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Downtown After Dark

THE FOOD

A Mecca of Culinary Art

Mark the Date Seasonal Events Calendar

Discover 16 Unique

Downtown Neighborhoods

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Sure, LA is known as the undisputed capital of the entertainment world, but with the highest concentration of artists of any city in the world and art and culture for every taste and interest, LA is becoming contender for capital of the cultural world. And, Downtown LA’s diverse and expanding cultural cluster is leading the way.

Experience first-hand the vibrant offerings that are making Downtown Los Angeles one of the world’s premier arts and culture destinations.

Whether looking for one of the best collections of contemporary art, the world’s largest public display of gold, a national space exploration treasure, the finest orchestra in America, or a celebration of art, music, theater and history, it all awaits in Downtown LA.

Plan Your Los Angeles Arts & Culture Adventure at discoverLosAngeles.com LosAngelesFan

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C O N T E N T S WelcoMe Arts District .................................................................6 Bunker Hill ..................................................................6 Central City East..........................................................7 Chinatown ..................................................................7 City West .....................................................................8 Civic Center .................................................................8 El Pueblo/Union Station .............................................8 Fashion District ...........................................................8 Figueroa Corridor ......................................................10 Financial District .......................................................10 Furniture and Decorative Arts District......................12 Historic Core..............................................................12 Jewelry District .........................................................12 Little Tokyo................................................................12 Old Bank District.......................................................13 South Park ................................................................13 architecture Historic Architecture and Sites .................................14 Modern Architecture ................................................19 The Broadway Theater District .................................20 diversions seasonal calendar............................................34 downtown nightlife guide ...........................28 PERFORMING ARTS Music Venues ............................................................22 Smaller Sound Stages ..............................................23 Larger Theater Houses ..............................................24 Intimate Theaters .....................................................25 MUSEUMS For Art Lovers............................................................26 Culture Vultures and History Buffs ...........................26 Special Interests........................................................27 Earthy Museums.......................................................27 GALLERIES Chinatown Galleries .................................................31 Gallery Row ..............................................................31 Downtown Art Walk.................................................31 TOURS ......................................................................32 SPEAkER SERIES..................................................33 PARkS ANd OPEN SPAcE ..............................36 SPORTING/cONvENTION vENUES ..........37 MOvIE ThEATERS ...............................................38 kId-FRIENdLy dOwNTOwN.......................38 ExcURSIONS Mid-Wilshire .............................................................40 Echo Park/Angelino Heights.....................................40 Hollywood ................................................................40 Griffith Park ..............................................................40 shoPPinG map ...........................................................................46 Arts District ...............................................................41 Bunker Hill/Financial District....................................42

Central City East........................................................43 Chinatown ................................................................43 Civic Center ...............................................................44 El Pueblo/Union Station ...........................................44 Fashion District .........................................................44 Furniture and Decorative Arts District......................48 Historic Core..............................................................48 Jewelry District .........................................................50 Little Tokyo................................................................50 Old Bank District.......................................................53 South Park ................................................................53 restaurants restaurants by cuisine ...................................68 Arts District ...............................................................54 Bunker Hill ................................................................55 Central City East........................................................56 Chinatown ................................................................56 City West ...................................................................58 Civic Center ...............................................................58 Downtown Adjacent ................................................58 El Pueblo/Union Station ...........................................59 Fashion District .........................................................59 Figueroa Corridor ......................................................60 Financial District .......................................................60 Historic Core..............................................................65 Jewelry District .........................................................67 Little Tokyo................................................................69 Old Bank District.......................................................71 South Park ................................................................72 accoMModations .....................................75 hotel accommodations chart ......................80 Good to knoW TRANSPORTATION DASH Downtown......................................................82 Subways, Light Rail, Buses .......................................82 Regional Rail Services ..............................................82 Taxis ..........................................................................82 Rental Cars................................................................83 SAFETy ....................................................................83 cOMMUNITy cONTAcTS Downtown Representatives and Advocacy Groups .....84 Places of Worship .....................................................84 EvERydAy ESSENTIALS Grocery Stores...........................................................84 Farmers Markets .......................................................85 Drug Stores/Pharmacies...........................................85 Pet Services...............................................................85 Pizza Delivery ...........................................................86 Movie Rentals/Theaters............................................86 Beauty/Spa Services.................................................87 Fitness.......................................................................88 index........................................................................89

Downtown Guide For Your Mobile Device

Guide Written by

Kathryn Maese

editor and Publisher

Sue Laris

General ManaGer

Dawn Eastin

executive editor

Jon Regardie staff Writer

Donna Evans advertisinG director

Steve Nakutin

account executives

Yoji Cole, Josie Damian, Catherine Holloway sales assistant

Claudia Hernandez art director

Brian Allison assistant art director

Yumi Kanegawa

Production and GraPhics

Alexis Rawlins accountinG

Tara LaPlante recePtionist

Danielle Salmon distribution ManaGer

Salvador Ingles

distribution creW

Lorenzo Castillo, Gustavo Bonilla The Downtown Los Angeles Guide is published annually by Los Angeles Downtown News. The newspaper covers business, politics, arts and culture. Los Angeles Downtown News is distributed every week throughout the business and government districts, as well as the residences of Downtown Los Angeles. Although the Downtown Los Angeles Guide strives to be as accurate and comprehensive as possible, there may be some elimination of content due to space requirements. For the latest, most complete ongoing coverage of Downtown Los Angeles and environs read the Los Angeles Downtown News, or visit LADowntownNews.com. Los Angeles Downtown News is not responsible for changes of schedule following publication, nor does it accept any responsibility for any loss, injury or inconvenience sustained by anyone using this publication or information from it. ©Los Angeles Downtown News 2014. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, except brief extracts for the purpose of review or promotion, without the written permission of the publisher and copyright owner.

Cover photo of Arnaldo Pomodoro’s “Colpo d’ Ala” sculpture at the Department of Water and Power headquarters by Gary Leonard. Special thanks to the following businesses and individuals for photos: Gary Leonard; Los Angeles Theater (Page 20); Bradbury Building (Page 21); L.A. Live (Page 22); Rukes (Page 22); Gene Schiavone (Page 22); Los Angeles Philharmonic, Anna Hult (Page 22); Figueroa Hotel (Page 29 & 78); Lucha Vavoom, Don Spiro (Page 34); Chynna Dim Sum (Page 57); Public School 612 (Page 59); Nola’s (Page 64); Palm Downtown (Page 69); Farmer Boys (Page 70); California Kabob Kitchen (Page 72); Daily Grill (Page 74); Los Angeles Athletic Club (Page 75); Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown (Page 77); Hayatt Regency Los Angeles Downtown (Page 79). With grateful thanks to everyone at Cartifact.

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C O N T E N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

Address: 1264 W. First St., Los Angeles, CA 90026 Telephone: (213) 481-1448. Fax: (213) 250-4617 E-mail: realpeople@downtownnews.com Website: LADowntownNews.com


WELCOME

Chinatown Summer Nights

Downtown Deconstructed: A Look at the Area’s 16 Neighborhoods

››

Every city boasts districts that make it memorable. There are artsy areas with galleries and lofts, ethnic hubs spilling over with restaurants and shops, and even former industrial buildings that have been reborn as chic hotspots. The neighborhoods that make up the fabric of Downtown Los Angeles are as diverse as the city itself, with 16 unique districts encompassing business, arts, fashion, residential, entertainment, industry, historical architecture, and a handful of cultural enclaves. Today, Downtown boasts more than 45,000 residents who are helping to revitalize the eight square miles that make up its boundaries. Bars are hopping, restaurants are bustling and retailers are finding fertile ground. The streets are alive with activity and energy, spanning from Chinatown and Dodger Stadium on the north, the University of Southern California and Exposition Park on the south, Western Avenue on the west, and the Los Angeles River on the east. The Downtown Guide is a roadmap to the sights, activities, history and treasures found within these 16 districts. Reference the index for a quick look at individual listings, or locate the maps, nightlife guide and seasonal events calendar for a more detailed view.

ARTS DISTRICT

Boundaries: The 101 Freeway to the north, Seventh Place 6

W E L C O M E | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

to the south, the Los Angeles River to the east, Alameda Street to the west. OVERVIEW: The Arts District is arguably one of the hottest neighborhoods Downtown. But it wasn’t always that way. Formerly known as the Warehouse District, this section east of Downtown was — and still is — made up of a collection of gritty warehouses, cold storage and food processing plants. In the 1970s, a group of pioneers set up shop in what were essentially abandoned buildings, sometimes paying minimal rent, and sometimes not. The Artists-In-Residence ordinance made these dwellings legal in 1981, which in turn lured more artists and non-profits to the growing community. Over the decades, it has become one of the city’s most vibrant enclaves. In 2005, a group of Downtown property owners and residents voted to create a Business Improvement District, bringing with it the official Arts District moniker. In line with Downtown’s citywide renaissance of the past few years, the district has witnessed the remodeling of century-old buildings as well as the rise of many new condos, which has attracted people from all walks of life. These days, a tour of the neighborhood reveals artsy coffee shops (including the wildly popular Handsome Coffee Roasters on Mateo Street), several acclaimed restaurants, a new specialty grocery store, dog park, numerous galleries, a brewery and the lively Southern California Institute of Architecture.

BUNKER HILL

Boundaries: Approximately Temple Street to the north, Third Street to the south, Olive Street to the east, the 110 Freeway to the west. OVERVIEW: Intrigued by the potential of its stunning vistas, wealthy developer Prudent Beaudry purchased nearly all the land that made up Downtown’s Bunker Hill. In the late 1800s, his vision took the form of an opulent subdivision of two-story Victorian mansions catering to the city’s upperclass residents. It was a stunning pocket of Downtown with gorgeous architecture and bustling activity. The exclusive community thrived until the end of World War I, when the region’s extensive streetcar system helped spur growth in surrounding communities. Increasingly, the hill’s grand homes were subdivided to accommodate a dense population of renters, and adjacent freeway development resulted in an even greater exodus from the city’s center. In time, the tony address became home to slum hotels and pensioners. In 1955, city planners bulldozed any trace of the once grand community, replacing it with a collection of concrete buildings and modern high-rises. While the city lost a unique part of its history in the ill-conceived redevelopment project, the seed for a new cultural hub was planted in 1967 with the opening of the Music Center campus. Today, Bunker Hill is home to world-class institutions such as the Walt Disney Concert


Hall, the Museum of Contemporary Art and the Colburn School of Performing Arts. The newest cultural addition will be the $130 million Broad museum, a design-forward repository of contemporary art set to open in 2014 with some 2,000 works. The institutions are part of a larger vision for a multi-billion dollar entertainment, shopping and arts development known as the Grand Avenue project. Visitors can also stroll Downtown’s Grand Park, a 12-acre swath of public space stretching from the Music Center to City Hall.

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CENTRAL CITY EAST

Boundaries: Central City East consists of two sub-districts: Industrial and Toy. The Industrial District is roughly edged by Third Street to the north, Eighth Street and Olympic Boulevard to the south, Alameda Street on the east and San Pedro Street on the west. The Toy District occupies a 12-block area with Third Street to the north, Fifth Street to the south, Los Angeles Street to the west and San Pedro Street to the east. oVerVieW: This 44-block district covers the eastern half of Downtown. Its diverse territory includes a bustling assemblage of seafood, produce and cold storage warehouses. Trucks rumble in and out, transporting fresh food to the region, while chefs swarm the markets before sunrise for the best sushi and produce. Amid the industry and gritty streets, modern loft buildings have brought new residents, retail and restaurants. The adjacent Toy District is a hive of activity packed with wholesale and retail shops selling silk flowers, perfume, DVDs, luggage and toys. Central City East also oversees one of Downtown’s most challenging communities — Skid Row. The concentration of missions and public services brings with it some troubling homeless issues, including safety and street encampments. The local business improvement district has begun to improve conditions here with patrols and safety walks. Visit centralcityeast.org.

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CHINATOWN

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Boundaries: Bernard Street to the north, Cesar Chavez Avenue to the south, North Main Street to the east, Yale Street to the west. oVerVieW: One of three major Chinatowns in California, this Downtown district was originally founded in 1880 around Alameda and Macy streets — near Olvera Street and Union Station. During its heyday, Chinatown boasted 200 buildings including three temples, an opera and newspaper. The Chinese, however, were prohibited from acquiring citizenship and property ownership, and with limits on immigration at the time, the district began to decline. Beginning in the early 1910s, Chinatown began a three-decade descent into decay. The area was condemned to make way for a new rail station, a devastating decision that erased nearly every trace of its history. In the 1930s, Chinatown was relocated to its current location three blocks north, and became the first modern American district owned and planned from the ground up by Chinese. Today, a dragon gate at Cesar Chavez Avenue marks the entrance to this area, which encompasses 16 square blocks. Broadway, Spring and Hill streets are the main thoroughfares through the area. Visitors and residents frequent the colorful malls, plazas and shops that carry everything from jewelry and antiques to herbs and cloth7th ing. The dining scene is also one of the most popular in St. the city, with noisy dim sum houses, authentic Cantonese eateries and tasty soup shops. There is no shortage of special events and festivals throughout the year, and those 8th in interested in exploring the area’s history and culture

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depth can sign up for one of the many tours of this distinct neighborhood. Visit chinatownla.com.

CITY WEST

Boundaries: Temple Street to the north, Wilshire Boulevard to the south, the 110 Freeway to the east, Lucas Avenue to the west. oVerVieW: The 110 Freeway separates City West from Downtown proper, forming the district’s eastern boundary. Despite its seemingly isolated location, this adjacent community is far from cut off from the development taking place across the highway. In fact, the former oil-rich district helped fuel the city’s first industrial boom in the 1890s — you can still catch a glimpse of a few oil derricks dotting the landscape. City West has experienced its own resurgence in recent years, especially in the residential sector where several sleek, multi-story apartment and condo projects have sprouted up (particularly along Wilshire Boulevard). The district has transformed a shabby collection of buildings and vacant lots into a rising community of modern structures, new schools, restaurants and a growing cluster of shops. Two major commercial tenants include the 20-acre Los Angeles Center Studios and the headquarters for the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. City West is once again a player in the Downtown boom.

CIVIC CENTER

Boundaries: The 101 Freeway to the north, Second Street to the south, Los Angeles Street to the east, Grand Avenue to the west. oVerVieW: Scan the skyline for one of the city’s most iconic buildings and you’ll find yourself in the heart of the Civic

City Hall Center. The 27-story City Hall is the majestic white marble marker for this district, which is home to a concentration of major public agencies employing a workforce of more than 93,000. It is defined by what city planners call the 10-Minute Diamond, a network of government and civic buildings accessible within a 10-minute walk of City Hall. The Civic Center is also home to numerous city, county and state structures, including the California Department of Transportation and the police headquarters. A few blocks west of City Hall is the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, and a collection of county and federal courthouses that sees a non-stop flow of jurists and attorneys.

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W E L C O M E | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

Boundaries: Cesar Chavez Avenue to the north, the 101 Freeway to the south, Main Street to the west, Alameda Street to the east. oVerVieW: This is the birthplace of the city, and the lively El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument details the journey of its first settlers (the site is believed to be near the original pueblo settled in 1781 by 11 Mexican families). The 44-acre park protects 27 historic structures, and 11 are open to the public, including the 1818 Avila Adobe (the oldest house in the city), Pico House, Italian Hall, the Chinese American Museum and the Plaza Catholic Church. One of the biggest draws here is the Olvera Street marketplace, a charming stretch of Mexican restaurants and vendors selling handicrafts and gifts. Across the street from El Pueblo is the regional transit hub Union Station. Built in 1939, it is considered the last of the great rail stations built in the U.S. The Mission-style terminus draws architecture and history buffs as well as commuters who ride the local subway system, Amtrak and the rail network. Thousands pass through the ornate station daily. Visit elpueblo.lacity.org or olvera-street.com.

FASHION DISTRICT

Boundaries: Seventh Street to the north, the 10 Freeway to the south, San Pedro Street to the east, Main Street to the west. oVerVieW: Spread across 100 blocks, the Fashion District is the hub of the West Coast apparel industry. Visitors will find showrooms, wholesale marts, and alleyways crammed with an endless variety of clothing, accessories and fashionable goods at discount prices. It can be an overwhelming experience for the novice — especially with


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Pershing Square more than 1,000 stores — but bargain hunters quickly learn the ins and outs of the district. Its epicenters can be found at the wholesale California Market Center on Ninth Street; the Cooper Building at Ninth and Los Angeles streets, also wholesale; retail outlets between Los Angeles, Wall, Ninth and Pico open to the public; menswear stores dotting Los Angeles between Seventh and Ninth streets; and the district’s most popular destination, the bazaar-like Santee Alley (between Santee Street and Maple Avenue, from Olympic to 12th Street). In addition to fashion, the district includes the subdistrict known as the Los Angeles Flower District. Two major marts make up the largest flower market in the country, with an endless array of colorful blooms that supply the region’s floral industry. The public is invited to shop and browse for just a few dollars. With its creative energy and industrial space, the district has become home to a growing community of lofts and apartments. Visit fashiondistrict.org and laflowerdistrict.com.

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W E L C O M E | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

FIGUEROA CORRIDOR

Boundaries: The 10 Freeway to the north, Exposition Park to the south, Flower Street to the east, Vermont Avenue to the west. oVerVieW: This is Downtown’s southernmost corridor, encompassing a diverse collection of cultural and educational institutions. The University of Southern California is perhaps its largest and most recognized landmark, with more than 17,000 undergrad students. The adjacent Exposition Park features a slew of family-friendly attractions that include the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena, the California African American Museum, and the California Science Center and IMAX Theater. All are built around the sunken Exposition Park Rose Garden, a bloom-filled setting popular for weddings, picnics and photography enthusiasts. New housing projects, restaurants and retail are adding to the energy in the evolving district. Info at (213) 746-9577 or figueroacorridor.org.

FINANCIAL DISTRICT

Boundaries: Approximately Third Street to the north, Eighth Street to the south, Olive Street to the east, the 110 Freeway to the west. oVerVieW: This cluster of steel and glass high-rises sprung up during the 1970s and ’80s after city-zoning regulations


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raised the height limit of buildings. The tallest, and perhaps most iconic structure on the horizon, is the US Bank Tower (formerly Library Tower). At 73 stories, it is the tallest building west of the Mississippi. The district is also home to several major law, banking, accounting and development firms, as well as the historic Richard J. Riordan Central Library and the Millennium Biltmore Hotel. But this nine-to-five district now sees activity late into the night and on weekends thanks to several clubs and restaurants, among them the rooftop of the Standard Hotel and the Elevate Lounge, planted on the 21st floor of the 811 Wilshire building. Loft-style housing brings even more activity with a growing residential populace, and shopping options include the outdoor mall FIGat7th, Macy’s Plaza, the underground 505 Flower and a new Target store.

FURNITURE AND DECORATIVE ARTS DISTRICT

Boundaries: Bounded by the L.A. Mart to the northwest (at Broadway and Washington Boulevard), Central Avenue to the east, Florence Avenue to the south. oVerVieW: This five-square-mile district encompasses Downtown’s newly defined furniture manufacturing sector. Its northern anchor is the L.A. Mart, an imposing structure housing more than 300 showrooms and 150 temporary exhibitors of gifts, furniture and home accessories to the trade. Bolstered by the influx of design-savvy loft dwellers, and the availability of buildings with ample showroom space and parking, the design business is thriving here. The district is establishing itself as a national player, with several well-attended design shows held every year.

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W E L C O M E | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

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HISTORIC CORE

Boundaries: Third Street to the north, Ninth Street to the south, Main Street to the east, Broadway to the west. oVerVieW: This historic heart of the city once served as the center of entertainment, business and retail. During its heyday starting in the late 1890s to the early 1930s, visitors could ride streetcars to the major department stores, catch live entertainment at vaudeville and theater houses, or stroll bustling Broadway in their Sunday best. Sadly, urban sprawl saw Angelenos move out of the city center, abandoning the core to shabby ground-floor swap meets, discount stores and churches. Thanks to a housing boom in the last decade, however, dozens of loft conversions have rehabbed many of the decaying structures, bringing with them an influx of art galleries, restaurants and nightlife. An effort is currently underway to help revitalize the Broadway corridor, starting with pedestrian-friendly improvements that will set the stage for a future streetcar system — a four-mile loop running from the Civic Center to the Convention Center. Today, the district houses an impressive collection of pre-1930s buildings. The district’s most noted landmarks include the gorgeous Bradbury Building, an architectural wonder with delicate ironwork, terra cotta and cage elevators, and the open-air Grand Central Market with its colorful assortment of produce and ethnic food stalls. A grouping of a dozen historic theaters within a seven-block area has been designated as the Broadway Theater District, the largest of its kind in the nation. A few have been restored and are used regularly for live events. Visit hdlabid.com.

JEWELRY DISTRICT

Boundaries: Fifth Street to the north, Eighth Street to the south, Broadway to the east, Olive Street to the west. oVerVieW: The Jewelry District got its start in the early 1960s with a lone facility at Sixth and Hill streets. In 1983, the St. Vincent Jewelry Center, followed a few years later by the International Jewelry Center, helped solidify the district’s reputation as a serious player. Today, it boasts more than 3,000 wholesale and retail jewelers throughout 12 blocks offering below-retail prices on gold, diamonds, silver, platinum and precious gems. The bargain hunting takes place six days a week (almost everything is closed Sunday), and shoppers haggle over the best prices for watches, engagement rings and gold bracelets, among other things. Come lunchtime, visitors often head to a tiny alley next to St. Vincent’s, which offers a charming European-like setting with a handful of cafes and eateries. The Pershing Square park at Fifth and Olive streets hosts a year-round slate of concerts, movies, holiday events and a large farmers market. Visit lajd.net.

LITTLE TOKYO

Boundaries: Temple Street to the north, Fourth Street to the south, Alameda Street to the east, Main Street on the west. oVerVieW: Within roughly five city blocks, visitors to this tiny Downtown district will discover the cultural center for Japanese Americans in Southern California. Little Tokyo’s main stretch is First Street between San Pedro Street and Central Avenue, where 13 of Little Tokyo’s historic buildings remain — it was declared a National Historic Landmark District in 1995. Established in the 1880s,


makes for a more colorful and organic streetscape, one that continues to make the Old Bank District a lively destination.

SOUTH PARK

Boundaries: Ninth Street to the north, the 10 Freeway to the south, Broadway to the east, the 110 Freeway to the west. oVerVieW: This summer, South Park welcomed Downtown’s first Smart & Final, adding to the critical mass of grocers and big name retailers locating in the area. In just over a decade, South Park has become one of Downtown’s biggest draws. Since the opening of Staples Center in 1999, the district’s streetscape and skyline have radically transformed. Development has exploded within its 32 square blocks, including stunning residential high-rises clad in glass and

steel, a full-service supermarket, packed bars and shopping. The nexus of South Park action is the billion-dollar sports and entertainment campus known as L.A. Live. Visitors flock here to attend concerts and events at the Nokia Theater, dance salsa at the Conga Room, bowl a few sets at the Lucky Strike Lanes, dine at the collection of restaurants or catch a movie at the sprawling cineplex. The final piece of the project was the JW Marriott and the Ritz-Carlton Residences and hotel — a stunning new tower marking the southern Downtown vista. Adjacent to L.A. Live is the revamped Convention Center, which attracts thousands of convention goers annually. New developments are on the horizon for the district as well, including the L.A. streetcar, a plan to revitalize the streetscape, and a charter elementary school. Visit southpark.la.com.

Japanese Village Plaza the neighborhood has endured many setbacks, namely Japanese internment during World War II, a devastating city redevelopment plan in the 1970s that destroyed many of its original structures, and several demographic shifts over the decades. These days, a concentration of sushi bars, ramen houses, gift shops and karaoke bars bring a steady stream of visitors. The open-air Japanese Village Plaza is perhaps the busiest shopping hub, with everything from a grocery store to a Hello Kitty shop to mochi ice cream. Little Tokyo’s cultural heavy hitter is the Japanese American National Museum, which divides its exhibits between old and new, as well as the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center, the Geffen Contemporary (MOCA) and a number of cutting-edge theaters. In recent years, the addition of several large-scale apartment and loft projects have helped to boost the residential population and bring renewed street life to the district, including a mix of notable restaurants and trendy retail. Visit visitlittletokyo.com.

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Boundaries: Third Street to the north, Fifth Street to the south, Main Street to the east, Spring Street to the west. oVerVieW: This district once served as the city’s financial heart, which for a time was known as the Wall Street of the West. When these institutions fled the urban core, the abandoned structures sat largely empty until the city passed legislation making it easier to convert historic structures into housing. In 1999, the current Downtown loft boom had its start here thanks to Gilmore Associates, which created a residential hub at the intersection of Fourth and Main streets. Stately old bank buildings and historic offices that had been long abandoned or underused were transformed into lofts, bringing with them hundreds of new Downtown pioneers. The redevelopment eventually spread to other parts of the Historic Core and Downtown, but the Old Bank District continues to have a special kind of community magic. The sidewalks are filled with professionals, artists, young families, hipsters, dog walkers and, during the monthly Art Walk, thousands of curious Angelenos. There’s a laid back vibe that encourages sitting at a patio table, lingering over a beer at Pete’s Cafe and chatting with neighbors. From bookstores and video shops to a local market and bakery, independent retail is the rule rather than the exception. It all

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ARCHITECTURE

History on Display: A Tour of Downtown’s Past and Present Walt Disney Concert Hall

Union Station

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There’s nothing like exploring a city on foot and discovering its history through architecture. Downtown’s buildings certainly have a dramatic tale to tell: it can be found underneath the streets and tunnels, buried under grime and neglect; or it can be glamorous and gilded, with the jaw-dropping opulence of a bygone era. At times, the story of this metropolis is hidden in plain sight, in structures used daily for mundane purposes but boasting an extraordinary past. This urban landscape is also constantly evolving with new landmarks and architecture, much of it stunning in both design and technology. From historic jewels to modern marvels, Downtown Los Angeles is just waiting for the adventurous spirit to uncover its secrets. For information about guided tours, see the Diversions section on page 22.

HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE AND SITES Angels Flight Railway Located across from Grand Central Market, Angels Flight is both a popular tourist landmark and a practical conveyance. For more than a century, this historic funicular has saved riders from walking up and down the steep hillside connecting Bunker Hill above to Hill Street below. Built in 1901 by Colonel J.W. Eddy, lawyer, engineer and friend of President Abraham Lincoln, it is believed to be the world’s shortest incorporated railway (298 feet). The orange and black wooden cars — named Sinai and Olivet — are pulled 14

up the 33 percent incline via metal cables. Angels Flight was dismantled in 1969 following a controversial redevelopment of Bunker Hill; it reopened after 27 years a halfblock south of its original location next to the Third Street tunnel. Today, a one-way ticket costs 50 cents (25 cents for Metro pass holders). [Listed in the National Register of Historic Places; L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] Between Third and Fourth streets on Hill Street.

Bradbury Building The 1893 Bradbury Building is one of Downtown’s most famous landmarks. Mining millionaire Lewis Bradbury commissioned the office building to stand as the ultimate symbol of his vision. Initially, he hired noted architect Sumner Hunt to design the space; unsatisfied with his design, however, Bradbury secured one of Hunt’s draftsmen, George Wyman, to lead the project. As the tale goes, on advice from his deceased brother via Ouija board, the untried Wyman agreed to design the structure. He was heavily inspired by the 1887 best-selling book Looking Backward by Edward Bellamy, a Victorian’s view of what a futuristic building would look like in the year 2000. The resulting design has been called a blend of Eclectic Victorian Pre-Modern. The traditional sandstone and brick façade gives way to ornate ironwork, marble staircases, glazed brick walls, Mexican tile floors, polished wood and cage elevators that still carry passengers up the building’s five flights. Open weekdays 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; weekends 9 a.m.-5 p.m. [National

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Millennium Biltmore Hotel Historic Landmark; listed in the National Register of Historic Places; L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 304 S. Broadway.

City Hall Built in 1928, City Hall was the tallest structure in Los Angeles for nearly 30 years. The 27-story building has since become an L.A. icon, as well as a regular actor in film and television. Designed by architects John Parkinson, Albert C. Martin and John C. Austin, City Hall was modeled after the mausoleum at Halicarnassus and blends Classical, Mediterranean and Moderne styles. Visitors can get a breathtaking view of the city from atop the Tom Bradley Observation Deck on the 27th floor. Free docent-led tours last about 40 minutes and are available weekdays from 9 a.m.-noon. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 200 N. Spring St., (213) 485-2121.

Coca-Cola Bottling Plant This unexpected landmark in the Industrial District may be off the beaten path, but it certainly makes for a fun photo op. Though it’s not open to the public, the exterior of this working bottling plant still offers plenty to see. Built in 1937, the edifice was designed by architect Robert V. Derrah to resemble an ocean liner inside and out, complete with promenade decks, ship bridges, a catwalk and portholes. Three giant Coke sculptures were added to its corner niches in 1941. It is considered one of the finest examples


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of Streamline Moderne design. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 1334 S. Central Ave.

kitchen out-building. It was designated a cultural heritage site in 1985 and is now the African American Firefighter Museum. Open Tuesday and Thursday 10 a.m.-2 p.m., and Sunday 1-4 p.m. Admission is free. 1401 S. Central Ave., (213) 744-1730, aaffmuseum.org.

Doheny Mansion

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Estelle Doheny, widow of oil baron Edward, bequeathed her Gothic Renaissance estate to the Catholic women’s school, Mount St. Mary’s College, in 1958. She and Edward arrived here in 1901, and systematically acquired nine Victorian mansions during their nearly six decades in residence. They created a gated community called The Richard J. Riordan Central Library Chester Place, which included their own Doheny Mansion. This showcase home features a marble-pillared great hall, Eastern Outfitting Company and the Columbia Outfitting a Pompeian Room with imported Siena marble and a TifCompany, opulence can be found in every detail. Architect fany iridescent glass dome. The grounds include a wigwam Claud Beelman was responsible for the trademark turhut where Doheny holed up with lawyer Henry O’Melveny, quoise terra cotta façade trimmed with deep blue and gold, of Downtown firm O’Melveny & Myers, during the Teapot along with the four-sided clock tower emblazoned with the Dome scandal — the Watergate of its time. [Listed in the name Eastern in neon. This is one Downtown building that National Register of Historic Places; L.A. Historic-Cultural must be seen. [Listed in the National Register of Historic Monument] Places; L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 8 Chester Place on the Doheny Campus of Mount St. Mary’s 849 S. Broadway, easterncolumbialofts.com. College. For tour information, (213) 477-2962 or dohenymansion.org. Fire Station #30 This 1913 fire station was one of two segregated fire staEastern Columbia Building tions in Los Angeles between 1924 and 1955, serving the This 13-story Art Deco beauty houses 147 loft condos. Central Avenue African American community. The beautiOpened in 1930 to serve as the retail headquarters for the fully restored facility retains the original floor tiles, poles and

Go For Broke Monument Built to honor Japanese American soldiers who fought in World War II, this Little Tokyo monument near the corner of Temple and Alameda streets was dedicated in 1999. A nine-foot-high, circular black wall is inscribed with the names of 16,126 veterans who served overseas. Its name comes from the battle cry of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the all-Japanese American unit. The unit suffered the highest casualty rate and was the most decorated in military history. Community volunteers can be found Tues.-Sun. from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. to explain the fascinating background in person. 160 N. Central Ave., goforbroke.org.

Herald Examiner Building Shuttered since the William Randolph Hearst-owned newspaper folded in 1989, this Mission-Revival structure is still a sight to behold. Designed by the state’s first registered female architect, Julia Morgan, the Herald Examiner opened in 1914 and featured lavish Moorish details — eye-catching yellow and blue mosaic domes on each corner, towers

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flanking the entry and curved archways. Though it has been mostly used for filming, a loft and office project at the site is under consideration. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 1111 S. Broadway.

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This 1935 granite and limestone Moderne building houses the city’s major daily newspaper. It was designed by Gordon Kaufmann, who also worked on the Santa Anita Racetrack and Vegasadjacent Hoover Dam. Three allegorical figures symbolizing the paper’s ethic — Father Time, Spirit of the Times and Gutenberg — adorn the building. Of note are the 10-foot-high murals by Hugo Ballin in the Globe Lobby. 202 W. First St.

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The 11-story Biltmore was designed by Schultze & Weaver, the firm responsible for the storied Waldorf-Astoria in New York. When it opened in 1923, the 1,000-room hotel was the largest and grandest west of Chicago. It was designed In the Beaux Arts style with Spanish Baroque detail. Its vaulted ceilings feature frescoes by Italian master Giovanni Smeraldi, whose work also graces the Vatican and the White House; the opulent lobby contains a Moorish beam ceiling and a Spanish baroque staircase leading to a 350-foot-long galleria. The hotel has 683 rooms, some of which have housed kings, presidents and celebrities (the Beatles stayed here in 1964 during their first U.S. tour). Don’t miss the Gallery Bar and a hallway display of historic photos. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 506 S. Grand Ave., millenniumhotels.com.

Widely considered Freshthe first Art Deco structure in Los Angeles, this building opened in 1928 as one of the most prestigious and expensive haberdasheries in the city. The Friendly Romanesque Revival exterior belies a sumptuous Moderne interior, which originally featured more than 30 tons of glass by designer Rene Lalique (a few original pieces remain in the panels atop the lobby columns). The stunning 10-room “Meet me on the Plaza”… penthouse was home to shoe magnate James Oviatt and The Galero Grill Cafe, his wife until the early 1970s, and signed photos of the couWinner ple’s friendsReader’s and clientsChoice still hang — John Barrymore, Errol Flynn, LeslieBest Howard and Howard Hughes, among others. Midday Escape The originallocated site of the is now home to the on haberdashery the Plaza Level at the restaurant Cicada. The penthouse is a popular location Cathedral Our Lady of the Angels. for weddings and special events, with burled mahogany

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furniture and cabinets, parquet wood floors in geometric patterns, imported fabrics and Lalique glass. [Listed in the National Register of Historic Places; L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 617 S. Olive St., oviatt.com.

Pacific Electric Building Completed in 1908 by Henry Huntington, the nine-story Pacific Electric was the largest building west of Chicago when it opened, and was considered by many to be the city’s first skyscraper. It was designed by architect Thornton Fitzhugh with elements of the popular Richardsonian Romanesque and Beaux Arts style. In addition to housing offices, L.A.’s trolley cars passed through a bustling terminal on the ground floor. When the Pacific Electric Railway disbanded in 1950, the train station was gutted for parking, and by the 1980s the offices sat mostly empty except for filming. Remarkably, many original features survived, including the lustrous white marble corridors, hand-painted mosaic tiles and Romanesque arches. It has since been converted into loft-style apartments. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument; listed in the National Register of Historic Places] 610 S. Main St., pelofts.com.

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for the California Department of Transportation. The modern structure houses some 2,300 employees and features a bold yet environmentally friendly design — 2,000 window scrims conserve energy and also change the building’s appearance throughout the day as they move with the sun. The building’s super-graphic street address rises four stories above Main Street while an eye-catching neon sculpture on the north side alludes to traffic and the local car culture. There is also an outdoor plaza with public art and a gallery. 100 S. Main St., dot.ca.gov.

seat house of worship that reflected the region’s heritage and historic missions. His modern interpretation features stark lines, concrete, glowing alabaster walls, 30-foot-tall bronze doors and copious sculpture and art. The building, which opened in 2002, was the first Roman Catholic cathedral constructed in the West in three decades. It was built to last 500 years and withstand an 8.0 earthquake. Beneath the cathedral is the crypt mausoleum — the largest in existence — clad in Spanish limestone and boasting stained glass. Free weekday tours at 1 p.m. 555 W. Temple St., (213) 680-5200, olacathedral.org.

Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels

Ramon C. Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts

Built at a cost of $195 million, Spanish architect José Rafael Moneo was commissioned to create an 11-story, 3,000-

Located on the northern end of Grand Avenue, this $232

ish Colonial and Revival touches. Limestone sculptures depicting various disciplines and literary figures adorn the building’s exterior, and a high-domed rotunda features an illuminated globe and 12 murals detailing the history of California. The grounds of the library are equally rich with sculpture, gardens and fountains. Despite being proposed for demolition in the mid-1970s, and ravaged by fires in 1986, the structure has survived to become one of the city’s most treasured institutions. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument; listed in the National Register of Historic Places] 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org/central.

Union Station This 1939 transportation hub was the last of the great train stations built in the nation. When it was proposed, Angelenos narrowly voted to approve the project, which required demolition of much of the city’s original Chinatown. Union Station was partially designed by the renowned father and son duo John Parkinson and Donald B. Parkinson (Los Angeles City Hall), and the notable Jan van der Linden, among others, assisted. It merges styles such as Art Deco, Spanish Revival, Mission and Streamline Moderne, with a smattering of Moorish detail. The gorgeous high ceiling is dotted with Deco light fixtures; the lower walls are clad in travertine marble, and the upper sections are covered with acoustic tile. It still serves as the city’s pulsing transit center. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument; listed in the National Register of Historic Places] 800 N. Alameda St.

Vibiana Modeled after a Baroque church in Barcelona, this is one of L.A.’s last remaining 19th century buildings. Built in 1876 by Ezra F. Kysor, the cathedral was a landmark in the city’s early days. It features neoclassic pilasters crowned with an 83-foot bell tower and a dramatic cupola that can be seen from blocks away. Los Angeles’ population would balloon exponentially in the decades that followed. Renowned architect John C. Austin enlarged the structure in 1924 and created a new Main Street façade fashioned from Indiana limestone. The cathedral once housed the Los Angeles Archdiocese, but in 1996, after suffering earthquake damage two years prior, the building was slated for demolition by the Archdiocese. It became the focus of a major preservation battle and was eventually saved from the wrecking ball. It has been converted into a spectacular special events center. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 114 E. Second St., vibianala.com.

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The Broadway Theater District

T

ake a walk down Broadway and you’re likely to encounter one of Downtown’s stunning theaters. These architectural gems stand as a reminder of a bygone era, when going to the movies was an elegant affair. Well-dressed patrons once filled these lavish palaces, which in their heyday echoed with live organ music and dazzled with sparkling crystal, velvet, marble and gilded detail. Downtown boasts the first and largest historic theater district to be listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and is home to a dozen jaw-dropping venues built between 1910 and 1931. The public can catch a rare glimpse into these venues during the Los Angeles Conservancy’s summer film festival.

