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LOS ANGELES

DOWNTOWN

40

C

NEWS Volume 42, Number 29

EBRATING EL

YEARS

Since 1972

presents

CITY LIVING Your local news and entertainment show on DowntownNews.com New Episode Every Monday at 9 a.m.

W W W. D O W N T O W N N E W S . C O M

July 22, 2013

ON TOP OF THE FOOD CHAIN How Bill Chait Became the Most Important Non-Chef in the Exploding Downtown Dining Scene

photo by Gary Leonard

Prolific restaurateur Bill Chait at Bestia, which he co-opened last year with chef with Ori Menashe and Menashe’s wife, pastry chef Genevieve Gergis. In the past four years Chait has helped open seven restaurants in Los Angeles. He has two more planned for Downtown. by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

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lot of people have had an impact on the surging Downtown food scene, but one thing in particular sets Bill Chait apart: He’s not a chef. That’s unusual at this moment in time, when chefs have been granted the auteur status formerly reserved for film directors. Seemingly wherever you look in Downtown, or even across the city, there’s a high-profile project driven first by those helming the kitchen: Just think of Trois Mec, where foodies buzzed over the team of Ludovic Lefebvre, Vinny

Dotolo and Jon Shook long before anyone knew what the three would prepare. In Downtown, Chait has already scored two big hits without ever scribbling down a recipe: He opened Rivera in South Park in 2009, one of only six local restaurants to currently boast four stars from Los Angeles Magazine (according to the magazine’s website). Late last year he debuted the Art District’s Bestia. It has been lauded as one of the city’s best restaurants in years, earning an effusive review from Jonathan Gold in the L.A. Times. It recently made the L.A. Weekly’s list of 99 Essential Restaurants.

While Chait is active across the city, he has two more big Downtown projects in the pipeline: He is teaming with Neal Fraser on Redbird, a long-awaited spot next to the former St. Vibiana’s cathedral. He is also developing a restaurant that will be part of Eli Broad’s under-construction Bunker Hill art museum. “Downtown is probably the most important restaurant and social market right now in Los Angeles and it’ll arguably define Los Angeles in a way that was never done before by any area in the city,” said Chait during a recent see Bill Chait, page 8

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2 Downtown News

AROUNDTOWN One Wilshire Sells for Record Price

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t may not look like a trophy office building from the outside, but it’s what’s inside that makes One Wilshire the most valuable office property in all of Los Angeles. The 30-story building at Wilshire Boulevard and Grand Avenue is one of the three most important telecommunications data server hubs in the world. That’s why Menlo Park investor GI Partners agreed to pay seller Hines Real Estate Investment Trust, Inc. $437.5 million for One Wilshire. The sale represents the highest price per square foot — $660 — ever paid for a Los Angeles County office property. The deal, first reported by the Los Angeles Times, also represents the largest office sale in the county since 2007, when now defunct Maguire Properties paid nearly $3 billion for a package of Downtown and Orange County towers. One Wilshire is currently 94% occupied, primarily by telecommunications entities that value the fact that the building is a major endpoint for fiber-optic cable routes that connect North America and Asia, said broker Kevin Shannon of CB Richard Ellis, who represented GI Partners in the deal. “This is main and main for this industry,” Shannon said. “The fiber connection and connectivity is irreplaceable.”

Metro Wants Regional Connector Lawsuits Dismissed

T

he Metropolitan Transportation Authority is tangled in three separate lawsuits dealing with the $1.37 billion Regional Connector, a crucial regional transit

July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years TAKE MY PICTURE GARY LEONARD

link that has some businesses on edge because of expected construction impacts. Thomas Properties Group, the Westin Bonaventure hotel and Japanese Village Plaza have separately sued Metro, alleging that the project’s Environmental Impact Report is faulty. Metro, however, believes it is exempt from such liability. According to Metro, the California Environmental Quality Act, the law that regulates EIRs, does not apply to “[f]acility extensions not to exceed four miles in length which are required for the transfer of passengers from or to exclusive public mass transit guideway or busway public transit services.” In Metro’s view, the connector, a 1.9-mile underground light rail link, is just such a “facility extension.” The agency conducted an EIR as a voluntary “extra step toward fulfilling the goals of CEQA,” Metro officials said in a statement. Metro, which has resisted Thomas Properties’ and the Bonaventure’s request that the agency tunnel under Flower Street instead of its plan to cut a trench down the street to lay the track, plans to file a motion on July 25 asking the court to dismiss the three lawsuits. It’s uncertain whether or when the judge might rule on the request.

Vegan Café Opens at Medallion

T

he food options at the corner of Fourth and Main streets continue to grow. This time, there’s not a burger, or any piece of meat, in sight. Dr. J’s Vibrant Café, a vegan restaurant, is having a grand opening ceremony on July 22 at the $125 million Medallion project from 11:30 a.m. until 9 p.m. The 100-seat spot serves dishes such as an avocado sandwich, a quinoa spring salad and a Tofu Supreme

Dodger Stadium

On-Field Photo Day

July 13, 2013

bowl, made with tofu, bell peppers and kale. The celebration will include a ribbon cutting at noon and some free food samples. “We’re old-fashioned eat-your-veggies, and you’re going to be healthy,” said co-owner Charles Tien. “We try to stay away from sugar, dairy, wheat, yeast, alcohol, caffeine and other chemicals as strictly as possible.” Dr. J’s is part of a major transformation of the mixed-use complex that opened in 2009. A Simply Salad opened there this year and construction is ongoing for a 1,700-square-foot space for a second location of upscale sushi purveyor Sushi Zo. Dr. J’s Vibrant Café is open seven days a week from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. at 334 S. Main St., (213) 5370905 or drjsvibrantcafe.com.

Homes for Artists

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n effort to help artists find affordable homes for artists in the Arts District got

a boost from the National Endowment of the Arts. Last week the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs received $75,000 from the NEA that will go towards a pilot program in the Arts District that will help keep artists informed on how to find affordable housing in the area and will reach out to developers to connect them to artists as potential future tenants. “This project will ensure that a thriving artists’ community remains a permanent part of the Arts District,” said Councilman José Huizar in a statement. The pilot program will include a series of workshops aimed at both developers and artist as well as a website that will provide information to artists about financial qualifications and existing affordable housing in the area, said Olga Garay-English, general manager of the Department of Cultural Affairs. She said the pilot program, which will start see Around Town, page 24

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July 22, 2013

Downtown News 3

Celebrating 40 Years

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4 Downtown News

July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

EDITORIALS Garcetti and His ‘Bench’

Urban Scrawl by Doug Davis

N

early 40 of the most powerful people inside City Hall are in the midst of doing something unexpected: explaining why they deserve to keep their job. It is an unusual development in Los Angeles, but it is also one that we applaud. The process, if done respectfully and professionally, will shine some light into government and help the public understand just what various power players do with their time, staff and budgets. It will also help define what constitutes success. In an ideal world, it creates that buzzword that gets floated so often: transparency. During his mayoral run, Eric Garcetti pledged that one of his first tasks would be to make department general managers reapply for their jobs. Some probably dismissed it as the stuff of campaigning — after all, would a mayor really jettison a group of individuals with six-figure salaries who oversee key departments? On July 8, Garcetti proved that it wasn’t the stuff of campaign promises. He called all the department heads together and, with the media present, told the general managers that they each need to prepare a memo addressing topics such as their past achievements and future goals. He also said that he expects some turnover in the ranks. While the desire to implement change is not unusual, this manner of openness is. Every mayor, like every new CEO at a large business or editor at a newspaper or magazine, wants to bring in their own “bench,” people whose opinions and achievements they have come over time to trust. Sometimes those in place before the new arrival keep their jobs if they share a similar vision, but in the private sector they are frequently forced out. During his two terms Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa saw regular turnover in several departments. Frequently, job changes would be announced on a Friday afternoon and would come in the form of a press release detailing the hire of a new GM for such and such a department. The person removed would be presented as a side effect of the new hire, even though there would have been no need for a change had the mayor and the GM seen eye to eye. Garcetti’s plan adds, as we say, transparency. His mode means there is no need to pretend that everything revolves around bringing in someone new. Instead, the key question is, can the person now in place reliably and efficiently lead the department and work with the mayor? Already there is speculation that a few GMs are on the hot seat, in particular the heads of Water & Power, the Fire Department and Recreation and Parks. Perhaps that’s the case, but at least now there is a level playing field, as everyone is charged with writing a memo detailing how he or she will increase jobs and economic development. They also are being asked to explain how they will utilize technology to enhance performance. The environment and sustainability are other subjects to address. These are all reasonable things to ask, and Garcetti is within his rights to ask for them. Now is the time that he can set and begin to implement an agenda, and he deserves to have the team he wants. Plus, it is good for Angelenos to know, from the GMs themselves, just what they define as success, and what their goals are.

Avoid Eminent Domain at Regional Connector Site

N

o one likes eminent domain proceedings. Getting into a situation where an arm of government moves to seize property is a lose-lose situation. Often civic leaders wind up looking like bullies. Frequently the person who has a holding snatched away is dissatisfied over the amount of money received. The potential of an ugly eminent domain outcome is why everyone involved with a key Little Tokyo parcel needs to do his or her best to keep a level head and treat each other with the utmost respect. If things go wrong, there is the potential for a situation that is currently serious to explode into one that is painful, expensive, time-consuming and highly litigious. Los Angeles Downtown News this month reported on a parcel on the southeast corner of First Street and Central Avenue that is owned by Robert Davies Volk. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority needs to acquire the property so that it can build the $1.37 billion Regional Connector. The project is an extremely important mass transit link that would speed up and facilitate light rail travel across the region. Metro and other officials have spent a lot of time determining the route and potential stations, and the site in question is vital to making everything work. The problem is, Volk wants more money than Metro is offering. With negotiations at an impasse, the Metro Board of Directors in late June voted in favor of pursuing eminent domain proceedings. The first formal step in the process would be for Metro to file a civil complaint. That could happen soon. Volk said his family has owned the property since the 1880s. Currently it is known to most Downtowners as a food destination. Weiland’s Brewery was there for 14 years, though it closed June 30, as the owner knew he had to vacate soon and has another opportunity. The site also holds the popular eateries Señor Fish and the Spice Table. The amount of money offered by Metro has not been disclosed, though an agency official noted that it is in the millions. Volk said Metro’s offer doesn’t reflect the land’s highest and best use valuation. In addition to the restaurants, part of the land is a parking lot. Therein lies the conflict. Volk believes the valuation should

