shiatsu Massage, granite countertops 206 S. Chicago St., Swedish Oil Massage, Foot Publication: LADT x NEW elegant hardwoodNews Massage, Sauna, Steam, and Los Angeles floors more. Lounge area. win-

4.3125” with gran- x x NEW bathrooms Health Dept. rank A Size/Color: for floors iteelectrical, • NEW copper plumbing, 7 Consecutive Years double-pane windows • 2 bed, 1.5 bath, approx 982 sq. ft.

SAKURA HEALTH GYM & SAUNA, INC. 111 N. Atlantic Blvd. Ste #231-233 Monterey Park, CA 91754 (626) 458-1919 [Corner of Garvey Ave.]

x

Associates

HBODY

MASSAGEH

First Professionally Licensed Massage Shop in L.A. County.

1/8 Ope - 1/ n H o 1- 9 S use 4p at. m -Su n.

8” 4C

$265,000

NEW roof, brick porch and

• NEWwalkway modern kitchen with granite Lot size approx. 2526 sq. ft. xcountertops Beautifully renovated Victorian style • NEW elegant hardwood floors home in the historic Boyle Heights area x Close to schools, Gold Line, • NEWand bathrooms with granite floors of Los Angeles. downtown Los Angeles • NEW roof, brick porch and walkway Paul: 818-419-7034 • prj@qnet.com • Lot size approx. 2526 sq. ft. Joanne: 626-705-8993 • maryjo.burger@gmail.com Beautifully renovated Victorian style home in the historic Boyle

Design by: apluscreative@yahoo.com 3386766 0119

Downtown Los Angeles Brentwood y Century City Woodland Hills

ROOFTOP GARDEN RETREAT WITH BBQ AND LOUNGE GRAND LOBBY • FITNESS CENTER • SPA MODERN KITCHEN w/CAESAR COUNTERTOPS HIGH SPEED INTERNET DESIGNER LIVING SPACES • PET FRIENDLY • DRAMATIC VIEWS WALKING DISTANCE TO RALPHS SUPERMARKET

Pricing subject to change without notice.

616 ST. PAUL AVE.

FREE Rent Specials On Select Floor Plans

NOW LEASING

$1,400’s/Mo. Free Parking

756 S. Broadway • Downtown Los Angeles 213-892-9100 • chapmanf lats.com

Piero

$265,000

Ph: 323.474.4668

Heights area of Los Angeles. Charm throughout. Two bedrooms with one and one- half baths. Modern new kitchen with gorgeous granite countertops and walk-in pantry. All kitchen appliances included. Ele-

gant hardwood floors in the living room, dining room, and bedrooms. Bathrooms have beautiful granite floors. New wrought iron gate and fence, landscaped with water-wise


20 Downtown News

January 10, 2011

Twitter/DowntownNews

We Got Games

hop in their step these days, and by hop, we mean the enormous leaping abilities that get Blake Griffin and Deandre Jordan on Sports Center seemingly every night. Can the duo soar over Lebron James, Dwyane Wade and the Miami Heat, who come to town Monday? Honestly, it’s not likely, but no matter what, the game promises some excitement. The Clippers then visit Golden State (Jan. 14) before coming home to host the Lakers.

Lebron Arrives, And So Do the Boxers Los Angeles Lakers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/lakers. Jan. 11 and 14, 7:30 p.m.: The Lakers have some chinks in their armor, but the suit isn’t broken yet. This is a good week to do armor repairs and get back on track. They start by hosting the Lebron-less Cavaliers and then head up to the Bay to tangle with the Golden State Warriors (Jan. 12). Then it’s back home to host old friends Jordan Farmar and Sasha Vujacic and the New Jersey Nets. They end the week with another look at rookie sensation Blake Griffin of the Clippers (Jan. 16). It’s technically an away game, but expect a Lakers crowd. Los Angeles Clippers Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7100 or nba.com/clippers. Jan. 12, 7:30 p.m.; Jan. 16, 12:30 p.m.: The Clippers have a

Los Angeles Kings Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., 1 (888) KINGS-LA or kings.nhl.com. Jan. 10 and 13, 7:30 p.m.; Jan. 15, 7 p.m.: The Kings finish off their eight-game homestand, taking on the Toronto Maple Leafs, the St. Louis Blues and the Edmonton Oilers. L.A. Matadors Nokia Theatre, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., lamatadors.com. Jan. 13, 7 p.m.: The L.A. Matadors are the local team in the new World Series of Boxing league. It’s an amateur league, with professional rules, which means the fights look just like a pro bout, but only last five rounds. The top-ranked Matadors have three Olympians among them, including Rau’shee Warren. They take on the Miami Gallo. —Ryan Vaillancourt

photo by Gary Leonard

Deandre Jordan and the Clippers look to cool off the Miami Heat this week.

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM


01-10-11