40 years and is the oldest remaining Orpheum theater in the country. Located on Main Street for more than 20 years, it moved to Broadway to keep pace with development trends. Every major vaudeville star on the Orpheum circuit performed here. While the exterior is styled after a Florentine Renaissance palazzo, the interior features elegant French details such as garland-draped columns, pastoral murals, and a lovely color scheme of pastels. These days it is used mostly for film and television productions. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 630 S. Broadway. Rialto Theatre Built in 1917 by theater impresario J.M. Quinn as a nickelodeon, the Rialto was added to Sid Grauman’s growing empire in 1919. It originally sat 1,000 and once sported a Greek revival pedimented façade that was torn down in the 1930s. Sadly, virtually none of the original architectural details remain, save for the faded marquee (it is the longest one on Broadway). The rundown structure houses retail but is planned for rehabilitation into an Urban Outfitters. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument — marquee, box office, and original entry floor only] 812 S. Broadway.

Arcade Theatre Originally named the Pantages, this 1910 vaudeville theater was the earliest of its kind and helped establish the district. Architecture firm Morgan and Walls designed it in the English Music Hall style, though it has undergone exterior changes. A midblock retail arcade passes between Broadway and Spring, and the lobby is used as an electronics store. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 534 S. Broadway. Cameo Theatre Built in 1910 as Clune’s Broadway, the Cameo was the longest continually operating movie theater in California until it closed in the early 1990s. It was designed with Beaux Arts and Italian Renaissance details, and originally seated 775 people. It is now used for retail and storage. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 528 S. Broadway. Globe Theatre Opened in 1913 as the Morosco, this structure designed by Morgan, Walls & Morgan, was made for stage productions, unlike its vaudeville peers. It later became the city’s first newsreel theater. It now houses a nightclub. 744 S. Broadway. Loew’s State Theatre Built in 1921, this 2,380-seat theater boasts the largest brick façade of the 12 Broadway theaters. It features a Beaux-Arts exterior and Spanish interior. Judy Garland got her start on this stage and it hosted several popular vaudeville acts. In the 1960s it screened Spanish language films. It is now occupied by a church. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 703 S. Broadway. Los Angeles Theatre Arguably Broadway’s most lavish theater, the Los Angeles was built at a cost of more than $1 million — at the time the most expensive theater ever built on a per-seat basis. The ornate French Baroque-inspired interior features a fivestory lobby, grand staircase leading to a crystal fountain, fluted columns, gilded mirrors and cove-lit murals. It was constructed during the Great Depression, and owner H.L. Gumbiner struggled to finish it. Charlie Chaplin stepped in to complete the project and premiered his silent classic City Lights in the venue in 1931. The theater is closed except for occasional tours and special events. The legendary S. Charles Lee designed the theater, which was inspired by the Fox in San Francisco. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 615 S. Broadway, (213) 629-2939, losangelestheatre.com. 20

Los Angeles Theater Mayan Theatre Designed by Morgan, Walls & Clements, this 1927 edifice is cloaked in intricate Mayan decorations by Francisco Cornejo. The multi-colored, bas-relief façade features ornate characters, symbols and hieroglyphs, all part of the Mayan revival craze of the 1920s. Though it now houses a salsa nightclub, the 1,491-seat theater was built to host live musical and comedy presentations. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 1038 S. Hill St., clubmayan.com. Million Dollar Theater This ornate Churrigueresque theater anchors the district on the north. The 2,000-seat theater underwent a $1 million renovation to bring back some of its former luster. It was the first movie palace commissioned by legendary showman Sid Grauman, and opened Feb. 1, 1918, with the debut of the cowboy film The Silent Man. The building was designed by prominent architect Albert C. Martin; the theater was designed by movie house luminary William Lee Woollett. Its exterior is marked by a terra cotta arch with columns, swags and medallions. The interior resembles an 18th century Mexican cathedral. It is currently closed. 307 S. Broadway, milliondollartheater.com. Orpheum Theatre The 2,000-seat Orpheum was the first of the historic theaters to reopen as a modern live music and film venue following a $3.5 million rehab. At 87, it is one of the most ornate theaters in Downtown, and was one of the city’s principal movie houses for nearly 40 years. Designed by prominent theater architect G. Albert Lansburgh with a Beaux-Art exterior and French interior, it features a marble terrazzo floor, marble walls, bronze fixtures, silk wall coverings and stunning chandeliers. 842 S. Broadway, laorpheum.com. Palace Theatre This 1911 structure dominated the vaudeville circuit for

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Roxie Theatre Opened in 1931, this Art Deco theater was the last movie theater built on Broadway. A small tower boasts a vertical marquee. It closed in 1989 and is occupied by ground floor retail. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 518 S. Broadway. Tower Theater This French Renaissance venue was S. Charles Lee’s first theater, and perhaps one of his most challenging — he had to squeeze 1,000 seats onto the tiny parcel (it is one of Broadway’s smallest theaters). It was the first movie palace in Downtown wired for sound films. Metropolitan took over the theater in the 1960s and operated it until its lease expired several years ago. It has been used for filming since the 1990s. It is closed to the public, though the glazed terra cotta exterior offers plenty to see from stained glass to a vertical marquee to sculptures depicting directors and actresses. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 802 S. Broadway, towertheatrela.com. United Artists Theatre This ornate 1927 Spanish Gothic theater was founded by Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks and Charlie Chaplin to screen world premieres. Much of the interior (domed mirrored ceiling and murals of the actors) has been restored over the years and, until recently, was home to the late Gene Scott’s Los Angeles University Cathedral. Now, the theater is slated to be turned into a boutique hotel by fall 2013. The developers of the Ace Hotel chain plan to reactivate the 1,600-seat theater, which was designed by C. Howard Crane (the building was designed by the noted firm of Walker and Eisen). The upper floors of the 13-story structure will house 180 rooms, a restaurant, bar and pool. [L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument] 933 S. Broadway. Learn more about this unique theater district on the Los Angeles Conservancy’s Saturday morning walking tour. Visit laconservancy.org/tours for details.


Partners. Its biggest claim to fame is its height: It is the tallest building between Chicago and Hong Kong, the tallest in the state and the tallest with a helipad. Completed in 1989 for an estimated cost of $350 million, the modern glass and steel structure anchors the Downtown skyline with its illuminated crown and terraced glass façade. 633 W. Fifth St.

Walt Disney Concert Hall This sinuous steel concert hall atop Bunker Hill has become one of Downtown’s most visited and photographed icons since opening in 2003. Home to the L.A. Philharmonic, the $274 million project was conceived by architect Frank Gehry with the help of computer-aided design. All curves and no right angles, it was a complex undertaking that took 16

years to fund, design and construct. The exterior is clad in brushed stainless steel, with mirror-like steel panels wrapping the Founders Room and Children’s Amphitheater. The interior features handsome Douglas fir ceilings that billow like sails and an intimate 2,265-seat amphitheater that provides fascinating people watching and state-of-the-art acoustics. The stunning pipe organ is a spiky centerpiece of the hall. While a tour will give you a glimpse of the exterior, gardens and common areas, only a concert ticket lets you get up close and personal in the hall. 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-7211, musiccenter.org. Learn more about these and other historic gems on any of eight regular walking tours offered by the Los Angeles Conservancy. Visit laconservancy.org/tours for details.

Bradbury Building million, eye-catching modern high school opened in September 2009 with 1,700 students. The design features a 140-foot helix-wrapped tower that some say resembles a roller coaster. A library is housed in a cone-like structure, with its pointed top sliced off and a skylight that lets natural light beam down on readers. At 450 N. Grand Ave., (213) 217-8600.

Los Angeles Center Studios This 12-story building served as the Unocal oil headquarters for 40 years. Designed by architect William Pereira, the Tower building was completed in 1958 and features classic elements of vintage Modernism such as black terrazzo floors, and glass and aluminum walls. In 1996 the company moved to El Segundo, leaving the 20-acre campus to an uncertain fate. Three years later, the Unocal building staged a comeback as a filming hub with six state-of-theart sound stages. It was the first movie studio to be built in the area since the 1920s. 1201 W. Fifth St., (213) 534-3000, lacenterstudios.com.

Museum of Contemporary Art, Grand Avenue Though most venture here to view the stunning art collection inside, the elegant museum commands its share of attention. Completed in 1986 by architect Arata Isozaki, this post-modern facility sports a red sandstone façade with geometric forms, glass-clad pyramids and distinctive skylights. The north and south wings unite via a copper barrel vault that forms an entryway to the museum. 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 626-6222, moca.org.

SCI-Arc Occupying the 1907 Santa Fe freight depot in the Arts District, this innovative architecture school is as long as the Empire State Building is tall. At a quarter-mile in length, the Southern California Institute of Architecture is a sight to behold with 500 students traveling to and from — some on scooters and skateboards. The reinforced concrete structure had been abandoned and covered in graffiti until 2002 when it morphed into a state-of-the-art, 30,000-squarefoot campus with studios, workshops, seminar rooms and a library. It was designed by Harrison Albright. 960 E. Third St., (213) 613-2200, sciarc.edu.

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Nike 3 on 3 at LA Live

Wild flowers at Los Angeles State Historic Park

American Ballet Theatre at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion

Grand Park

Hard Summer at Los Angeles State Historic Park

XLanes

Endeavour at California Science Center

Gustavo Dudamel

Where to Play Downtown

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The beauty of the Downtown entertainment scene is that there truly is something for everyone. If high culture is your thing, there are several world-class venues from which to choose. The Music Center campus, including the Walt Disney Concert Hall, is a top draw with its stimulating slate of theater, opera and symphony. Art lovers will appreciate the culturally diverse museums celebrating everything from Japanese history to kid-friendly exhibits to modern art. There are unique walking tours exploring the city’s hidden lore, stimulating speaker series and excursions galore. Don’t forget the lively and ever-expanding nightlife scene, which beckons with artisan cocktails, historical locales and plenty of people watching. Downtown is a playground just waiting to be discovered. 22

PERFORMING ARTS

When it comes to the performing arts in Downtown Los Angeles, two main players stand out: the Music Center campus, which includes the Walt Disney Concert Hall, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Ahmanson Theatre and Mark Taper Forum; and L.A. Live, the lively entertainment complex next to the Staples Center. In addition to these powerhouses, there is an equally impressive cast of venues catering to a range of eclectic interests.

Music Venues Club Nokia This intimate music venue at L.A. Live seats 2,300, with some of the best acoustics in town. You’ll find emerging

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music acts, cultural shows and private events. 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-7000 or clubnokia.com.

Conga Room Located at L.A. Live, this sleek venue features pan-Latin cuisine and dancing to everything from salsa to soul. It’s often called the “House of Blues for Latin music.” 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 745-0162 or congaroom.com.

Grand Performances at California Plaza Amid dancing fountains and twinkling pools, this nonprofit group hosts an exciting slate of free summer entertainment that’s family-friendly. Crowds flock to Cal Plaza for a lineup of eclectic world sounds (jazz, African, chamber music), international dance and performance


troupes, and movie nights. 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 687-2159 or grandperformances.org.

renowned for pristine acoustics. 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu.

Nokia Theatre

Grammy Museum Sound Stage

This mid-sized venue boasts the largest stage in Southern California, as well as a 7,100-seat configuration in which no guest is further than 220 feet from the action. Nokia hosts 120 events a year, including music, family, dance and comedy acts, and awards and special TV shows. 777 Chick Hearn Court (across from Staples Center). Visit nokiatheatrelalive.com.

In this 200-seat state-of-the-art theater, music fans come to see their favorite artists up close and personal. Often, musicians appear for a Q&A, then stick around to play solo sets. 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org.

Orpheum Theatre This 2,000-seat former vaudeville house has been restored with all the modern amenities. Still intact is the stunning Wurlitzer organ, one of only three original theater organs left in Southern California. From live acts to television tapings, the Orpheum has once again become a premiere venue. 842 S. Broadway, (877) 677-4386 or laorpheum.com.

Staples Center Located next to the Convention Center, Staples Center opened in 1999 as the first component of the glitzy L.A. Live sports and entertainment district. In addition to its four sports franchises (L.A. Lakers, Kings, Clippers and Sparks), the arena hosts everything from boxing matches to rock concerts to red carpet awards shows. 1111 S. Figueroa St. Box office (213) 742-7340 and info at staplescenter.com.

One-Eyed Gypsy Expect dancing girls, cabaret and classic burlesque acts in this intimate club (formerly Bordello). The provocative space, which once served as a brothel back in the day, is decked out in lots of red velvet and sultry lighting. An eclectic mix of bands fills out the lineup. 901 E. First St., (213) 687-3766 or one-eyedgypsy.com.

Pershing Square Downtown’s historic park hosts a regular schedule of free concerts, movie screenings, art exhibits and holiday events, including a winter ice skating rink. The summer music lineup brings concerts Thursday through Sunday. Bounded by Hill, Olive, Fifth and Sixth streets. (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare.

Nola’s This New Orleans-themed restaurant in the Arts District doubles as a 200-seat jazz and blues supper club. They’ve also got a Sunday jazz brunch. Most performances are free to diners. 734 E. Third St., (213) 680-3003 or nolasla.com.

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Designed to be one of the most acoustically sophisticated concert halls in the world, this 3.6-acre complex debuted in 2003 atop Bunker Hill. Today, it is one of Downtown’s most recognizable landmarks — it is home to the Los Angeles Philharmonic, led by Gustavo Dudamel, and the Los Angeles Master Chorale, headed by local maestro Grant Gershon. Architect Frank Gehry is said to have drawn inspiration from the look of a ship sailing at full mast when he designed this hall. The billowy stainless steel curves of the exterior and blonde wood ceiling of the 2,265-seat auditorium are both beautiful and functional, creating a stunning clarity of sound that showcases every note. The concert hall also hosts the free and popular World City performance and art series, which celebrates artistic traditions around the globe. The 2013-2014 season runs Oct. 14-May 17, and includes music, dance, puppetry and storytelling. 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-7211 or musiccenter.org.

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Bar Fedora Located in the rear of the First & Hope supper club, Bar Fedora channels a speakeasy vibe with its sultry lighting, intimate tables and Prohibition-era cocktails. Jazz and cabaret acts are programmed Thursday through Saturday. 710 W. First St., (213) 617-8555 or firstandhope.com.

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Colburn School This renowned performing arts school is often referred to as the “Julliard of the West.” More than 1,700 music, dance and drama students study with some 110 teachers. Both faculty and students, who range in age from infant to adult, perform more than 150 free public concerts year-round — everything from one-player recitals to an orchestral extravaganza. These shows unfold in a handful of onsite halls, including the famed Zipper, which is

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Redwood Bar & Grill

East West Players

This dimly-lit, nautical hangout hosts local blues groups, DJs, rockers and even the rockabilly set. 316 W. Second St., (213) 680-2600 or theredwoodbar.com.

Housed within the historic Union Center for the Arts in Little Tokyo, this award-winning theater company has premiered more than 100 plays and musicals about the Asian Pacific American experience and has held over 1,000 readings and workshops. Its repertoire features cutting-edge new works as well as adaptations of familiar plays with Asian casts. The mainstage of this 240-seat venue is the David Henry Hwang Theater, which serves more than 10,000 people a year. 120 N. Judge John Aiso St., (213) 625-7000 or eastwestplayers.org.

Second Street Jazz For a small bar and restaurant, this Little Tokyo outfit packs in a lot of local music. It runs the gamut — jazz, blues, hip hop, soul, rock, pop and R&B. 366 E. Second St., (213) 680-0047 or 2ndstjazz.com.

The Smell Located in the middle of an alley, the Smell is a friendly, all-ages refuge. The Concert at Pershing Square non-profit, volunteer-run space isn’t just for performances — it’s a hangout and a postmodern salon for emerging musicians and 2,000-person seating capacity for a variety of genres — progressive artists. The space is tight, sweaty, raw and dramas, musicals, comedies, classic revivals and even definitely punk rock. Tickets are generally $5, and are only touring Broadway productions. available at the door the night of the show. You can’t beat 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or taperahmanson.com. the price. No alcohol. 247 S. Main St., thesmell.org. Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Built in 1964, the Pavilion continues to make an impact on Larger Theater Houses visitors with its imposing crystal chandeliers, wide curving staircases, and one of the largest stages in the country. Ahmanson Theatre Located on the south end of the Music Center complex, it One of two venues that make up the Center Theatre houses the fourth largest opera company in the U.S., the Group (CTG), the Ahmanson boasts the largest theatrical L.A. Opera, led by tenor great and General Director Plácido subscription base on the West Coast and is the largest of Domingo. CTG’s spaces. Built in 1967, the theater features a flexible 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-7211 or musiccenter.org.

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Los Angeles Theatre Center This multi-theater facility is operated by the Latino Theater Company, which programs international festivals of dance, theater and spoken word, and often hosts one-off performances of small- to mid-sized touring groups. The LATC also hosts a summer conservatory for youth and works with the community to offer space for rehearsals, performances and cultural events. 514 S. Spring St., (213) 489-0994 or thelatc.org.

Mark Taper Forum Since 1967, the Taper has been racking up awards for theatrical excellence, including a number of Pulitzers and Tonys. Today, this theater in the round is led by Artistic Director Michael Ritchie, who continues to push the envelope with adventurous productions. The theater is part of a trio of performance spaces at the Music Center


(among them the Ahmanson and Dorothy Chandler Pavilion). Designwise, look for the sparkling abalone wall by designer Tony Duquette in the lobby, and a below-ground lounge that serves as the theater’s social hub. 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2772 or taperahmanson.org.

for local artists to create original and daring productions in theater, dance, music and film. 2220 Beverly Blvd., (213) 389-3856 or bootlegtheater.org.

The Hayworth Located in City West, this cozy venue specializes in thought-provoking theatrical productions. You’ll get a lot of bang for your buck here. 2511 Wilshire Blvd., theaterfilms.wix.com.

REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney/ CalArts Theater) This cutting-edge, black box space has carved out its own niche inside the lauded Walt Disney Concert Hall. Throughout the year, visitors are MOCA Grand Avenue treated to dance, avant-garde theater, films, panel discussions and literary events. The playful neon out front is just a taste of the surprises to be found inside this creative laboratory, whether you stumble across an impromptu performance in the lounge, stop in for a peek at the stunning art gallery, or take in one of the innovative performances that transform the flexible space. 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org.

USC’s Bovard Auditorium This gorgeous red brick building is the centerpiece of the campus, and though it is home to USC’s formidable symphony, it also serves as a venue for many music groups and performance troupes. Originally built for church services, the building features a large proscenium arch and side organ lofts. Recent renovations have improved the

24th Street Theatre

acoustics and amenities in this 1922 building. 3551 Trousdale Parkway, (213) 740-4211 or usc.edu.

Intimate Theaters Archway Studio/Theatre In addition to a slate of classical and contemporary plays, musical theater, variety shows and comedy, this Arts District space also hosts yoga and other community events. 305 S. Hewitt St., (213) 237-9933 or archwayla.com.

Bootleg Theater Located on Beverly Boulevard, this 1930s warehouse theater is a bit off the beaten path. It provides a space

Located inside a 1928 carriage house, this 99-seat theater in Exposition Park has showcased a number of critically acclaimed performances since 1997, including one-offs and Spanishlanguage productions. They also do youth outreach, art exhibits, music and dance. 1117 W. 24th St., (213) 745-6516 or 24thstreet.org.

MUSEUMS

There is no shortage of museums in Downtown Los Angeles, with several notable institutions celebrating art, culture and history. The Museum of Contemporary Art sits atop Bunker Hill, while its edgier sister locale, the Geffen Contemporary, occupies the opposite end of town in Little Tokyo. Exposition Park to the south is home to a cluster of venues including the family-friendly Natural History Museum and California Science Center.

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For Art Lovers Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), Grand Avenue

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MOCA is the only museum in the city devoted exclusively to contemporary art. Founded in 1979, MOCA has amassed one of the country’s most renowned permanent collections of art created since the 1940s. The collection boasts a vast cache of more than 5,000 Abstract Expressionist, Minimalist, Post-Modernist and Pop Art gems. Look for ambitious themed shows and retrospectives, surrounded by cool programming — especially during the summer, when nighttime events keep the museum doors open late with live music, art and cocktails. General admission $12; seniors and students $7; and free from 5-8 p.m. every Thursday. Closed Tuesday-Wednesday. 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 626-6222 or moca.org.

Museum of Contemporary Art, The Geffen Contemporary

sssmokehouse.com 213-626-0535 640 N. Spring St. (Chinatown)

Before MOCA’s flagship facility on Grand Avenue opened, a temporary exhibit space was commissioned in Little Tokyo to house the sculptures and installations that were pouring in from donors. Opened in 1983, the lofty space was accessible and approachable, and became an instant hit with visitors. Museum officials decided to make the temporary venue permanent, and its 40,000 square feet continues to house the more playful and unwieldy of MOCA’s shows. General admission $12; seniors and students $7; and free from 5-8 p.m. every Thursday. Closed Tuesday-Wednesday. 152 N. Central Ave., (213) 626-6222 or moca.org.

Culture Vultures and History Buffs African American Firefighter Museum

LA’s Original French Brasserie

Fire Station 30 was established in 1913 to serve the largely black Central Avenue community, and from 1924 to 1955, it was one of two segregated fire stations in L.A. It now serves as the first and only freestanding African American firefighter museum in the country. The space offers a fascinating look at vintage fire apparatus (including an 1890 hose wagon and 1940 Pirsch ladder truck), as well as photos, memorabilia and stories of the men and women who served. Free admission. Open Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. 1401 S. Central Ave., (213) 744-1730 or aaffmuseum.org.

California African American Museum

6 M e e t i n g Ro o m s TA I X Fr e n c h R e s t a u r a n t 1 9 1 1 W. S u n s e t B l v d . L o s A n g e l e s , CA 9 0 0 2 6 w w w. t a i x f r e n c h . c o m

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The California African American Museum (CAAM) researches, collects, preserves and interprets for public enrichment the history, art and culture of African Americans. In addition to its permanent collection of more than 6,000 objects of art, artifacts and historical documents, and a research library containing thousands of volumes, CAAM hosts nearly a dozen in-house curated and/or traveling exhibitions and more than 80 public programs each year. The museum is open Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sundays 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission and workshop participation is free. 600 State Dr., (213) 744-7432 or caam.ca.gov.

Chinese American Museum Housed in the oldest and last surviving structure of Los Angeles’ original Chinatown, CAM opened in 2003 after a 20-year effort on the part of local politicians, historians, educators, community volunteers and descendants of Chinese American pioneer families. The venue, which is located in the city’s El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, is Southern California’s first and only museum

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dedicated to telling the history and stories of the Chinese American experience in Los Angeles. Artifacts include antique furniture, herbal store furnishings, traditional wedding gowns, toys, faded photos and letters, dishware and literature. There are also audio recordings of Chinese Americans who shared their memories of growing up in Old Chinatown. Follow the hanging lanterns to the museum. General admission $3; students and seniors $2. Open Tuesday-Sunday. 425 N. Los Angeles St., (213) 485-8567 or camla.org.

El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument Of this monument’s 27 historic buildings, four function as museums: the Avila Adobe, the city’s oldest house; the Sepulveda House, home to exhibits and the Visitors Center; the Old Plaza Firehouse, which houses late 19th century fire-fighting equipment; and the Italian Hall Museum. The most popular part of the monument is the Olvera Street marketplace with restaurants, shops and booths selling handicrafts. The plaza serves as a lively civic gathering place that hosts sermonizing, performance and a busy calendar of festivals. Visit the El Pueblo website for a schedule of yearly events, which includes the Blessing of the Animals in April, and fiestas such as Cinco de Mayo (May), Dia de Los Muertos (November), and the beautiful candlelight procession Las Posadas (December). Open daily, though hours at shops and halls vary. 845 N. Alameda St., (213) 485-6855 or elpueblo.lacity.org.

Japanese American National Museum JANM is the only museum in the country dedicated to the Japanese American experience. Inside, you’ll find artifacts from the “Issei Pioneers,” first generation Japanese immigrants, and many initiatives that seek to safeguard the Issei’s rich oral histories and the materials that documented the lives of Japanese Americans before, during and after their World War II-era incarceration. Opened in 1992, the museum is located in a former Buddhist temple designed to incorporate Middle Eastern and Japanese aesthetic elements of a temple in Kyoto. A striking, 85,000-square-foot pavilion was added in 1999, allowing the museum to expand its offerings. There are local shows as well as visiting exhibits from institutions such as the Smithsonian. JANM has a museum store on the plaza level as well as a tea house, and it shares its sunny exterior plaza with MOCA, the Geffen Contemporary, and the nonprofit National Center for the Preservation of Democracy. Summer often brings family festivals, live concerts and speaker events. General admission $9; students and seniors $5. Admission is free every Thursday from 5-8 p.m. and all day every third Thursday of the month. Closed Monday. 369 E. First St., (213) 625-0414 or janm.org.

La Plaza de Cultura y Artes This cultural center celebrates the unique Mexican and Mexican American experience in L.A. and Southern California with interactive exhibits, films, lectures and classes. It is located on a 2.2-acre campus near Olvera Street, and is surrounded by a sprawling garden. Admission is free. Closed Tuesday. 501 N. Main St., (213) 542-6200 or lapca.org.

Latino Museum of History Exhibits focus on Latino art. The museum recently acquired a superb contemporary collection and more than 300 silkscreen prints from the Self-Help Graphics archives. Open Tuesday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 514 S. Spring St., (213) 626-7600 or thelatinomuseum.com.


Wells Fargo History Museum This petite museum can be found inside the Wells Fargo Center in the Financial District. It chronicles the company’s role in Southern California, including the Gold Rush days of the 19th century — stagecoaches, gold nuggets and Old West paraphernalia. The museum attracts school field trips, California history buffs and the occasional office worker looking for a break. Free admission. Groups of 10 or more can make reservations for free guided tours. Open MondayFriday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. In the lobby of 333 S. Grand Ave., (213) 253-7166 or wellsfargohistory.com.

Special Interests FIDM Museum and Galleries The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising teaches tomorrow’s design stars — you’ll see its stylishly dressed students all over this part of Downtown. But FIDM also takes care of a permanent collection of more than 12,000 costumes, accessories and textiles from the 18th century through the present, including designs from Chanel, Dior and Yves Saint Laurent. You can also view the early Hollywood Costume Collection on loan from the City of Los Angeles’ Department of Recreation and Parks. The highlight of the year comes when the museum presents its two major exhibits featuring a stunning display of movie and television costumes from the previous year. Free admission. Open Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 624-1200 or fidm.edu.

FIDM’s Annette Green Perfume Museum Part of the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising, the Annette Green Perfume Museum is the only museum of its kind in the U.S. — one dedicated to scents. Its namesake Green has been an authority and leader in the fragrance industry since the early 1960s, and the collection contains more than 2,000 bottles, perfume presentations and documentary ephemera dating back to the late 1800s. About 200 objects are displayed and rotated every six months. Free admission. Open Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 919 S. Grand Ave., second floor lobby, (213) 624-1200 or fidm.edu.

Grammy Museum Spanning four, eye-popping floors of unique exhibits celebrating the power and history of music, this sleek venue occupies a spot on the northeast corner of L.A.

Live. Incorporating film, sound and interactive experiences, the exhibits highlight genres such as rock and roll, hip-hop, country, classical, Latin, R&B and jazz. The collection of artifacts is vast and unlike anything else — there are lyric notebooks, archival photos, costumes, personal items and much more. The museum also explores the art and technology of the recording process, and the history of the awards, and it programs everything from free guitar lessons for kids and artistin-residence programs to intimate conversations with Grammy-winning stars. There are often special events surrounding new exhibits, including dinners and expert speakers. General admission $12.95; students and seniors $11.95. Open weekdays 11:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m., weekends 10 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 765-6800 or grammymuseum.org.

Earthy Museums California Science Center This popular museum has welcomed more than 18 million visitors since opening in 1998. It’s a veritable science wonderland with hands-on and creative exhibits that thrill and fascinate children and adults alike. Rotating special exhibits and displays fill three stories: The Air and Space Gallery features real planes and spacecraft; the World of Life examines the living environment, from a single-celled bacterium to a 100 trillion-celled human being; and the Creative World looks at the consequences, and amazement, of human invention — from computer technology and digital imaging to solar cars and earthquake-resistant buildings. A new Ecosystems wing features a diverse assortment of live plants and animals, as well as interactive exhibits in 11 environments; you can walk through a live kelp forest or experiment on a polar ice wall. The best times to visit are on weekends or on weekday afternoons after 1:30 p.m., because weekday mornings are often packed with school kids on field trips. A few steps across the Science Center’s plaza you’ll find the museum’s IMAX Theater, a seven-story screen that puts science in larger-than-life, 3D perspective. Be sure to visit the Center’s newest acquisition, the space shuttle Endeavour. Free museum admission. Open daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 700 State Drive, (323) 724-3623 or californiasciencecenter.org.

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County The ever-growing and changing NHM is in the throes of an exciting evolution, a $135 million campaign that

Music Center

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DOWNTOWN NIGHTLIFE GUIDE Angel City Brewery 216 S. Alameda St. (at Traction Ave.) (213) 622-1261, angelcitybrewery.com Reopened in spring, this century-old warehouse features a bar and beer garden with eight craft brews on tap. A whimsical slide from the building’s industrial past descends from the second floor, while Deco touches set off the curvy bar. Sip your beer next to towering stainless steel tanks or pull up a seat at one of the communal picnic tables. Food trucks provide sustenance. The Association 110 E. Sixth St. (213) 627-7385, theassociation-la.com Look for the black door with a lion’s head knocker and you’ve found this cheeky, English-inspired lounge. Inside, mixologists work like mad scientists behind a 60-foot bar crafting cocktails from ingredients like absinthe, cardamom, cava, ginger beer and fresh squeezed juices. There’s a live DJ Thurs.-Sat. Bacaro 2308 S. Union St. (213) 748-7205, bacarola.com Check out the chalkboard for a selection of rotating Italian reds, whites and sparkling wines. There’s a jovial vibe at this USC-adjacent spot (hence the students and profs), and lots of wine talk at the communal table.

Nibble from a selection of California tapas. Bar 107 107 W. Fourth St. (213) 625-7382, myspace.com/bar107 Downtowners have been throwing back stiff shots and Pabst tall boys for years at this neighborhood watering hole. Old favorites course through the speakers, and there’s an impressive collection of kitsch decorating the dimly-lit space (give a wink to the naked Burt Reynolds painting). Don’t miss the gong show karaoke night on the last Wednesday of the month — it’s a riot. Belasco Theatre 1050 S. Hill St. (213) 746-5672, thebelasco.com Inside the historic Belasco Theatre you’ll find a vast event space and dance club. It also houses Vintage 1050, a wine and tapas bar with happy hour specials. Blue Whale Bar 123 Astronaut E. S. Onizuka St., #301 (213) 620-0908, bluewhalemusic.com A hidden gem in Little Tokyo’s Weller Court, this jazz bar/concert venue is intimate and chill. Cover $10. Broadway Bar 830 S. Broadway (213) 614-9909, 213nightlife.com

Little Bear

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The Edison

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The neon sign outside hints at the ’40s supper club vibe. The low-lit interior sports a 50-foot circular bar, tiered lounge and a location that lures concertgoers from the Orpheum Theatre next door. Caña Rum Bar 714 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 745-7090, canarumbar.com This dark, intimate spot has a vintage Latin vibe. The handmade rum cocktails are tasty and fresh (try the Brazilian Necktie), and there’s a lowkey patio that welcomes cigar smokers. Patrons are charged a $20 membership fee that’s good for a year. Casey’s Irish Bar & Grille 613 S. Grand Ave. (213) 629-2353, 213nightlife.com Venture just below street level into Downtown’s favorite Irish pub, replete with tin ceilings and dark wood. Cozy up to the mahogany bar or take a pint out onto the covered patio. Cole’s 118 E. Sixth St. (213) 622-4090, 213nightlife.com It’s still home to the famed French Dip sandwich, but the historic Cole’s also serves as a modern saloon that slings excellent whiskey drinks and throwback cocktails. There’s ambiance aplenty, with original glass, penny tiles, old photos and a 40-foot mahogany bar. Conga Room 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 745-0162, congaroom.com Located at L.A. Live, this is where salsa dancing (and lessons), good sangria from three bars, and live bands come together in a sleek space that combines the vibes of Barcelona and Mexico City.

Corkbar 403 W. 12th St. (213) 746-0050, corkbar.com This stylish South Park wine bar on the ground floor of the Evo condo building serves California wines — small Paso Robles vintners and the Napa heavy hitters. There are about 70 wines by the glass, as well as flights and bottles. Sip inside the casual space or on one of two patios. The Down & Out 501 S. Spring St. On the bottom of the Alexandria Hotel, a diverse crowd fills this cavernous dive bar. The walls are decorated with celebrity mug shots, games are usually on TV, and there are plenty of beer and drink specials. Ebanos Crossing 200 S. Hill St. (213) 935-8829, ebanoscrossing.com This new resto-lounge replaced Pho Citi with its Prohibition-inspired concept featuring small plates and a creative menu of forbidden spirits. Named after a Texas river crossing favored by bootleggers, modern-day pleasureseekers enter through a red backlit stone corridor into a space decked out with scandalous red walls and chairs, dark leather furniture and flickering candlelight. The Edison 108 W. Second St. (213) 613-0000, edisondowntown.com The Edison is a former power plantturned-vintage cocktail lounge. Entertainment runs the gamut from eclectic bands to Goth acrobats hanging from the ceiling. The main attraction is the space itself, a sumptuous and stunning interior that still retains many of the architectural and mechanical artifacts of its former life. Be sure to dress nicely. Elevate Lounge 811 Wilshire Blvd., 21st floor (213) 623-7100, elevatelounge.com It may feel like an office building on the


elevator ride up, but once inside guests are transported thanks to the wall-towall views, modern aesthetic and DJs spinning nightly. Grab a drink from one of the two bars and hit the dance floor. Escondite 410 Boyd St. (213) 626-1800, theescondite.com Think of this place as a sort of burger speakeasy (there are no clear signs so it’s easy to miss). They’ve got a tasty list of the aforementioned food, as well as a rustic bar serving beer and handmade drinks. You’ll find live music every night of the week. Lot parking available. Exchange LA 618 S. Spring St. (213) 627-8070, exchangela.com Built in 1930, this former stock exchange is now in its second incarnation as a nightclub. The Art Decoinspired space is big, loud and ideal for dancing the night away. The Falls 626 S. Spring St. (213) 612-0072, thefallslounge.com Adding to the nightlife collection along Spring Street, this vintage-glam bar has a spot-on mix of great bartenders, good tunes, an eclectic crowd and chic ambiance. It’s just the kind of neighborhood place where you want to hang out. Far Bar 347 E. First St., (behind the Chop Suey Café) (213) 617-9990, farbarla.com The Far Bar has evolved into a serious craft beer hub, with some 40 taps dedicated to great brews. Tucked behind the Chop Suey Café, the brick-walled patio strung

with twinkling lights is still a favorite spot to settle in for the night. Tip: Look for the sidewalk sign and enter through a very narrow alleyway. Figueroa Hotel 939 S. Figueroa St. (213) 627-8971, figueroahotel.com The Moroccan-inspired Figueroa Hotel is an unexpected oasis just a block north of Staples Center. Head to the rear of the hotel, grab a drink at the lush Veranda Bar and enjoy it poolside. There are tables set amid exotic lanterns, succulents and even a few low, fabric-draped beds. This is the perfect place to enjoy the sunny California weather. First & Hope 701 W. First St. (213) 617-8555, firstandhope.com This Art Deco-inspired supper club serves inventive cocktails and wellmade classics. Head to the back of the restaurant where Bar Fedora hosts sultry cabaret and live music. Gallery Bar and Cognac Room 506 S. Grand Ave. (213) 612-1206, millenniumhotels.com There’s an Old-World elegance to this bar in the historic Biltmore Hotel, which has become a hip destination in its own right thanks to a storied history (The Black Dahlia), veteran bartenders and romantic setting. The drinks are strong and generous, and there’s live jazz Friday and Saturday. Golden Gopher 417 W. Eighth St. (213) 614-8001, 213nightlife.com Exposed brick walls, chandeliers and golden gopher lamps augment a rocking jukebox, cheap Pabst Blue Ribbon and an outdoor lounge for the city’s holdout smokers. Grand Star 943 N. Broadway (213) 626-2285, grandstarjazzclub.com The Grand Star is a vintage Chinatown hangout. Order up a wicked rum drink and soak in the kitsch. There’s lively karaoke and a lineup of jazz,

Onyx Restaurant, Lounge & Bar

Figueroa Hotel hip hop and R&B. Every Friday they host the Underground, a night of ’80s favorites that gets the crowd moving. Hank’s Bar 840 S. Grand Ave. (213) 623-7718 Founded by the late great Henry “Hank” Holzer (a former boxer) on the ground floor of the Stillwell Hotel, this is one of Downtown’s last good dive bars. There’s free popcorn, a great jukebox and stiff drinks that won’t break the bank. Icon Ultra Lounge 1248 S. Figueroa St. (213) 867-6000, iconultraloungedtla.com Located across from Staples Center, this sprawling club and party space sits on the second floor with two decks, sweet views, a dance floor, cabana-lined rooftop bar and cigar lounge. King Eddy Saloon 131 E. Fifth St. (213) 629-2023, kingeddysaloon.com This longtime neighborhood dive bar, which opened in 1933, changed ownership last year. The result has been a few cosmetic changes, including some new craft brew options. The clientele is mixed, the prices are cheap and the character is as colorful as ever. L.A. Brewing Co. 750 S. Broadway (213) 622-0500, labrewingco.com Sample from the 100 beers on tap, served at a chilly 22 degrees. Munch on burgers, steaks and finger foods while you watch the game or hang out. There’s a live cover band every Thursday. La Cita 336 S. Hill St. (213) 687-7111, lacitabar.com If you’re in the mood for an authentic Mexican ranchero bar that draws just about every demographic, then get your drink on here. Booze is cheap, lighting is dim, DJs rock, and the covered patio

is a hidden gem. Tip: Hit the build-yourown Bloody Mary bar on Sunday. Las Perlas 107 E. Sixth St. (213) 988-8355, 213nightlife.com They’ve got a fabulous selection of tequila and mezcal, and intriguing cocktails made with syrups, Mexican herbs, fruit and spices. You can bring in outside food to help soak up the alcohol. It’s perfectly dim for your journey down the rabbit hole. Library Bar 630 W. Sixth St. (213) 614-0053, librarybarla.com It may be tricked out like a cozy library with overstuffed chairs and books on the shelves, but the only thing you’ll be checking out here is the selection of craft beers on tap, a smart wine list and some outstanding eats. Sundays bring a free movie and drink specials. Little Bear 1855 Industrial St. (213) 622-8100, littlebearla.com This Belgian beer cafe and restaurant which debuted in January in the heart of the Arts District, is open until 2 a.m. daily. They’ve got a wide selection of Belgian imports that pair well with a juicy burger and crispy fries. Lucky Strike Lanes & Lounge 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 542-4880, bowlluckystrike.com This hip L.A. Live outpost of Lucky Strike takes bowling night to a new level with fancy cocktails, stylish decor, a lounge and dress code. Mas Malo 515 W. Seventh St. (213) 985-4332, masmalorestaurant.com Customers can select from nearly 240 tequilas and 30 mescals. The daily “hora feliz” from 4-6 p.m. brings $5 margaritas and other swell deals. Don’t forget to throw in a fried pickle taco.