be higher, that it should reflect the potential of the land if, say, it housed apartments. The spark for the belief comes from the many residential complexes that have risen in the area over the past decade. One large apartment complex is immediately to the east. One interesting aspect is that everyone, Volk included, recognizes the importance of the land for the Metro project. Volk freely acknowledges that using his property makes logistical sense. What he doesn’t like is the money offered. Already there are indications that reaching a happy medium could be difficult. A Metro official said Volk did not respond when the agency offered a purchase price. Nor, she said, has he delivered a counter-offer. Right now the situation appears to be at an impasse. If that is the case, then it is worth doing whatever is necessary to resolve that impasse and to begin a dialogue before things move too far in the eminent domain process. Perhaps there is a trusted business leader or elected official who can play peacemaker, such as the parcel’s own representative, 14th District Councilman José Huizar. It is worth doing whatever is necessary to get everyone to the table, and once there, all sides need to be flexible with their demands and expectations. It is possible that eminent domain proceedings could play out. In that situation, the court would be charged with determining a fair market value for the site, and Volk and Metro would be stuck with the ruling. All sorts of things would have to be considered, including the price for the highest and best use of the land, but also any potential constraints preventing that best use from occurring. The other problem with the conflict is that things will get expensive and bog down. In an eminent domain case there will be high legal fees. The court proceedings as well could be time consuming, and any delays tied to haggling over the price might ultimately be less than the cost of slowing down the entire project. No one wants eminent domain here. That’s why the parties need to get to the negotiating table. Even if there is not a solution that makes everyone happy, it is worth finding one that everyone can accept. It’s better to have the players do it than the courts.


July 22, 2013

Downtown News 5

Opinion

The Readers Have Their Say

hood. Think of Santa Monica’s Third Street Promenade or Old Town Pasadena:
Foot traffic there is a vibrant source of activity. —Rafa Chavez, June 14, 10:58 a.m.

Website Comments on Jan Perry’s Departure, Metro Gates, Downtown Parks and More

E

very week Los Angeles Downtown News gets online comments to the stories we publish. These are some of the most interesting responses. Additional comments are welcome at downtownnews.com. Regarding the article “The End of the Era of Jan,” about Councilwoman Jan Perry’s departure, by Ryan Vaillancourt, published June 24 Jan Perry is one of the best politicians we ever had, and during her time on the Council she did so much for Los Angeles. I sincerely hope that she will continue her public work. —Michael Delijani, June 24, 11:42 a.m. My father worked for the LAPD in the ’70s and ’80s. The stories he can tell you about Downtown Los Angeles makes it hard for me to believe it’s the same place he used to patrol. Now I drive from OC to L.A. at least once a week. Thank you Jan Perry, you changed L.A. into a place I love to go. I’m pretty picky, so it’s a pretty big compliment. —Jacques W., June 24, 2:52 p.m. Regarding the article “Riding Metro? Now You Actually Have to Pay,” about turnstiles being installed at Union Station and the end of the honor system, published online June 21 It’s about time! Maybe now the crazies, beggars and peddlers will have to pay to bother the fare-paying public. The honor system is

nice, but I guess it also shows the unfortunate fact that there are those among us who aren’t so honorable. Way to go, MTA! —Bettie Miner, June 21, 1:47 p.m. Can we sue the consultant and board members who recommended that we not have turnstiles to begin with? —Ghost of Gilbert Lindsay, June 24, 11:30 a.m. Hmmmm. Still amazes me that it took them 10+ years to figure out that the honor system doesn’t work. —M. Thomas, June 25, 11:22 a.m. Regarding the article “City Buys Eyesore Property at First and Spring; Plans New Park” by Ryan Vaillancourt, published online June 17 That’s excellent news. Another of Downtown L.A.’s many dead zone eyesores will finally be removed. Now, hopefully, they will design this as an expansion of Grand Park, rather than a standalone park. A little coordination with the County on this would be great. —Joel Covarrubias, June 18, 11:29 a.m. It will be wonderful to have another sorely needed park Downtown. But please oh please, please, please don’t build another shade-less, concrete solar oven like Spring Street Park. We’ve got plenty of concrete parking lot lids masquerading as parks. How

about some accessible, soul-restoring green space and shade? —Robert Bradford, June 18, 1:21 p.m. Regarding the article “Zoning Code Rewrite Has Major Downtown Implications,” by Ryan Vaillancourt, published June 17 Hoorah for the city. I look forward to participating in the update process. The current zoning code is very messy. —Rex Darling, June 17, 3:05 p.m. We need more transit friendly development to wean ourselves off the L.A. car culture that has blighted our city for decades. Allow for higher density and require less parking spaces for buildings within walking distance to Metro rail stations and major bus stops. —Whitman Lam, June 18, 12:34 p.m. Regarding the editorial “Benefits and Cautions of a Retail Revival,” published June 10 The advantages of large department stores is that they bring in much more people traffic than the local mom and pop stores. This brings additional revenue to everyone in the surrounding area, especially the eateries. What is not desirable are big bulk or dirt cheap stores like Costco and Wal-Mart. These tend to hurt the small retailers the most and folks who shop at these stores don’t do much walking in the surrounding neighbor-

Regarding the article “An Al Fresco Fiasco,” about citations for some Historic Core businesses that set up seating, and the time and money it takes to get permits, by Richard Guzmán, published June 10 Wow, that is bureaucracy at its absolute worst. Nine freakin’ months and over $2,000! To put chairs and tables out in the city? That’s a disgrace. —Robert, June 10, 7:22 a.m. There’s no logical reason the permit process should take nine months and cost thousands of dollars. We should be encouraging people to get these permits because permits mean the activity will continue and will happen in a sanctioned way, leaving room for pedestrians. —Brian R., June 10, 5:47 p.m. This is a sidewalk, not a patio. I live in the area and avoid this block because there is no sidewalk space left for the pedestrian access. The sidewalk here is about 12 feet wide, but the first four to five feet next to the street has all the parking meters, mailboxes, bike racks, newspaper racks, etc. That leaves five to seven feet for the sidewalk, but most Downtown businesses have doors that open on to the sidewalk and lots of these businesses prop their doors open, which removes another two feet. Now the effective sidewalk width is in the three to five foot range. That is before the restaurants and other businesses take over the sidewalk and in some cases leave as little as 18 inches for pedestrian use. —Karl Lime, June 10, 10:10 a.m.

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6 Downtown News

July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Amid Homelessness Spike, Optimism for a Bold Goal At Halfway Point, a Campaign to End Chronic Homelessness in L.A. County Faces Challenges by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

W

hen the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority recently reported a 16% increase in the number of people sleeping on L.A. County streets since 2011, there may have been nobody more disheartened than Christine Marge. Marge, the director of housing at the United Way of Greater Los Angeles, is overseeing the nonprofit’s Home for Good initiative, a partnership with the L.A. Area Chamber of Commerce that set out in 2011 to end chronic and veteran homelessness in L.A. County by 2016.

LAHSA’s homeless count, which was released earlier this month, came at Home for Good’s halfway point. In theory, the LAHSA homeless count numbers should have reflected a 50% drop, at least among veterans and chronically homeless individuals. While the report did show a 23% decrease in homeless veterans, the overall number of chronically homeless individuals jumped 16%, from 12,560 to 14,942. Still, Marge and Home for Good evangelists insist that their bold goal of finding a home for every chronically or veteran homeless individual by 2016 remains possible. Currently, the service providers in the region are housing 335 chronically

n ow o pe n eroa St.

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homeless people per month. To reach Home for Good’s 2016 goal, that rate needs to be 1,095 per month. With fewer funding sources available today than there were even two-and-a-half years ago, Marge knows that on the surface the goal sounds unlikely. But the numbers, she said, belie the crucial progress that the region has made in the past two years in streamlining the complicated civic process that connects street dwellers with permanent housing. “Certainly there are people out there who might feel pessimistic given the numbers and we certainly hear that perspective from some folks,” Marge said. “But when we look at the resources that we have in our system, limited as they may be, and the commitments and talent we have behind it, we still feel confident.” Home for Good’s core strategy has been to realign existing public housing resources so that the neediest individuals and veterans are first in line to get supportive housing units. The so-called “housing first” paradigm, while not universally supported, has since taken deep root in the county. According to several Los Angeles-based homeless service experts, government agencies, philanthropic organizations and business interests are cooperating better than ever before. “There is an unprecedented level of collaboration and coordination occurring now between organizations and jurisdictions that I don’t think has ever been evident here in Los Angeles,” said LAHSA Executive Director Michael Arnold. That means more public funds have been spent on permanent supportive housing, which puts medical, social and other services inside apartment buildings so its tenants can get onsite treatment. It also means fewer available funds for other homeless services, like shelters and substance abuse programs that are not tied to housing, or transitional housing efforts. Now that homelessness appears to have increased despite the permanent supportive housing push, some are starting to question the shifting paradigm. “[Home for Good] told us that if they could get this thing going, and if they could get the resources, then we’re going to see the number go down,” said Orlando Ward, spokesman for the Volunteers of America, a homeless service provider. “We’ve built all this permanent supportive housing, but we have an increase in homelessness.” Under the Numbers The overall increase in homelessness, from 50,214 in 2011 to 58,423 people counted this year, was driven in large part by a spike in the population of the so-called “hidden homeless” — people sleeping in, say, a tent in their friend’s backyard or in an unconverted garage. While the demographic is seen by some as a crucial indicator of people being at-risk of ending up on the streets, others are skeptical of including the number in the regional count, in part because it has proven to be a very volatile number. This year, LAHSA-contracted statisticians from University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, who measure the hidden homeless through a telephone survey, found there to be 18,274 hidden homeless. That’s up from 10,800 in 2011. In 2007, there were 20,746. This year’s survey made about 28,000 phone calls, engaged about 3,000 households and identified 28 people experiencing hidden homelessness, Arnold said. The statisticians extrapolated that, in a county of some 10 million people, there are 18,274 hidden homeless. When considering only the people living on the streets or in emergency shelters, however, homelessness edged up only by 735 people. “That’s the count that makes the most sense,” said Ruth Schwartz, executive director of the nonprofit Shelter Partnership. “Given that we’re still in, for a lot people, a long recession and that there was a modest increase, I think basically we held our own. A lot of people got into housing but other people fell out of housing.” Indeed, perhaps the most daunting challenge between now and 2016 for Home for Good is that during that timeframe more than 21,000 veterans are projected to experience homelessness, and 19,836 non-veteran individuals and families are expected to experience chronic homelessness. A Home for Good study indicated that, in order to meet the future demand, the region needs to find 26,247 housing units. Some of those will have to be new units, but some could be found in the form of existing apartments that are not housing the neediest people. According to Arnold, only 25% of the region’s permanent supportive housing stock is actually occupied by people who were previously chronically homeless. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.