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McCormick & Schmick’s 633 W. Fifth St., Fourth Level (213) 629-1929, mccormickandschmicks.com Take in the dazzling skyline and the unbeatable food and drink specials. Happy hour is a Downtown institution here.

fur interior and karaoke scene. They serve up sake, wine and fancy drinks, as well as an eclectic mix of small plates, fondue and pastas. 321 Lounge 1911 Sunset Blvd. (213) 484-1265, taixfrench.com There are a lot of retro lounges out there, but this is the real thing: a dark, cozy den with sofas, tight tables, and stage that’s hit by everything from indie bands to comedians.

Mignon 128 E. Sixth St. (213) 489-0131, mignonla.com Cozy and intimate, this unpretentious wine bar and bistro seats about 20. Pull up a stool for a taste of one of two dozen or so small production European wines. Relax after work or come for a mellow date. Nirvana Bar & Grill 314 E. First St. (213) 625-0066 Nirvana is a chill place to watch the game or meet up with co-workers. There are plenty of flat screens and a projector playing sports. Happy hour prices can’t be beat. One-Eyed Gypsy 901 E. First St. (323) 637-4153, one-eyedgypsy.com You’ll find an eclectic lineup of live music every night of the week, gilded décor and a long wooden bar where locals can belly up with a craft beer or hand-muddled cocktails. Try your luck at the vintage Skee-Ball machines or fortune teller booth. Onyx Restaurant, Lounge & Bar 118 W. Fifth St. (213) 891-1144, onyxloungela.com This candlelit lounge in the historic Security Lofts building serves farm fresh cocktails, absinthe, punches to share and a long list of other vintage drinks.

Escondite name and you can relax over a martini and good burger with friends. This longtime Old Bank District hangout offers a lively patio scene, prime people watching and a busy happy hour.

displayed, and the resident bartenders definitely know how to pour them. The space has an Irish-infused vibe with plaid carpets, taxidermy and pool tables.

Pour Haus Wine Bar 1820 Industrial St. (213) 327-0304, pourhauswinebar.com This adorable gem offers affordable wines by the glass, along with a few tasty snacks like cheese, olives and charcuterie. The welcoming garden patio offers comfy sofas for reclining and there’s a selection of board games for some friendly competition.

Silo Vodka Bar 225 W. Seventh St. (213) 221-7956, silodtla.com You’ll find top-notch cocktails paired with everything that goes well with vodka, including caviar, sliders, cheese, salumi and of course, fried Twinkies.

Public School 612 612 S. Flower St. (213) 623-1172, publicschool612.com Get your education in the art of food and beer. The gourmet bar menu features lamb burgers, short rib tacos, artisan cheeses and more.

Pattern Bar 100 W. Ninth St. (213) 627-7774, patternbar.com Fabulous corncakes, elegant salads, Spanish omelets, cured meats and cheeses whet the appetite. Sundays feature all things vintage Cuba. There are inventive cocktails, sangria, beer and wine.

Redwood Bar and Grill 316 W. Second St. (213) 680-2600, theredwoodbar.com Dubbed the “Pirate Bar,” this maritime-inspired tavern is decked out with fishing nets and floats, weathered wooden planks and the stumps of dock timbers. If there aren’t live bands or DJs doing their thing in the back, the jukebox is always a good bet.

The Perch 448 S. Hill St., 13th floor (213) 802-1770, perchla.com Travel up two elevators to a bar with some of the greatest views Downtown and laid back patio vibe. Dusk is gorgeous, and when the sun goes down, the fire pits light up.

Salvage Bar & Lounge 717 W. Seventh St. (213) 688-7755, salvagela.com Using salvaged materials from the historic Roosevelt Lofts, this lounge comes with lots of vintage style, tap beer, organic cocktails and gourmet eats.

Pete’s Cafe and Bar 400 S. Main St. (213) 617-1000, petescafe.com It’s Downtown’s equivalent of “Cheers,” where everyone knows your

Seven Grand 515 W. Seventh St. (213) 614-0737, 213nightlife.com Behind the hand-carved black walnut bar, more than 120 whiskeys are

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Spring St. Bar 626-B S. Spring St. (213) 622-5859, springstla.com Suspender-wearing barkeeps at this beer-centric pub pour from 26 brews on tap. There are yummy gourmet eats, and no attitude. Standard Downtown Rooftop Bar 550 S. Flower St. (213) 892-8080, standardhotels.com For impact, you can’t beat the Standard’s stellar rooftop location with endless skyline views, infinity pool, pod-shaped cabanas, and stylish crowds. They’ve also added a mini beer garden where you can down a stein and bratwurst. Suede Bar & Lounge 404 S. Figueroa St. (213) 489-3590, suedebarla.com This petite bar and lounge on the first floor of the Bonaventure Hotel features a sleek vibe with a red color scheme, a DJ and popular happy hour. You can smoke a cigar from the humidor on the patio. Tapas and Wine Bar C 428 E. Second St. (213) 628-8877, barc.biz Don’t let the unassuming strip mall location fool you. Your head will spin once you catch a glimpse of the waitresses in French maid outfits, the faux

Tony’s Saloon 2017 E. Seventh St. (213) 622-5523, 213nightlife.com There’s a casual, Prohibition-era charm to this Arts District locale. You’ll find hand-crafted cocktails, muscular drinks, pool, free ping pong and a photo booth. There’s also a nightly happy hour and a passthrough window from the pizza joint next door. The Varnish 118 E. Sixth St. (213) 622-9999, 213nightlife.com A nondescript brown door at the back of Cole’s opens to a bygone world of vested bartenders who take their drink-making seriously. It’s dark, intimate and conducive to drinking. The Vault 801 S. Hill St. (800) 725-1184, vaultnightclub.com Inside a former bank building, this dance club and lounge has two dance floors and bottle service. Villains Tavern 1356 Palmetto St. (213) 613-0766, villainstavern.com This take on an outlaw’s hideaway blends Steampunk and Gothic-chic. It boasts a fabulous patio, shuffleboard, an arched church window and antique apothecary bottles. Cocktails are painstakingly made and served in charming mason jars. The menu alone is worth a visit. Weiland Brewery Underground 505 S. Flower St. (213) 622-1125, weilandbrewery.net The name doesn’t lie: This Weiland’s is located underground in the City National Bank Building. Open weekdays, visitors will find great craft beers, over 100 wines and plasma TVs with sports aplenty. Wurstküche Restaurant 800 E. Third St. (213) 687-4444, wurstkucherestaurant.com Belgian beer, exotic grilled sausages and long communal tables make for a festive scene well after midnight.


has transformed the space. The most recent addition is the museum’s world-class dinosaur hall, which doubled the size of the venue’s old galleries. The 14,000-square-foot space features an impressive array of 300 fossils and specimens, 30 full-body displays using dynamic mounting techniques that let you get up close and personal, and the world’s only T-Rex growth series (an adult, juvenile and baby). Opened in 1913, the NHM houses a mindboggling 35 million specimens. Three diorama halls display mammals and habitats from all over the world, and other standouts include the gem and mineral hall, the family-friendly Discovery Center and Insect Zoo, and the Dino Lab, in which visitors can watch as paleontologists work on dinosaur fossils. In addition to the steady stream of field trips and school children during the day, Angelenos also make their way to the museum at night. DJ events and special speakers appear late into the night during the First Fridays series, which runs January through June. Like the California Science Center (listed above), the best times to visit are on weekends or on weekday afternoons, because of the constant flow of school excursions. General admission $12; seniors and students $9; children ages 5-12 are $5; children ages 13-17 are $8. Open daily 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-DINO or nhm.org.

GALLERIES

The Downtown art scene continues to evolve with exciting new galleries and lively events. The monthly Downtown

Downtown Art Walk

gallery hubs. In the late ’90s, two art spaces opened on the tiny pedestrian walkway. More galleries followed, and when they started hosting communal openings on Saturday nights in 2000, the scene exploded. Crowds swelled, and today, though the hype and the body mass have mellowed, the galleries remain. Dozens of art spaces have branched off from Chung King Road to adjacent pockets and along Hill Street. The art here tends to be a bit more mature and internationally sought compared to the art in the spunky, younger spaces of Gallery Row. Many venues still pay tribute to the Chinatown culture and locale, even keeping the original storefront names. Chung King Road is in Chinatown’s West Plaza, adjacent to 949 N. Hill St., (213) 680-0243 or chinatownla.com.

Gallery Row and the Downtown Art Walk

Art Walk draws thousands of art lovers and night owls into local galleries, along with Chinatown’s openings along Chung King Road. In total, about 70 galleries have laid down roots in Downtown, creating a thriving art scene that shows no signs of slowing.

Chinatown Galleries The quaint, 40-foot wide pedestrian thoroughfare known as Chung King Road may look like it came straight out of a vintage movie set, but it is in fact one of the city’s few

Since 2004, art lovers have flocked to Downtown’s Gallery Row, roughly defined as Main and Spring between Second and Ninth streets. The hip gallery cluster has since spawned a monthly Art Walk, a free, self-guided public art phenomenon in which participating galleries stay open late on the second Thursday of the month. On these nights, the streets are packed with locals and visitors alike mingling on the sidewalks, drifting in and out of galleries, sipping wine in outdoor cafes, and dropping in on book signings and live music performances. Most of the galleries are within walking distance. Gallery hours range from noon to 9 p.m. Maps and info at galleryrow.org and downtownartwalk.com.

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Olvera Street

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TOURS

In a city as big as Los Angeles, there are endless excursions to accommodate just about everyone. In Downtown alone, you’ll find unexpected parks, historic landmarks and architectural gems.

Architecture Tours L.A.

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These tours are guided by an architecture historian and guidebook author who knows her way around the city’s most interesting landmarks. Choose from two- and threehour driving tours (via deluxe van) of more than 70 Downtown sites including buildings that played a part in the formation of the city, historic hotels, elegant department stores, wholesale districts, civic gems, Little Tokyo, Chinatown and modern marvels such as Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall. Tours are $70 per person and typically last between 2-3 hours. (323) 464-7868 or architecturetoursla.com.

Home to the colorful oil baron Edward Doheny and his family for 60 years, this eclectic, Romantic Revival mansion was built in 1899. The home, along with the surrounding historic Chester Place properties, is part of the Mount Saint Mary’s campus. Visitors are welcome to peek inside for a look at the exquisite architectural details. You’ll see the Pompeian Room with its iridescent Tiffany glass dome and imported Siena marble, and learn about the lives of Edward and Estelle Doheny (as well as the influential cast of characters who lived on or near Chester Place). Public tours include the first floor of the mansion and surrounding grounds; the complete tour lasts approximately 2 1/2 hours. Tickets are $20. Reservations required. On the Mount Saint Mary’s College campus, 10 Chester Place, (213) 477-2962 or dohenymansion.org.

Downtown L.A. Walks

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1375 East 6th Street Los Angeles CA 90021

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Esotouric

A GREAT WAY TO RELIEVE STRESS

• Large SeLectIon of PIStoLS, revoLverS, rIfLeS and Shotgun rentaLS

Pico House (1870), the largest and the first three-story building built in Los Angeles; and Olvera Street, a quaint Mexican marketplace built in 1930. Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m., 11 a.m. and noon. 130 Paseo de la Plaza, (213) 628-1274 or lasangelitas.org.

Lace up your walking shoes and get ready to explore. This helpful website provides free, downloadable podcasts that guide listeners through the streets, sidewalks and walking paths of Bunker Hill, Chinatown, Civic Center, Downtown’s Center, Fashion District, Figueroa Corridor, Historic Downtown, Jewelry District, Toy District and Warehouse District. Visit downtownlawalks.com.

El Pueblo Volunteer docents known as Las Angelitas lead free, 50-minute walking tours of the city’s birthplace. Highlights include the monument’s historic buildings such as the Avila Adobe (1818), the pueblo’s oldest construction; the

D I V E R S I O N S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

This is not your run-of-the-mill tour company. Routes tend to veer off into fascinating, neglected neighborhoods, following provocative and complex themes. You’ll find a mix of crime and social history, music and architecture, literature and film, and art and urban study. All of it is told by expert guides in a witty, wellresearched and always passionate manner. Whether on foot or aboard the Esotouric bus, you’ll explore the city’s secret heart, find out what life was like through the eyes of local lit legends Charles Bukowski and John Fante, retrace the last steps of the city’s most notorious unsolved mystery, Elizabeth “The Black Dahlia” Short, or delve into the secret history and future of Downtown. Ticket prices vary. Visit esotouric.com.

Los Angeles Central Library Tour Daily walk-in, docent-led tours teach visitors about the library’s Goodhue Building, with its sphinxes and rooftop pyramid; the high-tech Bradley Wing; the Maguire Garden art; and the eight-story atrium decked out in whimsical chandeliers. You’ll also learn about the library’s services too. Tours last about an hour and depart in front of the library store. 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7168 or lapl.org/central/tours.html.

Los Angeles Conservancy Tours When it comes to the history and architecture of the city, there’s probably no more important an organization than the Los Angeles Conservancy. Not only does it save architecturally and culturally significant buildings from the wrecking ball, it also has a whip-smart cadre of docents. For more than two decades they’ve led fascinating walking tours of the historic Broadway Theater District, Art Deco palaces, civic gems, high-rises and the Historic Core. Most of the two-and-a-half-hour excursions depart at 10 a.m., rain or shine. Reservations required, as the tours often sell out. Tickets are $10 for the general public, $5 for members. (213) 623-2489 ext. 2 or laconservancy.org.

Metro Rail Art Tours This transit agency has made a serious commitment to public art, as evidenced when you ride the bus or rail lines. Even if you’re not riding the Metro, you can still


check out the commissioned artwork. Free docent-led tours are offered the first Thursday, Saturday and Sunday of every month with insight into the artwork, artists, creative process and community connection. The twohour tours meet at Hollywood/Highland Metro Station on Saturday and at historic Union Station on Sunday. Participants are introduced to quirky bus shelters with bird sounds, dancing lights, flying men and industrial angels. No reservations required. (213) 922-2738 or metro.net/metroart.

San Antonio Winery It’s the last place you’d expect to find a working winery, but this Downtown-area venue is full of surprises. Follow the signs as they lead beyond warehouses and railroad tracks, and you’ll find the historic San Antonio Winery. Family-owned since 1917, it’s a rare gem in the middle of the city where you can get an up close look at oak barrels, fermenting cellars, an onsite bottling operation and lots of local history. It’s the last of the producing wineries in Los Angeles and the last of the more than 100 that once lined the L.A. River Basin. The tour highlight, of course, is the complimentary wine tasting. There’s also an onsite restaurant and wine store. Weekday tours are 12-4 p.m. on the hour; weekends 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on the hour. 737 Lamar St., (323) 223-1401 ext. 15 or sanantoniowinery.com.

Saturday Housing Bus Tour You’ll step inside about half a dozen residences, both for sale and for lease, on this extensive bus tour, which is geared towards prospective Downtown residents or the merely curious. These Saturday excursions visit the full spectrum of Downtown spaces: historic loft-style condos, artsy abodes and luxury apartments. In some cases, tenants are already in residence; other projects are under construction with sales offices and model units available to visit. Tours start at 9 a.m. and end at about 1 p.m. (213) 624-2146 or downtownla.com.

by the Chinatown Business Improvement District. Tours begin at 10:30 a.m. Tickets are $20 adults, $15 seniors/ students. Reservations required. (213) 680-0243 or chinatownla.com.

Urban Shopping Adventures Get insider access to the Fashion District’s 90 square blocks. This tour company takes you where you need to go for the best bargains and must-see spots so you can shop like a pro. You can walk or take a chauffeured van to find the best deals on fashions, accessories, sample sales, fabric and flowers. Custom outings for crafters, brides, bachelorette parties and mother/daughter groups are available. Ticket prices vary. (213) 683-9715 or urbanshoppingadventures.com.

Walt Disney Concert Hall Tours You don’t always need a ticket to get inside this stunning silver venue. Visitors can choose from a variety of free options including self-guided audio tours, matinee public guided tours, lunchtime expresses, and a walk through the nearly one-acre Urban Garden. Though tours often don’t include the auditorium — because of the nearly constant rehearsal and performance schedule — the building’s stunning lobby, exterior and surrounding pockets have plenty to offer. There are also free tours of the other theaters that comprise the Music Center campus — the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the Ahmanson Theatre and the Mark Taper Forum. These are provided by the Symphonians, volunteer docents of the Music Center since 1965. Tours take about an hour and begin in the Grand Lobby. Times vary. 111 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-4399 or musiccenter.org/visit/tours.html.

SPEAKER SERIES

Distinguished speakers tend to flock Downtown, from dignitaries and foreign officials to authors, celebrities and some of the greatest thinkers of our time. The Los Angeles Central Library and Zócalo are two of the biggest players when it comes to snagging marquee names, but there are also a handful of smaller groups that host equally impressive and interesting guests.

ALOUD at the Central Library You can usually count on the leading newsmakers of the day to make an appearance at the Central Library’s speaker series. For more than a decade, they’ve hosted poets, novelists, scientists, educators, performing artists, environmentalists, journalists, political figures and filmmakers, and the frequent addition of a local scholar, critic or fellow artist makes for a lively dialogue. Free. 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7025 or lfla.org/aloud.

Live Talks L.A. With just a few years under its belt, this newcomer continues to snag powerhouse speakers such as actor Dustin Hoffman, Labor Secretary Robert Reich and novelist Ken Follett. Proceeds from ticket sales fund literacy, arts and educational causes. Ticket prices vary. Visit livetalksla.org.

SCI-Arc Downtown’s edgy architecture school hosts a multidisciplinary slate of speakers that runs summer to fall. The lineup draws architects, artists, film-makers, engineers, theoreticians and performers. Free to the public. 960 E. Third St., (213) 613-2200 or sciarc.edu.

Segwow This company offers all the benefits of a walking tour without actually having to walk. Participants see the sights via Segway — a battery-powered human transporter akin to an upright moped. These two- to three-hour excursions can cover nine miles and 60 blocks, with riders zipping by local landmarks, major hotels and shopping plazas. Participants should be between approximately 100 and 250 pounds (there is no age requirement), physically fit enough to be on their feet for two hours, and capable of continuously shifting their weight from front to back and side to side. Tours are $89 per person. (310) 358-5900 or segwow.com.

Starline Tours You’ll spot the red, double-decker buses cruising some of Downtown’s main attractions. They’re a great way to see the city in Hollywood style. You can even hop on and off at 13 sites — Olvera Street, Chinatown and the Music Center among them. (800) 959-3131 or starlinetours.com.

Undiscovered Chinatown Tour This insider tour takes you beyond the touristy gift shops to find the hidden temples, herbalists, jewelry malls, art galleries and trendy boutiques that abound in this intriguing district. On these two-and-a-half-hour walking tours, you’ll explore alleyways, plaza stalls and ornate courtyards, and learn how to bargain like a pro. Offered on the first Saturday of every month, and hosted losangelesdowntown.com | D I V E R S I O N S

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seasonal calendar

CiClAViA Support walking and biking during this popular event that opens up a 10-mile car-free zone through the city, including Downtown. Some 100,000 people are expected. Visit ciclavia.org.

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Downtown Art wAlk

Take a self-guided tour of the area’s galleries, public museums and art venues, held on the second Thursday of every month from noon-9 p.m. It’s a lively street scene with hundreds of people popping in and out of restaurants and cafes, sipping wine, and soaking up the artsy atmosphere. Download maps and info at downtownartwalk.com.

WINT ER

DECEMBER ChinAtown Art night The quaint alleyways and courtyards of Chung King Road and historic Chinatown come alive during the concurrent opening of hip art galleries. Visit chinatownla.org.

holiDAy SeASon lighting Ceremony This is the unofficial start of the holiday season at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, the birthplace of the city. It’s a festive time to visit this colorful landmark. Visit olvera-street.com.

l.A. kingS holiDAy iCe At l.A. liVe Nokia Plaza gets in the holiday spirit with an ice skating rink sponsored by the L.A. Kings. You can glide with Santa amid the twinkling lights. Through January. 800 W. Olympic Blvd., lalive.com.

l.A. County holiDAy CelebrAtion This holiday extravaganza features an enormous lineup of local choirs, instrumental groups, and dance companies who represent the cultural fabric of L.A. Dec. 24. Free admission and parking. Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-3099 or lacountyarts.org.

lAS PoSADAS Visitors come for the re-enactment and celebration of Mary and Joseph’s nine-day trip to Bethlehem, complete with candlelight procession, singing, and the nightly breaking of a piñata. From Dec. 16 through Christmas Eve. Free. El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, Sepulveda House Visitor Center, 622 N. Main St., (213) 485-8372, olvera-street.com.

PerShing SquAre iCe rink Surrounded by palm trees and high-rises, this popular ice rink offers day and evening skating, hockey workshops for kids and concerts. Through January. Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., laparks.org.

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D I V E R S I O N S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

This street festival celebrates all that is eclectic and unique about L.A. Expect live music, art, food, a beer garden and other activities.

JANUARY JAPAneSe new yeAr Celebrate the New Year Japanese-style with traditional ceremonial events including taiko drumming, dancing, martial arts, calligraphy, folk songs, a kimono fashion show and more. Main events are at Weller Court, the Kyoto Hotel and Garden, and the Japanese Village Plaza, (213) 628-2725 or jaccc.org.

FEBRUARY ChineSe new yeAr

Chinatown at North Spring Street and Cesar Chavez, facebook.com/LAChinatownSpringfest.

ChinAtown Art night Stroll the alleyways and courtyards of Chung King Road and historic Chinatown, where dozens of hip art galleries host concurrent openings. Visit chinatownla.com.

Celebrate the Year of the Horse with a colorful parade and festival complete with a lion dance, floats and firecrackers. Free.

DoDger SeASon The team’s regular season is April to October. Dodger Stadium’s ticket office is open Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and during home games.

Feb. 1-2, 2014. Visit chinatownla.com.

ChinAtown FireCrACker 5/10k run As part of the Chinese New Year festivities, bike riders, runners and walkers take part in this annual event. There will be free, live entertainment all weekend.

1000 Elysian Park Ave., 866-DODGERS or dodgers.com.

MAY brewery ArtwAlk

Feb. 22-23, 2014. Visit firecracker10k.org.

lAntern FeStiVAl This is the Chinese American Museum’s signature event — a 2,000-year-old festival that takes place at a historic site for L.A.’s Chinese community. Lantern making, Chinese opera-style face painting, traditional crafts, entertainment and artisans appear in and around the museum.

Twice a year the residents of the world’s largest artist colony open their studios to the public on the weekend. It’s an art-filled open house you won’t want to miss. Brewery Arts Complex, 620 Moulton Ave., breweryartwalk.com.

bug FAir

CAM is at 425 N. Los Angeles St., (213) 485-8567 or camla.org.

Want to taste the wares of a bug chef or hold a Madagascar hissing cockroach? This annual celebration attracts vendors, artists and insect aficionados to celebrate all things creepy and crawly.

S P R I NG

MARCH loS AngeleS mArAthon The first Los Angeles Marathon was in 1986, luring almost 11,000 runners. Year to year, the course and the dates change — but the race itself is an institution, with more than 20,000 participants and a 26.2-mile course that winds through parts of Downtown. There are several adjunct events, including a 5K run on the same day. March 9, 2014. Visit lamarathon.com.

APRIL bleSSing oF the AnimAlS Every year on the Saturday before Easter at Olvera Street, Catholic priests bless dogs, cats, iguanas, goats, hamsters — anything that walks, crawls, flies, hops or slithers. El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, 845 N. Alameda St., (213) 485-8372 or olvera-street.com.

FieStA broADwAy Celebrating its 25th year, this lively Cinco de Mayo celebration is the largest of its kind anywhere. More than 300,000 people flock to the streets of Downtown for music, food, entertainment and vendors. April 27, 2014. Visit fiestabroadway.la.

Natural History Museum, 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-DINO or nhm.org.

CinCo De mAyo El Pueblo and Olvera Street come alive with traditional music, cultural presentations, dancing and food booths. El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument, 125 Paseo de la Plaza, (213) 485-8372 or olvera-street.com.

DAnCe Downtown Get free dance lessons, then hit the floor for a no-pressure dance party under the moonlight with live music and DJs. Through September. Music Center Plaza, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-3660 or musiccenter.org/dancedowntown.

luChA VAVoom Every year at the Mayan Theater, excited crowds line up around the corner for a ticket to this campy Mexican wrestling-burlesque-comedy extravaganza. Dubbed Cinco de Mayan, this feast for the eyes sells out fast. Mayan Theater, 1038 S. Hill St., luchavavoom.com.


Drum Downtown For a Saturday morning music rush, try this free, informal outdoor drumming experience at the Music Center. Hand drums, shakers, tambourines and other percussion instruments are provided. Through September.

Union Station, 800 N. Alameda St., amtrak.com.

10-11:30 a.m. Music Center Plaza, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-3660 or musiccenter.org.

Summer on the PlAzA At FigAt7th Enjoy a summer of free afternoon concerts and performances ranging from poetry and blues to Zydeco and jazz. Through September. FIGat7th, 735 S. Figueroa St. Visit artsbrookfield.com.

SUM M ER

JUNE FriDAy night Sing-AlongS Belt out classic tunes with friends, strangers and songbirds, accompanied by live musicians. Free. Through August. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Music Center Plaza, 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-3660 or musiccenter.org.

grAnD PerFormAnCeS The Watercourt comes alive in the summer with local and international performance troupes, and the occasional screening or talk. Through September. Free at the Watercourt, 300-350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 687-2159 or grandperformances.org.

l.A. Film FeStiVAl This two-week movie extravaganza draws some 90,000 visitors to watch 200 features. There are galas, panel discussions and more. Regal Cinemas at L.A. Live. Visit lafilmfest.com.

lASt remAining SeAtS Each summer the Los Angeles Conservancy presents classic films in Broadway’s historic theaters. Many of the evening programs include old newsreels and advertisements, and lectures by film historians. Several venues Downtown. (213) 430-4219 or laconservancy.org.

PSomAS PAPer yACht ChAllenge Now in its seventh year, this imaginative event allows participants to create a pint-sized yacht to race across the City National Fountain. Enjoy a nautical costume contest, music, tasty treats and a silent auction. City National Plaza, Fifth and Flower streets. Visit psomas.com.

JULY ChinAtown Art night Stroll the alleyways and courtyards of Chung King Road and historic Chinatown, where dozens of art galleries pop up among the old school antique stores and curio shops. Visit chinatownla.com.

Dog DAy AFternoon Bring your pooch to this free, festive evening that invites locals to meet and mingle over cocktails and, what else, hot dogs. There’s music, pet vendors and pet adoptions. Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, 555 W. Temple St., downtownla.com.

Fourth oF July bloCk PArty Enjoy a spectacular fireworks display, entertainment, food trucks, picnicking and splashing during this free daylong celebration. Grand Park, 210 N. Grand Ave., grandparkla.org.

FriDAy night FliCkS As part of Pershing Square’s summer programming, watch free films under the stars every Friday. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Through August. 8 p.m. Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., laparks.org.

PerShing SquAre Summer ConCertS Free outdoor concerts and performances, held in Pershing Square’s plaza. Bring a blanket and picnic basket. Various times Thursdays through Sundays. Through August.

uSC troJAn FootbAll When the mighty USC Trojans play, it’s an all-day event with tailgate parties and an eardrum-splitting game. Season runs through December. Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, 3911 S. Figueroa St., lacoliseum.com or usctrojans.com.

OCTOBER brewery ArtwAlk A twice-annual open studio art event, unfolding in the world’s largest artist colony. Brewery Arts Complex, 620 Moulton Ave., breweryartwalk.com.

CiClAViA Support walking and biking during this popular event that opens up a 10-mile car-free zone through the city, including Downtown. Some 100,000 people are expected. Oct. 6, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., ciclavia.org.

hAlloween PArty For Downtown kiDS

Pershing Square, 532 S. Olive St., laparks.org.

This sixth annual Halloween party for the little ones includes lots of fun activities, entertainment, food and trick or treating.

AUGUST ChinAtown Summer nightS This popular evening of food, music and art draws hundreds of Angelenos to indulge in a foodie extravaganza with chef demonstrations, gourmet food trucks, craft beer, DJs and cultural activities for the family. Free. Central and West Plazas, 943-951 N. Broadway, chinatownsummernights.com.

l.A. FooD & wine FeStiVAl This foodie extravaganza tempts with freeflowing vino, gourmet eats and lots of people watching. Visit lafw.com.

Oct. 31, 5-8 p.m. Grand Hope Park, 919 S. Grand Ave., downtownla.com.

loS AngeleS CliPPerS L.A.’s other basketball team plays from October through April. Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St. Visit nba.com/clippers.

loS AngeleS kingS niSei week

First held in 1934, this nine-day celebration of second generation Japanese Americans born in the U.S. draws thousands to Little Tokyo for parades, cultural activities, a car show, sumo wrestling and taiko drumming. Throughout Little Tokyo, (213) 687-7193 or niseiweek.org.

FA L L

SEPTEMBER ChinAtown Art night

The galleries of Chung King Road and historic Chinatown host a concurrent opening for art lovers. Visit chinatownla.com.

miD-Autumn moon FeStiVAl This fun, family-friendly cultural festival features performances, music, food and moon viewing. Central and West Plaza, 943-951 N. Broadway, chinatownla.com.

StAir Climb For loS AngeleS Climb to the top of Downtown’s tallest building during this race for charity. There’s also a block party with food trucks, vendors, live music and a beer/wine garden. Funds support the YMCA. Ketchum-Downtown YMCA, 401 S. Hope St., kintera.org.

The Kings play October through April. Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St. Visit kings.nhl.com.

loS AngeleS lAkerS The championship Lakers regular season is October through April.

Seasonal calendar

nAtionAl trAin DAy At union StAtion This kid-friendly event has grown in popularity over the years. This year marks the 75th anniversary of Union Station, so expect a big event with train tours, live entertainment, giveaways and exhibits for all ages.

Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St. Visit nba.com/lakers.

worlD City At DiSney hAll Now in its 11th year, the 2013-2014 season kicks off Oct. 14 and ends May 17. The free slate of events includes music, dance, puppetry and storytelling from around the globe. Disney Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave. Visit musiccenter.org.

NOVEMBER DiA De loS muertoS This Mexican ceremony makes light of death and simultaneously honors the dearly departed with processions in late October; the main event unfolds during the first days of November. Make sugar skulls in remembrance of a loved one. El Pueblo Historical Monument, 125 Paseo de la Plaza, (213) 485-8372 or elpueblo.lacity.org/elpdd.

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Town Hall Los Angeles

the sunshine or throw bread to the birds as they take in the scenery. You can grab lunch from any of the cafes and restaurants lining the Watercourt, and in the evening stay for one of the free summer concerts or events (thanks to the nonprofit Grand Performances). 300-350 S. Grand Ave. For info about Grand Performances, (213) 687-2159 or grandperformances.org.

Business and city leaders, as well as those who simply want to stay informed, make it a point to attend these timely lectures focusing on issues that affect the lives of Angelenos. Topics have focused on business, education, the economy, infrastructure, government and more. Ticket prices vary. (213) 628-8141 or townhall-la.org.

Zócalo Zócalo, which means “public square” in Spanish, has featured more than 800 thinkers and doers in a free-flowing, non-partisan format. The wide range of topics has encompassed politics, governance, economics, education, technology, arts and science. Free. Visit zocalopublicsquare.org.

PARKS AND OPEN SPACE

Downtown’s residential growth has led to a push for more parks and green space. The Central City’s longtime gathering place, Pershing Square, is evolving into a more user-friendly venue with concerts, community events and a lively farmers market; and the sprawling Los Angeles State Historic Park, with its grassy expanse and bucolic setting, is undergoing an $18 million renovation. Tucked here and there, sometimes in unlikely locales, are creative pocket parks that serve the growing community.

Biddy Mason Park This unexpected monument honors the life of former slave Biddy Mason, who walked behind her master’s wagon

El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument

train from Mississippi to California in 1851, and petitioned the court to declare her a free citizen. The courts obliged in 1856, and Mason began her inspiring journey as a midwife, orphanage operator, and later as founder of the city’s First African Methodist Episcopal Church on land she purchased and then donated to the church. Her astonishing story is commemorated on plaques in the courtyard, which is full of camphor, jacaranda trees and public art. It’s a relaxing place to sit for an hour with your lunch or during a coffee break. 333 S. Spring St. (Broadway Spring Center, between Broadway and Spring, Third and Fourth streets).

California Plaza Watercourt Surrounded by towering office buildings, the Watercourt may seem like an unlikely oasis. But thanks to the jumping fountains, shaded tables and relaxed hum of activity, it is the ideal place to lounge and lunch. Local workers bask in

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Called the “birthplace of Los Angeles,” El Pueblo’s nearly 30 historic buildings (most of which are open to the public) are clustered around a bustling and historic open-air plaza. Every day of the week, but particularly on weekends, the colorful plaza hosts music, dancing and public speakers, as well as lively mariachis and vendors. Take an afternoon stroll, soak up some history at one of the museums or shop at Olvera Street, just steps away. 125 Paseo de la Plaza. Visitor Center is (213) 628-1274. Info at lacity.org/elp or olvera-street.com.

ALOUD at the Central Library

Exposition Park Rose Garden This sunken oasis spans 7.5 acres and boasts more than 20,000 rose bushes representing 190-plus varieties. The site is visited by more than one million people annually, with colorful blooms most of the year. Between April and November, green thumb groups such as the Secret Garden Pruning Club wander the grounds to care for the bushes, and there are always wedding parties and families frolicking among the gazebos, statues and fountain. The grounds surrounding the garden are full of expansive lawns that also host picnics and pick-up soccer games. Don’t miss the blooming of the roses festival in April. Open daily 9 a.m.-sunset. Closed Jan.1-March 15 for pruning. 701 State Drive, (213) 763-0114 or laparks.org.

Grand Hope Park

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Located next to the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, this playful little park is well used by FIDM’s hip students lounging on the grass. There’s a playground, fountain, benches and lawn dotted with whimsical coyote statues. A colorful mosaic archway stands at the entrance. Bounded by South Hope and Ninth streets, Grand Ave. and Olympic Blvd.

James Irvine Garden Walk onto the campus of the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center and you’ll discover this secret Japanese garden. Built in 1979, it covers a sloping, triangular area of 8,500 square feet. Designed by well-known L.A. landscape architect Takeo Uesugi, it features a 170-foot brook, gently cascading waterfalls, meandering paths and lush vegetation that soothe the soul. It’s also a popular spot for weddings and receptions. Closed Mondays. 244 S. San Pedro St. (between Second and Third streets). Visit jaccc.org.

Kyoto Gardens

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From the lobby of the DoubleTree, take the elevator to the third floor “garden in the sky,” a miniature half-acre version of an historic 400-year-old, 10-acre garden in Tokyo. The grounds feature bridges, gurgling streams, waterfalls, bamboo-shaded alcoves, placid ponds and gorgeous views of the Downtown skyline. With each step, the Zen theory goes, comes a release from work and worry. 120 S. Los Angeles St., (213) 629-1200 or doubletreeladowntown.com.


L.A.’s Grand Park Spanning 12 acres from the Music Center to City Hall, this $56 million urban park hosts concerts, picnics, farmers markets and film screenings. It is a lavender-scented expanse of grassy lawns and performance spaces, with seating areas amid mini-gardens studded with cacti. There is an interactive fountain with lights and jets of dancing water, a fenced-in area for dogs and a series of ADA-compliant pathways. The space is open until 10 p.m. daily. 201 N. Grand Ave., grandpark.lacounty.gov.

Dodger Stadium

Dodger Stadium

Los Angeles State Historic Park The park will be closed for a year beginning in January while it undergoes a major renovation. Nestled in an unlikely stretch of industrial Chinatown, this 32-acre state park boasts a colorful history. The area was once home to Tongva villages and the Zanja Madre, or “Mother Ditch,” a key part of L.A.’s early water system. The former rail yard also played a prominent role in the railroad history of the late 19th and 20th century. There are wildflowers, winding dirt trails for walks or jogs, picnic areas, and many of Downtown’s dog owners bring their pets here to explore the open space. The $18 million upgrade will bring a pavilion, farmers market, amphitheater and permanent restrooms. 1245 N. Spring St., (213) 620-6152 or parks.ca.gov.

Maguire Gardens This 2.3-acre public park unfolds by the Flower Street entrance of the Richard J. Riordan Central Library, with some 7,000 visitors daily. There are seven fountains, as well as shady jacaranda and olive trees. Artist Jud Fine’s “Spine” sculpture pays homage to the infrastructure of a book, with tiered pools of water and steps. Dotted along “Spine,” you’ll find unexpected sculptures — a prehistoric predator fish, a California newt and a peregrine falcon (several of which happen to nest in Downtown high-rises). Don’t miss the Grotto Fountain, a tribute to civil liberties etched with quotes from Frederick Douglass and the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. Weddings are a weekend constant, and you’ll see Downtowners and library patrons lying on the low knolls throughout the gardens. Open 24 hours. Southeast corner of Fifth and Flower streets. Visit lapl.org.

night of the week, and the central location means they can take advantage of the area’s many restaurants, shops and nightlife options.

Learning Center). The first public park built in the area in more than a century, Vista Hermosa features walking trails, streams, meadows, oak savannahs, a nature-themed playground, landscaped picnic areas and an amphitheater with a waterfall and graded flat rocks for seating. There’s also a FIFA-regulation soccer field that draws local teams. The field and the park’s mostly native Southern California plants are designed to be eco-friendly. Open sunrise to sunset, daily. 100 N. Toluca St., at First St. and Beaudry Ave. Visit smmc.ca.gov.

SPORTING/ CONVENTION VENUES

Downtown Los Angeles is home to a number of professional sports teams, among them the Lakers, Dodgers and Kings. Lucky fans can take their pick of events almost any

Dodger Stadium was bought by a private ownership group this spring, and while some of the players may have changed, the venue remains one of Southern California’s most treasured landmarks. This 56,000-seat stadium has welcomed baseball fans since 1962. After scouting a spot at Chavez Ravine just north of Downtown, Brooklyn Dodgers owner Walter O’Malley built the stadium and moved his team to the West Coast. The venue is noted for its cleanliness, 300 acres of treefilled landscaping, a vast parking lot, the beloved Dodger Dog, and a cantilevered design that eliminates view-blocking columns. Don’t miss the 90-minute, behindthe-scenes tour. There is also free shuttle service for ticket holders that departs from Union Station. 1000 Elysian Park Ave., (866) DODGERS or dodgers.com.

Los Angeles Convention Center Marked by a signature blue-green glass crown, Downtown’s Convention Center is located next to the Staples Center and the L.A. Live entertainment district. While its energetic location is certainly a selling point for convention goers, so is the staggering 720,000 square feet of modern exhibit space. A sleek headquarters hotel has made it an even more attractive option for hosting events in the city. 1201 S. Figueroa St., (213) 741-1151 or lacclink.com.

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and Sports Arena Anchoring Exposition Park and its collection of muse-

Pershing Square Dedicated in 1866, this five-acre public square started out as a formal Spanish plaza called La Plaza Abaja. It has evolved dramatically over the decades: it served as a scene for militia receptions and public speakers during World War I; it was redesigned with lush, tropical plantings in 1928; and was uprooted in the 1950s to accommodate an 1,800-car underground garage. In 1992, the newly renovated park revealed a “modern” concrete design complete with a 10-story purple bell tower, bright yellow walls, a faux earthquake fault line and a Beethoven bust. Though the trees and grass are sparse, the city makes the most of this central space. There’s a bustling farmers market on Wednesdays, and a busy slate of events — concerts, films and community programming in the summer, and a popular ice-skating rink from November to January. Bounded by Hill, Olive, Fifth and Sixth streets. (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org/pershingsquare.

Vista Hermosa It’s hard to spot from the street, but those in the know come here to enjoy the 10.5-acre swath of green on the western edge of Downtown (adjacent to the Edward R. Roybal R2506 Los Angeles downtown newsv2 outlined for print 4.937LOSANGELESDOWNTOWN.cOm x 4.812.indd 1

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ums and green space is the imposing Memorial Regal Cinemas Coliseum, which opened to sports fans in 1923. It saw action during the 1932 and 1984 Summer Olympic Games, the World Series in 1959, and Super Bowls I and VII. John F. Kennedy accepted the Democratic presidential nomination here in 1960, and Pope John Paul II celebrated mass for thousands in 1987. Today, the Coliseum hosts the University of Southern California’s football team, concerts and special events. Look for the headless bronze male and female nudes that greet visitors at the Art Deco eastern entrance — they’re the work of late sculptor Robert Graham, commissioned for the 1984 Olympics. Together with the smaller Sports Arena located next door, these venues are often credited with the migration of professional sports 1111 S. Figueroa St. Box office (213) 742-7340 and info at to the West Coast, and today they still host soccer, raves, staplescenter.com. concerts and yes, the occasional rodeo. 3911 S. Figueroa St. (Coliseum) and 3939 S. Figueroa St. (Sports Arena), (213) 747-7111 or lacoliseumlive.com. Downtown’s main attraction when it comes to movie watching is the 14-screen Regal Cinemas, a modern movie Staples Center theater in the heart of L.A. Live. Rounding out the lineup is Staples Center is located between the Convention Center a handful of smaller operators that run the gamut from an and the massive entertainment complex known as L.A. IMAX theater to an art house destination. Live. Staples was originally built for the Los Angeles Kings, but in addition to the hockey team, the arena — which Downtown Independent opened in 1999 — is home to the Los Angeles Lakers, the This 222-seat event and film venue has a modern design Los Angeles Clippers and the Los Angeles Sparks (WNBA). and a cool selection of cult movies, foreign films and critiWhen one of those teams isn’t competing, the arena hosts cal darlings. Keep an eye out for film festival offerings. everything from boxing matches to rock concerts to red 251 S. Main St., (213) 617-1033 or carpet awards shows. Despite the crowd-drawing chamdowntownindependent.com. pionship games and visits from the likes of Prince, One Direction and Madonna, the arena’s attendance record is Electric Dusk Drive-In held by Taylor Swift. If you still yearn for the days of drive-in movies, then this

MOVIE THEATERS

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CALIFORNIA AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM 600 State Drive / Exposition Park Los Angeles, CA 90037 213-744-7432 www.caamuseum.org Parking $10 at 39th and Figueroa Streets FREE ADMISSION! D I V E R S I O N S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

Flagship Theatres University Village 3 Across the street from the University of Southern California campus, college kids and locals can get their movie fix at the Flagship, a triplex where contemporary films and fun late-night cult and horror flicks screen. 3323 S. Hoover St., (213) 748-6321 or flagshipmovies.com.

IMAX Theater This state-of-the-art theater in the California Science Center offers family-friendly fare that usually ties into exhibits at the museum — namely science and nature-themed adventures. The seven-story screen is the largest in Los Angeles, and is designed so that the film’s images extend beyond a viewer’s peripheral vision, making him or her part of the action. The 3D projector is the size of a small car. General admission $8.25; children (4-12) $5; students and seniors $6. Open daily. 700 State Drive, (213) 744-2019 or californiasciencecenter.org.

REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater)

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The California African American Museum screens mostly first-run, award-winning and critically acclaimed documentaries during April, June, August and November. Topics span politics, art, music, education, history and sports, often touching upon controversial themes. Thursdays at 7 p.m. Reservations suggested. Free. 600 State Dr., (213) 744-2024 or caamuseum.org.

Bring a picnic basket, lawn chair or blanket, and enjoy a fun film projected onto a 40-by-20-foot inflatable screen in the heart of Pershing Square. Well behaved pets on leash are welcome. Films begin at dark with the curtain going up at 8:30 p.m. from July through September. The series runs from May through October. 532 S. Olive St., (213) 847-4970 or laparks.org.

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is the ticket for you. Electric Dusk screens films year round in the parking lot of City Market, from black-and-whites to cult classics to family favorites. Most seating happens on the swath of Astroturf in front of the screen, and there are a limited number of spots for cars that sell out fast. The Snack Shack carhops will bring you hot dogs, veggie burgers and even giant brownies. Gates open 90 minutes before show time. Saturday nights. 1000 San Julian St., electricduskdrivein.com.

In addition to its regular schedule of concerts, theater and speakers, REDCAT hosts cutting-edge films — curated surveys and retrospectives, a showcase for local filmmakers and video artists, documentaries, and in-person presentations. It’s a film nerd’s paradise. 631 W. Second St., (213) 237-2800 or redcat.org.

Regal Cinemas This giant, 14-screen complex is Downtown’s biggest and newest movie destination. The state-of-the-art theaters are located on the western edge of the L.A. Live campus, ideal for grabbing a bite to eat and a cocktail before or after show time. They even host private parties. 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 763-6070 or regmovies.com.

KID-FRIENDLY DOWNTOWN

Young families are continuing to move Downtown. For them,


and for the families living nearby, there are plenty of cultural institutions with diverse programming for kids, and several parks and plazas that hold events year round.

Bob Baker Marionette Theater Bob Baker got his start decorating department store windows and performing marionette shows around town. In 1961, he opened his own theater on the western edge of Downtown. Thanks to the puppeteer’s tenacity, a crew of apprentice and professional puppeteers, and a colorful army of marionettes, his venture is still pulling strings. The kitschy shows rotate in repertory all week long, and there’s scheduled time for ice cream and cake after the shows. 1345 W. First St., (213) 250-9995 or bobbakermarionettes.com.

Cathedral Garden The olive tree garden at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels delights with whimsical animal sculptures designed by a children’s book author. Based on bible stories, the expressive pieces include a camel, bear, turtle, lion, fish (with mouth agape) and even a giant beehive cave for exploring. Grab lunch from the cathedral cafeteria and eat it on the patio overlooking the garden. The main plaza also offers several water features that delight curious minds. 555 W. Temple St., (213) 680-5200 or olacathedral.org.

insects live in enclosed outdoor habitats. Inside, there are daily activities, an interactive Discovery Center, and the largest live insect zoo on the West Coast. The California Science Center (with an adjoining IMAX Theater) is just steps away, and is also a great resource for kids — and free. It specializes in colorful, interactive exhibits and science-minded displays. The California African American Museum hosts creative programming for families on Sundays, and the grounds in between all three of these institutions feature expansive lawns, picnic areas, retired spy planes and life-sized dinosaur models. The Natural History Museum is at 900 Exposition Blvd., (213) 763-DINO or nhm.org. The California Science Center is at 700 State Drive, (213) 744-7400 or californiasciencecenter.org. The California African American Museum is at 600 State Drive, (213) 744-7432 or caam.ca.gov.

El Pueblo and Olvera Street Every day of the week, Olvera Street and the plaza at the center of El Pueblo bustle with activity. In the plaza, there are bands onstage and strolling musicians, and people dancing sporadically to both. Roaming ice cream vendors and clowns ply their trades, and the Old Mexico City-style street has plenty of booths where toys and souvenirs can be had. 845 N. Alameda St., olvera-street.com.

Colburn School

FIGat7th Kids Club

This school is really two institutions: The community-based School of Performing Arts offers open-enrollment classes in drama, music and dance to students from preschool age to adults; and the Conservatory of Music is a selective college offering classic music training at the baccalaureate and post-baccalaureate levels. 200 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-2200 or colburnschool.edu.

These free arts and crafts workshops are held on the second and fourth Saturday of each month from 2-4 p.m. (ages 3 and older). Children create everything from sea life dioramas to Shakespearean costumes to tiki sculptures. Reservations suggested. FIGat7th (lower level, M1), (213) 955-7150 or figat7th.com.

Exposition Park

Grand Performances

Exposition Park is a family-friendly, activity-rich paradise starring the kid-approved Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the California Science Center. The former hosts the Butterfly and Spider Pavilion, where free-moving

The Watercourt offers the ideal setting for a family-friendly excursion. Whether they frolic around the dancing fountains and ponds, or take in a summer concert or event with mom and dad in the evening, this Bunker Hill haven is always a hit

213.617.3300

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with the kids. There are cafes and fast-food eateries around the courtyard, or you can bring a picnic and dine al fresco with the little ones. 350 S. Grand Ave., (213) 687-2159 or grandperformances.org.

Lucky Strike Lanes & Lounge Though it may be an adult-only venue after 7 p.m., this bowling alley is available to keep the kids entertained during the day. There are pizza party options, and yes, the rental shoes do come in smaller sizes. 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 542-4880 or bowlluckystrike.com.

Music Center In addition to its fun public events in the plaza — free dance lessons, drum circles and weekend sing-alongs — the Music Center also produces World City, a free series of performances and workshops that celebrate diverse cultures through dance, music, storytelling, puppetry and more. Kids can take part in arts and crafts projects. Select Saturdays at 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. 135 N. Grand Ave., (213) 972-7211 or musiccenter.org.

Echo Park Lake

Orthopaedic Hospital Playground Open daily to the public, this nearly half-acre, universally accessible playground features a foam ground, colorful slides, tubes, bridges, swings, interactive puzzles, and a dragon that mists kids with water. Open daily 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At 2400 S. Flower St. Parking entrance is on 23rd St., between Flower St. and Grand Ave. Pedestrian entrance on Adams Blvd. Visit orthohospital.org.

Richard J. Riordan Central Library Los Angeles’ Central Library is a must-visit destination for inquisitive young minds, empowering kids and teens with their own reading rooms and programming. Every Saturday at 2 p.m. the library features storytellers, puppet shows, musicians, actors and magicians. Preschool story time (ages 3-5) is Tuesday at 11 a.m. 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7000 or lapl.org/central.

Target Free Family Saturdays at JANM The Japanese American National Museum hosts a monthly series of fun family Saturdays complete with crafts, workshops, music, story time and activities. Upcoming themes include comics, autumn and winter wonderland. There are events scheduled throughout the day. Free every second Saturday. 100 N. Central Ave., (213) 625-0414 or janm.org.

Target Sundays at CAAM On the first Sunday of the month, the California African American Museum offers a free day of art and activity celebrating the diverse influences and achievements of art and culture from the African American diaspora. Past events have included hands-on art projects guided by professional artists, as well as themed music and dance. 600 State Dr., (213) 744-2132 or caamuseum.org.

X Lanes On the third floor of the Little Tokyo Shopping Center you’ll find 28 LED-lit bowling lanes complete with arcade, billiards, karaoke, sports bar and restaurant. It really is fun for the whole family. 333 S. Alameda St., (213) 229-8910 or xlanesla.com.

EXCURSIONS

Just minutes outside of Downtown, dozens of memorable excursions await. From the La Brea Tar Pits on MidWilshire to paddle boat rides at Echo Park to hiking and 40

horseback riding at Griffith Park, the Central City’s adjacent communities are packed with adventure and delight.

Mid-Wilshire

A few miles west of Downtown on Wilshire Boulevard are two stunning Art Deco edifices: the former Bullocks Wilshire Department Store, now home to the Southwestern University School of Law, and the Wiltern Theatre, which packs a full slate of concerts. 3050 Wilshire Blvd., (213) 738-6700 or swlaw.edu; Wiltern Theatre, on the corner of Wilshire and Western Avenue. 3790 Wilshire Blvd., (213) 388-1400. Continuing westward on Wilshire brings you to the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits. Bubbling up in the shadow of Mid-City office buildings are pits of liquid asphalt that have snared some of the world’s most famous Ice Age fossil remains — mammoths, saber-toothed cats and giant sloths. Paleontologists can be spotted knee-deep in black stuff; they recover hundreds of ancient bones a year. 5801 Wilshire Blvd., (323) 857-6300 or tarpits.org. Adjacent to the La Brea Tar Pits is a storehouse of art inside the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), home to more than 100,000 works of art, blockbuster exhibits, and nighttime programming that packs the grounds well into the night. 5905 Wilshire Blvd., (323) 857-6000 or lacma.org. Across the street from LACMA is the Petersen Automotive Museum. The first floor chronicles the evolution of the car; the second is composed of five large, changing galleries with race cars, classics, vintage motorcycles, concept cars, and this being L.A., vehicles that have starred in movies or belonged to stars. 6060 Wilshire Blvd., (323) 930-CARS or petersen.org.

Echo Park/Angelino Heights

Just northwest of Downtown lies Echo Park, a diverse neighborhood that mixes families and longtime locals with newly arriving hipsters. The result is taquerias next door to wine bars; cool watering holes and galleries next to family-owned businesses; murals everywhere; and most importantly, a laid back vibe. The area’s centerpiece is Echo Park Lake, which recently underwent a $64 million renovation. Picnics unfold on weekends, floating lotus blossoms dazzle, and

D I V E R S I O N S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

a concrete trail welcomes joggers, skaters and strollers. Ducks and geese freely intermingle, paddle boats are available. Just east of the lake is the hilly residential enclave of Angelino Heights, one of Downtown’s first suburban neighborhoods. Drive down the 1300 block of Carroll Avenue, and the streets branching out from it, for breathtakingly restored Queen Anne, Bungalow and Craftsman homes. Echo Park Lake is located along Glendale Boulevard, south of Sunset Boulevard, laparks.org.

Hollywood

Hollywood Bowl

With 18,000 seats, this is the largest natural amphitheater in the United States. Opened in 1922, the Bowl hosts hundreds of people who picnic in and around the grounds before shows. In the summer, it is home to the Los Angeles Philharmonic (the Phil plays in the Walt Disney Concert Hall the rest of the year) and a slate of touring music acts. There’s a lineup of jazz and classical music, as well as more youthful concerts. The firework shows are spectacular. 2301 N. Highland Ave. in Hollywood, (323) 850-2000 or hollywoodbowl.com.

Universal Studios Though a bit far afield from Downtown, this SoCal theme park is a worthy attraction for both visitors and locals. The movie-themed destination includes rides, a studio tour, shows and lots of restaurants and shops in its bustling CityWalk. 100 Universal City Plaza, Universal City, (800) 864-8377 or universalstudioshollywood.com.

Griffith Park

Just a few miles outside of Downtown you’ll find the largest city-owned park in the U.S. In 1896, gold miner Colonel Griffith J. Griffith gave 3,000 acres of ranchland to Los Angeles, with the stipulation that the land serve people of all classes. The hilly terrain is zigzagged by excellent hiking trails, golf courses, swimming holes and picnic spots. The outdoor Greek Theatre, the domed Griffith Observatory and the Los Angeles Zoo are all nestled in its hills. The Greek Theatre is at 2700 N. Vermont Ave., (323) 665-5857 or greektheatrela.com. Griffith Observatory is at 2800 E. Observatory Road, (213) 473-0800 or griffithobs.org. The L.A. Zoo is at 5333 Zoo Drive, (323) 644-4200 or lazoo.org.


Hammer and Spear

SHOPPING

Boutique Finds, High-End Fashion, Wholesale Bargains and Plazas Galore

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Downtown retail has never been stronger and more exciting, with hordes of national and independent retailers setting up shop here. It’s a convergence of wholesale business, high-end fashion, vintage treasures, charming boutiques and alleys of discount goods for a steal. Each district offers its own brand of sport and stimulation, from the brilliantly-hued blooms found in the Flower District to the boisterous bartering in Santee Alley to the hip furniture in the Historic Core. Here are a few of the highlights in each neighborhood.

ARTS DISTRICT

One of Downtown’s original residential districts, shoppers will find unexpected delights around every corner. Rummage your way through awesome vintage boutiques, designer

clothing stores and one-of-a-kind furniture warehouses.

Apolis Global A stylish line of men’s clothing and accessories with a social bent. 806 E. Third St., (213) 613-9626 or apolisglobal.com.

District Millworks The specialty here is furniture made from reclaimed wood and industrial materials. The studio also does custom design work. 917 E. Third St., (323)630-1828 or districtmillworks.com.

Hammer and Spear This retailer of lovely vintage home goods also stocks new

textiles, ceramics and other decor. 255 S. Santa Fe Ave., #101, (213) 928-0997 or hammerandspear.com.

Poketo Store Inside a colorful warehouse space, you’ll discover beautiful items to decorate your life. There are wallets and T-shirts emblazoned with art from up-and-coming artists, whimsical accessories, stationary, home goods and sweet toys. 820 E. Third St., (213) 537-0751 or poketo.com.

SCI-Arc Supply Store This is the student store for the Southern California Institute of Architecture. The Downtown community can losangelesdowntown.com | S H O P P I N G

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business since 1954, when Morris Bernstein was part of a larger “Book Row” on Sixth Street. These days, son Leonard runs Caravan, and he’s usually seated behind an old wooden desk. 550 S. Grand Ave., (213) 626-9944.

City Target Locals finally got their wish — a Target store Downtown. It may seem like a commonplace occurence, but the arrival of Target has helped put an exclamation point on Downtown’s resurgence. This big-name retailer has helped attract even more stores to the area — a win-win for everyone. City Target is located inside the FIGat7th shopping mall, and offers all the usual amenities as well as a grocery section, in a more compact space. 735 S. Figueroa St., (213) 330-4543 or target.com.

City Target purchase books as well as architecture and art supplies. 955 E. 3rd Street, (213) 356-5309 or sciarc.edu.

THVM Atelier Racks of some of the best L.A. designers tempt fashion buffs to this eclectic warehouse. 1317 Palmetto St., thvm.com.

BUNKER HILL/FINANCIAL DISTRICT

Downtown’s business and cultural districts are in the midst of a retail boom, with big name stores and entrepreneurs creating lots of shopping buzz. The area is also home to Downtown’s two major malls, the ideal place to spend a few hours — and a few bucks.

redone L.A. Fitness is just the start of changes that will ultimately help integrate the plaza into the thriving seventh street retail corridor. The mall is currently anchored by Macy’s, along with Victoria’s Secret, Casual Corner, Express, a postal center and a food court. 700 S. Flower St., (213) 624-2891 or theblocdowntown.com.

Brooks Brothers Located outside of the Jonathan Club, this elegant men’s retailer has returned to Downtown after a three-year hiatus. You’ll find high-end suits, ties, shirts and accessories in this 1,400-square-foot space. 545 S. Figueroa St., (213) 688-4072 or brooksbrothers.com.

Caravan Books The BLOC This longtime shopping mall is getting a facelift. The newly

For rare and antique books with a side of L.A. history, a visit to Caravan is in order. The quaint shop has been in

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Denim Refinery Take a ride on the hand-operated elevator to this eighth floor retail shop/showroom that stocks vintage and original denim designs. You can even bring your outdated jacket or jeans and have them customized with dyes, wax, paint or laser printed with images. 527 W. Seventh St., #808, (310) 800-6135 or denimrefinery.com.

FIGat7th The new City Target and Sport Chalet join a growing list of anchor tenants at this beautifully redone shopping center. Among the other big names are Morton’s, Starbucks, Gold’s Gym, California Pizza Kitchen, Sprinkles Cupcakes and Yolanda Aguilar Beauty Institute and Spa. Thanks to a $40 million renovation, the 500-seat food court is one of the best places for lunch Downtown (a slate of exciting

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new eateries is on the horizon, too). There’s also a weekly farmer’s market, and frequent live music and holiday events to keep shoppers entertained. 735 S. Figueroa St., (213) 955-7150 or figat7th.com.

505 Flower These two towers house a modern underground shopping area boasting a flower shop, fitness center, photo shop, dentist and several eateries including the Weiland Brewery Underground. 505 S. Flower St., B Level.

L.A. Phil Store After a visit to the gorgeous Walt Disney Concert Hall, stop in to the gift shop where you can find a range of fun items — Beethoven bobbleheads, stunning modern jewelry, musicrelated T-shirts, elegant scarves and loads of quirky gifts. 131 S. Grand Ave., (213) 972-3440 or laphilstore.com.

fashion accessories, incense oils, craft supplies, luggage and so much more. All of it is offered at wholesale prices to the public. Most stores are open Monday-Saturday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. A good place to start is Los Angeles Street, one of the district’s main thoroughfares. Third on the north, Fifth on the south, Los Angeles on the west and San Pedro on the east. Visit centralcityeast.org.

CHINATOWN

There’s a magical quality about Chinatown that you can’t find anywhere else in the city — paper lanterns overhead, smoked ducks hanging in the windows and quaint shops filled with tourist trinkets. The main plazas and walkways are alive with energy, activity and lots of colorful shopping. Whether you stop into a traditional

herb shop, stroll the galleries or haggle in the maze of alleyways, it’s almost a guarantee that you won’t leave Chinatown empty handed.

Central Plaza A distinctive pagoda entryway marks Chinatown’s most popular and historic plaza, strung with fanciful paper lanterns and packed with gift shops selling pretty umbrellas, jade keepsakes and silk pajamas. Central Plaza is bordered by North Broadway, North Hill, Bernard and College streets. Inside the former Hong Kong Cafe, Realm incorporates stunning architectural details like hand-painted ceilings and dragon-entwined columns. The eye-popping selection of eclectic merchandise includes modern and unusual gifts

The Library Store The Central Library houses a unique gift shop selling autographed books, exhibit merchandise, apparel, greeting cards, journals, and items for children, readers and writers. Closed Sunday and Monday. 630 W. Fifth St., (213) 228-7550 or librarystore.org.

MOCA Store There’s lots of browse-worthy material at this fun museum gift shop, including books, toys, calendars, towels, home design items, prints, and other cool gizmos. A museum membership gets you 10% off. 250 S. Grand Ave., (213) 621-1710 or mocastore.org.

Urban Outfitters This trendy, big-name clothing store will open its doors in the historic Rialto Theatre in early 2014. 812 S. Broadway, urbanoutfitters.com.

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Zara This major fashion retailer plans to open a 27,000-squarefoot flagship store at FIGat7th in spring 2014. 735 S. Figueroa St., zara.com.

CENTRAL CITY EAST

Cash is king and there are deals to be had across this busy district. Tiny wholesale shops crammed with every item imaginable offer the public a chance to scoop up cheap toys, party supplies, perfume, electronics, Hello Kitty goodies, car accessories and more. It’s fun, fast-paced and a bit gritty. Snag parking where you can and explore on foot.

Dish Factory This 35,000-square-foot space carries some 10,000 items ranging from inexpensive restaurant-style dishes to heavy duty stock pots to flatware. It’s an ideal spot to hit if you’re hosting a party and need multiples on the cheap. 310 S. Los Angeles St., (213) 687-9500 or dishfactory.com.

Hats On Spun off of a popular Korean chain, this shop carries some 500 hat types — everything from MLB caps to beanies to classic fedoras for him and her. Don’t miss the endless selection of Kangol berets for the Samuel Jackson in you. Prices range from about $6 to $80. 349 S. Los Angeles St. #8002 (Ground Floor), (213) 625-1561.

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Toy District Despite its name, you’ll find more than just toys within this 12-block district. There are 500 businesses selling everything under the sun — silk flowers, electronics, DVDs,

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such as coffee table books, art, sleek glassware, ceramics, silver pieces, toys, stationary and other novelties. 425 Gin Ling Way, (213) 628-4663 or realmhome.com. For a more traditional taste of Chinatown, visit Gin Ling Gifts. The vintage neon sign hints at the 1930s Shanghai vibe. You’ll find custom Chinese dresses — both fancy and casual — along with cute accessories, fans, jewelry and hair bling. Prices are super affordable. 441 Gin Ling Way, (213) 617-1452.

an enjoyable way to spend the afternoon, especially on warm days when you can eat lunch on the picnic tables. City Hall East at 200 N. Main St., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

EL PUEBLO/ UNION STATION

This petite district is home to a cluster of colorful shops centered along Olvera Street, which runs through the heart of the historic El Pueblo.

Corazon de Los Angeles Find Latin-themed paintings, folk art, gifts and more at this Olvera Street boutique and gallery. W-19A Olvera St., (213) 617-0227.

Chung King Road Though this tiny pedestrian alley is only 40 feet wide, it packs a lot of punch. Visitors will find original Chinese storefronts, romantic lanterns and mahjong clubs mixed in with trendy shops and art galleries. Openings bring in the artsy crowd. Chung King Road is between Yale and Hill streets or ckroad.com.

Dynasty Shopping Center Hidden from street view, this huge indoor swap meet is packed with dozens of stalls selling clothes, toys, luggage, purses and fashion jewelry. There are bargains to be had, especially if you are willing to haggle a little. Just next door is the Chinatown Plaza, a collection of jewelry storefronts. Both the Dynasty Center and Chinatown Plaza are in the 800 block of Broadway, between Alpine and College streets. 800 N. Broadway, (213) 626-4951.

Flock Shop A small shop with big style, this boutique offers plenty of surprises such as funky jewelry, silkscreened T-shirts, vintage items, unique leather handbags, cheeky letterpress cards and handmade plushies. If you want to take home something original, this is the place. 943 N. Broadway #103 or flockshopla.com.

Olvera Street

Wing Hop Fung Chinatown’s largest and most popular department store sprawls over two stories and 20,000 square feet. It’s a breathtaking storehouse of Chinese gifts and is one of the largest herbal retailers in the U.S. Start your adventure on the ground floor, where you can browse endless aisles and shelves of fragrant loose-leaf teas — glass jars filled with hand-rolled jasmine pearls and the beautiful, dried pink buds of China rose tea. Upstairs, Wing Hop Fung has an impressive selection of spirits, from unique wine to more than 100 types and dozens of often-scarce Japanese and Korean sake. You’ll also find gifts and home goods, such as dishes, rice cookers, silk pajamas and clothing, decorations, and teapots, among other things. 727 N. Broadway #102, (213) 626-7200 or winghopfung.com.

Shareen’s Vintage Discover a sprawling 7,000-square-foot wonderland of curated vintage pieces, as well as a stunning vintage bridal collection. Shareen also designs her own line of vintageinspired clothing. Be prepared to spend a few heavenly hours perusing the eye-popping stock. They’ve got snacks and candy too, but no boys allowed (since ladies try on clothing out in the open). 1721 N. Spring St., (323) 276-6226 or shareen.com.

Welcome Hunters This edgy boutique sells men’s and women’s clothing with a focus on up-and-coming, avant-garde designers. It’s pricey, but if you want cutting-edge gear you’ll find it here. 454B Jung Jing Rd., (213) 687-9905 or welcomehuntersla.com. 44

S H O P P I N G | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

FASHION DISTRICT

This dense hub of shops and alleys beckons with affordable prices on fashion, accessories, toys, fabric, beads, flowers and just about anything else you can imagine. A few shops are wholesale only, but for the most part, this shopping paradise is yours to explore. Come prepared with cash and walking shoes.

Art Lewin & Co.

A small crop of shops and services has sprung up to serve the local government workforce and surrounding residential community. Most businesses are open weekdays from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

This is where the movers and shakers go to get a bespoke suit made — a highly customized garment where the client gets to choose everything from the fabric to the features and fit. Impeccable tailoring and service. 112 W. Ninth St., #626, (213) 785-2400 or artlewinbespoke.com.

2nd Street Cigars and Gallery

California Market Center

Home of the La Plata Cigar Company, this art-filled shop offers their house line as well as national brands. There is a good supply of accessories too, from torches to cutters to humidors. The shop also hosts cigar tastings and art openings. 124 W. Second St., (213) 452-4416 or 2ndstreetcigars.com.

While this 2,000-showroom fashion hub sells to the trade, the public can get a taste of the action during the monthly sample sales from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. On the last Friday of the month, you’ll spot a line that often stretches around the block. Expect to find racks of discounted designer clothing and accessories. Cash only. 110 E. Ninth St., (213) 630-3600 or californiamarketcenter.com.

CIVIC CENTER

Fong’s You’ll find Asian art, antiques, figurines, opera puppets, jewelry and more at this longtime Chinatown gift shop. 943 Chung King Road, (213) 626-5904 or fongsonchungkingroad.com.

The center of El Pueblo is Olvera Street, a lively marketplace that boasts 80 shops and stalls stocked with leather goods, candles, handicrafts, souvenirs, candy, tequila, art, food vendors and restaurants. Olvera Street is a must for any tourist or Angeleno. Generally open daily from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 125 Paseo de La Plaza, (213) 628-1274 or olvera-street.com.

FIDM Scholarship Store

Los Angeles Mall Tucked between the County Hall of Administration and the County Courthouse, it is easy to miss this underground collection of retail. It’s a bit frayed around the edges, but convenient in a pinch. There are about a dozen eateries, a CVS pharmacy, dry cleaners, gift shop, shoe repair, and a handful of other services. 201 N. Spring St.

FIDM Museum Shop There’s a surprisingly unique selection of gifts and goods at this fashionable shop, including chic jewelry (recycled from rubber), designer purses from alums, home accessories, toys, books and more. 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 623-5821 or fidmmuseumshop.com.

City Hall Farmers Market

FIDM Scholarship Store

Every Thursday, City Hall East transforms into a farmers market with colorful flowers, local produce, rotisserie chicken, olives, honey, artisan bread, crafts and more. It’s

Shop for a good cause at this cute boutique, which stocks deeply discounted clothing, jewelry and accessories — some donated from major manufacturers and department


stores. Don’t miss the fun holiday sale where you can score lots of great gifts on the cheap. 919 S. Grand Ave., (213) 624-1200 or fidm.edu.

Brings You...

Flower Mart

Corner of 6th & Hope St. >

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Two cavernous buildings across the street from each other make up the Flower Mart — the main hive of a sub-district focusing on wholesale blooms and floral supplies. The public is welcome to shop alongside designers, who come here for the best and freshest flowers. You’ll find bunches of colorful blooms, pre-made bouquets, potted plants and supplies. There is an ATM but you should come prepared with cash. The mart opens to the public at 8 a.m. Mon., Wed. and Fri., and 6 a.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sat. Admission is $2 on weekdays and $1 on Saturday (closed Sunday). There’s parking on Wall and San Julian streets. Southern California Flower Market is at 742 Maple Ave., (213) 627-2482. Los Angeles Flower District is at 754 Wall St., (213) 627-3696 or laflowerdistrict.com.

Michael Levine Though there are smaller and cheaper fabric shops throughout the district, this 60,000-square-foot store has it all under one roof, including the latest designs (Amy Butler, Echino, Heather Ross), patterns and notions. The staff is super helpful and there’s even a bathroom. Across the street, you’ll find a space devoted to interior fabrics. Parking is validated in the lot if you spend $20 or more. 920 S. Maple Ave., (213) 622-6259 or mlfabric.com.

Morrie’s This is the place to go for big name and designer label women’s clothing at a discount. These are the real thing, not the knockoffs you’ll find throughout the district. There is 7,000 square feet to browse and the stock changes frequently. The holidays bring even more bargains. 934 S. Maple Ave., (213) 623-3083.

Moskatels (Michael’s)

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626-B S SPRING STREET IN DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

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Craft enthusiasts and party planners flock to this mega store for a wide selection of silk flowers, baskets, ribbon, vases, party goods, scrapbooking kits, frames, seasonal decorations, art supplies and wedding items. Owned by craft store giant Michael’s, you’ll often find better deals on merchandise here. Located between Seventh and Eighth streets, three blocks east of Los Angeles Street and one block west of San Pedro Street. Open Monday through Saturday 6 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 733 S. San Julian St., (213) 689-4590.

Novecento You’ll find antique European furniture at this unique shop on Olive Street, encompassing everything from MidCentury items to contemporary designs. There are stunning table and floor lamps, vintage toys, paintings, rugs and one-of-a-kind items. 910 S. Olive St., (213) 622-7700 or novecento.1stdibs.com.

Santee Alley Santee Alley is considered the epicenter of Downtown bargain hunting. This open-air street market comprised of more than 200 stalls and small shops is open daily, though weekends attract the biggest crowds hunting for cheap jeans, T-shirts, trendy shoes, knock-off sunglasses, toys and men’s suits. Haggling is expected, and though a number of shops now take plastic, prices often go down if you pull out cash. Parking at the Alley can be intense, but don’t be discouraged. Many lots charge $5 to $7 for the day. For other transportation options, as well as restaurants, rest-

The Historic Bank District

13 1 E 5T H ST 01 3 CA LI FO RN IA 90 LO S AN GE LE S,

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rooms and ATMs, pick up the Fashion District map (at fashiondistrict.org, at the California Market Center, or from a yellow-clad district ambassador on the street). Olympic Boulevard to 12th Street, between Maple Avenue and Santee Street, (213) 488-1153 or thesanteealley.com.

well as consign higher end pieces. Items range anywhere from $50 to $350. 548 S. Spring St., Unit 112, (213) 622-0648 or buttonsandbowsla.com.

Crack Gallery & Boutique This store on the ground floor of the Hayward Hotel offers a blend of sexy, attention-getting men’s and women’s clothing, shoes and accessories. It also carries affordable pop art pieces. Open daily. 204 W. Sixth St., (213) 622-3493 or crackgallery.com.

Santee Street The bazaar-like Santee Alley is packed with people and fun knockoffs, but don’t overlook the street itself. These are shops, not stalls, selling apparel, accessories and lots of sparkly costume jewelry that makes great gifts. Usually, there’s no wholesale license needed. Santee Street is located just west of Santee Alley.

Downtown Flea DTLA Bikes

Roger Stuart Upscale men’s suits and clothing at moderate prices. Suits are made in Italy and Spain. Professional service. Open daily. 729 S. Los Angeles St., (213) 627-9661 or rogerstuart.com.

Virgo Tucked away in the Fashion District is this rare gem, complete with dressing room (a rarity here). They’ve got a carefully selected inventory of new and vintage men’s and women’s apparel that’ll make you swoon. Many of the vintage items are repurposed with modern styling, like the line called Boos and Besito. Accessories, shoes and jewelry abound. Plus, they do custom studding. 216 E. Ninth St., (213) 988-8899 or virgodowntown.com.

FURNITURE AND DECORATIVE ARTS DISTRICT

As the local shopping nexus for the interior design industry, this district features hundreds of furniture manufacturers that sell primarily to the trade only. Occasionally, shoppers can take advantage of special sales. Bounded by the L.A. Mart on the northwest (at Broadway and Washington Boulevard), Central Avenue on the east and Florence Avenue on the south.

hip-hop artist Pit Bull. Pictures of those and other stars wearing Vlados hang in the store. 2200 S. Main St., (213) 629-2591 or vladofootwear.com.

HISTORIC CORE

No longer just a collection of cheap electronics, perfume and CDs, this historic Downtown district has diversified with an astonishing cluster of hip boutiques selling furniture and clothing — many in unique locations.

DTLA Bikes angelo:HOME The beautiful Eastern Columbia building is the backdrop for this boutique home goods store that focuses on stylish yet affordable furniture and decor. 847 S. Broadway, (213) 488-9347 or angelohome.com.

Beautiful Fül L.A. designer Alejandro Rodriguez debuts his flagship menswear store at the Rosslyn Hotel. 107 W. Fifth St., beautifulful.com.

Bliss Boutique Reasonable prices on a nicely edited selection of women’s clothing, shoes and accessories. 204 1/2 W. Sixth St., (213) 489-4022 or blissstores.com.

Brigade L.A. Mart The L.A. Mart is a full-resource center for gifts, decorative accessories and home furnishings. The L.A. Mart is usually for the trade only — in other words a qualified buyer or designer. But look for the occasional L.A. Mart sample sales, when the public can buy goods at up to 70% off wholesale. 1933 S. Broadway, (800) LAMART4 or lamart.com.

Unfolding on four parking lots between Second and Fourth streets, Main and Broadway, Downtown now has its very own flea market. The organizers of the popular Fairfax High Flea Market have brought their magic to the Historic Core, where shoppers can hunt for antiques, vintage goods, collectibles and indie designers. There is space for some 400 vendors, as well as food trucks, live music and beer. On the fourth Sunday of every month from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $5. 253 S. Main St., dtflea.com.

It may be an unlikely locale for a luxe fashion boutique, but it certainly fills a niche in Downtown for high-end apparel. Shoppers will find designer labels with an emphasis on local talent. Ladies’ clothing and accessories dominate, with shoes by designer Jeffrey Campbell. 510 W. Seventh St., (213) 623-0013 or brigadela.com.