July 22, 2013

Downtown News 7

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8 Downtown News

July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Bill Chait 800 W 7th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90017 213.623.2288 | WokcanoRestaurant.com

Continued from page 1 interview in the former Campanile space in Hollywood, where he is working with chef Walter Manzke on another project. Chait isn’t just a Downtown player. In the past four years he has opened seven restaurants, each time partnering with a prominent chef. At Rivera he teamed with John Rivera Sedlar; it was the latter’s first restaurant in about 15 years. At Bestia he worked with Ori Menashe and his wife, pastry chef Genevieve Gergis. While most restaurant owners would be happy with one successful place in that timeframe, Chait’s hits keep on coming. Just one of his ventures, Playa, a Westside spot also with Sedlar, has closed. “I think he’s amazing and has had an incredible impact on our restaurant scene,” said Merrill Shindler, a contributing editor to the Zagat Los Angeles restaurant guide and the host of a weekly radio show on dining and restaurants on KABC 790 AM. “He’s very much behind the scenes. Most people wouldn’t know him.” While the chefs are involved in all aspects of each restaurant, from concept to design, Chait’s partners say he is clearly the nuts and bolts guy. He navigates projects through the city’s often-Byzantine permitting process. He’s on hand at dusty construction sites. He’s the one who gets the doors open. “Bill gets things done and he’s laser fo-

cused, very logical,” Sedlar said. “Yet he really understands that restaurants are a personal expression of the chefs. He supports the chef.” Started With Pizza Delivery Chait, a slim 52-year-old with dark hair falling over his forehead, attended the University of California at Berkeley, where he made a living by reselling concert tickets and putting on music shows. After school he entered the restaurant business, though his start was less than auspicious: He delivered pizzas for Jacopo’s Pizza in Beverly Hills at night. During the day he tried to establish a career as a venture capitalist, and he didn’t stay in the pizza business long. In 1985 he bought his first restaurant, Louise’s Italian Kitchen, in Brentwood. Along with partner Howard Weinberg, he began an expansion of the eatery that culminated with nearly 20 Louise’s in Southern California, Wisconsin, Washington D.C., and Maryland. In 1996, Entrepreneur magazine placed Chait and Weinberg on its list of “Young Millionaires.” Chait remains involved with Louise’s. Although long successful, Chait didn’t really resonate on the food world’s radar screen until 2009, when he teamed up with Sedlar. The chef had been a leader in the culinary fusion world of the 1980s and early ’90s, and was behind celebrated establishments such as St. Estephe, Bikini and Abiquiu. Then he stepped away from the game, and although he sometimes consulted, he didn’t run a restaurant for 15 years.

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(above) Chait at Bestia. The restaurant has been among the most praised Los Angeles eateries of the last year. (below) Rivera, his first Downtown Restaurant.

A Proposition 65 Public Notice The California Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act requires California businesses to advise employees and neighbors of any potential exposure to chemicals considered by the state to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm. Veolia Energy Los Angeles, Inc. wants you to know that detectable amounts of some of these substances may be found in and around its facility located at 715 W. Third St., Los Angeles, CA. Potential sources of these substances can include common products such as gasoline, oil, natural gas, paint.


Downtown News 9

Celebrating 40 Years photo by Gary Leonard

July 22, 2013

Bestia is one of the most difficult reservations in the city.

A few years ago Sedlar decided to return to the fold, yet rather than just serve meals, he wanted to explore the philosophy behind the food. He found an understanding collaborator — one who also knew how to get money for a project — in Chait. “Bill had a similar philosophy,” recalled Sedlar. “We like fresh. We like high quality experience. The first thing I did was say to Bill, ‘Let’s go eat in Spain and talk ideology and philosophy.’” For Chait, the partnership began a new direction in the restaurant business. “John is really the first chef that I partnered with that had a very specific vision, a concept,” he said. “It created what is now essentially the business model.” Rivera was a hit, and two years later they opened Playa on Beverly Boulevard. However, the restaurant closed in March. It was a learning experience. “We were in the wrong market niche in terms of how we were perceived,” Chait said. “In retrospect, we should have had John do more street food.” Though Playa failed, Chait’s business model worked perfectly at Bestia. Menashe first met Chait about five years ago when he cooked at the now closed Angelini Osteria on Third Street near San Vicente Boulevard. Their paths crossed again when Menashe did a stint at Test Kitchen, a showcase of chefs hosted at different restaurants. Menashe was trying to launch his own restaurant, and when plans with a business partner fell through, he reached out to Chait. They began looking at spaces in the Arts District. They considered the spot that now houses Little Bear across from Church & State. They ultimately settled on an off-thebeaten-track building at 2121 E. Seventh Place. They opened the 110-seat spot in November, spending $1.2 million on the project. The reviews were phenomenal. Chait, it seems, always had a clear game plan. “We went somewhere where there were better bones for the vision that Ori was doing,” Chait said. Bestia now feeds about 300 people a night during the week and 350 on weekends. It’s double what the partners had originally projected. A New Bird If things go according to plan, Chait will only get busier. By late fall, he and Fraser hope to open the approximately $2 million Redbird. They are partnering with property owners Tom Gilmore and Richard Weintraub to open the restaurant on the first floor of the old rectory adjacent to the cathedral. Again, the vision is clear and chef-focused. “It will be a very eclectic, contemporary American restaurant with great bars, great outdoor space,” Chait said. “Neal’s going to do a lot of grilling, the way people eat today, much lighter, flavorful.” Chait and Fraser are keeping details close to the vest, but he said the design for Redbird will be led by Fraser and his wife, Amy Knoll. He said the look will stay true to the historic nature of the building. Fraser said he expects to be “strapped to the stove” when the restaurant opens and that Knoll will oversee the daily operations. But while Chait joined the project long after it had been in the works, he is an essential part of getting the project off the ground. “He was the missing link,” Fraser said. “Restaurants are always crap shoots; there’s a lot of luck involved. But as far as the business side, that’s where he’s proven to have the most value. There’s an art to what he does.” There will be art of a different kind at Chait’s next project, which he said will coincide with The Broad museum’s 2014 opening. Chait would not reveal details, only teasingly hinting that it’s going to be “a big project.” Right now, Chait is focusing on Republique, the project with Manzke in the old Campanile. Redbird, meanwhile, is still in the permitting process. Downtown waits, hungrily. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.


10 Downtown News

July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Art Library Launched photos by Gary Leonard

photo by Richard Guzmán

Well-Known Artists Support Cutting-Edge Youth Program

(l to r) Dan McCleary pulls out one of the 5,000 books that make up the new Art Division Library; Students at Art Division’s new library. by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

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or years veteran Los Angeles artist Dan McCleary has been a mentor to young aspiring artists through his Art Division program, which teaches art to underserved youth. He’s also been an avid collector. His collection includes work from masters like Leonardo da Vinci and Pablo Picasso and it spans multiple genres, from sculpture and photography to painting and illustration. But what he’s collected isn’t hanging on the wall of some gallery or museum. Instead, it’s all neatly stacked on plain wooden shelves in a simple room less than a block from MacArthur Park. With the hope of inspiring future generations of artists, on July 28 McCleary is launching a new art library stocked with about 5,000 art books he’s collected through donations during the past decade. The 2-5 p.m. event includes a student photography exhibition.

The library is part of his Art Division nonprofit program, which he launched in 2010. “This is now the heart and soul (of Art Division),” he said on a recent weekday afternoon at the new library, which was already being used by about six of his 20 students. “Looking at the art books really does change people’s lives…I think we’ve become too reliant on the Internet. They can Google artists and see their work online, but it doesn’t compare to seeing it in books.” The veteran Los Angeles painter, whose work has been compared to Renaissance masters like Piero della Francesca, started Art Division while working as the director of art programs for Heart of Los Angeles, an after-school program in the LAPD’s Rampart Division that focuses on art, sports and academics. Once students graduated from high school, some who wanted to pursue art were left with few options, McCleary said. “There are very few services for young adults,” he said. “Once you hit 18 you’re on your own and I was finding that a

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lot of kids just ended up lost. So this provides them a path.” The program teaches free classes like figure drawing, printmaking, art history and photography to students 18 to 25 years old. Instructors include established artists like contemporary painter Eowyn Wilcox, photographer Andy Romanoff and even a former student, 27-year-old Javier Carrillo, who aged out of the program two years ago and now teaches printmaking. “For students like myself, after high school it can be hard to figure out a direction in life,” Carrillo said. “Art can be a ticket into that and you can use those skills for a lot of things.” The new library is a vital addition to the program that will help motivate new artists, Carrillo noted. “When I open a book it’s like finding a treasure,” he said. “Before I start any project I look through books and get inspired by seeing the work of other artists.” Art Division board members include other big names in the art world like Perri Guthrie, a fine art appraiser and the national chairperson for the International Society of Appraisers Fine Art Committee, and Paula Holt, adjunct professor at USC’s School of Performing Arts and a former commissioner of cultural affairs for the city. “(McCleary) has developed a program that is working for a small focus group of serious artists,” Holt said. “I cannot tell you what it’s like to see them grow. These kids are learning to live life as artists, to make it work for them, to make it pay.” The new library is a vital tool for their growth as artists, she said. “It’s our belief that if you are never exposed to that kind of beauty you’ll never develop that muscle,” she said. Holt said she doesn’t see the library growing in terms of physical space in the future, but she does see it growing in terms of programs that will be offered, with lectures, film screenings and discussion slated for the space. Out of the Pages As a young man, McCleary was inspired to pursue painting after reading books on artists like painter Albrecht Durer. “When I was 18 I was on Hollywood Boulevard and saw a Durer watercolor of a wing of a bird and it just changed my life,” he said. The collection of art books began after his mother passed away in 2004, when McCleary already had the idea to open an art library for young students. “I told my friends to not send flowers, to just give me art

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July 22, 2013

Downtown News 11

Celebrating 40 Years

The Central City Crime Report

A Rundown on Downtown Incidents, Trends and Criminal Oddities by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

I

n the Central City Crime Report, we survey the recent week in public safety. All information is provided by the LAPD’s Central Division.

photo courtesy of Art Division Library

Emmanuel Galvez, Dan McCleary and Javier Carrillo work on a mural at a middle school in the San Fernando Valley designed by Carrillo. McCleary started Art Division in 2010 to offer art classes to underserved youth.

checking out some of the art books. “It’s a great place to hangout, read books, get some references if you want to,” said Roberto Ortiz, 21, who focuses on acrylic painting and drawing. “Even just hanging out with the people who come hear helps get you inspired. You just want to paint and be creative.” Next to him was Alex Gonzales, 21, who focuses on illustration and surreal drawings. “When I see an image on a book it gives me ideas,” he said. As of a week before the opening, the library was still slated to be open just for the students, although McCleary said officials with the nonprofit will be discussing how it will serve the public in the future. “We want it also to serve this community, not just the students,” he said. Art Division Library is at 2418 W. Sixth St., (213) 385-1585 or artdivision.org. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.

T

books,” he said. Since then the donations have continued to pour in and books have come from donors that have included artists as well as organizations like the Peter Norton Family Foundation. The new single-room facility looks more like an independent bookstore than a library meant to inspire future artists. There is a table set up in the middle of the room where Art Division students can sit down to read the books. Stacked in three separate approximately 10-foot-tall shelves that cover three walls, the books are organized alphabetically by categories like individual artists and genres. There’s no library card needed since the books are meant to be read at the library. Students can also bring other work to the library or simply hang out. Some of the students sitting at the table a few days before the official opening were drawing in sketchbooks. Others were

Crazy Love: A woman victim has declined to press charges against her boyfriend after he allegedly struck her in the stomach while dancing inside the Club Mayan at 1038 S. Hill St., then dragged her outside the club. After the July 7 incident, the suspect drove the victim to her mother’s house and continued to hit her, police said. The victim, who sustained bruises, ultimately opted not to pursue charges because the suspect is “a good man and a good father.” Pricey Bud: The owner of a medical marijuana clinic claims that burglars took $30,000 worth of product. An alarm company alerted the owner of the shop at 215 E. Washington Blvd. that a break-in occurred at 1:50 a.m. on July 11. When authorities arrived, the suspects, who gained entry through a smashed window, were gone. According to police, the victim was unable to provide paper work that supported the $30,000 loss claim, and the surveillance system had been out-of-order at the time of the event.

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Even Purple Shirts Get Their Bikes Stolen: On July 7 at about 11:15 p.m., a Downtown Center Business Improvement District security officer left his BID-issued bike on the sidewalk outside the 7-11 at 508 W. Seventh St. When he returned, the Purple Shirt’s bike was gone. An unknown suspect who appeared to be about 25-years-old was seen pedaling away. The incident was one of six bike thefts reported last week, two of which had been unlocked and unattended. Ducati D’oh!: A resident of Bunker Hill Towers is now without his very nice motorcycle. On July 9, the victim parked his Ducati bike inside the residential parking facility and later returned to find it missing. There was no video surveillance available at the location, according to police. Handicap Placard Thief Nabbed: A homeless man suspected of stealing handicap parking placards from area vehicles was arrested last week. A witness observed Jimmy Sanford, 56, removing a placard from a vehicle parked in the Skid Row area and flagged down police, who arrested him. While Sanford denied involvement in other placard thefts, police believe he is responsible for 13 other similar incidents. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.com.

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12 Downtown News

Celebrating 40 Years

SIMPLY THE BEST A host of dignitaries joined all manner of Downtown denizens at the Hotel Figueroa’s poolside veranda bar on July 16 to fete the winners of the Los Angeles Downtown News’ 25th annual Best Of Downtown awards. The winners were selected by Downtown News readers. See a list of who won at downtownnews.com.

Photos by Gary Leonard

July 22, 2013


July 22, 2013

Downtown News 13

Celebrating 40 Years

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14 Downtown News

July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

A Not So Shy Building Boom Developer Barry Shy Poised to Double Residential Portfolio by Ryan VaillancouRt staff wRiteR

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istoric Core apartment king Barry Shy turned heads in 2010 when, in the lobby of his latest property, he commissioned a mural that depicts the Downtown skyline with African lions perched atop each of his buildings. If all goes according to Shy’s plans for the next few years, he’s going to have to call back his muralist to add four more lions. Shy, whose most recent project was the SB Tower that opened in 2010, is working on plans for four separate residential projects on which he expects to break ground within 12 months. He plans to build the four buildings — three would be ground-up projects; one is a proposed adaptive reuse conversion of an existing building — all at the same time. Rather than tackle the proposed developments one-byone, Shy said he’ll save money by building all four projects, which comprise 1,150 units, at once because he can use the same contractors. He estimates that it will take eight to 12 months to finalize plans and secure permits for each project. With about 1,200 units in his current Downtown portfolio, Shy is already among the largest landlords in the Central City. Specifically in the Historic Core, he owns more housing product than any other landlord, by a wide margin. One of his four planned projects, SB Omega, would be a 40-story, 500-unit tower on what is currently a parking lot on the southwest corner of Sixth and Main streets. The other three projects, however, are located a bit beyond Shy’s normal Historic Core stomping grounds. He bought a 12-story building at 939 S. Broadway, just south of the United Artists Theatre, which is being turned

into an Ace Hotel. Shy plans to convert the current garment-maker building into 150 apartments. Immediately to the south, Shy also bought the adjacent parking lot at Broadway and Olympic Boulevard. There, he plans to build 250 units in a new building that will rise to about 13 stories along Broadway and about 20 stories along Olympic Boulevard. Then, at 916 S. Hill St., which is currently a parking lot, Shy plans to build another 250 units in a 20- or 21-story tower. Shy said he paid $30 million collectively for the two Broadway properties and the Hill Street site. The big purchase, he said, was motivated by the need to defer tax liability on the gains from selling a senior living facility outside of Downtown (the federal tax code allows real estate investors to defer tax payments on capital gains if the profits are re-invested in another real estate asset). Gentler Lion The Israel-born Shy, 49, has been a controversial figure in Downtown, mostly because he has often found himself embroiled in legal battles related to his local business deals. He has tangled in court with tenants and former business partners and has earned a reputation for litigiousness. Moving forward, Shy said he’s become less inclined to settle disagreements in court. In years past Shy said he would fight tenants over claims large and small. He was motivated by principles more than money, he said, and whatever it took to win, he’d do it. Now? “It’s not worth the headache anymore,” he said. With a major workload on the horizon, Shy believes he’s on to Downtown’s next hottest mini-market — the area between the Historic Core and South Park. photo by Gary Leonard Measured by recent investment, the general area bound Controversial developer Barry Shy is eyeing plans for four new Downtown by Olympic Boulevard and Eighth Street, from Broadway to apartment buildings, two of which are at Broadway and Olympic see Shy, page 24 Boulevard. He plans to build them all at once.

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Downtown News 15

Celebrating 40 Years

photos by Brian Forest

July 22, 2013

CALENDAR The Art of Architecture MOCA Exhibit Looks at the Field, the Process and Its Impact on the City

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JULY 8 rchitecture is more than the buildings that stand on

by RichaRd Guzmán city editoR

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a street corner, or weave like a sailing ship, or stretch high in the air. Yes it is all of those things, but it is also scribbled sketches on hotel notepaper, more refined drawings s models of buildwnNew done with or without a computer, even owntoand k.com/L.A.D o o b ce Fa ings that may never materialize. This is some of what MOCA takes on in A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture From Southern Like Downtown News on Facebook California. The exhibit that explores the process of architec& Be Entered to Win Movie Tickets! ture and its impact on Los Angeles opened last month at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. It continues at the Little Tokyo museum through Sept. 16. New Sculpturalism features the work of 38 Los Angeles architects of the past 25 years. Several of those featured have standout projects in Downtown, among them industry legend Frank Gehry, whose Walt Disney Concert Hall has become perhaps the most photographed structure in the city, and Thom Mayne, whose Morphosis Architecture designed the Caltrans building at First and Main streets. Also featured is Michael Maltzan, a Silver Lake-based architect who has taken on many projects in thenNarea, from m the massive, underco ntow ews. E-NEWS at DowFe n up Santa construction One in the Arts District to several strikSIGN UP Sig ing housing complexes for formerly homeless individuals. The exhibit features models of structures, drawings, artSign Up for Our E-News Blasts & work, photos and video. All are intended to show different Be Entered to Win Movie Tickets! elements of the architectural process. Like a miniature city, the models are placed on raised platforms throughout the space. Dotted lines run between the groups, which are separated into categories such as residential, commercial, civic, cultural and more. Above the models are curved screens where video of the ar-

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(Clockwise from top) A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture From Southern California includes the work of 38 Los Angeles architects of the past 25 years. The exhibit features models, drawings and video; The “Textile Room” is an installation designed by architects Marcelo Spina and Georgina Huljich. It stands16 feet high and is wrapped in carbon fiber tape; Frank Gehry’s proposal for a Chinese museum is part of MOCA’s exploration of architecture.