Peruse 10,000 square feet of bikes and take a spin on the indoor race track. Repairs and accessories too. 425 S. Broadway, (213) 533-8000 or dtlabikes.com.

El Maestro Bicycles For more than a decade they’ve serviced the Downtown bike community. They’re friendly, knowledgeable and fair. 806 S. Main St., (213) 627-0580 or elmaestrobicycles.com.

Farmacia Million Dollar At this botanica, visitors will find a large collection of herbs, candles, oils and saintly statuettes for every objective — whether you want to win the lottery, get a promotion, find love or even get revenge. There are traditional drug store sundries and a professional pharmacist on hand, but the real fun is searching the aisles for unusual gifts — voodoo doll anyone? On Sundays, you can sometimes find a palm reader on duty. 301 S. Broadway, (213) 687-3688.

Flamingo Vintage Great vintage clothing, housewares and treasures abound. 548 S. Spring St., (310) 595-0624.

Broadway

Gather DTLA

Architectural salvage is the name of the game at this fun store, located near the L.A. Trade Tech campus. There is plenty to rummage through, from antique mantles to gorgeous mirrors to lighting and furniture. There are decorative collectibles aplenty, and you won’t be disappointed if you’re looking for a one-of-a kind piece. Open daily. 1800 S. Grand Ave., (213) 746-8600 or ogtstore.com.

Many of Broadway’s historic structures are filled with discount retail shops and mini swap meet malls on the ground floor. These shops sell wedding dresses, cheap perfume, bootleg DVDs, shoes, electronics and sunglasses. The strip is a mash of people, blaring music, rumbling buses and vendors proclaiming their bargains to passing customers. It’s uniquely L.A. and definitely worth a visit. On Broadway between Third and Ninth streets.

Get crafty at this adorable knitting supply shop located inside a bookstore. Owner Evi is friendly, knowledgable and also offers classes. 453 S. Spring St., (213) 908-2656 or togatherdtla.com.

Vlado Footwear

Broadway Smoke Shop & Accessories

This colorful showroom caters to hip-hop culture and serious street dance. Vlado sponsors local dance crews and events for “jerkin,” a spin-off of break dancing. As owner Jill Kim’s designs evolved on the dance scene, they also caught the attention of celebrities such as Jamie Foxx and

Lots of selection, good deals and friendly staff. 624 S. Broadway, (213) 622-2825.

Olde Good Things

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S H O P P I N G | downtown los angeles gUIde

Buttons and Bows You can buy and sell vintage and designer fashions, as

Grand Central Market A major overhaul is underway at this historic L.A. openair market, which has served the local population for nearly a century. The multi-phase plan will usher in a new era for the landmark, bringing in artisan purveyors of cheese, wine, bread, coffee, farm fresh produce and meats, while keeping the longtime vendors who sell ethnic foods and dry goods. The 12,000-square-foot basement will become a foodcrafting space for brewers, charcuterie makers and the like, and could house an exhibition kitchen. In the meantime, shoppers can


continue to enjoy some 30 food and retail stalls selling everything from carnitas tacos and chop suey to ice cream and produce. The market bustles with activity from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. 317 S. Broadway, (213) 624-2378 or grandcentralmarket.com.

and personal protection. There are also countless accessories and gadgets like scissors, flashlights, trimmers, razors and lighters. 324 S. Broadway, (213) 626-1897 or rosscutlery.com.

Historic Core Farmers Market

Opened earlier this year, Ross is the first national retailer to return to this historic corridor. The 39,000-square-foot discount clothing store occupies the basement and ground floor of the former Woolworth department store building. 719 S. Broadway, (213) 243-5744.

Ross Dress for Less

Locals can pick up fresh fruits and veggies at this weekly Sunday farmers market. There are nearly two dozen vendors selling everything from bread and fruit juices to honey and orchids. Located on a block of fifth street between Spring and Broadway. No pets allowed. From 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 500 S. Spring St.

Round2 L.A. Vintage men’s and women’s apparel and accessories in the heart of Downtown. From hipster to couture, items range from a $5 1970s blouse to a $1,295 pair of sparkly green Christian Louboutins. 600 S. Spring St., round2la.com, (213) 605-5268.

Honey Zhuang This tiny boutique adds flair to the mix of retailers near Sixth and Spring streets with vintage and new men’s and women’s clothing. She’s also got lots of great jewelry and accessories to peruse. 600 S. Spring St., St., #108, (888) 538-3839 or honeyzhuang.com.

Nicholas Bowes T-shirts and shorts. 210 W. Eighth St., (213) 624-0866 or nicholasbowes.com.

Kapsoul You’ll find this tiny shop of collectibles tucked under the SB Lofts. The fashion, music and cultural high and lowlights of the 1980s and early ’90s are up for sale — everything from vintage shades to vinyl to MC Hammer action figures. 548 S. Spring St., (818) 693-4180 or kapsoulstore.com.

Nicholas Bowes This Australian-born designer (who appeared on the TV show “Fashion Star”) sells unique leather pieces (jackets, pillows and wallets) as well as non-leather goods like

1 Man’s Trash An outpost for this eponymous clothing brand (favored by celebs), the shop also offers hard-to-find vintage clothing, shoes and accessories. 655 S. Main St., (213) 840-3654 or 1mclothing.com.

Ross Cutlery This landmark Downtown store features 6,000 square feet of knives including blades for chefs, sportsmen, collectors

Six Hundred There’s a diverse selection of clothing from vintage to designer at this trendy boutique. 600 S. Spring St., (213) 599-1600 or sixhundredla.com.

Stock & Bond A selection of men’s and women’s contemporary designers as well as vintage items. 111 W. Seventh St., Suite R1.

Sub Urban Riot Located in the SB Main Lofts Building, this retail shop sells cool and affordable men’s and women’s clothing. They also offer accessories and items for the home and body. 111 W. Seventh St., (213) 689-3281 or suburbanriot.com.

SHOP at FIDM? Who knew FIDM had such diverse shopping options!

FIDM Scholarship Store Fabulous clothes, jewelry, accessories, fabrics, and trim at wholesale prices. 75% of the store priced under $10. Proceeds benefit the FIDM Scholarship Foundation.

FIDM Museum Shop Limited edition jewelry and one-of-a kind accessories. Distinctive stationery and cards. Original home decor. Unique gifts designed by local artists.

FIDM Store The FIDM Store carries logo merchandise as well as school and office supplies, art supplies, greeting cards, tote bags, and gifts. ®

919 South Grand Avenue at 9th, LA 90015 losangelesdowntown.com | S H O P P I N G

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arguably the most popular complex in the Jewelry District. There are nearly 500 tenants selling every jewel, stone, precious metal and bead imaginable. There are prices to fit every budget, with some items priced at up to 80 percent less than the competition. There’s a 250-car parking structure adjacent to the center on Broadway. Open 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday. 640-650 S. Hill St., (213) 629-2124 or svjc.com.

Buy cigars, cigarettes and accessories, or relax while you smoke a hookah on the patio. 548 S. Spring St., (213) 622-0224.

JEWELRY DISTRICT

For unbeatable deals on precious gems, watches, engagement rings and other sparkly trinkets, shoppers benefit from impressive savings since they’re buying directly from the manufacturers at wholesale prices. There are a number of jewelry marts throughout the area, including: International Jewelry Center (550 S. Hill St.); California Jewelry Mart (607 S. Hill St.); Jewelry Theater Building (411 W. Seventh St.); and the 556 S. Broadway Building. Parking is widely available throughout the district, and can vary greatly, from $3 to $22 a day. Visit lajd.net. The district’s hub is Hill Street, from Fifth to Eighth streets.

LITTLE TOKYO

Bunkado

Icing on the Ring Engagement rings, diamonds and lots of education for newbies. 607 S. Hill St., Suite 316, (888) 565-6150 or icingonthering.com.

Lara’s Jewelry A popular spot for engagement rings and fine jewelry. 550 S. Hill St., Suite 570, (213) 623-0919 or larasjewelry.com.

Pershing Square Farmers Market Every Wednesday and Thursday from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Pershing Square comes alive with colorful produce dis-

chapman market

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7 days a week. last call for delivery 1:45 am

Beer & wine CALL 213-489-4080

chapman piZZeria free delivery we do catering

CALL 213-489-5999 221 w. 8th street

At the corner of 8th & BroAdwAy 50

S H O P P I N G | downtown los angeles gUIde

plays, tasty food stalls, crafts, jewelry and other goodies. Lunchtime is busiest when the workers from the surrounding towers descend. Be sure to bring cash. Get off at the Pershing Square metro stop and avoid parking. 532 S. Olive St., rawinspiration.org.

Single Stone Pay a visit to this chic and modern showroom if you’re on the hunt for stunning vintage and antique inspired rings. They’ve got a large selection of styles and gems to choose from. You can even design your own engagement ring with the help of the super friendly and knowledgeable staff. 607 S. Hill St., Suite 204, (213) 892-0772 or singlestone.com.

St. Vincent Jewelry Center At some 200,000 square feet, this is the largest and

Though it spans just a few blocks, this district is perhaps one of the most enjoyable to stroll and shop. The quaint stretch of historic storefronts along First Street offers restaurants, gifts, flowers and even hardware. Inside the plazas, you will also find a treasure trove of spots to explore, whether you crave delicate Japanese sweets, beautiful kimonos or dainty tea sets.

American Apparel These modern cotton basics — T-shirts, leggings, leotards, short shorts and other retro-inspired garb — are sweatshop-free and made Downtown. 363 E. Second St., (213) 617-7222 or americanapparel.net.

Anzen Hardware Since 1946 they’ve offered finely crafted gardening tools, gadgets and knives — professional chefs even frequent the store. There are also kitchen utensils, carpentry goods, household items and bonsai tools. They make keys too. 309 E. First St., (213) 628-7600.

Visit The Library Store at Downtown’s historic Central Library! A carefully crafted collection of eclectic and literary gifts and goods.

213.228.7550 lfla.org/store All sales support the Los Angeles Public Library.

The Library Store @TheLibraryStore TheLibraryStore


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Cote de Boeuf

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800 W 6th Street Los Angeles, CA 90017

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eat, drink, & indulge in some of the best downtown has to offer Lobster Roll

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Shrimp Cocktail

HOURS: Mon - Thu 10am - Midnight Fri 10am - 2am | Sat 2pm - 2am Sun 2pm - 10pm

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lving The First Revo SA! in the U Sushi Counter open 7 days a week, 11 am - 10 pm 120 Japanese Village plaza (Little Tokyo)

(213) 680-0567

Validated FREE Parking (Enter on Central Ave.)

Gourmet LA Bakery

LUNCH & DINNER Our sandwiches are made while you wait and every selected ingredient is the freshest possible including our award winning croissants and telera bread. BREAD & PASTRIES Our bread is traditional Mexican, but we have made our selection as diverse as this city. CAKES For all occasions. Just tell us your needs and ideas and we will turn it into a delicious reality. DRINKS All natural & fresh traditional Mexican coolers.

Bunkado

Little Tokyo Galleria & Market

This longtime store isn’t much to look at from the outside. But inside, the immaculate yet cozy Bunkado (which means “house of culture”) is crammed with so many different kinds of Japanese-themed items it is overwhelming at first. The inventory ranges from parasols to stationary to intricate Japanese dolls. 340 E. First St., (213) 625-1122 or bunkadoonline.com.

This indoor Japanese shopping mall is anchored by the Woori Market, a full-service grocery store specializing in Asian products and ready-made food. There are several restaurants including Sushi Go 55 and Honda Ya, and shops filled with lovely housewares, dishes, knickknacks and more. Don’t miss the bowling alley. Parking is validated. 333 S. Alameda St., (213) 625-7104.

Fugetsu-Do

Made by DWC

Family-owned and operated since 1903, Fugetsu-Do is located on the historic First Street block. You’ll find a counter full of traditional Japanese rice cakes (mochi) and manju (sweet bean filled rice cakes). These chewy, pillowlike confections come in a rainbow of colors and flavors, such as green tea, chocolate and even peanut butter. 315 E. First St., (213) 625-8595 or fugetsu-do.com.

Handmade gifts from the women of the Downtown Women’s Center fill this lovely shop and cafe. Proceeds support homeless and low-income women at the DWC. In addition to the organic tea, coffee and food, the shelves are stocked with unique items, some made from refurbished or vintage pieces. You’ll find soy candles and natural soaps, journals, succulent arrangements and decoupage art, among other things. 438 S. San Pedro St., (213) 213-2881 or madebydwc.org.

Heirloom Everything has a story in this vintage shop, where you’ll find old leather jackets, Harley T-shirts and biker boots. The petite shop specializes in pre-1970s clothing. 301 E. First St., (213) 617-8485.

Japanese Village Plaza Japanese Village Plaza is Little Tokyo’s most popular place to shop and stroll. You can browse the gift shops, sample green tea frozen yogurt, visit the market for a selection of Japanese goods, or simply sit in the plaza and people watch. The First Street entrance is marked by a traditional fire tower. Two-hour parking with validation on Central Avenue between First and Second streets. 335 E. Second St., (213) 617-1900.

Kimski Makes

ICE CREAM

A trendy apparel boutique featuring vintage and designer items at moderate prices. 369 E. Second St., (213) 626-0340 or kimski.com.

COFFEE & TEA

Kinokuniya Bookstore This catchall bookstore offers Japanese stationery, pens, washi paper, stickers, music, magazines and gifts. Oh yeah, books too. 123 Astronaut E. Onizuka St., (213) 687-4480 or kinokuniya.com.

213.623.4244

548 S. Broadway Ave. LA, CA 90013

(On Broadway between 5th and 6th streets)

Mon. - Sat., 6:30am - 8pm • Sun., 7am -7pm GourmetLABakery.com 52

S H O P P I N G | downtown los angeles gUIde

Kool’s Clothing Store If you love vintage clothes and quirky accessories, this litle shop is a gem. They restock all the time and you won’t leave empty-handed. 110 Japanese Village Plaza Mall, (213) 680-1777 or koolsusa.com.

Monkey Pants Find the cutest little childrens pants at this new store, which also stocks unique toys and accessories. 131 Japanese Village Plaza Mall, (323) 915-5300 or japanesemonkeypants.com.

No. A Eclectic boutique pieces from T-shirts to silk dresses to accessories. 374 E. Second St., (213) 626-6155 or number-a.com.

PopKiller Second This colorful boutique has a cheeky selection of vintage goodies that you’ll definitely want to take home. There are heart-shaped sunglasses, “I Heart L.A.” T-shirts, novelty toys and lots of accessories that make you smile. 343 E. Second St., (213) 625-1372 or popkiller.us.

Q Pop Shop It’s a festival of all things cute and collectible at this cheery shop across from Weller Court. Merchandise features plushies, T-shirts, gallery art, accessories, toys, books and music. 128 Astronaut E. S. Onizuka St., (213) 687-7767 or qpopshop.com.

Rafu Bussan At 7,000 square feet, this is the largest gift shop in Little Tokyo. There’s an eye-catching selecting of beautiful ceramics and tea sets, as well as cookery, paper lanterns, sushi-shaped candles and Japanese dolls. This is a great place to go for that special gift. 326 E. Second St., (213) 614-1181 or rafubussaninc.com.


Raggedy Threads

Skin.Graft

An impressive selection of vintage apparel spanning the decades. 330 E. Second St., (213) 620-1188 or raggedythreads.com.

The retail showroom for this L.A.-based design house features avant-garde designs (somewhere between underground and couture) with accessories starting at $100 and the priciest items topping $1,000. 125 W. Fourth St., (213) 626-2662 or skingraftdesigns.com.

RIF A sneaker consignment store with rare names. These shoes are pricey but unique. 334A E. Second St., (213) 617-0252 or rif.la.

Sanrio This Hello Kitty outpost oozes serious cuteness. Fans will go gaga over the shelves of clothing, bags, stationary, dolls, makeup, and toys featuring Hello Kitty and her animated friends. It’s not just kid stuff though: There are also whimsical grown-up items such as a Hello Kitty toaster oven or iPod speaker system. 115 Japanese Village Plaza, (213) 620-0830 or sanrio.com.

SOUTH PARK

South Park is flush with offices, restaurants and entertainment options, but retail spots are beginning to crop up too.

Downtown L.A. Bicycles Buy a bicycle, get repairs or check out the resource

center. You can even rent bikes here and explore the city on two wheels. 1626 S. Hill St., (213) 745-6783 or downtownlabicycles.com.

Smart & Final Extra This newcomer is a welcome addition to the growing Downtown marketplace. Located on the bottom of a new residential building, the store offers all the usual bulk goods with the addition of a full-scale grocery market. 845 S. Figueroa St., (213) 629-0039 or smartandfinal.com.

The Well You can check everything off on your to-do list at this clothing retailer/hair-nail salon/event space. 1006 S. Olive St., (213) 550-4448 or getwell.la.

Tokyo Japanese Outlet Located across from the Sanrio store, it’s impossible to leave this gift shop without something adorable, and prices are affordable. They’ve got the requisite Hello Kitty merchandise, but also sweet bento box sets, sushi items and kitchen gadgets that you can’t live without (like teddy bear and bunny molds for hard-boiled eggs). There are pens, stickers, toys, makeup and even household items. 114 Japanese Village Plaza Mall, (213) 626-2761 or tokyojlsusa.com.

PLÁCIDO DOMINGO ELI AND EDYTHE BROAD GENERAL DIRECTOR

JAMES CONLON RICHARD SEAVER MUSIC DIRECTOR

THAÏS

Weller Court This shopping center includes several restaurants, shops, karaoke clubs and a cafe. Don’t miss the Marukai Market, where you can pick up groceries as well as pre-packaged snacks and food items. If you want a sit-down meal, be sure to visit the always popular Orochan Ramen and Curry House. There’s also a bookstore, salon and sport shop. 123 Onizuka St.

OLD BANK DISTRICT

Centered along Fourth and Main streets, you’ll find a diverse collection of entrepreneurs who have set up shop to serve the local loft community. It’s a fun, vibrant slice of Downtown life, with plenty of unique shopping.

Blends High-end, limited edition sneaks and gear. 125 W. Fourth St., (213) 626-6607 or blendsus.com.

The Last Book Store Located on the ground floor of the Spring Arts Tower, this indie shop sells old and used books. The assortment is eclectic, including everything from cookbooks and sci-fi to fiction and photography. Most titles are less than $10. They’ll also buy your used books and CDs. 453 S. Spring St., (213) 488-0599 or lastbookstorela.com.

Old Bank District Market This is the area’s go-to market for all those necessary sundries you forgot to pick up earlier — pita chips, beer, wine, chicken stock, martini olives, ice cream. There’s also a deli counter and coffee bar, and great patio seating. The owners are always super friendly and helpful too. 409 S. Main St., (213) 680-9000.

13 |14 sEASON CARMEN • FALSTAFF • THE MAGIC FLUTE • BILLY BUDD LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR • THAÏS • EINSTEIN ON THE BEACH AUDRA MCDONALD

TICKETS FROM

IN CONCERT

• DMITRI HVOROSTOVSKY IN RECITAL

19! LAOpera.com | 213.972.8001

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Raw Materials Stop in to this friendly neighborhood shop for art and architectural supplies, as well as fine art printing and custom framing. 436 S. Main St., (213) 627-7223 or rawmaterialsla.com.

WITH PROJECTED

ENGLISH

TRANSLATIONS

OFFICIAL TIMEPIECE OF LA OPERA

losangelesdowntown.com | S H O P P I N G

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Perch

RESTAURANTS Where to Find Tasty Eats Downtown

key

$

to

abbreviations

Entrees under $10

$$ Entrees $10-20 $$$ Entrees $20 and up

B -- Breakfast L -- Lunch D -- Dinner W -- Open Weekends BR -- Brunch W/B -- Wine and Beer FB -- Full Bar De -- Delivery WiFi -- Free WiFi

ARTS DISTRICT Angel City Brewing 216 S. Alameda St. (at Traction) (213) 622-1261, angelcitybrewing.com Sip your pint of beer in a warehouse-turned brewery. There’s art, music and food trucks, too. International, $, D, W, W/B Bestia 2121 E. Seventh Pl. (213) 514-5724, bestiala.com Everything is good at this trattoria, from the house-cured meats to the fresh bread to the Napolitana pizza cooked in a wood-burning oven. Italian, $$$, D, W, FB Church & State 1850 Industrial St. (213) 405-1434, churchandstatebistro.com 54

French dishes accompanied by delicious cocktails in this upscale bistro. French, $$$, L, D, W, FB The Daily Dose 1820 Industrial St. (213) 281-9300, dailydoseinc.com Duck into an old cobblestone alley to find this industrial gem serving good coffee and gourmet eats. American, $, B, L, W, BR District BBQ & Lounge 738 E. Third St. (213) 680-3008, districtbbq.com Formerly K-Town BBQ, this new restaurant serves burgers and Korean barbecue-inspired dishes in a casual and hip atmosphere. Korean, $$, L, D, W, W/B Eat.Drink.Americano 923 E. Third St. (213) 620-0781, eatdrinkamericano.com Enjoy a craft beer with a selection of meats, cheeses, sandwich/burger dinner plates, and sweet bites. American, $$, D, W (Sat. only), W/B Handsome Coffee Roasters 582 Mateo St. (213) 621-4194, handsomecoffee.com This minimalist-chic cafe roasts its beans onsite and serves artisan coffee and espresso. Cafe, $, W Little Bear 1855 Industrial St.

R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

(213) 622-8100, littlebearla.com A Belgian beer cafe with seriously good eats. Belgian, $, L, D, W, BR, FB Nola’s 734 E. Third St. (213) 680-3003, nolasla.com Relish Creole classics in a laid-back and hip New Orleans atmosphere. Live jazz daily. Southern, $$, L, D, W, BR, FB The Novel Cafe 811 Traction Ave. (213) 621-2240, novelcafedtla.com This trendy cafe serves breakfast all day, as well as sandwiches, pastas, quesadillas, burgers and pastries. Salads/Sandwiches, $, B, L, W, WiFi The Pie Hole 714 Traction Ave. (213) 537-0115, thepieholela.com Enjoy a cup of gourmet coffee with a slice of savory or sweet pie fresh from the oven. American, $, B, L, D, W, WiFi Pizzanista 2019 E. Seventh St. (213) 627-1430, pizzanista.com Excellent New York-style pizza. Pizza, $$, L, D, W, De, WiFi Purgatory Pizza 1326 E. First St. (323) 262-5310, eatpurgatorypizza.com This pizzeria offers a wickedly delightful selection of pizza,


sandwiches and salads. Pizza, $$, L, D, W, De, WiFi R23 923 E. Second St. (213) 687-7178, R23.com A longtime favorite that serves high-end sushi and other Japanese delicacies. There’s also an art gallery and lounge. Japanese, $$$, L, D, W (Sat. only), W/B, WiFi Urth Caffe 451 S. Hewitt St. (213) 797-4534, urthcaffe.com Enjoy gourmet breakfast or lunch with a cup of freshroasted organic coffee. Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L, D, W, BR, WiFi Wurstküche 800 E. Third St. (213) 687-4444, wurstkucherestaurant.com Specializes in exotic sausages, Belgian fries and beer galore. German, $, L, D, W, W/B Zip Sushi Izakaya 744 E. Third St. (213) 680-3770, zipizakaya.com Delicious Asian fusion food served in a relaxed atmosphere with a lovely patio. Asian/Fusion, $$, L, D, W, W/B BUNKER HILL Bunker Hill Bar & Grill 601 W. Fifth St. (213) 688-2988 Elevated American eats like truffle burgers, short rib sandwiches and aioli fries next to Library Tower.

My house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples. - Isaiah 56:7

MASS SCHEDULE | HORARIO DE MISAS

Monday-Friday 7:00am & 12:10pm

Sunday | Domingo 8:00am & 10:00am (12:30pm en Español)

Confessions|Confesiónes: Monday-Friday @ 11:00am HOURS OF OPERATION | HORAS DE APERTURA Monday-Friday | Lunes-Viernes: 6:30am - 6:00pm Saturday | Sábado - 9:00am - 6:00pm Sunday | Domingo - 7:00am - 6:00pm

www.olacathedral.org follow us at “olacathedral”

555 W. Temple Street, Los Angeles | (213) 680-5200

Urth Caffe American, $$, L, FB, WiFi California Pizza Kitchen 330 S. Hope St. (213) 626-2616, cpk.com A fast and affordable lunch favorite that offers a great selection of pizza and salads. California/Fusion, $$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Esaan Thai 601 W. Fifth St. (213) 488-9995, esaanthai.com Affordable Thai food prepared with organic ingredients. Thai, $, L, WiFi Etchea 254 S. Hope St., 2280 S. Figueroa St. (213) 626-0157, etcheabakery.com This rustic French cafe and bakery serves a Basqueinspired menu and freshly baked breads. French, $, B, L, D, W (Sat. only)

First & Hope 710 W. First St. (213) 617-8555, firstandhope.com Upscale comfort food in an Art Deco-inspired space. American/Fusion, $$, L, D, W, BR, FB, WiFi Lemonade 505 S. Flower St. (213) 488-0299, lemonadela.com Well-known for its fresh-squeezed lemonade, this chic eatery also features seasonal California-inspired foods. American $$, B, L Market Cafe 330 S. Hope St. (Wells Fargo Center) (213) 680-7387, patinagroup.com Healthy breakfast and lunch options including salads, sandwiches and flatbread pizza. Salads/Sandwiches, $, B, L Mendocino Farms 300 S. Grand Ave. (213) 620-1114, mendocinofarms.com This Downtown sandwich king whips up inventive creations using artisan ingredients. Salads/Sandwiches, $, L Nick & Stef’s 330 S. Hope St. (213) 680-0330, patinagroup.com Get your aged beef and expertly made martini at this longtime steakhouse favorite. Steakhouse, $$$, L, D, W (Sat. only), FB Noé (Omni Hotel) 251 S. Olive St. (213) 356-4100, www.noerestaurant.com Discover a rotating market-driven menu at this upscale eatery.

ALAN ZABOLIAN, D.D.S. A winning smile is beauty and confidence!

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Member of the American and California Dental Associations

1127 WILSHIRE BLVD., SUITE #918, LOS ANGELES, CA 90017 • 213.481.2917 LOSANGELESDOWNTOWN.cOm | R E S T A U R A N T S

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FOOD & DRINK

The Escondite 410 Boyd St.

CENTRAL CITY EAST

Asian-American fusion that includes Angus burgers, Kobe beef hot dogs, sushi and seafood delights.

(213) 626-1800 Guests can chow down on delicious burgers and sip cocktails in this lounge-like hideout. American, $$, L, D, W, BR, FB Farmer Boys 726 S. Alameda St. (213) 228-8999, farmerboysla.com Delicious fast food and grill items for breakfast, lunch or dinner, with a convenient drive-thru and free Wi-Fi. American, $, B, L, D, W Fisherman’s Outlet 529 S. Central Ave. (213) 627-7231, fishermansoutlet.net This popular seafood lunch favorite serves fresh fish, shrimp and scallops fried or grilled. Seafood, $$, L, W (Sat. only), W/B

CATERING

Neo Bistro, $$$, D, W, FB Ocho Mexican Grill 255 S. Grand Ave. (888) 988-6246, eatocho.com This fast casual grill has opened a second outpost serving Mexican classics. Mexican, $, L, D, W (Sat. only), De Skews 300 S. Grand Ave. (213) 613-0300 Specializes in skewers, bowls and salads. California/Fusion, $, L

Far East Catering will provide a modern and diverse array of food and libations for your next special event. We deliver a mutli-course, plated meal, buffet, craft beer and mixology bar. We’re multifaceted and can deliver whatever your party needs and desires!

347 East 1st Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012 | (213) 617-9990 | www.farbarla.com | Don@farbarla.com

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R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

L.A.’s Best Deli and Cafe 605 S. Central Ave. (213) 622-7437 Breakfast classics served all day, as well as Italian favorites such as pizza, pasta and sandwiches. Salads/Sandwiches, $, B, L, W (Sat. only) Yxta Cocina Mexicana 601 S. Central Ave. (213) 596-5579, yxta.net A modern spin on Mexican food with a lively happy hour. Mexican, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only), FB CHINATOWN Authentic Thai 637 N. Spring St. (213) 613-1115, authenticthaila.com Hearty Thai dishes at reasonable prices. Thai, $, L, D, W, De CBS Seafood 700 N. Spring St. (213) 617-2323 A Hong Kong-style seafood house with excellent dim sum service. Chinese, $$, L, D, W, W/B Chego 727 N. Broadway, #117 (323) 380-8680, eatchego.com Devotees of this popular Westside transplant will find the chubby pork belly rice bowl, ooey gooey fries and the Thai basil burger. Asian/Fusion, $, L, D, W, De Eastside Market Italian Deli 1013 Alpine St. (213) 250-2464, esmdeli.com A landmark lunch spot serving traditional Italian favorites such as cold cut sandwiches, meatballs and eggplant parmesan. Italian, $, B, L, W (Sat. only) Full House Seafood Restaurant 963 N. Hill St. (213) 617-8382 An old-time Chinatown favorite that serves seafood and Cantonese cuisine. It’s open until 3 a.m. for those latenight cravings. Chinese, $$, L, D, W/B Hoan Kiem 727 N. Broadway (213) 617-3650 Get your pho fix here. Don’t forget the refreshing lemonade. Vietnamese, $, L, D, W Homegirl Cafe 130 W. Bruno St., homegirlcafe.org (213) 617-0380 This cafe with a social mission serves breakfast and lunch, made with seasonal vegetables from their local farm. Cafe, $, B, L, W (Sat. only), BR Hop Li Seafood Restaurant 526 Alpine St. (213) 680-3939, hoplirestaurant.com Seafood and Cantonese fare, with their signature shrimp with honey glazed walnuts. Chinese, $, L, D, W, W/B J&K Hong Kong Cuisine 727 N. Broadway (213) 617-0638, jkhkcuisine.webs.com Diners will find Chinese and American favorites. Chinese, $, B, L, D, W, De Lucky Deli 706 N. Broadway


(213) 625-7847 Chinese takeout with an impressive selection of hot dishes, dim sum and roast duck. Chinese, $, L, D, W Nick’s Cafe 1300 N. Spring St. (323) 222-1450, nickscafela.com Since 1948, this nostalgic diner has served killer ham and eggs, along with a slew of breakfast and lunch favorites. American, $, B, L, W, CO Ocean Seafood 750 N. Hill St. (213) 687-3088, oceansf.com Fresh seafood and Hong Kong-style dim sum. Chinese, $$, L, D, W, W/B Chynna Dim Sum Philippe The Original 1001 N. Alameda St. (213) 628-3781, philippes.com Pho Hoa Home of the French dip sandwich since 1908; it’s an L.A. 818 N. Spring St. landmark. (213) 485-0074 American, $, B, L, D, W, W/B A giant bowl of steaming pho and a side of egg rolls. Phoenix Bakery Vietnamese, $, L, D, W 969 N. Broadway Pho 97 (213) 628-4642, phoenixbakeryinc.com 727 N. Broadway This longtime, family-operated bakery is famous for its (213) 625-7026 strawberry and whipped cream cakes. Now offering dim Authentic Vietnamese noodle soups, served quick and sum service. cheap. Bakery/Cafe, $, W, De Vietnamese, $, L, D, W Pho Broadway Plum Tree Inn 942 N. Broadway 913 N. Broadway (213) 572-2507 (213) 613-1819, plumtreeinn.com Fast, good pho with a homey vibe. This Chinatown favorite is popular for its addictive honey Vietnamese, $, L, D, W walnut shrimp and crispy beef.

Chinese, $$, L, D, W, De, FB Queen’s Bakery 809 N. Broadway (213) 622-9749 Rice puffs and almond cookies. Enough said. Bakery, $, W, De Regent China Inn 747 N. Main St. (213) 680-3333, regentchinainn.com You’ll find lots of seafood and Cantonese dishes at a reasonable price. Chinese, $, L, D, W, De 643 North 643 N. Spring St. (213) 687-8888, 643north.com You’ll find Italian fusion cuisine at this stylish newcomer, along with a dozen craft beers, a makeyour-own martini bar, and Italian cocktails. Italian, $$, L, D, W, BR, FB Spring Street Smoke House 640 N. Spring St. (213) 626-0535, sssmokehouse.com A laid-back beer joint that serves pork ribs, Texas hotlinks, brisket and more, cooked in a pit barbecue. American, $, L, D, W, W/B Starry Kitchen 943 N. Broadway (213) 814-1123, starrykitchen.com This quirky and beloved little eatery has found a new home in the Grand Star Jazz Club. Come for the outrageously delicious chili crab gumbo and crispy tofu balls. Asian/Fusion, $, D, W, FB Via Cafe 451 Gin Ling Way

DOWNTOWN L.A.’s

107 W. 4TH ST.

facebook.com/bar107

OPEN: M-F 4PM-2AM, S/S 3PM-2AM LOSANGELESDOWNTOWN.cOm | R E S T A U R A N T S

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(213) 617-1481 Casual, Vietnamese fusion fare in a vibrant, welcoming space. Vietnamese, $, L, D, W, W/B Yang Chow 819 N. Broadway (213) 625-0811, yangchow.com Some of the best Mandarin and Szechwan dishes including the favorite slippery shrimp. Chinese, $, L, D, W CITY WEST Flix Cafe 421 S. Beaudry Ave. (213) 534-2337, lacenterstudios.com The eatery that serves breakfast, lunch, pastries and coffee for Downtown’s sound stages. American, $, B, L Gus’s Drive In 1657 W. Third St. Trader Vic’s at L.A. Live (213) 483-8885, gussdi.com Drive through or dine in, they’ve got mouthwatering burgers, sandwiches and Mexican dishes. mustard vinaigrette. American, $, B, L, D, W Salads/Sandwiches, $, L, D, W (Sat. only), De Original Tommy’s 2575 W. Beverly Blvd. CIVIC CENTER (213) 389-9060, originaltommys.com Kendall’s Brasserie The chain’s original stand is open 24 hours and is home to 135 N. Grand Ave. the city’s most famous chili burger. (213) 972-7322, patinagroup.com American, $, B, L, D, W, CO A lovely bistro beneath the Music Center serving French Sandwich Joint favorites. 1068 W. Seventh St. French, $$$, L, D, W, FB (213) 623-5300 Patina Stellar sandwiches, especially when slathered with the 141 S. Grand Ave. (Walt Disney Concert Hall)

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R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

(213) 972-3331, patinarestaurant.com This Michelin-rated restaurant is a foodie’s dream. Post-theater dining on performance nights. California/Fusion, $$$, D, W, FB Spotlight Cafe and Tina Tacos 135 N. Grand Ave. (Music Center) (213) 972-7525, patinagroup.com A gourmet marketplace and taco stand with beer, conveniently located in the Music Center. American/Fusion, $, L, D, W/B DOWNTOWN ADJACENT Bacaro L.A. 2308 S. Union St. (213) 748-7205, bacarola.com Cool, low-key Italian wine bar specializing in eclectic small plates. Italian, $$, D, W, BR, W/B Barragan’s 1538 Sunset Blvd. (213) 250-4256, barragansrestaurants.com Mexican favorites and fantastic margaritas served since 1961. Now offers delivery service. Mexican, $$, L, D, W, FB, De Brooklyn Bagel Bakery 2217 W. Beverly Blvd. (213) 413-4114, brooklynbagella.com This bagel factory serves New York-style bagels made on site daily. Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L, W Dusty’s Bistro 3200 W. Sunset Blvd. (323) 906-1018, dustysbistro.com This lively eatery matches its artsy neighborhood, with French and American comfort food all day. French, $$, B, L, D, W/B Langer’s 704 S. Alvarado St. (213) 483-8050, langersdeli.com A thick, juicy pile of pastrami on rye comes with a side of L.A. history. Salads/Sandwiches, $$, B, L, W, W/B La Parrilla 1300 Wilshire Blvd. (213) 353-4930, laparrillarestaurants.com For more than 30 years, they’ve served up Mexican cuisine including the popular molcajete. Mexican, $$, B, L, D, W, FB, WiFi M Grill 3832 Wilshire Blvd. (213) 389-2770, mgrill.com A Brazilian barbecue buffet with an eye-popping selection. Brazilian, $$$, L, D, W, FB Pacific Dining Car 1310 W. Sixth St. (213) 483-6000, pacificdiningcar.com Downtown powerbrokers flock to this stylish steakhouse in a converted rail car. Open 24 hours a day. Steakhouse, $$$, B, L, D, W, FB Palermo 1858 N. Vermont Ave. (323) 663-1178, palermorestaurant.net Located adjacent to Downtown in Los Feliz, diners come for the classic Italian eats and quaint ambiance. Italian, $$, L, D, W, FB Papa Cristo’s 2771 W. Pico Blvd. (323) 737-2970, papacristos.com


Considered the best Greek food in L.A., Papa Cristo’s boasts a family-style dining room, market and deli. Greek, $, L, D, W, W/B The Park 1400 W. Sunset Blvd. (213) 482-9209, thepark1400sunset.com An eclectic and stylish bistro in Echo Park with an international menu and lots of vegetarian options. International, $$, B, L, D, W/B The Parks Finest 1267 W. Temple St. (213) 247-4909, theparksfinest.com Lip-smacking barbecue with a touch of Filipino flair. American, $, L, D, W, W/B Sage Organic Vegan 1700 W. Sunset Blvd. (213) 989-1718, sageveganbistro.com You won’t miss the meat at this gourmet vegan spot. Vegan, $$, L, D, W, BR, WiFi San Antonio Winery and Maddalena Restaurant 737 Lamar St. (323) 223-1401, sanantoniowinery.com Tour the city’s only producing winery and dine on hearty Italian cuisine. Italian, $$, L, D, W, W/B Taix 1911 Sunset Blvd. (213) 484-1265, taixfrench.com Affordable French country fare in Echo Park. French, $$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi

La Luz Del Dia W-1 Olvera St. (213) 628-7495, luzdeldia.com A cafeteria-style eatery serving cuisine from Michoacan, with some of the best carnitas and handmade tortillas around. Mexican, $, L, D, W, CO Traxx 800 N. Alameda St. (213) 625-1999, traxxrestaurant.com Watch the world pass by at this romantic Decoinspired restaurant inside Union Station. California/Fusion, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only), FB FASHION DISTRICT Alley Dog 317 E. 12th St. (213) 745-5042, thealleydogla.com Public School 612 Downtown’s quintessential bacon-wrapped hot dog experience. Follow your nose to the heavEL PUEBLO/UNION STATION enly smell of grilled onions and jalapeños. Ben & Jerry’s Union Station American, $, B, L, D, W 800 N. Alameda St. Amante Pizza & Pasta (213) 625-2665, benjerry.com 155 E. Olympic Blvd. Commuters need their Chunky Monkey and Cookie Dough (213) 488-4999, amantepizzaandpasta.com ice cream, too. Tasty pizza with gluten-free options. Open late. Dessert, $, W Italian, $$, L, D, W, De La Golondrina Dona Iñez W-17 Olvera St. 737 S. Los Angeles St. (213) 628-4349 (213) 488-5218 Beautiful patio, authentic Mexican food, and huge marHome-style Mexican dishes made to order in a cheerful garitas. space. Mexican, $$, L, D, W, FB Mexican, $$, L, D, W

Live Music Friday & Saturday Nights Happy Hour from 5:30-10pm Daily (Except Mondays) Catering & Delivery Available Pre-packaged Options for Office Delivery 3832 Wilshire Blvd. 2nd Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90010 | 213-389-2770 | mgrill.com LOSANGELESDOWNTOWN.cOm | R E S T A U R A N T S

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Gram & Papa’s 227 E. Ninth St. (213) 624-7272, gramandpapas.com Fresh baked bread, salads and sandwiches using carefully sourced ingredients. Salads/Sandwiches, $, L, De L’Angolo 101 W. Ninth St. (213) 622-2262, langolo-cafe.com Serving pasta, salads, seafood and grilled items in a casually elegant setting. Italian, $, L, D, W (Sat. only), W/B, De Market Restaurant 862 S. Los Angeles St., (Cooper Building) (213) 488-9119, marketrestaurants.com A market and deli featuring delectable sandwiches, juicy

burgers and hearty salads. Salads/Sandwiches, $, B, L, WiFi New Moon 102 W. Ninth St. (213) 624-0186, newmoonrestaurants.com The Chinese chicken salad is a specialty. Chinese, $, L, D, W (Sat. only), De, WiFi O’Mamamia Italian Restaurant 1300 S. San Pedro St., Suite 220 (213) 744-1211 A tranquil Italian eatery with reasonable prices. Italian, $$, L, De Picante 1001 Maple St. (213) 765-0201, picantelatinfusion.com Fresh Latin fusion food in the bustling Fashion District with

a lovely terrace and cocktails. Latin, $, L, D, W, FB Pressed Juicery 860 S. Los Angeles St. (213) 688-9700, pressedjuicery.com The Cooper Building houses this spot selling bottles of cold, fresh pressed juices creatively blended with healthy and tasty ingredients. Juice, $, B, L, W, De Tiara Cafe 127 E. Ninth St. (213) 623-3663, tiara-cafe-la.com Fusion food with a healthy bent including rustic pizzas, wraps and veggie burgers. California/Fusion, $$, L, W, BR, De, WiFi Wood Spoon 107 W. Ninth St. (213) 629-1765, woodspoonla.com This charming eatery serves up home-style Brazilian eats. Brazilian, $, L, D, W (Sat. only), BR, W/B FIGUEROA CORRIDOR Chick-fil-A 3758 S. Figueroa St. (213) 747-8721, chick-fil-a.com This chicken-centric chain has a loyal following near USC. American, $, B, L, D, W (Sat. only) Pasta Roma 2827 S. Figueroa St. (213) 742-0303, pastaroma.com A USC hangout with affordable pizza, pasta and salads. Italian, $$, L, D, W, W/B 29th Street Cafe 2827 S. Hoover St. (213) 746-2929, thetwonine.com A casual eatery housed in a charming restored Victorian house, serving salads and sandwiches. American, $, L, D, W, W/B

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R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

913 N. Broadway (in Chinatown) plumtreeinn.com •213.613.1819

FINANCIAL DISTRICT Angry Chef 404 S. Figueroa St., 4th Floor (213) 629-2000, angrychefgrill.com Flavorful Italian dishes served in the Bonaventure Hotel. Italian, $$, L, D, W, W/B Bar & Kitchen (O Hotel) 819 S. Flower St. (213) 623-9904, barandkitchenla.com American cuisine with market fresh flavors and an enticing bar in the modern O Hotel. American, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only), FB, WiFi Blimpie 444 S. Flower St. (213) 622-9227, blimpie.com A popular food chain specializing in sub sandwiches and salads. Salads/Sandwiches, $, L, De Blue Cow Kitchen 350 S. Grand Ave. (213) 621-2249, bluecowkitchen.com Urban farm cuisine using local farmers and artisan products. American, $$, L, D, W (Sat. night only), FB, WiFi Bonaventure Brewing Company (Westin Bonaventure) 404 S. Figueroa St., 4th Floor Pool Deck (213) 236-0802, bonaventurebrewing.com Enjoy your microbrew and burger on the skyline patio. American, $$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi


Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore!