Check Our Website for Full Movie Listings LADowntownNews.com chitects speaking and their completed buildings are projected. “The more important thing to me is to get architecture in the Eric Owen Moss, a prominent architect and director of the eye of the public and let them see that there’s a huge body of inSouthern California Institute of Architecture, said the exhibi- ventive work being produced in Los Angeles,” Wiscombe said. tion is intended to make the form more easily understood by Next to his pavilion is the vibrant “Textile Room” by the layman. Huljich Now Playing/Starts Julyand 12 Spina. Also standing 16 feet high, it is wrapped “I think the objective is to make architecture a public in carbon fiber tape. Subtle digital lighting emanates from the discourse,” he said, “to show the public who may not know interior, amplifying the color. what’s possible in architecture, what’s of interest in architecThe real color in the pavilion section comes from ture, what’s new in architecture and why we should pay at- Manferdini’s tilted cube. It resembles a splattered painter’s tention to this subject.” pallet that was somehow bent out of shape in an explosion of In addition to the big names, or “starchitects” as they are bright yellows, oranges and reds. sometimes called, the exhibit strives to predict which archiWhen it comes to the rest of the show, one standout is the tects will come to influence the city through their work. Up work by Maltzan. The designs on display include his One and coming architects including Elena Manferdini, Marcelo Santa Fe, a $164 million mixed-use project rising in the Arts Check OurHuljich Website Moviewere Listings LADowntownNews.com Spina, Georgina andfor TomFull Wiscombe commisDistrict across from SCI-Arc. sioned to design and build “pavilions,” geometric structures Another section depicts Moss’ design process for the Lawson that visitors can walk through. They are intended to show the Westen House, built in 1993 in Brentwood. The contemporary inventiveness of architecture. geometric home is made of steel, concrete, wood and glass, but “I think the range of possibilities is particularly interesting,” its beginnings were humble: The display shows a few sketches Moss said. “There are a lot of different points of view, a lot of on a wall that were made on notebook paper from a Wyndham different generations.” Hotel in Texas. Next to that are more refined drawings. A threeA Model Process dimensional model serves as the centerpiece of the section. Playing/Starts 19 to positioning architecture as art, Mayne hopes One space in the exhibit is dedicated to Gehry. ItNow is signifiIn July addition cant, in that Gehry in recent months reportedly nearly pulled the exhibit helps people understand the scope of the field. out of the show, putting the entire exhibit at risk. “Architecture as a discipline is probably one of the broadest The Gehry room is filled with the various designs for his reaching interdisciplinary activities there is,” he said. “It deals proposal for a Chinese museum. It shows galleries, class- with the city, infrastructure, landscape, obviously the envirooms and an auditorium inside the museum. The rectangu- ronment and ecological issues. The working models and the lar exterior utilizes a translucent, stone-like material. drawings give people an idea of the conception of it.” The main exhibit begins with pavilions designed by the A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture From Check Ourarchitects. WebsiteWiscombe’s for Full Movie LADowntownNews.com next-generation 16-footListings tall “SurfaceSouthern California runs through Sept. 16 at The Geffen to-Volume” structure, which is meant to look at fiberglass as Contemporary at MOCA, 152 N. Central Ave., (213) 626-6222 rubbery skin, is the first up. or moca.org.

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Clicking Back to the Future Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning Writer Bruce Norris’ New Play A Parallelogram Looks at Time Travel and Fate by Richard Guzmán city editor

S

ay your future self paid you a visit and warned of some not-so-great things that were going to happen to you and the world in the not-so-distant future. And no matter what the present you did, there would be no way to change any of it. That’s the scenario that Pulitzer Prize and Tony Awardwinning writer Bruce Norris explores in his new play A Parallelogram, which opens at the Mark Taper Forum on July

July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

21 and runs through Aug. 18. The dark comedy is the follow-up to Norris’ Clybourne Park, which was presented at the Taper last year and won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, the 2012 Tony Award for Best Play and the 2010 Olivier and Evening Standard Awards for Best Play in London. A Parallelogram tells the story of Bee, a woman who believes she is being visited by her future self. The future Bee, who is apparently using a remote control as a time travel device, reveals some details about the present Bee’s future, as

photo by Craig Schwartz

16 Downtown News

Playwright Bruce Norris during rehearsals for “A Parallelogram,” at the Mark Taper Forum. The dark comedy by the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Awardwinning writer opens July 21.

well as some dark times ahead for the world. Norris spoke to Los Angeles Downtown News about following up his award-winning play with a story that ponders some heavy existential questions about fate and destiny. Downtown News: This new play is a follow-up to Clybourne Park, which earned you a Pulitzer and Tony award. Did that add any pressure or stress when writing Parallelogram? Bruce Norris: No not at all. They were actually written at the same time. I was doing an experiment with myself. The first script for this was completed at the same time as Clybourne Park. Q: So what inspired this story? Are you a big science fiction fan? A: Well no actually. The science fiction element is about wish fulfillment and about what people wish was possible. I tend to write plays that are about, you know, about folly, about things that people think about themselves that turn out to be possibly not true. Q: If you knew how your life was going to turn out in the future and there was no way you could change it, would you still try? A: Well, first of all you can’t know. But I’m kind of empirical that way. I think that’s not a possibility. But if you could my feeling is that a lot of larger dimensions of your life are kind of fixed. And those things are fixed by things that are beyond your control; Your age, your health, the culture in which you were born. It’s a fairly pessimistic way of looking at things but there are minor aspects of your life you can fix. You can change your opinions but people don’t generally change their behaviors that much. Q: In the play, Bee’s future self travels back in time to tell her younger self that there’s nothing she can do to change her future. Why bother coming back at all just to reveal that? A: As the play goes on you start to question whether or not this person perhaps exists at all. But I think from her point of view she believes that if she knew that not very nice things were going to happen, then at least you wouldn’t be so surprised or miserable when they did. Q: So Bee may be imagining her future self. But what do you think is better — to know you can’t change your future, or to realize that you’re bat crazy but anything can happen in the future? A: Well the question is, what would make you less happy? Would it make you unhappy to know you weren’t going to become rich? Or would it actually make you happier to continue your life thinking you were going to win the lottery? Q: What are you hoping the audience gets out of this play? A: Ideally, whenever I write a play I hope to bring the audience to a point of greater ambivalence, so that you don’t know where to stand. I guess what I don’t like is certainty, when people feel like they know everything. That always just rubs be the wrong way so I like to increase doubt. Q: If your future self came back to say something to your 21-year-old self, what would he tell you never, ever to do in the future? A: He would tell me to exercise a lot more for one thing. And he would say not to expect to make a lot of money writing plays. Q: I know you said you’re not a science fiction fan, but I still want to know. Which one of these movies is the best time travel movie: Back to the Future, The Butterfly Effect or Hot Tub Time Machine? A: I’ve only seen one, Back to the Future. But that would be the one that I’m kind of riffing on because in that movie they believe they can change everything and mine posits the idea that you probably can’t. The Mark Taper Forum is at 135 N. Grand Ave. Tickets at (213) 628-2772 or centertheatregroup.org. Contact Richard Guzmán at richard@downtownnews.com.


July 22, 2013

Downtown News 17

Celebrating 40 Years

The

EVENTS SPONSORED LISTINGS Friday Night Flicks Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., (213) 8474970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. July 26, 8:30 p.m.: Swingers — This is a story about Mike, a guy who left his girl in New York when he came to L.A. to be a star. It’s been six months since his girlfriend left him and he’s not doing so good. So, his pal and some other friends try and get him back in the social scene and forget about his six-year relationship. Their social outings take them to Las Vegas, Los Feliz and other Hollywood hip clubs that were booming in the mid 1990s. Learn About Wine Space15-Twenty, 1520 N. Cahuenga Blvd., learnaboutwine.com. July 24: Taste more than 30 wines and get a sense for “old world vs. new world” varieties. There will be Marsatta Chocolate samples and an all-you-can-eat cheese table, plus music from a KCRW DJ. Tickets are $30-$50. Use discount code LADN at learnaboutwine.com.

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ou can dance if you want to, you can leave your friends behind. Or you can ignore the Men Without Hats song “Safety Dance” and take part in National Dance Day. Founded in 2010 by “So You Think You Can Dance” co-creator Nigel Lythgoe, the 2013 installment takes place at Grand Park. There will be an assortment of performances and instructional dance shenanigans, and Lythgoe will be there in person alongside “So You Think” host Adam Shankman. The free event is open to all ages and skill levels, though you’ll need some moves to participate in the “Hip-Hop Master Class” routine. It runs from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., so hydrate and get a good stretch in. At 200 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-7211 or musiccenter.org.

Friday, July 26 Dance Downtown Music Center, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-0777 or musiccenter.org. 6:30 p.m.: Complimentary lessons and a wellversed DJ highlight the cumbia, a dance cherished by experts and lusted after by, well, everyone who can’t dance it. Incidentally both groups are welcome to come enjoy the festivities, but priority goes to the first to arrive. Oba!

ROCK, POP & JAZZ Blue Whale 123 Astronaut E. S. Onizuka St., (213) 620-0908 or bluewhalemusic.com. All shows at 8 p.m. July 23: Wes Smith. July 24: Jessica Vautor Group. July 25: Gee Gee Gallegos Ninet. July 26: Josh Nelson and Sara Gazarek. July 27: Josh Nelson Quartet with Larry Koonse,

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ater has always been part of the Los Angeles conversation. Just watch Chinatown for the 17th time. On Tuesday, July 23, the Aloud series at the Central Library picks up the topic again, with a discussion of William Mulholland’s St. Francis Dam and the catastrophic 1928 collapse that claimed the lives of 385 people. Leading the diluvian dialogue will be historian and frequent Aloud guest Dr. William Deverell, head of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West. He knows his stuff and so do his distinguished guests, who include Patt Morrison. The talk starts at 7:15 p.m. at 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7500 or lfla.org.

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re fleas a good thing? No! How about flea markets? Yes! Experience the latter on Sunday, July 28, with the inaugural installment of Downtown Flea. If you need to justify the $5 admission charge for this multi-parking lot affair from Phillip Dane, just remind yourself that you’d probably pay more to use that same parking lot on an average day, and this way you get to see some great local craftsman and perhaps a few hoarders plying their trade. Downtown Flea is scheduled to be a monthly occurrence. If you can’t make it this week, mark your calendar for the fourth Sunday in August. At 246 S. Main St., (866) 966-9495 or dtflea.com.

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photo by David McNew

saTurday, July 27 National Dance Day Grand Park, 200 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-8080 or grandparkla.org. 10 a.m.: The Dizzy Feet Foundation hosts a day of choreography and movement. sunday, July 28 Downtown Flea 246 S. Spring St., (866) 966-9495 or dtflea.com. 10 a.m.: Four parking lots of local crafts and general knick knackery mark the inaugural run of Downtown’s first monthly flea market. Sunday Sessions Grand Park, 200 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-8080 or grandparkla.org. 2-8 p.m.: Do you like lounging in parks with neighbors? Do you like food trucks? Perhaps you enjoy the pulsing sounds of deep house music? If you like any combination of the three, don’t miss the third installment of the free electronic music event at Grand Park that is Sunday Sessions.

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by Dan Johnson, listings eDitor calendar@downtownnews.com

photo courtesy the Music Center

Everyone Dances, Mall Shakespeare and a New Downtown Flea Market

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Thursday, July 25 Off the Shelf: Creating L.A.’s 21st Century Library Grand Performances, 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 687-2159 or grandperformances.org. 8 p.m.: Library mania is going around. Catch the bug with a discussion between City Librarian John Szabo and Library Foundation President Ken Brecher on bringing the hall of books into the Internet age.

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photo courtesy LAPL Photo Collection

Tuesday, July 23 Catastrophe in California at ALOUD Mark Taper Auditorium, 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7500 or lfla.org. 7:15 p.m.: Historian Bill Deverell leads a discussion on the lasting impact of the 1928 St. Francis Dam failure and its fatal deluge. Tre Miller Rodriguez at ALOUD Last Bookstore, 453 S. Spring St., (213) 488-0599 or lastbookstorela.com. 7:30 p.m.: The New York-based author will be discussing her latest work, Splitting the Difference: A Heart Shaped Memoir, a meditation on giving a child away and losing a husband.

‘Don’T Miss’

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ou’re familiar with the story: Sweet and innocent Drew Barrymore and her family take in a strange alien with odd eating habits. We’re not talking about a biopic on the actress’ marriage to comedian Tom Green. Instead, it’s E.T., one of alienobsessive director Steven Spielberg’s most loved films. The Electric Dusk Drive-In will screen the film on Saturday, July 27, down at the old City Market produce facility. Advance tickets are sold out, so if you hope to see a boy and his blanketed alien flying above pines on an old bicycle, you best arrive 90 minutes early for some “day-of” car passes and Astroturf seating tickets. Showtime is 8:30 p.m. at 100 San Julian St. or electricduskdrivein.com.

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n Saturday, July 27, from 2-4 p.m., FIGat7th hosts some inner city iambic pentameter that will make you want to holler. William Shakespeare’s romantic misadventure Twelfth Night hits the shopping center stage courtesy of property owner Brookfield Properties. The play’s the thing and it’s being mounted by the Inner City Shakespeare Program, which has been recruiting students to perform classic works since 2005. The kidoriented performance comes complete with a costume crafting session in which children 3 and up are invited to don their own Shakespearean garb and imitate the bold players. In the end, “All the world’s a stage.” Even the food court. At 735 S. Figueroa St., (213) 955-7150 or figat7th.com. Send information and possible Don’t Miss List submissions to calendar@downtownnews.com.


18 Downtown News

Continued from previous page

New Original Works Festival photo by Angela Jimenez

Dave Robaire and Dan Schnelle. July 28: Ethio-Cali Ensemble. Bootleg Bar 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.org. July 22, 7:30 p.m.: Indie folk residents Miner will be performing their alternative set for yet another Every summer Downtown’s week. most experimental stage July 23, 7 p.m.: Madi Diaz, we appreciate your pushes the boundaries even youthful enthusiasm, precocious musings on love further with the New Original and accessible pop sound but we hope you unWorks festival. The event highderstand that we’re all still a little gun shy after the lights the creativity of up-andrecent MattyB travesty. coming performers and also July 24, 8 p.m.: Baby Alpaca’s press materials esveterans who want to experipouse a difficulty in defining the nebulous band’s ment. REDCAT’s three-week musical style. May we have a go? 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July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

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July 22, 2013 Nickelback, you’ll love the delicious nuance of Las Cafeteras and Chico Trujillo. Ham and Eggs 433 W. 8th St. or hamandeggstavern.com. July 22, 9 p.m.: Abelton Connect. July 26, 9 p.m.: Metro City Rhythm. July 27, 9 p.m.: Hungry Beat! Nokia Theater 777 Chick Hearn Court, (213) 763-6020 or nokiatheatrelalive.com. July 23, 7:30 p.m.: Paradoxically the “American Idol Live 2013” tour isn’t a travelling exhibit on currency. July 27, 8 p.m.: Carlos Vives. Nola’s 734 E. 3rd St., (213) 680-3003 or nolasla.com. July 22, 7:30 p.m.: Cornelius Herring on piano. July 23, 8 p.m.: Down Home blues jam session. July 26, 7:30 p.m.: South LA Blues All Stars. One-Eyed Gypsy 901 E. 1st St., (626) 340-3529 or one-eyedgypsy.com. All shows at 10 p.m. July 24: RT N the 44s. July 26: Will Magid. July 27: AK and the 47s. Redwood Bar and Grill 316 W. 2nd St., (213) 652-4444 or theredwoodbar.com. All Shows at 8 p.m. July 22: Francis Du Monde’s Rock ‘n Roll Circus with the Sleeping Car and Danger Friends USA. July 23: Michael Van London, the Lost Years and Clutch the Pearls. July 24: Burly Temple. July 25: The Dave Gleason Trio. July 26: Fartbarf, Feral Kizzy, Bombon and Bearwulf. July 27: The Objex, Black Mambas, the Freakouts and Modern Kicks. July 28, 3 p.m.: Garretson & Gorodetsky, Swords of Fatima and Labor Camp with Kurt Schellenbach. Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St., (213) 614-0737 or sevengrand.la. All shows at 10 p.m. July 22: New York’s own Sidewinders slap a little east coast jazz on us Downtowners. July 23: Not to be upstaged, the Makers will be holding it down for California as they improvise jazz and treat patrons to a classy taste of consummate professionalism. July 24: Soul singers Tara Priya has gone and declared herself a member of the anti-auto-tune camp.

Celebrating 40 Years Support your fellow human beings. The Smell 247 S. Main St., alley between Spring and Main streets, thesmell.org. All Shows at 8 p.m. July 24: Mr. Elevator & The Brain Hotel. July 26: Kat Kong, Batwings Catwings, Gnarbaby and Stab City. July 27: Lucky Dragons, Cat 500, And Martin, Mikki and the Mauses, Protectme and Sissy Cobb. Staples Center 1111 S. Figueroa St., (213) 742-7326 or staplescenter.com. July 27-28, 8 p.m.: The appearance of edginess with an ever-so-soft center, Bruno Mars is pop R&B’s answer to a hot stick of butter.

FILM Downtown Independent 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or downtownindependent.com. July 22, 5 and 9 p.m., July 23, 7 p.m., July 24, 3 and 7 p.m., July 25, 6 and 10 p.m.: Set in Brooklyn on the eve of President Obama’s history-making election, three former members of a once promising hip-hop crew cross paths once again to discover that some things never change in Big Words. July 22, 3 and 7 p.m., July 23, 5 p.m., July 24, 5 and 11 p.m. and July 25, 10 p.m.: Directed by Jon Wrights, GRABBERS tells the story of Ciaran O’Shea, a charming but heavy-drinking local Garda who is tasked with greeting Lisa Nolan, a straightlaced young officer who has just arrived to a small fishing village off the west coast of Ireland. July 26, 9 p.m.: On the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Revolution, Kordavision tells the story of Cuban photographer Alberto “Korda” Diaz and the iconic photographs he took. This screening features a Q&A with director Hector Cruz Sandoval. Eat See Hear Los Angeles Trade Tech College, 400 West Washington Blvd. or eatseehear.com. July 27, 5:30 p.m.: Musical acts The Cerny Brothers and Miracle Parade open up a night of food trucks and confused adolescent observations on mid 70s rock and roll via the semi-autobiographical Cameron Crowe classic Almost Famous. IMAX California Science Center, 700 State Drive, (213) 744-2019 or californiasciencecenter.org.

Explore the remnants and wisdom of an ancient empire in Mysteries of Egypt. Ice and polar bear enthusiasts will likely dig To the Arctic 3D. Experience the gripping story full of hope, crushing disappointment and triumph in Hubble 3D. Pershing Square 532 S. Olive ST., (213) 485-1645 or laparks.org/pershingsquare. July 26, 8:30 p.m.: Los Angeles is still strewn with the cultural wreckage of bright-eyed actors who think Swingers accurately represents the current paradigm of the entertainment industry. Kudos to Vince Vaughn and Jon Favreau for their lasting campaign of disinformation. REDCAT 631 W. 2nd St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org. July 25-27, 8:30 p.m.: Week one of the New Original Works Fest features 4TRAINS by Christine Marie & Ensemble, Molly Maps Erratic by Mecca Vazie Andrews and Depth of Surface by Samantha Goodman. Regal Cinemas 1000 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 763-6070 or lalive.com/movies. Through July 25: The Conjuring (11:20 a.m., 1, 2:10, 4, 5, 7:10, 8 and 10:10 p.m.); R.I.P.D. (11:30 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:30 and 10:20 p.m.); R.I.P.D. 3D (12:40 and 6:50 p.m.); Red 2 (1:20, 3:40, 4:30, 7:40, 9:40 and 10:40 p.m.); Turbo (11:20 a.m., 12, 1:50, 2:30, 5:10 and 7:20 p.m.); Fruitvale Station (11:40 a.m., 12:30, 2, 2:50, 4:20, 5:10, 6:50, 7:30, 9:10 and 9:50 p.m.); Grown Ups 2 (1;30, 4:20, 7 and 9:40 p.m.); Pacific Rim (3:40 and 10:30 p.m.); Pacific Rim 3D (12:20 and 7 p.m.); Despicable Me 2 (11:30 a.m., 1:50, 4:10 and 6:40 p.m.); Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain (12:50 and 3:10 p.m.); The Heat (7:50 and 10:50 p.m.); World War Z (12:30, 3:30, 6:30 and 9:30 p.m.).

THEATER, OPERA & DANCE A Parallelogram Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or centertheatregroup.org. July 24-27, 8 p.m. and July 28, 1 and 6:30 p.m.: Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning playwright Bruce Norris presents this story of geometric wonder as a suburban life faces the demands of chaos and entropy. And oh yeah, there’s some time travel too. Through August 18.

Downtown News 19 Bob Baker’s Something To Crow About The Bob Baker Marionette Theater, 1345 W. First St., (213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com. July 23-24, 10:30 a.m. and July 27-28, 2:30 p.m.: Come join Mama and Papa Goat and 100 more of the world famous Bob Baker Marionettes for a musical “Day on the Farm” you will never forget. Call for a reservation.