Grand Tower 255 south Grand avenue Leasing Information 213 229 9777

Promenade Towers 123 south Figueroa street Leasing Information 213 617 3777

museum Tower 225 south olive street Leasing Information 213 626 1500

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Pool / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Covered Parking

Community Amenities: ~ 24 Hr. Manned Lobby ~ Concierge ~ Pool / Spa / Saunas ~ Fitness Center ~ Gas BBQ Grills ~ Recreation Room

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air Conditioning & Heating ~ Balconies (most units) On-site: ~ Dry Cleaners / Dental Office / Restaurants

RESIDENCES: SINGLES STUDIO ONE BEDROOM TWO BEDROOM

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove & Dishwasher ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Solariums and/or Balconies

Apartment Amenities: ~ Refrigerator, Stove, Microwave & Dishwasher (most units) ~ Central Air & Heating ~ Balconies (most units)

On Site: ~ Convenience Store / Coffee House / Yogurt Shop / Beauty Salon

It’s our business to make you comfortable... at home, downtown. Corporate and long term residency is accommodated in high style at the Towers Apartments. Contemporary singles, studio, one bedroom and two bedroom apartment homes provide fortunate residents with a courteous full service lobby attendant, heated pool, spa, complete fitness center, sauna and recreation room with kitchen. Beautiful views extend from the Towers’ lofty homes in the sky. Mountain vistas and slender skyscrapers provide an incredible back drop to complement your decor. Far below are a host of businesses ready to support your pampered downtown lifestyle. With spectacular cultural events nearby, even the most demanding tastes are satisfied. Downtown, it’s not just big business anymore. Visit the Towers Apartments today.

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Border Grill 445 S. Figueroa St. (213) 486-5171, bordergrill.com This colorful spot serves up modern and upscale Mexican eats. Mexican, $$, L, D, W, FB Bottega Louie Restaurant & Market 700 S. Grand Ave. (213) 802-1470, bottegalouie.com Bistro-style dishes, a great bar and a market with beautiful pastries. It’s a bit of Paris chic in Downtown L.A. French, $$, B, L, D, W, BR, FB, WiFi The Cabbage Patch 520 W. Sixth St. (213) 489-4489, cabbagepatchla.com Enjoy freshly prepared salads and healthy sandwiches. Salads/Sandwiches, $$, L, D, W/B, De, WiFi Cafe Noa 816 S. Grand Ave. (213) 612-0345 Tiny but charming with good coffee, pastries and lunch specials. Cafe, $, B, L, De Cafe Pinot 700 W. Fifth St. (213) 239-6500, patinagroup.com Business lunches and romantic dinners unfold in this beautiful garden patio adjacent to the Central Library. California/Fusion, $$$, L, D, W, FB Caffe Primo Downtown 612 S. Flower St. (213) 895-5012, iloveprimo.com House-roasted coffees and a selection of salads, pizzas, pastas and panini. Cafe, $$, B, L, D, W California Pizza Kitchen 735 S. Figueroa St. (213) 228-8500, cpk.com A casual favorite serving affordable and fast California-style pizza. California/Fusion, $$, L, D, W, FB Casey’s Irish Bar and Grille 613 S. Grand Ave. (213) 629-2353, bigcaseys.com Lively Irish-themed pub with live music and a vintage ambiance. Irish, $$, L, D, W, FB Chaya 525 S. Flower St. (213) 236-9577, thechaya.com

Fine dining, Japanese and French fusion cuisine. A chic lounge and sushi bar look onto a garden patio. Asian/Fusion, $$$, L, D, W (Dinner only), FB, WiFi Checkers Downtown (Hilton Checkers) 535 S. Grand Ave. (213) 891-0519, hiltoncheckers.com California cuisine with French and Asian influences in an elegant dining room. California/Fusion, $$$, B, L, D, W, FB Chipotle 601 W. Seventh St. (213) 283-2058, chipotle.com This popular chain serves burritos and other Mexican favorites. Mexican, $, L, D, W, W/B Cicada 617 S. Olive St. (213) 488-9488, cicadarestaurant.com Relish Northern Italian dishes inside a stunning 1920s Art Deco dining room. Italian, $$$, D, W, FB, WiFi City Bean 700 S. Flower St. (213) 622-1101 Affordable coffee using local growers. Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L, D, W (Sat. only), WiFi Coco Laurent 707 S. Grand Ave. (213) 623-0008, cocolaurent.com Classic, elegant bistro with excellent dessert. French, $$$, L, D, W, BR, FB Colori at Figueroa 800 S. Figueroa St. (213) 489-2200 Great lunch specials and no corkage fee. Italian, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only), W/B Corner Bakery Café 801 S. Figueroa St. (213) 239-0424, cornerbakerycafe.com Get your freshly-baked bread and pastries, as well as tasty sandwiches and soups. Bakery/Cafe, $$, B, L, D, W (Sat. only), De, WiFi

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R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

The Counter 725 W. Seventh St. (213) 228-7800, thecounterburger.com Grab a clipboard and design your own burger. Open daily. American, $$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Crepe X-press 529 W. Sixth St. (213) 627-3739, crepexpresscafe.com Treat yourself to fresh crepes, omelets, sandwiches and salads in a relaxed setting. French, $, B, L, W (Sat. only), De, WiFi Cucina Rustica 888 Wilshire Blvd. (213) 988-8880, cucinarusticala.com All the Italian classics in a rustic, casually elegant setting. Live music every Thursday night. Italian, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only), FB, WiFi Daily Grill 612 S. Flower St. (213) 622-4500, dailygrill.com This restaurant has a busy happy hour and a diverse menu of grilled meat and seafood favorites. American, $$, L, D, W, FB, De, WiFi Denny’s 888 S. Figueroa St. (213) 629-4250, dennys.com Old-time diner chain open 24 hours. American, $, B, L, D, W Drago Centro 525 S. Flower St., #120 (213) 228-8998, dragocentro.com Elegant Italian cuisine by chef Celestine Drago. Italian, $$$, L, D, W, FB Dublin’s Irish Pub 815 W. Seventh St. (213) 627-6900, dublinsdtla.com Walking distance to Staples Center, get your Irish comfort food and sample from more than 100 taps. Irish, $$, L, D, W, BR, FB Engine Co. No. 28 644 S. Figueroa St. (213) 624-6996, engineco.com Sophisticated comfort food in a restored fire station. American, $$, B, L, D, W, BR, FB, De Fatburger 888 S. Figueroa St. (213) 891-0899, fatburger.com This juicy burger chain has set up shop Downtown. It’s open 24 hours. American, $, B, L, D, W, WiFi


Flying Pig Cafe 735 S. Figueroa St. (213) 689-8888, flyingpigcafela.com The second location of this Asian fusion eatery serves all the favorite dishes. Asian/Fusion, $, L, D, W, WiFi Garage Pizza 100 1/2 W. Seventh St. (213) 622-3390, garagepizzala.com Great thin-crust, New York-style pizza, including vegan options. Open late-night. Pizza, $$, L, D, W, W/B, De George’s Greek Grill 735 S. Figueroa St. (213) 624-6542, georgesgreek.com A food court find if you crave falafel, gyros and other Mediterranean favorites. Greek, $, L, D, W (Sat. only), De Green Hut Cafe 808 W. Seventh St. C (213) 627-8166, greenhutcafe.com Gourmet sandwiches such as braised short rib and pear- M brie, as well as salads, wraps, sliders and soup. Y Salads/Sandwiches, $, L, D, W, De CM Guild Restaurant 611 W. Seventh St. MY (213) 688-0808, guildrestaurant.com Upscale American bistro with a variety of salads, sand- CY wiches and happy hour favorites. CMY American, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only), FB, WiFi K IHOP 800 S. Flower St. (213) 629-1759, ihop.com All your classic diner favorites for breakfast, lunch and dinner. American, $, B, L, D, W Indus by Saffron 735 S. Figueroa St. (213) 688-1400, saffronindia.com Great Indian food fast. Indian, $$, L, D, WiFi Industriel 609 S. Grand Ave. (213) 488-8020 This two-story restaurant serves French comfort food in a chic-meets-rustic setting. French, $$, L, D, W, BR, FB, WiFi Juicy Lucy 735 Figueroa St. (213) 683-1030, thejuicylucy.com Creative burgers, including a signature cheese-stuffed patty. American, $$, L Just Baked 555 W. Fifth St. (213) 488-0948 Delicious sourdough sandwiches, freshly baked bread, cupcakes and pastries. Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L Kitchen Faire 512 W. Sixth St. (213) 347-0211, kitchenfaire.com You’ll find exquisitely made sandwiches, wraps, soups and salads made from farmers’ market ingredients. American, $, L, De L.A. Prime (Westin Bonaventure) 404 S. Figueroa St. (213) 612-4743, westin.com/bonaventure This classy New-York-style steakhouse atop the Bonaventure Hotel offers scenic views of the city.

Steakhouse, $$$, D, W, FB Le Ka Restaurant 800 W. Sixth St. (213) 688-3000, lekarestaurant.com A modern menu inspired by L.A.’s global influences with a large outdoor dining space. American/Fusion, $$$, L, D, W, FB Maria’s Italian Kitchen 615 S. Flower St. (213) 623-4777, mariasdowntownla.com Tempting Italian classics and excellent happy hour specials. Italian, $, L, D, FB, De Mas Malo 515 W. Seventh St. (213) 985-4332, malorestaurant.com

Hip Mexican eats and a striking tequila bar. Mexican, $$, L, D, W, FB McCormick & Schmick’s 633 W. Fifth St., fourth level (213) 629-1929, mccormickandschmicks.com Extensive seafood and steak menu, and a stellar happy hour. Seafood, $$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi The Melt 735 S. Figueroa St. themelt.com Grilled cheese and soup, a winning combo. Sandwiches, $, L, D, W Mendocino Farms 444 S. Flower St.

Best Hotel Restaurant Downtown News

Three Stars

Los Angeles Times

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Enjoy spectacular views of downtown Los Angeles and the surrounding city while dining at WP24 Restaurant & Lounge, master chef Wolfgang Puck’s newest restaurant offering his modern Chinese cuisine. Located on the 24th floor of The Ritz-Carlton, Los Angeles, WP24 features a formal culinary experience in the main dining room and a more casual menu in the lounge where guests can enjoy Asian small plates, sushi and nigiri. Join us and see what critics and guests are raving about! wolfgangpuck.com | 213.743.8824 ritzcarlton.com/losangeles

losangelesdowntown.com | R E S T A U R A N T S

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735 S. Figueroa St. (213) 627-3262, (213) 430-9040 mendocinofarms.com This sandwich market offers seasonal favorites made with organic products sourced from local growers. Salads/Sandwiches, $, L, D, De Mo-Chica 514 W. Seventh St. (213) 622-3744, mo-chica.com Peruvian cuisine with a modern aesthetic, with favorites like ceviche and alpaca burgers. Peruvian, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only), FB, BR Morton’s, The Steakhouse 735 S. Figueroa St. (213) 553-4566, mortons.com This upscale steakhouse boasts an elegant dining room adjacent to a lively bar. Steakhouse, $$$, L, D, W, FB Nazo’s Bakery 810 W. Eighth St. (213) 689-4833, nazos.net Delectable breakfast plates, sandwiches, savory croissants, pastries and coffee. Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L, De Ocho Mexican Grill 630 W. Sixth St. (888) 988-6246, eatocho.com Trendy eatery serving healthy and fresh Mexican food. Mexican, $, L, D Octopus Japanese Restaurant 729 W. Seventh St. (213) 402-1500, octopusrestaurant.com This sushi bar has a modern Asian vibe. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, FB Oleego by Parks BBQ 735 S. Figueroa St. (213) 614-9090, oleegousa.com Scrumptious Korean bulgogi bowls. Korean, $, L, D, W, W/B Panda Express 350 S. Grand Ave., Suite R1A; 630 W. Fifth St. (213) 626-5018; (213) 688-8783, pandaexpress.com A fast food favorite for fresh Chinese food. Chinese, $, L Qdoba 655 S. Hope St. (213) 572-0344, qdoba.com Healthy Mexican salads, soups and specialty burritos. Mexican, $, B, L, D, W Restaurant Standard 550 S. Flower St. (213) 892-8080 Great diner food and spiked drinks served 24 hours. Retro

R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

decor gives the place a fun and trendy vibe. American, $$, B, L, D, W, FB, BR, WiFi Roy’s Hawaiian Fusion Cuisine 800 S. Figueroa St., Suite 100 (213) 488-4994, roysrestaurant.com An upscale Hawaiian eatery with a fun Aloha hour every night. Hawaiian, $$$, L, D, W, FB Saffron 505 S. Flower St. (213) 488-9754, saffronindia.com Inside the City National food court you’ll find Indian faves like the yummy chicken tikka masala and garlic naan. Indian, $, L Soi 7 518 W. Seventh St. (213) 537-0333, soi7la.com A modern eatery serving classic Thai favorites. Thai, $$, L, D, W, W/B, De Soleto Trattoria & Pizza Bar 801 S. Figueroa St. (213) 622-3255, soletorestaurant.com The kitchen turns out artisan pizzas from its wood burning oven, along with pasta, panini and salads. Italian, $$, L, D, W, FB Sugarfish 600 W. Seventh St. (213) 627-3000, sugarfish.com Traditional sushi done right. Order the Trust Me special. Japanese, $$$, L, D, W, W/B Takami Sushi & Robata 811 Wilshire Blvd., 21st Floor (213) 236-9600, takamisushi.com Cradled on the 21st floor, guests can savor delectable Japanese cuisine while enjoying the scenic view. Japanese, $$$, L, D, W, FB Tommy Pastrami 516 W. Sixth St. (213) 362-3354, tommypastraminydeli.com Delightfully overstuffed sandwiches, irresistible side plates, and bread baked onsite. Salads/Sandwiches, $, L, D, De, W (Sat. only), WiFi Tossed 700 Wilshire Blvd. (213) 612-4322, tossed.com At this salad-themed food chain you can build your own salad and crepe wraps with some 50 toss-in items. Salads/Sandwiches, $, B, L, D, W, De, WiFi The Water Grill 544 S. Grand Ave. (213) 891-0900, watergrill.com The menu features seafood classics, a marble slab raw bar and craft beers on tap.


Seafood, $$$, L, D, W, FB Weiland Brewery Underground 505 S. Flower St., #B410 (213) 622-1125, weilandbrewery.net You’ll find good burgers, two happy hours with a great beer selection and over 100 California wines. American, $$, L, D, FB, WiFi Westin Bonaventure Food Court 404 S. Figueroa St. (213) 624-1000, bonaventuregalleria.com A diverse selection of food, from Middle Eastern to Cajun to Japanese to American eats. Food Court, $, L, D, W Wokcano 800 W. Seventh St. (213) 623-2288, wokcanorestaurant.com Wide range of options in sushi and Chinese cuisine in a chic and casual atmosphere. Asian/Fusion, $$, L, D, W, FB, De HISTORIC CORE Alma 952 S. Broadway (213) 244-1422, alma-la.com This former Venice pop-up settled Downtown with its seasonal, farm-fresh menu. International, $$, D, W/B Artisan House 600 S. Main St. (213) 622-6333, artisanhouse.net A trendy restaurant, market and full bar under one roof. American, $$, L, D, W, BR, FB, WiFi Badmaash 108 W. Second St.

(213) 221-7466, badmaashla.com An Indian gastropub serving up tasty Bombay street food with a sense of humor. Indian, $$, L, D, W, W/B Cole’s 118 E. Sixth St., colesfrenchdip.com (213) 622-4090 This French Dip sandwich, served at Cole’s since 1908, comes with a serious side of history. American, $$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Colori Kitchen 429 W. Eighth St. (213) 622-5950, colorikitchen.com Quaint, casual and affordable Italian food. Italian, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only) D-Town Burger Bar 216 W. Sixth St. (213) 228-0022 Simple but yummy burgers, fries and shakes with a retro vibe. American, $, L, D, W, WiFi Ensenada Restaurant 517 S. Spring St. (213) 489-2950, ensenadarestaurant.net Traditional Mexican eatery with generously-portioned seafood specials and Baja favorites. Mexican, $$, B, L, D, W, FB, De The Gorbals 501 S. Spring St. (213) 488-3408, thegorbalsla.com You’ll find an amalgam of cuisines at this cheeky eatery. International, $$, D, W (Sat. only), FB, WiFi Gourmet LA Bakery 548 S. Broadway

(213) 623-4244, gourmetlabakery.com Mexican sweet bread, croissants, cakes and tortas. Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L, D, W Grand Central Market 317 S. Broadway (213) 624-2378, grandcentralsquare.com Downtown’s historic open-air market offering produce, ethnic food, meat and dry goods. International, $, B, L, D, W, CO Horse Thief BBQ 324 S. Hill St. (213) 625-0341, horsethiefbbq.com Take your tray of Texas-style barbecue onto the patio next to Grand Central Market, with a view of Angels Flight. American, $$, L, W, De Kabab and More 317 S. Broadway (213) 621-0443 Inside the Grand Central Market you’ll find flavorful, affordable Persian food. Mediterranean, $, B, L, D, W, De L.A. Brewing Co. 750 S. Broadway (213) 622-0500, labrewingco.com Sample from the 100 beers on tap, burgers, steaks and finger foods. American, $, L, D, W, W/B Les Noces du Figaro 618 S. Broadway (213) 622-2116, figarobistrot.com Lovely French cafe and bakery with patio. French, $$, B, L, D, W, BR, FB, De Liliya China Bistro 108 W. Second St.

Menzie International | European Contemporary Furniture Showroom 1820 Industrial Street #102a | Los Angeles, CA 90021 | 213.488.0728

MENZIE

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losangelesdowntown.com | R E S T A U R A N T S

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(213) 620-1717, liliyachinabistro.com This busy, modern Chinese eatery offers all the favorites. Chinese, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only), W/B, De Localita and the Badasserie 817 S. Los Angeles St. (213) 623-3223, localita.co Vegan comfort food at its best. Try the signature breakfast sandwich slathered with chipotle sauce. Vegan, $, B, L, W (Sat. only) Maccheroni Republic 332 S. Broadway (213) 346-9725 Get your freshly made pasta at this little gem. Italian, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only) Mignon 128 E. Sixth St. (213) 489-0131, mignonla.com Sophisticated wine and cheese bar with a global spin. International, $, D, W, W/B New Mikado 1001 S. Broadway (213) 744-1505, mikadosushiroll.com Casual eatery with at least 20 varieties of sushi and rolls. Japanese, $$, L, D, De Nickel Diner 524 S. Main St. (213) 623-8301, 5cdiner.com A retro diner with lots of historic charm and comfort food. American, $, B, L, D, W, W/B Onyx Restaurant, Lounge & Bar 118 W. Fifth St.

(213) 891-1144, onyxloungela.com A candlelit lounge in the Security Lofts serving farm fresh cocktails, and elegant small plates and entrees. American, $$, D, W, FB The Parish 840 S. Spring St. (213) 225-2400, theparishla.com A twist on the English gastropub with treats like fried chicken, roasted bone marrow and sticky toffee pudding. British, $$, D, W, FB Pitfire Pizza 108 W. Second St. (213) 808-1200, pitfirepizza.com Rustic pies, pastas and salads in a lofty space. Italian, $$, L, D, W, W/B, De Redwood Bar & Grill 316 W. Second St. (213) 680-2600, theredwoodbar.com Good burgers and eats in a pirate-themed setting.

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American, $$, L, D, W, FB Sarita’s 317 S. Broadway (213) 626-6320 A Grand Central Market favorite for its fresh pupusas and fried yucca. Latin, $, B, L, D, W Semi Sweet Bakery 105 E. Sixth St. (213) 228-9975, semisweetbakery.com Heavenly-tasting pastries at this very sweet bakery, as well as special occasion cakes. Cicada Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L, D, W, De, WiFi Shish Kabob and Much More 101 W. Third St. (213) 625-1000, shishkabobla.com This small eatery packs a lot of punch with its flavorful kabobs and fluffy rice. Mediterranean, $, L, D, W Silo’s Slider Bar 225 W. Seventh St. (213) 622-3033, silosliderbar.com This vodka bar has expanded into a fashionable restaurant with gourmet sliders and sides. American, $$, D, W, FB Simply Salad 334 S. Main St. (213) 935-8048, simplysalad.com Get your salad made to order. Salads/Sandwiches, $, L, D, W, De Spring for Coffee 548 S. Spring St. (213) 228-0041, springforcoffee.com

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66

R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

635 S. Hill St. Ste. # 209 213-488-9222 www.time-tec.com


Freshly brewed single cups and gourmet pastries. Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L, D, W Sticky Rice 317 S. Broadway (213) 621-2865 Tucked inside the Grand Central Market is this authentic and delicious Thai spot. Try the beef panang and mango sticky rice. Thai, $, L, D, W Sustain Juicery 548 S. Spring St. (213) 488-1989, sustainjuicery.com An array of fresh, cold-pressed detoxifying juices, shots and smoothies. Cafe, $, B, L, D, W Syrup Desserts 611 S. Spring St. (213) 488-5136 Cozy coffee shop atmosphere with irresistible desserts, waffles, floats, cakes and more. Open late. Dessert, $, B, L, D, W, WiFi Terroni 802 S. Spring St. (323) 954-0300, terroni.com Dine in style at this stunning Italian eatery with great food and wine. Italian, $$, L, D, W, BR, FB Tierra Mia Coffee 653 S. Spring St. (213) 895-6000, tierramiacoffee.com Coffee, fresh baked goodies and sidewalk seating — great for people watching. Cafe, $, B, L, D, W Two Boots Pizza 826 S. Broadway (213) 623-2100, twoboots.com East Coast pizza with uniquely-named dishes such as the Cleopatra Jones pizza or the Edgar Allen Po’ Boy. Pizza, $, L, D, W, De Umamicatessen 852 S. Broadway (213) 413-8626, umamiburger.com This trendy spot offers everything from fried pig ears to a truffle burger to the tres leches donut. International, $$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Valerie Confections 317 S. Broadway (213) 621-2781 One of Grand Central Market’s new tenants, this delectable shop offers scrumptious baked goods and lunch specials. Bakery/Cafe, $, L Yorkshire Grill 610 W. Sixth St. (213) 623-3362, yorkshiregrillla.com A well-loved eatery with classic grill favorites. American, $, B, L, W (Sat. only), De

Mexican $, L, D, W, FB, De Farid Restaurant 635 S. Broadway (213) 622-0808 Some of the best Persian food around, including great lunch specials. Mediterranean, $$, L, W Olive Bistro & Catering 619 S. Olive St. (213) 327-1186, olivebistrocatering.com Fresh pastas, salads and catering. Italian, $, B, L, De, WiFi Sai Sai Noodle Bar (Millennium Biltmore Hotel) 501 S Olive St. (213) 624-1100, saisairestaurant.com

An upscale noodle bar with a Japanese and Vietnamese bent. Asian/Fusion, $$, L, D, W/B, WiFi Sandwich Shop 531 W. Sixth St. (213) 627-1508, sandwichshopla.com Fusion sandwiches tempt with creations such as the lemongrass pork banh mi, the bulgogi hoagie and the Cubano. Salads/Sandwiches, $, B, L, W (Sat. only), De The Shawarma Factory Place 419 W. Seventh St. (213) 239-9609 Known for its meat roasted on spits, there’s also falafel, kabob, hot dogs, French fries and salads.

JEWELRY DISTRICT Arda’s Cafe 418 W. Sixth St. (213) 689-4438, ardascafe.com Zesty salads and boldly seasoned sandwiches on homemade baguettes. Salads/Sandwiches, $, B, L, W (Sat. only), De Coronado’s 212 W. Fifth St. (213) 489-0138, coronadosdtla.com Gourmet tamales and tacos in a charming space on the ground floor of the Alexandria Hotel. LOSANGELESDOWNTOWN.cOm | R E S T A U R A N T S

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RESTAURANTS BY CUISINE key to abbreviations

$ $$ $$$

Entrees under $10 Entrees under $20 Entrees $20 and up

American

Alley Dog ........................................................ $..........59 Artisan House.................................................. $$........65 Azalea ............................................................. $$........69 Bar & Kitchen .................................................. $$........60 Big Wang’s ...................................................... $$........72 Blue Cow Kitchen ............................................ $$........60 Bonaventure Brewing Company ..................... $$........60 Bunker Hill Bar & Grill ..................................... $$........55 Chick-fil-A ....................................................... $..........60 Cole’s .............................................................. $$........65 The Counter .................................................... $$........62 The Daily Dose ................................................ $..........54 Daily Grill ........................................................ $$........62 Denny’s .......................................................... $..........62 D-Town Burger Bar ......................................... $..........65 Eat.Drink.Americano ....................................... $$........54 Engine Co. No. 28 ............................................ $$........62 The Escondite .................................................. $$........56 The Farm of Beverly Hills ................................ $$........73 Farmer Boys .................................................... $..........56 Fatburger ........................................................ $..........62 Flix Cafe .......................................................... $..........58 Guild Restaurant ............................................. $$........63 Gus’s Drive In .................................................. $..........58 Hooters ........................................................... $$........73 Horse Thief BBQ .............................................. $$........65 IHOP ................................................................ $..........63 Juicy Lucy ........................................................ $$........63 Kitchen Faire ................................................... $..........63 L.A. Brewing Co............................................... $..........65 Lawry’s Carvery ............................................... $$........73 Lemonade ....................................................... $$........55 Lucky Strike Lanes & Lounge .......................... $$........73 Mabel’s Chicken and Waffles .......................... $$........73 The Melt.......................................................... $$........63 Nickel Diner..................................................... $..........66 Nick’s Café....................................................... $..........57 Onyx Restaurant, Lounge & Bar ...................... $$........66 Original Pantry Cafe ........................................ $..........73 Original Tommy’s ............................................ $..........58 Pacific Dining Car ............................................ $$$......58 The Parks Finest .............................................. $..........59 Pete’s Cafe & Bar............................................. $$........72 The Pie Hole .................................................... $..........54 Philippe the Original ....................................... $..........57 Redwood Bar & Grill........................................ $$........66 Restaurant Standard ....................................... $$........64 Riordan’s Tavern ............................................. $$$......74 Silo’s Slider Bar ............................................... $$........66 Spring Street Smoke House............................. $..........57 The Stocking Frame ........................................ $$........74 Stella’s Food & Cocktails ................................. $$........74 29th Street Cafe .............................................. $..........60 Weiland Brewery Underground ...................... $$........65 Yard House...................................................... $$........74 Yorkshire Grill ................................................. $..........67

belgian

Little Bear ....................................................... $..........54 Brazilian

M Grill ............................................................. $$$......58 Wood Spoon ................................................... $..........60 British

The Parish ....................................................... $$........66 California/Fusion

Bottle Rock...................................................... $$........72 Cafe Pinot ....................................................... $$$......62 California Pizza Kitchen................................... $$..55, 62 Checkers Downtown ....................................... $$$......62 Patina ............................................................. $$$......58 Skews.............................................................. $..........56 Tiara Cafe ........................................................ $$........60 Traxx ............................................................... $$........59 Wolfgang Puck Bar & Grill............................... $$$......74 Chinese

CBS Seafood .................................................... $$........56 Chynna Dim Sum ............................................ $$........69 Full House Seafood Restaurant ....................... $$........56 Green Bamboo ................................................ $..........70 Hop Li.............................................................. $..........56 J&K Hong Kong Cuisine ................................... $..........56 Liliya China Bistro ........................................... $$........65 Lucky Deli........................................................ $..........56 New Moon ...................................................... $..........60 Ocean Seafood ................................................ $$........57 Panda Express ................................................ $..........64 Plum Tree Inn ................................................. $$........57 Regent China Inn ............................................ $..........57 Tangerine........................................................ $$........71 Yang Chow...................................................... $..........58 Food Court

St. Vincent Court ............................................. $..........69 Westin Bonaventure Food Court ..................... $..........65 French

Fickle/The Sandwich Smith ............................. $$........69 First & Hope .................................................... $$........55 Le Ka Restaurant ............................................. $$$......63 Spotlight Cafe and Tina Tacos ......................... $..........58 Uncle John’s Cafe ............................................ $..........74

Bottega Louie.................................................. $$........62 Church & State ................................................ $$$......54 Coco Laurent ................................................... $$$......62 Crepe X-press .................................................. $..........62 Dusty’s Bistro .................................................. $$........58 Etchea ............................................................. $..........55 Industriel ........................................................ $$........63 Kendall’s Brasserie .......................................... $$$......58 Les Noces du Figaro ........................................ $$........65 The Perch ........................................................ $$$......72 Taix ................................................................. $$........59

Asian/Fusion

German

American/Fusion

Chaya .............................................................. $$$......62 Chego.............................................................. $..........56 Flying Pig Cafe ................................................ $....63, 69 Sai Sai Noodle Bar ........................................... $$........67 Starry Kitchen ................................................. $..........57 Wokcano ......................................................... $$........65 WP24 .............................................................. $$$......74 Zip Sushi Izakaya............................................. $$........55 Bakery/Cafe/Dessert

Ben & Jerry’s Union Station............................. $..........59 Big Man Bakes ................................................ $..........72 Brooklyn Bagel Bakery .................................... $..........58 Cafe Dulce ....................................................... $..........69 Cafe Noa.......................................................... $..........62 Caffe Primo Downtown ................................... $$........62 Chado Tea Room ............................................. $..........69 Cherry on Top.................................................. $..........69

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City Bean ......................................................... $..........62 Corner Bakery Cafe .......................................... $$........62 Demitasse Cafe ............................................... $..........69 Frances Bakery and Coffee .............................. $..........69 Gourmet LA Bakery ......................................... $..........65 Handsome Coffee Roasters ............................. $..........54 Homegirl Cafe ................................................. $..........56 Hygge Bakery .................................................. $..........73 Just Baked....................................................... $..........63 Mikawaya ....................................................... $..........70 Nazo’s Bakery.................................................. $..........64 Peddler’s Creamery ......................................... $..........72 Phoenix Bakery ............................................... $..........57 Semi Sweet Bakery ......................................... $..........66 Spring for Coffee ............................................. $..........66 Syrup Desserts................................................. $..........67 Threads Cafe and Lounge ................................ $..........71 Tierra Mia Coffee ............................................. $..........67 Queens Bakery ................................................ $..........57 Urth Caffe........................................................ $..........55 Valerie Confections ......................................... $..........67

Wurstküche..................................................... $..........55 Greek

George’s Greek Grill......................................... $$........63 Papa Cristo’s ................................................... $..........58 Hawaiian

Aloha Cafe....................................................... $..........69 Roy’s Hawaiian Fusion Cuisine ........................ $$$......64 Trader Vic’s ..................................................... $$$......74 Indian

Badmaash ....................................................... $$........65 Gill’s Cuisine of India ....................................... $..........73 Indus by Saffron .............................................. $$........63 Saffron ............................................................ $..........64 International

Alma ............................................................... $$........65 Angel City Brewing ......................................... $..........54

R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

The Gorbals ..................................................... $$........65 Grand Central Market...................................... $..........62 Lazy Ox Canteen.............................................. $$........70 Mignon ........................................................... $..........66 Noé ................................................................. $$$......55 The Park .......................................................... $$........59 Umamicatessen .............................................. $$........67 Irish

Casey’s Irish Bar and Grille .............................. $$........62 Dublin’s ........................................................... $$........62 Italian/Pizza

Amante Pizza & Pasta ..................................... $$........59 Angry Chef ...................................................... $$........60 Bacaro ............................................................. $$........58 Bestia .............................................................. $$$......54 Casa Nostra ..................................................... $$........73 Cicada ............................................................. $$$......62 Colori at Figueroa............................................ $$........62 Colori Kitchen.................................................. $$........65 Cucina Rustica ................................................. $$........62 Drago Centro ................................................... $$$......62 Eastside Market Italian Deli............................. $..........56 Garage Pizza ................................................... $$........63 Il Mare............................................................. $$........73 L’Angolo.......................................................... $..........60 Maccheroni Republic....................................... $$........66 Maria’s Italian Kitchen .................................... $..........63 Olive Bistro...................................................... $..........67 O’Mamamia Italian Restaurant ....................... $$........60 Palermo .......................................................... $$........58 Panini Cafe ...................................................... $$........74 Pasta Roma ..................................................... $$........60 Pitfire Pizza ..................................................... $$........66 Pizzanista!....................................................... $$........54 Portofino Cucina ............................................. $$........72 Purgatory Pizza ............................................... $$........54 San Antonio Winery & Maddalena Restaurant .... $$........59 643 North........................................................ $$........57 Soleto Trattoria & Pizza Bar ............................ $$........64 Terroni ............................................................ $$........67 Two Boots Pizza .............................................. $..........67 Xlixe Pizzeria ................................................... $$........71 Japanese

Aburiya Toranoko ........................................... $$$......69 Arashi Sushi .................................................... $$........72 Curry House..................................................... $..........69 Daikokuya ....................................................... $..........69 Frying Fish ...................................................... $..........70 Hakata Ramen Shin-Sen-Gumi ....................... $..........70 Hama Sushi ..................................................... $$........70 Hana-Ichimonme ............................................ $..........70 Hashi Ramen ................................................... $..........70 Honda Ya Izakaya............................................ $..........70 Izakaya Fuga ................................................... $..........70 Katsuya ........................................................... $$$......73 Kouraku .......................................................... $..........70 Kula Revolving Sushi Bar................................. $..........70 Men Oh Tokushima Ramen ............................. $$........70 Mitsuru Sushi and Grill .................................... $..........70 New Mikado .................................................... $$........66 Nirvana Sports Bar & Grill................................ $$........70 Octopus Japanese Restaurant ......................... $$........64 Oomasa ........................................................... $$........71 R23 ................................................................. $$$......55 San Sui Tei ...................................................... $..........71 Shabu Shabu House ........................................ $..........71 Suehiro Cafe .................................................... $..........71 Sugarfish ......................................................... $$$......64 Sushi Gen ........................................................ $$$......71 Sushi & Teri ..................................................... $$........71 Takami Sushi & Robata ................................... $$$......64 Tenno Sushi .................................................... $..........71 Toranoko ......................................................... $$$......71 Yojie Japanese Fondue & Sake Bar .................. $$........74 Zencu .............................................................. $$........71 Korean