BARS & CLUBS The Association 610 S. Main St., (213) 627-7385. Carved out of the area that used to belong to Cole’s, the bar in front, the Association is a dimly-lit, swank little alcove with some serious mixologists behind the bar. Look for a heavy door, a brass knocker and a long line. Barbara’s at the Brewery 620 Moulton Ave., No. 110, (323) 221-9204 or bwestcatering.com. On the grounds of the Brewery, this bar and restaurant in an unfinished warehouse is where local residents find their artistic sustenance. Fifteen craft beers on tap, wine list and full bar. Bar 107 107 W. Fourth St., (213) 625-7382 or myspace.com/bar107. Inside the keyhole-shaped door, tough-as-nails Derby Dolls vie for elbowroom with crusty old bar guys and a steady stream of Old Bank District inhabitants. Velvet señoritas, deer heads with sunglasses, a wooden Indian and Schlitz paraphernalia plaster the red walls. There’s no shortage of entertainment, with the funky dance room, great DJs and the occasional rock band. In the photo booth, you can capture your mug in old-fashioned black and white. Open from 3 p.m. to 2 a.m. seven days a week. Big Wang’s 801 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2449 or bigwangs.com. Wings, beer and sports: That’s the winning recipe at this sports bar. The Downtown outpost, the third for the Hollywood-based bar, has everything the other locations have, plus a comfortable patio with outdoor flat screens. Bonaventure Brewing Company 404 S. Figueroa St., (213) 236-0802 or bonaventurebrewing.com. Where can you get a drink, order some decent bar food, sit outdoors and still feel like you’re

Continued on next page


20 Downtown News

July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Move Those Hips photo courtesy Music Center

Continued from previous page Downtown? It’s a tall order to fill, but this bar in the Bonaventure Hotel does it admirably. Come by for a taster set of award-winning ales crafted by Head Brewer David Blackwell. Sure, the hotel is vaguely ’80s, and you’ll probably encounter some convention goers tying a few on, but it only adds to the fun. Bottlerock 1150 S. Flower St., (213) 747-1100 or bottlerock.net. Situated on the ground floor of the Met Lofts in South Park, this wine bar features a vast range of bottles from around the world and a price range equally as wide. Wines by the glass start at around $8, but if you’re feeling overcome by oenophilia (or just deep-pocketed) there are some first growth Bordeauxs for more than $1,000 for the bottle. And if you don’t get your fill while at the bar, which also features a rotating crop of artisanal beers and a full dinner menu, the bar also sells bottles at retail. Broadway Bar 830 S. Broadway, (213) 614-9909 or broadwaybar.la. Located next to the Orpheum Theatre in the Platt Building, the Broadway Bar’s blue neon sign beckons patrons inside to its 50-foot circular bar. The casualchic spot is based on Jack Dempsey’s New York bar, with low lighting and a dose of ’40s glam. There’s a

Cumbia is a South American dance style often mistaken for salsa. While the two pelvisintensive dances are related, they’re actually quite different. On July 26 at 6:30 p.m., the Music Center plans to school you on what separates the two, and how to really dance the cumbia. The event is an installment in the free Dance Downtown series, which includes a lesson and is open to beginners. At 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-0777 or musiccenter.org.

THE ANSWER TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

patio upstairs with nice views, and a jukebox. Caña 714 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 745-7090 or canarumbar.com. In the Caribbean, “caña” is slang for sugarcane. Rum is made from sugarcane. Therefore, Caña serves premium handcrafted rum cocktails in an intimate, elegant environment featuring live Caribbean and tropical Latin music.

Casey’s Irish Pub 613 S. Grand Ave., (213) 629-2353 or bigcaseys.com. With its worn brick staircase, tin ceilings and dark wood decor, it’s easy to see how this neighborhood bar and grill still works its Irish charm. Regulars cozy up to the 60-foot mahogany bar with a pint of Guinness and a plate of bangers and mash. Casey’s has a full menu with six beers on tap and a selection of Belgian ales and microbrews.

Cole’s 118 E. Sixth St., colesfrenchdip.com. This beloved restaurant saloon has been renovated under new ownership. The great leather booths and dark wood bar of the old spot remain, but now the glasses are clean. Draft beer, historic cocktails, including what is probably the best Old Fashioned in town, and a short wine list. And oh yeah, some serious French dip sammies.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


July 22, 2013

Downtown News 21

Celebrating 40 Years

Continued from previous page Corkbar 403 W. 12th St., corkbar.com. If the name didn’t give it away, this South Park establishment is all about the wine, specifically, California wine. Situated on the ground floor of the Evo condominium building, Corkbar serves up a seasonal food menu of farmer’s market-driven creations to go with your Golden State pinots, cabernets and syrahs. Down and Out 501 S. Spring St., (213) 489-7800 or twitter.com/ thedownandout. This latest offering from the same folks that brought you Bar 107. The 3,000-square-foot space on the ground floor of the Alexandria Hotel features mug shots of celebrities including Frank Sinatra, Hugh Grant, Steve McQueen and Andy Dick. The owners describe it as a sports bar for local residents who don’t want to mingle with tourists. Dublin’s 815 W. Seventh St. or (213) 489-6628.

The absurdly large collection of draft beers all for three dollars has kept this place alive and well. A plethora of TVs, quick service, cheap beer and good bar food make this place a favorite for after work drinks and sports spectatorship alike. Edison 108 W. Second St., (213) 613-0000 or edisondowntown.com. Downtown history has come full circle in this former power plant turned stunning cocktail bar. The Edison is perhaps Downtown’s hottest hotspot and draws an eclectic crowd, including jaded Hollywood types who can’t help but gawk at the preserved bits of machinery, the huge generator and the coal box that now houses the jukebox. Escondite 410 Boyd St., (213) 626-1800 or theescondite.com. This beer and burger-centric joint is tucked in an odd strip mall near Skid Row. No wonder its name means “The Hideout” in Spanish. There are nine craft beers on tap, plus 15 bottle varieties and a 56seat patio that welcomes your furry pals (dogs, that

is). The Escondite also pairs its food and drink with regular live music. What a find. Far Bar 347 E. First St., (behind the Chop Suey Café), (213) 617-9990 or chopsueycafeandlounge.com. Tucked behind the Chop Suey Café is the Far Bar, where intimacy and a sense of noir L.A. collide. If you can find the place, which you enter through the back of the café or via a skinny alley a few doors down, you can throw them back in the same spot author Raymond Chandler is rumored to have done the same. Figueroa Hotel 939 S. Figueroa St., (213) 627-8971 or figueroahotel.com. The Moroccan-inspired Figueroa Hotel just a block north of Staples Center manages the unique feat of making you feel like you’re in the heart of the city and removed from it at the same time. The light-filled Veranda Bar is just steps from the clear, glittery pool, and it’s common to see suit-clad Downtowners a few feet from swimsuit-wearing Euro-tourists.

MORE LISTINGS Hundreds of listings of fun and interesting things to do in Downtown Los Angeles can also be found online at ladowntownnews.com/calendar: Rock, Pop & Jazz; Bars & Clubs; Farmers Markets; Events; Film; Sports; Art Spaces; Theater, Dance and Opera; Classical Music; Museums; and Tours.

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July 22, 2013

Downtown News 23

Celebrating 40 Years

CLASSIFIED

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2005 NISSAN ARMADA SE 5.6L V8, Silver/Blk, Leather, Only 323-532-0121 1446, WestsideRentals.com. The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles 38K Miles. NI4111 / 5N706134 www.almalam.com and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Only...$15,999 call 888-838HISTORIC ARTS District BacheAngeles. 5089 www.downtownnissan. lor, $595/Month Walk to The Pie com Hole, and Wurstkuche 310-576One copy per person. 1446, WestsideRentals.com. 2008 PORSCHE CAYENNE GTS Certified, Sand White/Black, SENIOR APARTMENTS 62 + furniture 4.8L V8, Low Miles ZP1556 / Studio $873 1 Bedroom $929. 8LA73049 ONLY....$50,898. Call 2 bdrm. $1112. Balcony, Full FURNITURE SHOWROOM 888-685-5426 www.porschedoKitchen, A/C, Clubhouse, BBQ, MOVING SALE! Entire 6500 sq. wntownla.com Resource room, Laundry, SEC ft. upscale furniture showroom 8 O.K. Visit GSL SAN LUCAS. near Arts District 40-60% off. 2008 VW JETTA PASSAT 2.5S com 213-623-2010. Please call ahead. 323-266Certified, 5cyl PZEV., Gray/Blk, 6421 Only 10,115 miles ZV1959 / CondoMiniuMs/unfurnisHed CC059045 Only...$18,980 Call 888-781-8102 www.vwdownbusiness LA SKYPAD Stunning Views townla.com 2br/2ba 28th Floor Bunker Hill BUSINESS FOR Sale. Cake Tower luxury condo. Many Up2009 AUDI A5 2.0T QUATTRO Decorating and Supplies bougrades. Utilities included. ParkCertified, Turbo, Gray/Black, tique, ten minutes East from ing, Concierge, Gym, Pool, TenAWD, 35K Miles A13424D-1 / downtown, owner retiring. nis, Market onsite. Unfurnished AA065553 ONLY....$32,995 Call Unicorn Decorations (323)269$2,950/mo. Furnished $3,450/ 888-583-0981 www.audidtla. 4410. mo. (409) 771-9540 com