District BBQ & Lounge ..................................... $$........54 Korea BBQ House ............................................ $..........70 Korean Kitchen Hibachi Barbecue ................... $$........70 Manna Korean BBQ ......................................... $$........70 Oleego by Parks Barbecue ............................... $..........64 Kosher

The Shawarma Factory Place .......................... $$........68 Latin American

Boca at Conga Room ....................................... $$$......72 Picante ............................................................ $..........60 Rivera.............................................................. $$$......74 Sarita’s ............................................................ $..........66

Mexican

Bar Ama .......................................................... $$........72 Barragan’s....................................................... $$........58 Border Grill...................................................... $$........62 Chipotle .......................................................... $..........62 Coronado’s ...................................................... $..........67 Doña Inez ........................................................ $$........59 El Cholo ........................................................... $$........73 Ensenada Restaurant ...................................... $$........65 Freebirds ......................................................... $..........73 La Golondrina.................................................. $$........59 La Luz Del Dia.................................................. $..........59 La Parrilla ....................................................... $$........58 Mas Malo ........................................................ $$........63 Ocho Mexican Grill .......................................... $....56, 64 Qdoba ............................................................. $..........64 Rosa Mexicano ................................................ $$........74 Señor Fish ....................................................... $..........71 Yxta Cocina Mexicana ..................................... $$........56 Mediterranean

California Kabob Kitchen................................. $$........73 Farid Restaurant ............................................. $$........62 Kabab & More ................................................. $..........65 Shekarchi ........................................................ $$........74 Shish Kabob and Much More .......................... $..........66 Spitz ................................................................ $..........71 Sultan Chicken ................................................ $..........69 Peruvian

Mo-Chica......................................................... $$........64 Salads/Sandwiches

Arda’s Cafe ...................................................... $..........67 Blimpie ........................................................... $..........60 The Cabbage Patch ......................................... $$........62 Eastside Market Italian Deli............................. $..........56 Gram & Papas ................................................. $..........60 Green Hut Cafe ................................................ $..........63 L.A.’s Best Deli and Cafe .................................. $..........56 Langer’s .......................................................... $$........58 Market Cafe..................................................... $....55, 73 Market Restaurant .......................................... $..........60 Mendocino Farms ........................................... $....55, 63 The Novel Cafe ................................................ $..........54 Sandwich Joint................................................ $..........58 Sandwich Shop ............................................... $..........67 The Sandwich Smith ....................................... $$........62 Simply Salad ................................................... $$........66 Tommy Pastrami............................................. $..........64 Tossed ............................................................. $..........64 Seafood

Fisherman’s Outlet .......................................... $$........56 McCormick & Schmick’s .................................. $$........63 Rock’N Fish...................................................... $$$......66 Water Grill....................................................... $$$......64 Southern

Nola’s .............................................................. $$........54 Spanish

Bäco Mercat .................................................... $$........71 Steakhouse

Flemings Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar ......... $$$......73 L.A. Prime ....................................................... $$$......63 Morton’s The Steakhouse................................ $$$......64 Nick & Stef’s .................................................... $$$......55 Pacific Dining Car ............................................ $$$......58 Palm Downtown ............................................. $$$......73 Rock’N Fish...................................................... $$$......74 Thai

Authentic Thai ................................................ $..........56 Esaan Thai ....................................................... $..........55 Soi 7 ................................................................ $$........64 Sticky Rice ....................................................... $..........67 Vegan/Vegetarian

Dr. J’s Vibrant Cafe .......................................... $..........72 Localita and the Badasserie ............................ $..........66 Pressed Juicery................................................ $..........60 Sage Organic Vegan ........................................ $$........59 Shojin Organic & Natural................................. $$........71 Sustain Juicery ................................................ $..........67 Vietnamese

Blossom ......................................................... $..........72 Hoan Kiem ...................................................... $..........56 Pho Broadway................................................. $..........57 Pho Hoa .......................................................... $..........57 Pho 97............................................................. $..........57 The Pho Shop .................................................. $..........71 The Spice Table ............................................... $..........71 Via Cafe ........................................................... $..........57


Kosher, $$, L, De St. Vincent Court Between buildings at 650 S. Hill St. (213) 629-2124, svjc.com This Parisian-inspired alleyway with cafes and restaurants is a Jewelry District landmark. Food Court, $, B, L, W (Sat. only) Sultan Chicken 311 W. Sixth St. (213) 236-0604, sultanchicken.com The chicken, hummus and garlic sauce are out of this world. Mediterranean, $, B, L, W (Sat. only), De LITTLE TOKYO Aburiya Toranoko 243 S. San Pedro St. (213) 621-9500, toranokola.com Trust the sushi chefs — they won’t steer you wrong when it comes to ordering. Japanese, $$$, L, D, W, FB Aloha Cafe 410 E. Second St. (213) 346-9930, eatatalohacafe.com Hawaiian-themed restaurant serves awesome Loco Moco, Kalua pork and shaved ice. Hawaiian, $, B, L, D, W Azalea (DoubleTree by Hilton) 120 S. Los Angeles St. (213) 253-9235, doubletree.hilton.com Modern California cuisine in a casual setting. American, $$, B, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Cafe Dulce 134 Japanese Village Plaza (213) 346-9910, cafedulce.co Get your LAMILL coffee and baked goods, from roti buns to fresh baguette sandwiches to unique donuts (green tea is a favorite). Bakery/Cafe, $, L, D, W, WiFi Chado Tea Room 369 E. First St. (213) 258-2531, chadotearoom.com A traditional tea house with sandwiches and light fare. Bakery/Cafe, $, L, W, WiFi

Cherry on Top 333 S. Alameda St. (213) 626-2150, cherryontop.net Dozens of frozen yogurt flavors and toppings, as well as vintage board games, cartoons and Nintendo. Dessert, $, B, L, D, W, WiFi Chynna Dim Sum 333 S. Alameda St. (213) 625-2009, chynnadtla.com Get your dim sum and a cocktail in this restaurantlounge. Chinese, $, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Curry House 123 Onizuka St. (Weller Court) (213) 620-0855, curryhouse-usa.com Delicious Japanese curry is hot on their menu. Don’t be deterred by the line. Japanese, $, L, D, W, W/B Daikokuya 327 E. First St. (213) 626-1680, daikoku-ten.com One of the best ramen houses in the city. Japanese, $, L, D, W Demitasse Café 135 S. San Pedro St. (213) 613-9300, cafedemitasse.com Indulge in some freshly brewed coffee, or enjoy a simple cup of loose-leaf tea and a baked good. Cafe, $, W, WiFi Fickle/The Sandwich Smith 362 E. First St. (213) 628-1888, ficklela.com By day a gourmet sandwich eatery, by night a chic fusion restaurant. American/Fusion, $$, L, D, W Flying Pig Cafe 141 S. Central Ave. (213) 621-0300, flyingpigcafela.com The beloved food truck has grown into a restaurant serving fusion favorites like duck fried rice, pork belly bao and kimchi burritos. Asian/Fusion, $, L, D, W (Sat. only), W/B Frances Bakery & Coffee 404 E. Second St.

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R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

(213) 680-4899 Delectable French pastries in an unexpected location. Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L, W (Sat. only) Frying Fish 120 Japanese Village Plaza (213) 680-0567 A conveyor belt carries rolls and sushi to hungry diners. Japanese, $, L, D, W, W/B Green Bamboo 136 S. Central Ave. (213) 625-2228 Fresh Chinese favorites that you can eat in or take out. Chinese, $, L, D, W, W/B Hakata Ramen Shin-Sen-Gumi 132 S. Central Ave. (213) 687-7108, shinsengumigroup.com This authentic ramen shop has its followers, and there is usually quite a rush during dinner. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, W/B Hama Sushi 347 E. Second St. (213) 680-3454 A very small but delicious sushi spot that overflows with satisfied guests. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, W/B Hana-Ichimonme 333 S. Alameda St. (213) 626-3514 Satisfying ramen and killer shaved ice. Japanese, $, L, D, W, W/B Hashi Ramen 442 E. Second St. (213) 617-0237 Ramen bowls and comfort food sides. Japanese, $ L, D, W, W/B Honda Ya 333 S. Alameda St., 3rd Floor (213) 625-1184, izakayahondaya.com Succulent Japanese small plates and grilled meat. Japanese, $, L, D, W, W/B Izakaya Fuga 111 S. San Pedro St. (213) 625-1722, izakayafu-ga.com A modern spin on Japanese small plates with a loungelike aesthetic. Japanese, $, L, D, W, FB Korea BBQ House 323 E. First St. (213) 680-1826, koreabbqhouse.com Steaming cast iron turtle skillets are loaded with tasty meat and caramelized cabbage. Korean, $, L, D, W, W/B

Korean Kitchen Hibachi Barbecue 135 Japanese Village Plaza Mall (213) 680-1039 You can’t get better than a sizzling plate of spicy meat. Try the short rib meal. Korean, $$, L, D, W, W/B Kouraku 314 E. Second St. (213) 687-4972 An affordable Japanese diner with delicious noodles and comfort food. Japanese, $, L, D, W, W/B Kula Revolving Sushi Bar 333 E. Second St. (213) 290-9631, kulausa.com Let your sushi come to you on this entertaining and tasty conveyor belt. Japanese, $, L, D, W, W/B Lazy Ox Canteen 241 S. San Pedro St. (213) 626-5299, lazyoxcanteen.com This popular gastropub serves global small plates. International, $$, L, D, W, W/B, WiFi Manna Korean BBQ 333 S. Alameda St. (213) 617-0306, mannabbq.com All you can eat Korean barbecue inside the Little Tokyo Mall. Korean, $$, L, D, W, FB Men Oh Tokushima Ramen 456 E. Second St. (213) 687-8485 You’ll love the rich and tasty tonkatsu ramen. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, W/B Mikawaya 118 Japanese Village Plaza (213) 624-1681, mikawayausa.com Serving traditional Japanese pastries since 1910. Their mochi ice cream is the best. Bakery/Cafe, $, L, D, W Mitsuru Sushi and Grill 316 E. First St. (213) 626-4046 Serves an eclectic variety of Japanese and American favorites in a casual atmosphere. Japanese, $, L, D, W, W/B Nirvana Sports Bar & Grill 314 E. First St. (213) 625-0066 A great place to catch the game after work with a beer and some Japanese small plates. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, FB

Farmer Boys


Oomasa 100 Japanese Village Plaza (213) 623-9048, japaneserestaurantinfo.com/oomasa Pull up a stool at the 40-seat sushi bar. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, W/B The Pho Shop 333 S. Alameda St. (213) 617-8533 Tasty Vietnamese noodles and Asian fusion cuisine inside the Little Tokyo Mall. Vietnamese, $, L, D, W San Sui Tei 313 E. First St. (213) 613-0100 A diner-style noodle house. Japanese, $, L, D, W, W/B Señor Fish 422 E. First St. (213) 625-0566, senorfishla.net An extensive menu features Baja-style seafood, hearty breakfast, combination plates and a vibrant bar. Mexican, $, B, L, D, W, FB Shabu Shabu House 127 Japanese Village Plaza (213) 680-3890, shabushabuhouse.menutoeat.com One of Little Tokyo’s busiest eateries. Japanese, $, L, D, W, CO, W/B Shojin Downtown 333 S. Alameda St. (213) 617-0305, theshojin.com The concept is vegan, macrobiotic, gluten free, organic and natural. Don’t miss the garlic seitan and the Dynamite Roll. Japanese/Vegan, $$, L, D, W, W/B The Spice Table 114 S. Central Ave. (213) 620-1840, thespicetable.com A wood-burning hearth cooks satay and other Southeast Asian dishes. The banh mi sandwiches are a must. Vietnamese, $, D, W (Sat. only), BR, W/B Spitz 371 E. Second St. (213) 613-0101, eatatspitz.com Get your Döner kebab with a side of hip. They have a full bar too. Mediterranean, $, L, D, W, FB Suehiro Cafe 337 E. First St. (213) 626-9132 Homey diner with noodles, bento boxes and tempura. Japanese, $, L, D, W, W/B Sushi Gen 422 E. Second St. (213) 617-0552, sushigenla.com This is where the sushi connoisseurs go to get their fix. Japanese, $$$, L, D, W (Sat. only), W/B Sushi & Teri 116 Japanese Village Plaza (213) 687-8368 Affordable and succulent selection of udon, teriyaki, tempura and sushi. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, W/B Tangerine 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St. (213) 620-0588, tangerinegourmet.com Cantonese and Taiwanese dishes in Weller Court. Chinese, $$, L, D, W, De Tenno Sushi 209 S. Central Ave.

(213) 625-0602, tennosushi.com Reasonably priced sushi and rolls in a lounge-like setting. Japanese, $, L, D, W, FB Threads Cafe & Lounge 269 S. San Pedro St. (213) 620-1057, threadscafe.com A clean, modern cafe where you can lounge and surf the Web. Cafe, $, B, L, D, W (Sat. only), De Toranoko 243 S. San Pedro St. (213) 621-9500, toranokola.com A chic, stylish sushi and izakaya cocktail bar. Japanese, $$$, L, D, W, FB

Xlixe Pizzeria 432 E. Second St. (213) 620-0513, xlixe.com A budget-friendly pizzeria with hearty slices, scrumptious pies, sandwiches and salads, and craft beers. Pizza, $$, L, D, W, W/B, De Zencu 319 E. Second St., 2nd Floor (213) 687-7780, zencu.com Casual sushi and lots of specials. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, W/B OLD BANK DISTRICT Bäco Mercat 408 S. Main St.

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(213) 687-8808, bacomercat.com Vegan, $, L, D, W Try the signature flatbread sandwiches — the bäco (a Peddler’s Creamery hybrid sandwich, taco and pizza). They also offer a global 458 S. Main St. selection of wine and beer. (213) 537-0257, peddlerscreamery.com Spanish, $$, L, D, W, BR, FB Workers peddle a bicycle to churn ice cream at this quirky BAR Ama shop. Scrumptious flavors include organic and vegan 118 W. Fourth St. options. (213) 867-8002, bar-ama.com Dessert, $, W Get your gourmet Tex-Mexican comfort food and cocktails The Perch in a lively space. 448 S. Hill St., 13th floor Mexican, $$, L, D, W, FB (213) 802-1770, perchla.com Big Man Bakes Set on the rooftop of a quaint and classical building, Perch 413 S. Main St. offers French food, wine and live jazz. (213) 622-2127, bigmanbakes.com French, $$$, D, W, FB Heavenly cupcakes available in 10 daily flavors and 11 Pete’s Cafe and Bar special flavors. 400 S. Main St. Dessert, $, W (Sat. only), De (213) 617-1000, petescafe.com Blossom 426 S. Main St. (213) 623-1973, blossomrestaurant.com Super fresh and authentic Vietnamese food at bargain prices. Vietnamese, $, L, D, W (Sat. only), W/B Dr. J’s Vibrant Cafe 334 S. Main St. (213) 537-0905, drjsvibrantcafe.com Asian-inspired vegan cuisine incorporating macrobiotic, gluten-free and California Kabob Kitchen Ayurvedic principles.

Downtown’s longtime favorite for drinking, eating and people-watching. American, $$, B, L, D, W, BR, FB, WiFi Portofino Cucina Italiana 464 S. Main St. (213) 239-9019, portofinodtla.com Good, simple Italian food done right. Italian, $$, L, D, W, W/B, De SOUTH PARK Arashi Sushi 1111 S. Hope St. (213) 749-1900, arashisushi.com The sushi is as delicious as it is beautiful. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, W/B Big Wang’s 801 S. Grand Ave. (213) 629-2449, bigwangs.com Watch the game with a pint and some sliders. American, $$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Boca at Conga Room (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 745-0162, congaroom.com Enjoy a fun night of salsa dancing and dining. Latin, $$$, D (Thurs., Fri. & Sat. Only), W, FB Bottle Rock L.A. 1050 S. Flower St.

TRUFFLE OIL LOBSTER

pEKinG DucK

(Order 1 hour in advance for traditional Peking Duck)

SnOW FLAKE icE

50% OFF

(Selected items only)

Lunch SpEciAL - $9.95 & UP

(1 Entrée, 2 Side Dishes and White Rice) 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St., #202 90012 • 213-620-0588 Open 7 Days a Week. Mon-Thurs: 11:30am-3pm & 5pm-10:30pm. Fri-Sun: 11:30am-10:30pm Detailed menu at

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(213) 536-4090, patinagroup.com Salads, casual breakfast and fresh lunch fare, plus good coffee. Salads/Sandwiches, $, B, L The Original Pantry Cafe 877 S. Figueroa St. (213) 972-9279, pantrycafe.com Open 24 hours, this historic L.A. institution fills your belly with huge breakfasts, steak and burgers. American, $, B, L, D, W, CO Palm Downtown 1100 S. Flower St. (213) 763-4600, thepalm.com Serious steaks, lobsters and expert martinis. Steakhouse, $$$, L, D, W, FB

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American, $$, L, D, W, W/B Lucky Strike Lanes & Lounge (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 542-4880, bowlluckystrike.com High-energy atmosphere where you can bowl while you sup on small plates and burgers. American, $$, L, D, W, FB Mabel’s Chicken and Waffles 314 W. Olympic Blvd. (310) 428-3060 Diners in need of comfort food should look no further than this newcomer near the Fashion Institute. American, $$, L, D, W Market Cafe 1150 S. Olive St., Garden Level (AT&T Center)

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(213) 747-1100, bottlerockla.com Delightful wine, good beer and delicious small plates. California/Fusion, $$, L, D, W, W/B California Kabob Kitchen 141 W. 11th St. (213) 747-9500, ckkabob.com A quaint sit-down Persian spot with friendly staff. Mediterranean, $$, L, D, W (Sat. only), De, WiFi Casa Nostra 825 W. Ninth St. (213) 362-3311, casanostraristorantela.com A romantic little spot with authentic cuisine. Italian, $$, L, D, W, FB El Cholo 1037 S. Flower St. (213) 746-7750, elcholo.com The Downtown outpost of this classic L.A. Mexican food chain. Mexican, $$, L, D, W, FB The Farm of Beverly Hills (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 747-4555, thefarmofbeverlyhills.com Upscale comfort food favorites with fresh ingredients. American, $$, B, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 745-9911, flemingssteakhouse.com Classic steakhouse and 100-plus wines by the glass. Steakhouse, $$$, L, D, W, FB Freebirds 3335 S. Figueroa St. (213) 746-1212, freebirds.com Create your own burrito from the tortilla to the salsa. Mexican, $, L, D, W, WiFi Gill’s Cuisine of India (Stillwell Hotel) 838 S. Grand Ave. (213) 623-1050, gillsrestaurant.com A notoriously good, and cheap, Indian food buffet. Indian, $, L, D, W (Sat. only), W/B, De Hooters 1248 S. Figueroa St. (213) 222-9464, westcoasthooters.com This hot wings chain boasts 40 flat screens and seating for 270. It’s also home for the Fox Sports Broadcasting booth. American, $$, L, D, W, FB Hygge Bakery 1106 S. Hope St. (213) 995-5022, hyggebakery.com Modern Danish bakery serving pastries, cakes and breads. Bakery/Cafe, $, B, L, W, De, WiFi Il Mare 1111 S. Hope St. (213) 746-7766, ilmareitaliano.com Authentic and affordable Italian dishes in a friendly atmosphere. Italian, $$, L, D, W, FB, De Katsuya (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 747-9797, sbe.com/katsuya/l.a.live Upscale, fun sushi and robata restaurant with lounge. Japanese, $$$, D, W, FB, L Lawry’s Carvery (L.A. Live) 1011 S. Figueroa St., #115 (213) 222-2212, lawrysonline.com This casual eatery is beloved for its prime rib and handcarved sandwiches.

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Panini Cafe 600 W. Ninth St. (213) 489-4200, mypaninicafe.com Sit on the sprawling patio while you munch panini, soups and salads. Italian, $$, B, L, D, W, W/B Riordan’s Tavern 875 S. Figueroa St. (213) 627-6879, riordanstavern.com New York-style pub with classic fare. American, $$$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Rivera 1050 S. Flower St. (213) 749-1460, riverarestaurant.com Chef John Sedlar turns up the heat on Latin cuisine at this stunning space. Daily Grill Latin American, $$$, L, D, W, FB Rock’N Fish (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 748-4020, rocknfishlalive.com This Manhattan Beach import serves up mouthwatering steak and seafood. Steakhouse/Seafood, $$$, L, D, W, FB Rosa Mexicano (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 746-0001, rosamexicano.com Authentic Mexican food and killer margaritas in a colorful space. Mexican, $$, L, D, W, FB, De, WiFi Shekarchi 914 S. Hill St. (213) 892-8535, shekarchirestaurant.com Come for the grilled kabobs and specialty rice. Mediterranean, $$, L, De

Stella’s Food & Cocktails 1248 S. Figueroa St. (213) 908-1925, stellasbarandgrillca.com Great place for a burger and cocktail near Staples Center. American, $$, L, D, W, FB The Stocking Frame 911 S. Hill St. (213) 488-0373, thestockingframe.com You’ll love eating inventive dishes inside this sprawling and beautiful industrial space. Try the octopus and pork belly tacos. American, $$, D, W, BR Trader Vic’s (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 785-3330, tradervicsla.com This legendary chain features tropical drinks and an old

NEW HOURS, OUR DELI NEW OFFERINGS NEW HOURS,

OUR DELI

At Artisan House, we offer an assortment of deli salads and sandwiches, both grab-and-go and made-to-order. Every item is hand-prepared with fresh, wholesome ingredients. Whether you’re dining in or taking out, you’re still getting the same quality you’ve come to expect from Artisan House.

ouse, we offer an assortment of deli salads and sandwiches, both grab-and-go to-order. Every item is hand-prepared with fresh, wholesome ingredients. u’re dining in or taking out, you’re still getting the same quality you’ve come to expect from Artisan House.

OUR DELI starting Monday, July 29th at 7:30am

UR DELI

school Hollywood vibe that dates back to 1934. Hawaiian, $$$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Uncle John’s Cafe 834 S. Grand Ave. (213) 623-3555, ujcafe.com A longtime Downtown diner serving the same hearty breakfast and lunch dishes in a new locale. American/Fusion, $, B, L, W (Sat. only) Wolfgang Puck Bar & Grill (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 748-9700, wolfgangpuck.com Puck’s signature take on bar and grill cuisine. California/Fusion, $$$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi WP24 (Ritz Carlton) 900 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 743-8824, wolfgangpuck.com Restaurateur Wolfgang Puck’s newest Downtown venture on the 24th floor of the Ritz-Carlton at L.A. Live. Asian/Fusion, $$$, D, W, FB, WiFi Yard House (L.A. Live) 800 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 745-9273, yardhouse.com American fusion dishes and more than 100 beers on tap. American, $$, L, D, W, FB, WiFi Yojie Japanese Fondue & Sake Bar 501 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 988-8808, yojie.com Become the chef at this lively shabu shabu spot that also serves dessert fondue. Japanese, $$, L, D, W, W/B

NEW OFFERINGS

At the Historical Olvera Street Marketplace

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OUR SPECIAL OFFERS NEW HOURS,

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or professional At Artisan House, we offer an assortment of deli salads and sandwiches, both grab-and-go and made-to-order. Every item is hand-prepared for Downtown residence when you dine with us for lunch with fresh, wholesome ingredients. Whether you’re Partnering exclusively withstill Intelligentsia Babycakes, you endless dining in or taking out, you’re getting theCoffee sameand quality you’veArtisan come toHouse expectgives from Artisan House. rofessional coffee and breakfast options to get your day started right. Grab something to go or join us when you dine with us for lunch at our indoor/outdoor market café.

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OUR MARKET 600 South Main St. • 213-622-6333 facebook.com/artisanhouse

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Artisan House goes beyond fine dining. Our market is fully stocked with a wide variety of facebook.com/artisanhouse twitter.com/ArtisanHouseLA artisinal products for you to take home and enjoy. We offerinstagram.com/artisanhouseLA a selection of the world’s om/artisanhouse twitter.com/ArtisanHouseLA instagram.com/artisanhouseLA finest craft-brewed beers, exceptional wines, spirits, and non-alcoholic beverages. Pair this with our assortment of fine meats, cheeses, and vegetables for an exceptionalLOS culinary experience GUIDE at home. Also available for pick-up. 74 R E S T A U R A N T S | DOWNTOWN ANGELES

$2 PARKING SPECIAL

A unique cultural artus gallery and gift store when you dine with for lunch specializing in high quality imported items from Mexico and artwork, hand made crafts and jewelry by talented local artists. Our goal is to not just offer our customers a place to shop, but a memorable cultural experience.

634 N. Main St., W-19A (Upstairs)

213-617-0227 | FIND US ON

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accommodations

Los Angeles Athletic Club

Checking in at Downtown Hotels key to a b b r e v i at i o n s

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Luxury Deluxe First Class Moderate Economy

Hotel ratings from aaa

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Doing business in Downtown has never been more pleasurable. Likewise, pleasure seeking in the city has become serious business. So when it comes time to book a hotel, the competitive hospitality market offers up plenty of choices for a memorable overnight stay, from elegant inns to trendy digs to budgetfriendly venues. Surrounding the Convention Center, the L.A. Live entertainment district dazzles with a campus of lively restaurants, bars, concert venues, sporting events and more. Those looking to partake in Downtown’s cultural

attractions should turn their attention to Bunker Hill, where the Walt Disney Concert Hall and Music Center beckon with all manner of activity. Special packages and deals abound throughout the Central City — giving visitors all the more reason to explore the area at their leisure.

RITZ-CARLTON AT L.A. LIVE

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900 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 743-8800 ritzcarlton.com; lalive.com This high-end, high-rise offers luxury accommodations as part of the new Convention Center hotel complex at L.A. Live. Check in is on the 23rd floor of this 54-story tower, which also houses posh condominiums on the upper levels. The Ritz offers 123 five-diamond rooms, including a 3,000-square-foot suite for a lucky VIP. Among the amenities are a 3,400-square-foot-lounge, rooftop pool and bar, stunning views of the city and, of course, the Ritz’s trademark service. The hotel also boasts a luxurious, full-service

spa where guests are greeted with champagne. Hotel Restaurants: WP 24, Ritz-Carlton Club Lounge

JW MARRIOTT HOTEL

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900 W. Olympic Blvd. (888) 832-9136, (213) 765-8600 lalivemarriott.com; lalive.com Look for the sleek glass high-rise next to Staples Center and you’ll find the new JW Marriott Hotel Los Angeles at L.A. Live. Boasting 878 guest rooms (occupying floors four through 21), the hotel puts visitors in the heart of the action. The L.A. Convention Center, Staples Center, movie theaters, concert venues, restaurants, the Grammy Museum, nightclubs and even a bowling alley is all just steps away. There are 40 meeting rooms and some 100,000 square feet of meeting space. Hotel Restaurants: L.A. Market Restaurant, gLAnce wine bar, ION rooftop patio, the Mixing Room, Espressemante Illy Coffee Bar

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design with spacious floor plans, deluxe bedding, Wi-Fi and picture windows. The Doubletree features a beautiful halfacre Japanese garden on its rooftop, replete with private seating areas tucked into winding paths, a waterfall and mini bridges. The unique setting makes it a favorite spot for weddings and summer nights in the hotel’s beer garden. Hotel Restaurants: Azalea Restaurant and Bar, Rendezvous Lounge

HILTON CHECKERS LOS ANGELES

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Omni Los Angeles Hotel at California Plaza

OMNI LOS ANGELES HOTEL AT CALIFORNIA PLAZA

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251 S. Olive St. (800) 843-6664, (213) 617-3300 omnilosangeles.com This 453-room hotel occupies the ideal perch atop Bunker Hill, allowing guests easy access to the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Walt Disney Concert Hall, the Music Center and the fanciful fountains of the California Plaza Watercourt. The hotel’s Noé restaurant offers fine dining with a market-driven bistro menu, while the elegant bar is a pleasant way to spend the evening. Rooms are

comfortable and modern, with all the necessary business amenities. Banquet and meeting facilities are found on the second floor. Hotel Restaurants: Grand Cafe, Noé, Morsel’s

DOubLETREE by HILTON HOTEL LOS ANGELES DOwNTOwN

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120 S. Los Angeles St. (800) 222-8733, (213) 629-1200 doubletreeladowntown.com Asian-fusion style marks this elegantly redone hotel in the heart of Little Tokyo. The 437 rooms feature a contemporary

535 S. Grand Ave. (800) 445-8667, (213) 624-0000 hiltoncheckers.com This historic hotel seamlessly blends elegant accommodations with modern amenities. Built in 1927, the 12-story Hilton Checkers has a boutique feel with 188 rooms, antique and marble finishes, and attention to detail at every turn. The lovely rooms come with plush bedding, flat screen TVs, spacious bathrooms and custom designed work areas. Guests can enjoy a dip in the rooftop lap pool, a leisurely book in the library, or a hand-made classic cocktail at the chic lounge. Hotel Restaurants: Checkers Downtown, Checkers Lounge

THE HyATT REGENCy LOS ANGELES DOwNTOwN

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333 S. Figueroa St. (800) 233-1234 losangelesdowntown.hyatt.com This business-friendly hotel features 469 (newly redone) guest rooms and suites, a smoke-free environment and a lovely lobby accentuated with skylights and a sunken bar where a pianist often entertains guests. There are abundant, windowed rooms and salons for special events, conferences or business meetings, as well as a heated pool, 24-hour fitness center and convenient concierge service. Hotel Restaurants: 333, The Back Porch, Lobby Bar and Lounge

LuxE CITy CENTER HOTEL, LOS ANGELES

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1020 S. Figueroa St. (888) 336-3745, (213) 748-1291 luxecitycenter.com Situated across from Staples Center and L.A. Live, this upscale hotel features 162 rooms and 16 suites. With its chic L.A. style and boutique feel, the Luxe is indeed an urban oasis. Amenities include cordless speaker phones, ionic hair dryers, rain showers, 42-inch LCD televisions and Keurig coffee makers. There is also a business center, spa and meeting facilities. Be sure to visit the stylish outdoor lounge for a cocktail and views of the city. Hotel Restaurant: Figoly

MILLENNIuM bILTMORE HOTEL

♦♦♦ OPEN DAILY 11 a.m. — LATE 515 W. 7TH ST., LOS ANGELES 90014 213 985 4332 WWW.MASMALORESTAURANT.COM

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A C C O M M O D A T I O N S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

506 S. Grand Ave. (800) 245-8673, (213) 624-1011 millenniumhotels.com/losangeles A stay at the historic and stunning Biltmore is an unforgettable experience. Hotel guests are surrounded by the history and lore of the fabled inn, which was built in 1923. The awe-inspiring Italian Renaissance architecture drips with decorative detail and splendor, and the hand-painted frescoes, sparkling chandeliers and elegant furnishings are a sight to behold. There are 683 rooms and suites featuring modern amenities and classic style reflective of the


of Southern California, and is a central jumping off point for exploring Exposition Park’s museums and cultural institutions. Just a few minutes south of Downtown via the DASH bus and Expo Line, the 240-room Radisson features business suites, Sleep Number beds, flat screen TVs, a restaurant and cafe, swimming pool, and 24-hour fitness and business center. More than 15,000 square feet of meeting and banquet space is available. Hotel Restaurants: McKay’s Restaurant, Rosso’s Pizzeria

SHERATON LOS ANGELES DOWNTOWN

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This 485-room hotel in the heart of the Financial District is the perfect jumping off point for business or leisure. Recently remodeled rooms are contemporary and comfortable, with the cozy Sheraton Sweet Sleeper bed, marble bathrooms, room service, high-speed Internet access and city views. The property is connected to the The BLOC, offering even more shopping and dining options. Guests can also take advantage of the lobby lounge, gym and fullservice business center. Hotel Restaurants: The Brasserie, The Lobby Bar

UNION CHURCH LA o v e G o d . b l e s s t h e c it y.

711 S. Hope St. (800) 325-3535, (213) 488-3500 l sheratonlosangelesdowntown.com

WESTIN bONAVENTuRE HOTEL AND SuITES

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404 S. Figueroa St.

the bridge @

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown

UNION CHURCH LA l o v e G o d . b l e s s t h e c it y.

hotel’s history. Amenities include a Roman-style indoor swimming pool, health club, beautiful ballrooms (which frequently host weddings and special events), restaurants and the vintage Gallery Bar. Don’t miss the daily high tea from 2 to 5 p.m. in the grand Rendezvous Court. Hotel Restaurants: Sai Sai Noodle Bar, Smeraldi’s Restaurant, Rendezvous Court

MIyAKO HOTEL LOS ANGELES

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328 E. First St. (800) 228-6596, (213) 617-2000 miyakoinn.com Located in the middle of Little Tokyo’s historic First Street North block, the 173-room Miyako is a respite from the hustle and bustle of Downtown. Inside the welcoming lobby, guests will find contemporary décor with traditional Japanese touches. Rooms are comfortable and offer all the basic amenities. Be sure to visit the lovely health spa and sauna where you can get a top-notch shiatsu massage. The hotel also houses a small business center, restaurant and karaoke bar. An ideal district for walking and exploring, guests are just steps from dozens of lively restaurants and shops. Hotel Restaurants: Tamon, Cafe Take 5

QuALITy INN & SuITES HOTEL 250

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250 Silver Lake Blvd. (213) 639-1920 hotel250.com Just two miles west of Downtown, this multi-level hotel is simple but efficient. It features views of the Hollywood sign and is located amid the restaurants and shops in the artsy Silver Lake neighborhood. Rooms are updated and come with free high-speed Internet and a complimentary breakfast buffet.

RADISSON HOTEL MIDTOWN

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3540 S. Figueroa St. (800) 333-3333, (213) 748-4141 radisson-midtown.com The remodeled Radisson is across from the University

DID YOU KNOW... buying your groceries, filling up your tank, and shopping at your favorite neighborhood store benefits you and your fellow Angelenos? By shopping in the city of Los Angeles you help support local businesses and keep sales tax in the city. This helps pay for neighborhood services such as libraries, parks, animal shelters, street cleaning, police and fire protection. It also helps create and keep jobs in our communities and protects our environment by minimizing fuel usage.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT Your shopping decisions have a direct impact on what happens in your own neighborhood. Why give your sales tax dollars to a city whose services don’t benefit you or your family? Shop LA is about making our life better by doing the things we’d normally do in a way that directly supports our home town.

This summer visit the free museums, dine and shop at El Pueblo Historical Monument, home of the famous Olvera Street. Shop LA! Buy it local, buy it here!

Check us out at:

facebook.com/ShopLAcity and facebook.com/ElPuebloLA losangelesdowntown.com | A C C O M M O D A T I O N S

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(213) 624-1000 thebonaventure.com Located in Downtown’s bustling Financial District, the landmark mirrored towers of the 1,354-room Bonaventure beckon convention goers, business travelers and tourists alike. The recently renovated guest rooms feature floorto-ceiling views of the city, as well as the hotel’s signature 10-layer Heavenly Bed feature. The 35-story Bonaventure is a sprawling city within a city, with color-coded elevators, 42 shops and restaurants, the revolving Bona Vista Lounge, the upscale L.A. Prime Steakhouse, and a state-of-the-art gym. The hotel is the largest convention facility with 110,000 square feet of meeting space and a full-service business center. Hotel Restaurants: Bona Vista Lounge, Bonaventure Brewing Company, Lakeview Bistro, L.A. Prime

Nestled between Union Station (just two blocks away) and Chinatown, this comfortable hotel offers 80 guest rooms and suites. Clean, modest and situated in a prime location for exploring Downtown’s cultural attractions on foot, Metro Plaza is a good bet for travelers coming into Union Station via train, bus, Metro or FlyAway from LAX.

RITZ MILNER HOTEL

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813 S. Flower St. (213) 627-6981 milner-hotels.com Just a few blocks from the L.A. Convention Center and L.A. Live, this comfortable boutique hotel offers affordable rates with lots of history. There is complimentary breakfast, Internet, and a restaurant and pub onsite. Just a block from the Metro and Macy’s Plaza.

Figueroa Hotel and an outdoor heated pool. The boutique inn offers eco-friendly amenities as well, including electric vehicle charging stations, energy efficient lighting and Green Earth key cards.

HOTEL SOLAIRE

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1710 W. Seventh St. (213) 616-3000 hotelsolairelosangeles.com Just a mile from the L.A. Convention Center and Staples Center, the Hotel Solaire is a budget-friendly locale with free wireless Internet, continental breakfast and coffee,

METRO PLAZA HOTEL

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711 N. Main St. (800) 223-2223, (213) 680-0200 metroplazahoteldowntownla.com

CATERING • FREE DELIVERY DOWNTOWN • TAKE OUT/DINE IN

ACE HOTEL

NR 929 S. Broadway acehotel.com Opening in fall 2013 in the historic United Artists building, this chic boutique hotel chain will help bolster the renaissance underway along Broadway. The 1927 structure once served as a prominent movie palace, and hotel developers plan to reactivate the 1,600-seat theater. The 13-story building will feature 180 rooms, a restaurant, bar and pool. The Downtown hotel joins Ace’s sister venues in Seattle, Portland, New York and Palm Springs, all of which are known for their hip style and celeb following.

FIGuEROA HOTEL

DOWNTOWN 847 S. Santee St. | 213-489-1726 or 213-488-5128

RW L A

Rightway La PROPERTY MANAGEMENT INC

Specializing in property management of: ~ Homeowner Associations ~ Commercial Properties ~ Rental properties and individual Investments Peter Drivas has over 15 years of experience in property management. Customer service is what we are all about.

www.rightwayla.com | office: 213-620-9634 | cell: 949-285-9919 78

A C C O M M O D A T I O N S | downtown los angeles gUIde

NR 939 S. Figueroa St. (800) 421-9092, (213) 627-8971 figueroahotel.com Known affectionately as the Hotel Fig, this is a one-of-akind oasis where the city ceases to exist. Part Morocco, part Spain and completely unique, a stay at the Fig is a vacation unto itself. Built in 1925, the hotel’s lobby and common areas are decked out in antiques, Oriental rugs, brass urns, palms and vibrant fabrics. Outside at the sprawling Veranda Bar, you can sip your cocktail amid wrought iron, a languid pool and a mellow vibe. The suites are pretty spectacular too.