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use in this state of a fictitious phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 2009 CHEVY MALIBU HYBRID 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 Art dirEctor: Brian Allison business name in violation of the 4DR. Gray/Gray, Great Mileage, web: DowntownNews.com of the Penal Code and provirights of another under federal, AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa AC, Loaded F13074-1/ F131890 sions of the Civil Code. email: realpeople@downtownnews.com state, or common law (see SecCleaning ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins ONLY....$13,995ProductioN Call 888-304The undersigned will sell on tion 14411 et. seq. Business and 7039 www.felixchevrolet.com the 6th day of August 2013 at Professions Code). CONCEPTO’S CLEANING facebook: PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard 11: 00 A.M. on the premises Pub. 7/22, 7/29, 8/5, 8/12/2013 Crew. Professional, experiL.A. Downtown News 2009 MERCEDES CLK350 where said property has been enced, cleans apartments, AccouNtiNG: Tara LaPlante AMG Certified, White Stone, stored and which are located homes, offices and restaurants. Fictitious Business name 3.5L, low miles 5940C / F270087 twitter:at Thriftee Storage Company Call for a quote. 323-459-3067 statement dirEctor: Steve Nakutin ONLY....$25,991AdvErtisiNG Call 888-319LLC, 1717 N. Glendale Blvd. or 818-409-9183. File no. 2013142323 DowntownNews clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway 8762. www.mbzla.com in the city of Los Angeles, The following person is doing County of Los Angeles, State AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Yoji Cole, Josie Damian, business as: (1)ORTHOPAEHealtH of California, the following: 2011 NISSAN Catherine SENTRA Holloway 2.0S The Los Angeles News is the must-read DIC FOUNDATION, 2400 Downtown S. Name of owner: SEDAN Certified, Red Brick sAlEs AssistANt: Claudia Hernandez newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is disFlower St., Los Angeles, CA KUR SPA Happy Hour from 2 to Mike Sukiasyan Pearl/Silver, 30mpg, CU0827R every regisMonday throughout the offices and 90007-2697, tributed are hereby 7pm, Monday to Friday: Any full Space number: S-20 / L651168 ONLY....$11,995 callJessica Tarr circulAtioN: residencesregistrant: of Downtown Los Angeles. tered by the following body massage or facial $40 (55 Description of goods: 888-845-2267 distributioN www.carsonnis-MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles LOS ANGELES ORTHOPAEmnts) Manicure and Pedicure One copy per person. Personal effects san.com DIC HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Bonilla $25. $2.00 off anyCastillo, waxing. Gustavo 412 Amount: $827.20 2400 S. Flower St., Los Angeles, W. 6th Street #1111 relaxatkur. Name of owner: CA 90007-2697. This business com. adabatun@yahoo.com. Henry Melendez For a complete list of our is conducted by a corporation. 818-574-9882. Space number: L-11 pre-owned inventory, go to Registrants has not begun to Description of goods: www.DTLAMOTORS.com transact business under the ficEditor & PublishEr: Sue Laris Personal effects titious business name or names Amount: $370.00 GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin listed herein This statement was Purchases must be paid for at filed with DEAN LOGAN, Los the time of purchase in cash Angeles County Clerk on July fiCtitious business naMe ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie only. All purchased storage 2, 2013. units with the items contained ManageMent citY Editor: Richard Guzmán NOTICE—This fictitious name Fictitious Business name herein are sold on an “as-is” stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt statement expires five years from statement basis and must be removed the date it was filed in the office no.Maese 2013138255 coNtributiNG Editor: File Kathryn at the time of sale. Sale subof the county clerk. A new fictiThe following person is doing coNtributiNG writErs: Dave Denholm, Jeff Favre, tious business name statement ject to cancellation in the business as: (1)ORTHOPAEDIC Los Angeles Downtown News event of settlement between Greg Fischer, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Ryan E. Smith, must be filed before that time. HEMOPHILIA TREATMENT Thriftee Storage Co. and obli1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 Job location Los Angeles, CA. The filing of this statement does Marc Porter ZasadaCENTER, 2400 S. Flower St., gated party. Send resume w/this ad, to not of itself authorize the use in phone: 213-481-1448 • fax: 213-250-4617 LosAllison Angeles, CA 90007-2697, are Thriftee Storage Company Art Code 132218-RM, H. dirEctor: Uba, Kula Brian this state of aweb: fictitious business hereby registered by the followDowntownNews.com LLC Sushi USA, Inc.,AssistANt 17801 Main Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa name in violation of the rights of ing registrant: ORTHOPAEDIC Dated at Los Angeles, CA by realpeople@downtownnews.com Street, Suite A, Irvine, CA 92614 ANd GrAPhics: another underemail: federal, state, or ProductioN HOSPITAL,Alexis 2400 Rawlins S. Flower St., Felipe F. Islas / Manager common law (see Section 14411 Los Angeles, CA 90007-2697. July 19, 2013. et. seq. Business and ProfesThis business is conducted by a PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard facebook: corporation. Registrants has not general

LEGAL

EMPLOYMENT

RestauRant ManageR

facebook: L.A. Downtown News

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AccouNtiNG: Tara LaPlante

FOR RENT? U.S. GOVT JOBS LEASE? AdvErtisiNG dirEctor:FOR Steve Nakutin NOW HIRING clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNGFOR MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway SALE?

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Civil Service / Postal Clerks AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Yoji Cole,are Josielooking Damian, People No Experience. Job Security. Catherine Holloway here, shouldn’t your $20-75 an hour and Benefits ad should be here? sAlEs AssistANt: Claudia Hernandez CALL NOw! (855) 631-0850

the LOFT expert!

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The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is disDowntown 2002 tributed everysince Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

(213) 481-1448

circulAtioN: Jessica Tarr distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles Bill Cooper One copy per person. distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla

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downtownnews.com

Editor & PublishEr: Sue Laris GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin

Los Angeles Downtown News 1264 W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90026 phone: 213-481-1448 fax: 213-250-4617 web: DowntownNews.com email: realpeople@downtownnews.com

sions Code).

All submissions are subject to federal and California der the fictitious business name Pub. 7/22, 7/29, 8/5, 8/12/2013 fair housing laws, which make it illegal to indicate or names listed herein This stateEditor PublishEr:any Suepreference, Laris limitation, or ment was filed with DEAN LOin any &advertisement notiCe of sale GAN, Los Angeles County Clerk discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, GENErAl MANAGEr: Dawn Eastin on July 2, 2013. sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, notice oF sale NOTICE—This fictitious name ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie ancestry, familial status, source of income or physical or mental disNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN statement expires five years Editor: Richard Guzmán ability. We willcitY not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that the undersigned intends from the date it was filed in the stAFFofwritEr: Ryan Vaillancourt which is in violation the law. All persons are hereby informed that to sell the personal property office of the county clerk. A new described below to enforce all dwellings advertised are available on anKathryn equal opportunity coNtributiNG Editor: Maese basis. fictitious business name statecoNtributiNG writErs: Dave Denholm, Jeff Favre, ment must be filed before that a lien imposed on said propLos Downtown ertyNews pursuant to Sections time. The filing of Angeles this statement Greg Fischer, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Ryan E. Smith, 21700-21716 of 90026 the Business 1264authorize W. First Street, Los Angeles, CA does not of itself the Marc Porter Zasada & Professions Code, Section

ExEcutivE Editor: Jon Regardie citY Editor: Richard Guzmán stAFF writEr: Ryan Vaillancourt coNtributiNG Editor: Kathryn Maese coNtributiNG writErs: Dave Denholm, Jeff Favre, Greg Fischer, Kristin Friedrich, Howard Leff, Ryan E. Smith, Marc Porter Zasada

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STUDIO APARTMENTS STUDIO APARTMENTS

Move-inNOWNOW LEASING LEASING Specials

MONTH $675$675 PERPER MONTH 5TH LOS ANGELES 5TH & LOS&ANGELES

UTILITIES PAID! ALLALL UTILITIES PAID! 213-622-1437 213-622-1437

AccouNtiNG: Tara LaPlante AdvErtisiNG dirEctor: Steve Nakutin clAssiFiEd AdvErtisiNG MANAGEr: Catherine Holloway AccouNt ExEcutivEs: Yoji Cole, Josie Damian, Catherine Holloway sAlEs AssistANt: Claudia Hernandez circulAtioN: Jessica Tarr distributioN MANAGEr: Salvador Ingles distributioN AssistANts: Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla

Art dirEctor: Brian Allison AssistANt Art dirEctor: Yumi Kanegawa ProductioN ANd GrAPhics: Alexis Rawlins

The Los Angeles Downtown News is the must-read newspaper for Downtown Los Angeles and is distributed every Monday throughout the offices and residences of Downtown Los Angeles.

PhotoGrAPhEr: Gary Leonard

One copy per person.


24 Downtown News

July 22, 2013

Celebrating 40 Years

Shy Continued from page 14 Figueroa Street, it’s tough to argue with that bet. Shy’s two Broadway properties will add to a rapidly changing corner. They neighbor the under-construction Ace Hotel, and are across the street from Geoff Palmer’s proposed two-building 686-unit project. Shy’s Hill Street site is a block from Canadian developer Onni Group’s 32-story tower that is under construction at Ninth and Olive streets, and another block from Hanover Company’s under construction 284-unit project at Olympic Boulevard and Hill Street. Then there’s Carmel Partner’s 700-unit complex under construction at Eighth Street and Grand Avenue. Property owner Steve Needleman, who through his company Anjac Fashion Co. controls several sites in the area, and who sold the Broadway building and Hill Street parking lot to Shy, said

the area became a target for two key reasons. One, it was already home to some high-profile investments in the Ace Hotel and the proposed Street Car, which would run down Broadway and up Hill Street. The second, and perhaps more important factor, he said, is land. The area has lots of parking lots, at least for now. Needleman, who said he was entertaining multiple offers for the two-parcel package, said he wanted to sell to Shy because of the developer’s track record of completing projects. “When it came down to the different buyers, I had the confidence in him because I knew that he was going to finish the project,” Needleman said. “Barry has made it happen and you can’t take away from the impact he’s made on a residential level Downtown.” The exact timeline for Shy’s four projects are uncertain, but he expects to secure approvals for them within eight months to one year. Residential projects of their proposed size generally take about 18 to 24 months to build. Contact Ryan Vaillancourt at ryan@downtownnews.

Around Town Continued from page 2 sometime before the end of the year, will likely be extended to other parts of the city like Hollywood and the San Fernando Valley.

ESPN Zone Shuttered

A

fter five years of packing in hundreds of pre and post-event patrons at L.A. Live, the sports bar mecca ESPN Zone has been shuttered to make way for three new eateries. Anschutz Entertainment Group will replace the sprawling sports bar and

restaurant with three new eateries by Denver-based Consumer Concept Group. The new spots will include Tom’s Urban 24, which features what an AEG statement dubbed “urban cuisine and epic cocktails,” Live Basil Pizza and Smashburger. The later specializes in gourmet burgers at affordable prices — the burgers range from $5-$7. All three plan to debut in the fourth quarter this year. “We decided that, with all the other restaurants open and serving a variety of different audiences, perhaps there was a better way to repurpose the space,” said AEG spokesman Michael Roth.

Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

Now For Call n Specials Move-I

8 7 7 - 2 65 - 714 6

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dish washer (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

TOWERS T H E

A PA RT M E N T S

www.TowersApartmentsLA.com

MAID SERVICE • FURNITURE • HOUSEWARES • CABLE • UTILITIES • PARKING RESIDENCES: SINGLES • STUDIO • ONE BEDROOM • TWO BEDROOM

07-22-13  

Los Angeles Downtown News is a free weekly newspaper distributed in and around downtown Los Angeles.

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