HISTORIC MAyFAIR HOTEL

NR 1256 W. Seventh St. (213) 632-1200, (213) 484-9789 mayfairla.com Built in the 1920s, the hotel retains a sense of its history with glass etchings, brass fixtures, skylight and pillars. The 295 rooms are clean, air-conditioned and affordable, with free Wi-Fi. The staff prides itself on an Old World, gracious kind of service. Hotel Restaurant: Celebrity Lounge Restaurant

KAWADA HOTEL

NR 200 S. Hill St. (800) 752-9232, (213) 621-4455


lobby and common areas are decked out in retro wallpaper and mod furnishings, with fun extras like billiards, ping pong and a photo booth. The infamous rooftop lounge comes with infinity pool, red seating pods and Astroturf. There’s also a 24-hour gym, barber shop and a pet-friendly policy. Meeting and event space available. Hotel Restaurants: Restaurant Standard, Biergarten

STAy ON MAIN

NR 636 S. Main St. (213) 213-7829 stayonmain.com This youthful, high-tech hotel/hostel is geared toward the 18- to 30-year-old demographic. The 147 rooms are sim-

ple, stylish and inexpensive with iPod docks, flatscreens, bright bedding and even Xbox games if you so desire. Depending on your budget and needs, you can choose from private rooms with private baths or shared rooms with shared facilities down the hall.

STILLWELL HOTEL

NR 838 S. Grand Ave. (213) 627-1151 Located in South Park, the Stillwell offers clean and comfortable guest rooms in a secure facility at very modest rates. The vintage property is quirky with a low-key bar and a popular Indian Restaurant. Hotel Restaurant: Gill’s Cuisine of India

The Hyatt Regency Los Angeles Downtown kawadahotel.com Conveniently located between the Civic Center and Historic Downtown, this budget- and family-friendly hotel is popular for both business and leisure. The 114 rooms are comfortable and updated with flatscreen, full kitchenette, high-speed Internet, on-site laundry room and same-day valet service Hotel Restaurant: Cherry Pick Café

LOS ANGELES ATHLETIC CLub

NR 431 W. Seventh St. (800) 421-8777, (213) 625-2211 laac.com This historic athletic and social club offers 72 deluxe rooms including nine high-end club-themed suites (Bruin, Trojan, beach and yacht, among them). The newly renovated rooms feature custom furniture, large tiled bathrooms, plush robes, luxurious linens and flat screens. Guests can also take advantage of the club’s athletic facilities, including a stunning pool and basketball court. Centrally located amid the Historic and Jewelry districts. Hotel Restaurants: The Grill Room, The Trophy Room, Duke’s, The Game Room, Main Bar, Snack Bar

O HOTEL

NR 819 S. Flower St. (213) 623-9904 ohotelgroup.com Beyond the frosted glass doors you’ll find a minimalist lobby that feels very New York — dark wood, dim light, a postmodern fireplace. This sleek little boutique spot was converted out of a 1920s building, so the 67 rooms aren’t gigantic, but they boast a sleek design with amenities such as desks and plush bedding. It also houses a trendy restaurant and bar, and spa in the lobby. Hotel Restaurant: Bar & Kitchen

THE STANDARD DOWNTOWN L.A.

NR 550 S. Flower St. (213) 892-8080 standardhotels.com This mid-century landmark (it was an oil company headquarters) was converted into a bold, bright boutique hotel with plenty of eye candy and modern design details. There are platform beds, open bathrooms, foot sculptures and even bathtubs that can accommodate two or more. The

All you cAn eAt BBQ And ShABu ShABu StArting At $17.99 We hAve the BeSt KoreAn BBQ in lA! » We proudly use the highest quality meats, have a great atmosphere, and great service. » Champagne shower for birthday celebrations » FREE PARKING for up to 3 hours with validation. » Full Bar & Soju Cocktails (last call is one hour before closing time) 333 S. Alameda St. # 305 (On the third floor of the Little Tokyo Galleria) 213-617-0306 | www.mannabbq.com Mon-Wed 11am-11pm, Thurs & Sun 11am-12:30am, Fri & Sat 11am to 1am losangelesdowntown.com | A C C O M M O D A T I O N S

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Westin Bonaventure Hotel and Suites 404 S. Figueroa St., thebonaventure.com (800) 937-8461 • (213) 624-1000

JW Marriott Hotel

900 W. Olympic Blvd., lalivemarriott.com (888) 832-9136 • (213) 765-8600

Millennium Biltmore Hotel

506 S. Grand Ave., millenniumhotels.com/losangeles (800) 245-8673 • (213) 624-1011

Cecil Hotel

640 S. Main St., thececilhotel.com (800) 896-5294 • (213) 624-4545

Sheraton Los Angeles Downtown

711 S. Hope St., sheraton/losangelesdowntown.com (213) 488-3500

The Hyatt Regency Los Angeles Downtown 333 S. Figueroa St., losangelesdowntown.hyatt.com (800) 233-1234 • (213) 617-1133

Omni Los Angeles Hotel at California Plaza 251 S. Olive St., omnilosangeles.com (800) 843-6664 • (213) 617-3300

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown 120 S. Los Angeles St., doubletreeladowntown.com (800) 222-8733 • (213) 629-1200

Historic Mayfair Hotel

1256 W. Seventh St., mayfairla.com (213) 632-1200 • (213) 484-9789

Figueroa Hotel

939 S. Figueroa St., figueroahotel.com (800) 421-9092 • (213) 627-8971

Radisson Hotel Midtown at USC

3540 S. Figueroa St., radisson-midtown.com (213) 748-4141

Stillwell Hotel

838 S. Grand Ave. (800) 553-4774 • (213) 627-1151

The Standard Downtown L.A. 550 S. Flower St., standardhotels.com (213) 892-8080

Hilton Checkers Los Angeles

535 S. Grand Ave., hiltoncheckers.com (800) 445-8667 • (213) 624-0000

Ace Hotel

929 S. Broadway, acehotel.com/losangeles (503) 546-9772

Miyako Hotel Los Angeles 328 E. First St., miyakoinn.com (800) 228-6596 • (213) 617-2000

Luxe City Center Hotel

1020 S. Figueroa St., luxecitycenter.com (888) 336-3745 • (213) 748-1291

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rant Room Servic e Busin ess Se rvices

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175 om/Sp

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Rates, amenities and descriptions subject to change.

1,354 135

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Soaring atrium of glass and concrete, lobby bar, food court, shopping galleria and bridge access to other Downtown landmarks.

878 73

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The JW Marriott is the sleek 878-room hotel attached to the L.A. Live complex.

683 55

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Beautiful, ornate historic landmark building. Handsome restaurants, chic bars, beautiful ballrooms and top-notch service.

587 41

This 1927 budget hotel features Italianate design, Internet access, 24-hour cafe, in the heart of historic Downtown.

485 40

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Great location adjacent to shopping mall, financial and Jewelry districts. Casual dining. Polished look and service.

469 69

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Across from World Trade Center, closest to Bunker Hill and Music Center.

453 14

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Nestled between Bunker Hill and the Financial District. Walking distance to museums and Music Center. Casual restaurant, bar.

437 20

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Understated elegance, service to meet every need. Great shopping, several restaurants and cafes. In the heart of Little Tokyo.

295 9

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Vintage 1920s building renovated to serve the needs of business travelers as well as tourists looking for great value. Mezzanine restaurant.

280 5

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Eclectic decor, gracious international atmosphere and service. Walking distance from L.A. Convention Center and Staples.

240 19

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Newly remodeled. Central location next to USC. Executive lounge for business travelers, restaurant and cafe. Free shuttle.

232 8

207 21

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Trendy decor, retro restaurant, chic bar popular with singles. Former oil company headquarters in heart of Financial District.

188 5

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Beautiful boutique hotel with European charm. Top-notch service, classy restaurant. Adjacent to Richard J. Riordan Central Library.

180

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A new boutique-hotel in the historic United Artist building. Expect trendy design and amenities.

173

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An oasis in the middle of Little Tokyo. Comfortable rooms, invigorating spa and health club, restaurant, karaoke bar.

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Couldn’t be closer to Staples, L.A. Live and the Convention Center. Newly renovated.

162 16

A C C O M M O D A T I O N S | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

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Historic hotel straddling Financial District and South Park. Air-conditioned rooms, near California Mart, Convention Center and Staples.


Ramada Los Angeles/Downtown West 1901 W. Olympic Blvd., ramada.com (213) 385-7141

Ritz Milner Hotel

813 S. Flower St., milner-hotels.com (800) 827-0411 • (213) 627-6981

Ritz-Carlton at L.A. Live

900 W. Olympic Blvd., ritzcarlton.com (213) 743-8800

Kawada Hotel

200 S. Hill St., kawadahotel.com (800) 752-9232 • (213) 621-4455

Hotel Solaire

1710 W. Seventh St., hotelsolairelosangeles.com (213) 616-3000

Howard Johnson

603 S. New Hampshire Ave., hojo.com (213) 385-4444

Holiday Inn Express

611 S. Westlake Ave., hiexpress.com (213) 483-6363

Metro Plaza Hotel

711 N. Main St., metroplazahoteldowntownla.com (800) 223-2223 • (213) 680-0200

Los Angeles Athletic Club 431 W. Seventh St., laac.com (800) 421-8777 • (213) 625-2211

Vagabond Inn Los Angeles at USC

3101 S. Figueroa St., vegabondinn-los-angeles-hotel.com (800) 522-1555 • (213) 746-1531

O Hotel

819 S. Flower St., ohotelgroup.com (213) 623-9904

Quality Inn & Suites Hotel250 250 Silver Lake Blvd., hotel250.com (888) 470-5808 • (213) 639-1920

Rodeway Inn Convention Center Los Angeles 1904 W. Olympic Blvd., laconventioninn.com (213) 380-9393

Best Western Dragon Gate Inn 818 N. Hill St., dragongateinn.com (877) 574-2464 • (213) 617-3077

Knights Inn Los Angeles

1255 W. Temple St., knightsinn.com (213) 250-8925

ervice Busin ess Se rvices

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a C oc kt ail Lo unge Valet Parki ng Free P arkin g Pool

175 om/Sp

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147 1

Modern, budget-friendly hostel in the Historic Core.

130 5

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A modest inn about a mile from Staples Center and Convention Center.

127 40

123 13

Room S

636 S. Main St., stayonmain.com (213) 213-STAY (7829)

Resta u

Stay On Main

Suite

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Upscale boutique hotel recently remodeled with large rooms, high-speed Internet, adjacent to shopping.

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An intimate five-diamond hotel with all the amenities.

114

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Small, quaint hotel located in Civic Center and on the edge of the Historic Core. Pleasant decor and coffee shop.

91

Complimentary Continental breakfast, free HBO, full-service business center and free high-speed Internet, convenient to Downtown.

90

A short drive to Downtown, this budget hotel is geared toward the business traveler.

80 15

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80 11

72

9

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Established in 1880. New refurbished rooms. Athletic and spa facilities, luxury meeting and conference rooms. Restaurant and bar.

72

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A stone’s throw from the USC campus. Business-friendly amenities, free high-speed Internet.

67

1

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Extensive corporate business services. Newly remodeled rooms. Free local calls and complimentary hot breakfast.

64 13

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Minutes from Downtown. Free breakfast, high-speed Internet, business center, fitness room, restaurant. Located between Olvera Street, Chinatown and Union Station. Continental breakfast, 24-hour desk.

A few blocks from L.A. Live. This boutique hotel features stylish yet affordable accommodations. Fitness center and restaurant.

54

1

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One mile from the Convention Center. All the basics and a heated pool.

52

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This hotel is in the heart of Chinatown. Asian decor, beauty shop, pharmacy, cafe.

25

One the western edge of Downtown. Free Continental breakfast and high-speed Internet.

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GOOD TO KNOW

Uptown Drug & Gift Shop

Your Cheat Sheet to Downtown’s Essential Services TRANSPORTATION

››

The nation’s second largest transit agency is headquartered Downtown, and the regional nexus of Union Station allows commuters to take any number of buses, subway lines and trains to just about any destination in the city and beyond. Look for signs marking tourist destinations, districts and other services for both pedestrians and motorists.

DASH Downtown The Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) operates a network of buses in Downtown called the DASH, which circulates in and around the Central City. For 50 cents, you can travel from one end of Downtown to the other. Five routes operate weekdays, with two on weekends. No service on major holidays. Monday through Friday Routes A, B, D and E operate every five to eight minutes; and F operates every 10 minutes. On weekends, Routes E and F operate from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Route E operates from 6:30 a.m. on Saturday only), and take riders to the Fashion District, Financial District, City West and Exposition Park/USC. 82

For information call LADOT at (213, 310, 323 or 818) 808-2273, or visit ladottransit.com. Look for the DASH bus signs on every street, or ask a DASH driver for a map and schedule.

SubwAyS, LigHt RAiL, buSeS Metro operates one of the largest fleets of buses in the nation. In addition, its four local Metro Rail lines (Green Line, Blue Line, Red Line and Gold Line) can take you to Universal City, Hollywood, Pasadena, Downtown Los Angeles (including Staples Center), LAX, Long Beach and more for $1.50 one way. Day passes can be had for $5 ($1.80 for senior citizens). The regional EZpass can be used for travel on Metro buses and trains as well as buses operated by 11 municipal bus operators in Los Angeles County. The cost is $84 for a regular monthly EZpass or $35 for seniors and disabled. Call (323) GOMETRO for Metro information or check MTA’s 24-hour interactive trip planner at metro.net. Flyaway This non-stop bus, which operates daily, is one of the most convenient ways to travel directly from Downtown to LAX. One-way fare is $7. Union Station, (866) IFLYLAX, lawa.org/flyaway.

G O O D T O K N O W | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

RegionAL RAiL SeRviceS From Union Station you can access Metrolink trains, the regional rail system that connects most cities in Southern California. Amtrak operates regional rail service with connections to its national network. For AMTRAK information call (800) USA-RAIL (8727245) or amtrak.com. For Metrolink information and fares call (800) 3715465 or metrolinktrains.com. tAxiS Taxis congregate around hotels, office towers, shopping malls and transit hubs such as Union Station. Several franchise taxi operators work in Los Angeles, so look for the official Los Angeles Taxicab Seal before taking a ride. A cab without the seal is a bandit cab without legal authorization to operate. For a map and full list of L.A.-area cabs, visit taxicabsla.org. Listed below are the authorized taxi companies that service Downtown, their coverage areas and telephone numbers: Bell Cab Los Angeles, (800) 666-6664 Beverly Hills Cab


Los Angeles and Beverly Hills, (800) 273-6611 L.A. Checker Cab Co. Los Angeles and West Hollywood, (800) 300-5007 City Cab Los Angeles and San Fernando Valley, (800) 750-4400 Independent Taxi Los Angeles and Beverly Hills, (800) 521-8294 United Checker Cab Los Angeles, Long Beach and Burbank, (310) 834-1121 United Taxi Los Angeles and Beverly Hills, (800) 411-0303 Yellow Cab Co. Los Angeles, (800) 200-1085

RentAL cARS There are ample car agencies that will cater to you at your office, hotel or conference center. Here are a few options: Avis Rent-A-Car 888 S. Figueroa St., #130, (213) 533-8400, avis.com. Budget Car and Truck Rental Union Station, 800 N. Alameda St., (213) 617-2977, budget.com. Enterprise Rent-A-Car 1944 S. Figueroa St., (213) 746-6654, enterprise.com. 530 S. Olive St., parking level 1 (Pershing Square), (213) 627-5432, enterprise.com. Hertz Rent-A-Car 333 S. Figueroa St. (L.A. Hotel), (213) 625-0997, hertz.com. Union Station, 800 N. Alameda St., (213) 625-1034, hertz.com. 711 S. Hope St. (Downtown Sheraton), (213) 629-7421, hertz.com. 900 W. Olympic Blvd. (JW Marriott), (213) 765-8659, hertz.com. Zipcar Hourly car rental, ideal for appointments and daytrips. Locations conveniently located around Downtown and USC. Requires a monthly membership. Main Office: 1529 N. Cahuenga Blvd., (323) 866-4505, zipcar.com Mozaic Apartments at Union Station, 888 N. Alameda St. PacMutual Building, 523 W. Sixth St. Pegasus Apartments, 612 S. Flower St. USC (all around campus)

SAFETY

Downtown has become increasingly safe to walk and enjoy thanks to new housing, businesses and other pedestrian improvements. The Los Angeles Police Department is headquartered here, and is aided by local Business Improvement Districts (BID) whose security and bike officers regularly patrol each district. For more information about the local BIDs and Los Angeles Police Department, call the following: Central City East Association This group administers two BIDs — the L.A. Downtown Industrial District and the Arts District. The area covers the eastern swath of Downtown, some 97 blocks from San Pedro to the Los Angeles River. (213) 228-8484, centralcityeast.org. Chinatown BID The BID’s crimson-shirted Red Patrol keep Chinatown’s streets clean and safe. Red Patrol (213) 252-1600, press 7. BID office (213) 680-0243, chinatownla.com. Downtown Center BID With more than 400 property owners in 65 blocks of the Central Business District, this is Downtown’s largest BID. Its purple-clad officers and ambassadors can often be seen throughout the area answering questions or giving directions from information kiosks. For general inquiries call (213) 624-2146, after hours (213) 624-2425, downtownla.com.

Downtown Center BID District Safety Fashion District BID The yellow-garbed clean and safe team patrols the bustling Fashion District on bike and via cruisers. For 24-hour public safety assistance call (213) 741-2661, fashiondistrict.org. Figueroa Corridor BID This organization covers the area just south of Downtown including Exposition Park and USC. For information, call weekdays at (213) 746-9577, the service hotline at (213) 746-3444, figueroacorridor.org. Historic Downtown Los Angeles BID This BID aims to improve the Broadway Theater District and its historic resources.

(213) 239-8336, hdlabid.com. Little Tokyo BID This BID supplements city services by providing a professional security patrol, street maintenance, and marketing programs. (213) 473-3030, visitlittletokyo.com. LAPD Central Division Located at 251 E. Sixth St., about five blocks east of the Pershing Square Red Line station. It is served by several bus lines. To report non-emergency crimes call (877) 275-5273, or for general inquiries call (213) 485-3294. South Park BID

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This BID makes use of a fleet of electric vehicles to patrol its active residential and entertainment district. (213) 663-1111 or southpark.la.

COMMUNITY CONTACTS

Downtown RepReSentAtiveS AnD ADvocAcy gRoupS Ninth Council District, Councilman Curren Price Now covers only the Staples Center/ L.A. Live/ Convention Center area, and the Figueroa Corridor stretching to USC. 200 N. Spring St., Room 420, (213) 473-7009. First Council District, Councilman Ed Reyes Covers Chinatown, City West and L.A. River issues. 200 N. Spring St., Room 410, (213) 473-7001. 14th Council District, Councilman José Huizar Now covers a vast majority of Downtown, including the Central Business District, South Park, the Broadway Theater District, parts of the Historic Core and Skid Row. 200 N. Spring St., Room 465, (213) 473-7014. Neighborhood Prosecutor This office deals with community crimes such as drug dealing, littering, prostitution, panhandling and transient issues. Email mediate@lacity.org. 312 S. Hill St., second floor, (213) 978-4093. Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council This neighborhood advocacy group advises city leaders on local issues and plans community events. Meetings held in various locations, (213) 473-6451, dlanc.com. FilmLA Inc. Call this office with complaints, concerns or questions about filming and how it affects you. Open weekdays 8 a.m.-6 p.m., and 24-hour on-call staff, (213) 977-8600 (after hours call main line and press option #2).

WWW.

Visit filmla.com. Historic Cultural Neighborhood Council Covers Chinatown, El Pueblo, Elysian Park, Little Tokyo, and the Industrial and Arts districts. 307 E. First St., (213) 613-1911, hcncla.org.

pLAceS oF woRSHip Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels 555 W. Temple St., (213) 680-5200, olacathedral.org Centenary United Methodist Church 300 S. Central Ave., (213) 617-9097, gbgm-umc.org/centenary-umc Central City Church of the Nazarene 419 E. Sixth St., (213) 689-1760, lacentralcity.org Chabad of Downtown Los Angeles 219 W. Seventh St., (213) 488-1543, downtownjcc.com First Chinese Baptist Church 942 Yale St., (213) 687-0814, fcbc.org First Congregational Church of Los Angeles 540 S. Commonwealth Ave., (213) 385-1341, fccla.org First United Methodist Church of Los Angeles, Villa Flores Multipurpose Room 1020 S. Flower St., (213) 749-0212, firstla.org Higashi Honganji Buddhist Temple 505 E. Third St., (213) 626-4200, hhbt-la.org Jodo Shu Betsuin Buddhist Temple 442 E. Third St., (213) 346-9666 Koyasan Buddhist Temple 342 E. First St., (213) 624-1267, koyasan.org La Placita Church 535 N. Main St., (213) 629-3101 Live Church L.A. 800 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 493-4329, livechurchla.com Maryknoll Japanese Catholic Center

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G O O D T O K N O W | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

222 S. Hewitt St., (213) 626-2279 New City Church of L.A. 514 S. Spring St., (213) 471-2415, newcitychurchla.com Nishi Hongwanji Los Angeles Betsuin 815 E. First St., (213) 680-9130, nishihongwanji-la.org Second Church of Christ, Scientist 946 W. Adams Blvd. St. Anthony Croatian Catholic Church 712 N. Grand Ave., (213) 628-2938, croatianchurch.org St. Bridget (Chinese) Catholic Church 510 Cottage Home St., (323) 222-5518, home.stbridgetccc.com St. John’s Cathedral 514 W. Adams Blvd., (213) 747-6285, stjohnsla.org St. Peter’s Italian Church 1039 N. Broadway, (323) 225-8119, stpeteritalianchurchla.org St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church 621 W. Adams Blvd., (213) 749-8950 Union Church of Los Angeles 401 E. Third St., (213) 629-3876, unionchurchla.org Wilshire Christian Church 634 S. Normandie Ave., (213) 382-6337 Zenshuji Soto Mission 123 S. Hewitt St., (213) 624-8658, zenshuji.org

EVERYDAY ESSENTIALS

gRoceRy StoReS Bunker Hill Market & Deli Basics, plus beer, wine and spirits. They’ll deliver Downtown too. 800 W. First St., (213) 624-1245. Chapman Market Cool little mini mart that stocks beer, wine, snacks and some groceries. They offer free delivery within a few blocks. 221 W. Eighth St. City Target In addition to the usual Target goods, they offer a grocery section where you can find most of what you need to stock the pantry. 735 S. Figueroa St., (213) 330-4543. Grand Central Market Fresh produce, meat and prepared food stalls. One-hour free parking with $10 purchase. 317 S. Broadway, (213) 624-2378, grandcentralsquare.com. Joe’s Downtown Market (Toy Factory Lofts) Snacks, drinks, gourmet items, soy cheese, beer and other sundries. 1855 Industrial St., (213) 612-0248. Marukai Snacks, drinks, produce, meat, Japanese items and sundries. 123 S. Onizuka St., (213) 893-7200, marukai.com. Old Bank District Market Basic groceries, milk, wine, coffee, gourmet items, deli and magazines. 409 S. Main St., (213) 680-9000. Ralphs Fresh Fare Full-service market with coffee counter, bakery, deli, fresh sushi and dry cleaning. Validated parking accessed from Flower Street. 645 W. Ninth St., (213) 452-0840, ralphs.com. Smart & Final Extra Fresh produce, bulk items, prepared foods and a coffee shop. 845 S. Figueroa St., (213) 629-0039, smartandfinal.com. Two Bits Market This gourmet grocer is a small but welcome addition to the area. You’ll find dry goods, organic produce, cheeses, wine, spirits and fresh deli fare.


Historic Core Farmers Market 210 W. Fifth St., (213) 627-2636, twobitsmarket.com. Little Tokyo Galleria Market Inside the Little Tokyo Galleria, this full-service Korean grocery chain offers Asian products, a meat and seafood counter, and tasty premade deli foods. Validated garage parking. 333 S. Alameda St., (213) 617-0030. Urban Radish A community market and eatery with a meat counter, charcuterie, fresh produce, gourmet items and even pet food. 660 S. Matteo St., (213) 892-1570, urban-radish.com. Wal-Mart Check out this new Wal-Mart neighborhood market on the ground floor of the Grand Plaza housing complex. 701 W. Cesar Chavez Ave., (213) 337-0172, walmart.com.

FARMeRS MARKetS Bank of America Farmers Market Fridays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.: Food stalls, produce, flowers and crafts. 333 S. Hope St., at Bank of America Plaza, ccfm.com. City Hall Farmers Market Thursdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Farm fresh produce, flowers, olives, oils, hummus, dips, bread and crafts. Music 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. City Hall East, 200 N. Main St. FIGat7th Farmers Market Thursdays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.: The outdoor mall in the Financial District offers an assortment of produce, kettle corn, flowers, honey, breads, olives, nuts and more. 735 S. Figueroa St., (213) 955-7150, figat7th.com. Historic Core Farmers Market Sunday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.: Fresh local produce, cheese, organic products and crafts. Fifth Street, between Spring and Broadway. Pershing Square Farmers Market Wednesdays and Thursdays, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.: Produce, flowers, baked goods and crafts are just a few of the items for sale at this lively market in Pershing Square. 532 S. Olive St., rawinspiration.org. DRug StoReS/pHARMAcieS CVS Pharmacy Large, bright store with pharmacy, cosmetics, spirits and lot parking. Open 24 hours. 1050 W. Sunset Blvd., (213) 975-1200, cvs.com. GNC Shop for vitamins, supplements, sports nutrition, health

and beauty products. There are multiple Downtown locations. 750 S. Flower St., (213) 622-6931; 505 S. Flower St., (213) 489-7732; 510 W. Sixth St., (213) 622-2078; or 316 W. Seventh St., (213) 489-4591; or gnc.com. Rite-Aid Drug store necessities and toiletries, plus good deals on wine. Open 24 hours. 500 S. Broadway, (213) 623-5820; or 600 W. Seventh St., (213) 896-0083. Uptown Drug & Gift Shop Old-school pharmacy with personal service, screenings and free prescription delivery. 444 S. Flower St., #100, (213) 612-4300, uptowndrugs.com. Walgreens Located at the corner of Seventh and Hope streets, this is the chain’s first Downtown store. 617 W. Seventh St., (213) 694-2880, walgreens.com.

pet SeRviceS Bark Avenue They’ve got a “spaw,” grooming, boarding, daycare and a training academy. 545 S. Main St., (213) 748-7485, barkavela.com. Downtown Doggie U Wash Self-service and professional grooming with eco-friendly products. 744 S. Hill St., (213) 623-8100, downtowndoggieuwash.com. DTLA Vets A full-service veterinarian service in your own backyard. 333 S. Spring St., (213) 293-7163, dtlavets.com. Go Dog LA A 9,000-square-foot open space for doggies as well as cage-free boarding, grooming and outdoor yards. 1728 Maple Ave., (213) 748-4364, godogla.com. Muttropolitan A modern, full-service salon for pets including a selfservice wash. 408 E. Second St., (213) 626-8887, muttropolitanla.com. Bark Avenue’s Pet Project This retail store offers pet food and supplies, and they deliver it free to your door. 548 S. Spring St., #107, (213) 688-7752, petproject-losangeles.com. Pussy & Pooch This chic pet boutique offers a bathhouse, “Pawbar” cafe and monthly socials. You can also find pet food, treats and accessories. Local delivery.

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Papi’s Pizzeria Hand tossed pizza and salads for lunch, dinner and late night. Dine in, take out or delivery. 109 E. Eighth St., (213) 623-3588 or papispizzeria.com Pitfire Pizza Free delivery and individual gourmet pizzas, pasta, salads and sandwiches. Plus seasonal offerings. Parking is $2 at lot on 232 S. Main St. with validation. 108 W. Second St., (213) 808-1200 or pitfirepizza.com. Pizzanista Delivery is $2.50 with $20 minimum purchase at the Arts District joint. A former pro skateboarder might bring it to your door. 2019 E. Seventh St., (213) 627-1430, pizzanista.com. Purgatory Pizza Rustic, handmade pizzas from a quirky crew. Dine in or they’ll deliver. 1326 E. First St., (323) 262-5310 or eatpurgatorypizza.com. Two Boots Pizza Traditional Italian flavors and free delivery. 828 S. Broadway, (213) 623-2100 or twoboots.com. Xlixe Pizzeria Pies and Pints Lunch specials, free delivery, happy hour and specialty pies. 432 E. Second St., (213) 620-0513 or xlixe.com.

Pussy & Pooch 564 S. Main St., (213) 438-0900, pussyandpooch.com. South Park Doggie Day Care Spa and Supplies Daycare, boarding, grooming, spa, training and supplies. Check the website for special offers. 1320 S. Grand Ave., (213) 747-3649, southparkdoggie.com.

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Movie RentALS/tHeAteRS Downtown Independent This small theater specializes in indie and classic films. 251 S. Main St.; (213) 617-1033, downtownindependent.com. Regal Cinemas This state-of-the-art theater is Downtown’s biggest with 14 screens. Located on the L.A. Live campus. 1000 W. Olympic Blvd.; (213) 763-6070, regmovies.com.

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beAuty/SpA SeRviceS The Artform Studio This super hip hybrid hair salon-record shop does it all: Hair, makeup, fashion and, of course, great tunes. 701 E. Third St., Suite 120, (213) 613-1050, theartformstudio.com. Bolt Barbers Old-school barbers with a modern sensibility and serious skills. You can also get a shave and shoe shine. 460 S. Spring St., Suite B, (213) 232-4715, boltbarbers.com. Candolyn’s Hair, mani-pedi, scalp treatment and massage at the California Plaza Watercourt. 350 S. Grand Ave., D-9; (213) 625-7895, candolyns.com. C&J Beauty Center and Salon This newcomer offers beauty supplies, hair and nail service, skincare and waxing. 804 W. Seventh St.; (213) 624-3000. Curt Darling Salon Get the signature Darling DryCut along with a range of hair and styling services. 440 S. Main St., (213) 426-4000, curtdarling.com. Diva Den Hair Salon Specializing in ethnic hair and extensions. 1042 S. Olive St., (213) 747-7674. Elisa’s Garage This loft studio caters to Downtown’s professionals, artists and hipsters looking for a great cut. 1401 S. Santa Fe Ave., (213) 623-1233, elisasgarage.com. European Hair Design Inside the Bonaventure Hotel, this full-service salon has built a loyal clientele of men and women over the last 30 years.

Bolt Barbers 404 S. Figueroa St., Suite 413; (213) 892-1580, wolfeurosalon.com. Imperial Barber Shop Get a great and super affordable cut at this Little Tokyo spot. No appointments; cash only. 114 Judge John Aiso St., (213) 625-2830. Jacqueline’s Salon Hair and nail services on Bunker Hill. 108 W. 2nd St., #202; (213) 617-7911, jacquelinessalon.com

Nail Service Cool 3D nail art, lash extensions, waxing and facials; validated parking in garage on Second Street. 244 E. First St.; (213) 626-0315, nailserviceusa.com. Nails on Ninth Affordable manicures and pedicures. 127 W. Ninth St., (213) 627-6245. Neihule This chic, full-service salon across from Pershing Square

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is decked out in mod white. They even have a bar for refreshments. Early morning appointments available. 607 S. Olive St., (213) 623-4383, neihule.com. Neihule 2 This second location complements the flagship Olive Street salon with a nail spa, tanning and blow dry bar. 512 W. Seventh St.; (213) 627-5300, neihule.com. Oasis City Spa Inside the O Hotel is this clean and tranquil modern spa that promises to revive and rejuvenate. 819 S. Flower St., (213) 784-8194, oasiscityspa.com. Rendez Vous Salon & Spa A newcomer to the Downtown scene with friendly service. 125 W. Ninth St., (951) 662-6974. The Ritz-Carlton Spa This upscale spa will pamper you in the signature Ritz style. 900 W. Olympic Blvd., (213) 743-8800, ritzcarlton.com. Rudy’s Barber Shop Cuts and color on the cheap and trendy. Standard Hotel, 550 S. Flower St.; (213) 439-3058, rudysbarbershop.com. Salon Eleven A hip, upbeat salon in South Park offering cuts, color, styling, waxing, makeup and Brazilian Blowouts. Validated parking. 420 W. 11th St., (213) 744-9944, salon-eleven.com. Salon on Seventh This longtime, full-service Downtown salon is located next to the historic L.A. Athletic Club. 429 W. Seventh St., (213) 688-0436, salononseventhla.com. Salon on 6 Hip, modern salon and day spa in the Historic Core. Complimentary consultations are available, and highly recommended.

548 S. Spring St.; (213) 623-5033, salonon6.biz. Salon Pure Unisex cuts, color, nails and waxing in the Santa Fe Lofts. 117 E. Sixth St.; (213) 624-7873, salonpurela.com. Salon Shaniaz Image design, hair styling, facials, hair removal, makeup and makeovers with Euro-Asian techniques. In the Bonaventure Hotel. 404 S. Figueroa St., (310) 968-0728, shaniaz.com. Soho Spa Nails Indulge in a mani-pedi at this relaxing Little Tokyo spot. 127 S. San Pedro St, (213) 626-6899, sohospanails.com. Soleil Beauty Salon This 9,800-square-foot gym offers mixed martial arts and fitness classes for men, women and kids. 901 S. Main St., (213) 593-9090, salonsoleilla.com. Ultima Beauty Center Located in Macy’s Plaza, you’ll find beauty supplies, as well as a full spectrum of services including cuts, color, nails, facials, massage, waxing and tanning. 750 W. Seventh St.; (213) 689-9308, ultimabeautycenter.com. Vertigo Salon This sprawling full-service salon melds Hollywood glam with a modern twist. 605 W. Olympic Blvd., (213)622-2101, vertigosalonla.com. Wax Candy Get waxed in a clean, comfortable and friendly locale. They’ll even give you a lollipop afterward. 756 S. Main St.,(213) 228-2639, waxcandy.com. Yolanda Aguilar Beauty Institute & Spa With more than 40 years in the biz, this lovely, tranquil spa does everything from facials to massages to body wraps. 735 S. Figueroa St. (FIGat7th), suite 100; (213) 687-6683, yabeauty.com.

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FitneSS Archway Studio By night they present classical and contemporary theater; by day they offer a serious yoga studio with various styles and levels. 305 S. Hewitt St., (213) 237-9933, archwayla.com. Bikram Yoga Hot, sweaty yoga in a large studio. Bring a towel. 700 W. First St., (213) 626-9642, bikramyogadowntownla.com. CrossFit213 This strength and fitness program with get you ready to tackle any physical challenge. 903 S. Hill St., (213) 222-8067, crossfit213.com. CrossFit Mean Streets This is the method used by cops, martial artists and athletes. You get hard-core, no frills personal training that’ll make you want to barf but will get you in great shape. 265 S. Main St.; (213) 290-2367, crossfitmeanstreets.com. Future Health Get buff on the 57th floor of the U.S. Bank Tower with a custom exercise and nutrition program. 633 W. Fifth St., Suite 5750, (213) 617-8229, futurehealthworld.com. Equinox A beautiful locale with luxury amenities and state-of-the-art equipment. Plus a smoothie bar. 444 S. Flower St., (213) 330-3999, equinox.com. Evoke Yoga Located in the historic Van Nuys Building, this 1,500-square-foot space adds a serene, modern touch to the growing area. 212 W. Seventh St., (213) 394-5492, evokeyoga.com. Gold’s Gym You’ll find every class imaginable, from boot camp to cycling to Pilates. 735 S. Figueroa St., (213) 688-1441, goldsgym.com. Ketchum-Downtown YMCA Basketball/volleyball, aerobics, indoor track and FitLinxx program. 401 S. Hope St., (213) 624-2348, ymcala.org. Krav Maga Unyted This modern studio welcomes all levels for its challenging martial arts workout. The staff is friendly and the instructors are some of the best. 334 S. Main St., (213) 223-6233, unytedfitness.com. L.A. Fitness (Macy’s Plaza) L.A. Fitness has personal trainers, tons of equipment and fun classes. 700 S. Flower St., (213) 624-3933, lafitness.com. Los Angeles Athletic Club This private club features a pool, personal training, classes and social events. 431 W. Seventh St., (213) 625-2211, laac.com. Pilates Plus Downtown LA A hip Pilates gym using the Systeme Dynamique to tone, strengthen and tighten. 845 S. Broadway, (213) 863-4834, ppspx.com. The Rec Center Crossfit Get your fit on at this tough Arts District gym. 588 Mateo St., (213) 621-2964, thereccentercrossfit.com. Tapout This 9,800-square-foot gym offers mixed martial arts and fitness classes for men, women and kids. 400 W. Pico Blvd, (213) 748-7552, tapoutla.com. YAS Fitness Push yourself to the limit at this sleek South Park facility. Classes include yoga for athletes, indoor cycling and more. 831 S. Hope St., (213) 430-9053, go2yas.com.


INDEX

downtown los angeles from a to z ACTIVITIES

Aloud at the Central Library.........................................33 Archway Studio/Theatre...............................................25 Bob Baker Marionette Theater.....................................39 Blessing of the Animals................................................34 Brewery Artwalk......................................................34, 35 Bug Fair.........................................................................34 Chinatown Art Night . .............................................34, 35 Chinatown Firecracker Run.........................................34 Chinatown Summer Nights..........................................35 Chinese New Year........................................................34 Chung King Road.........................................................31 Ciclavia....................................................................34, 35 Cinco de Mayo..............................................................34 Dance Downtown.........................................................34 Dia de los Muertos........................................................35 Dodger Season.............................................................34 Dog Day Afternoon.......................................................35 Downtown Art Walk......................................................34 Downtown Independent.........................................38, 79 Drum Downtown...........................................................35 Electric Dusk Drive-In...................................................38 Fiesta Broadway...........................................................34 Films at CAAM..............................................................38 Flagship Theatres University Village 3........................38 Fourth of July Block Party............................................35 Friday Night Flicks........................................................35 Friday Night Sing-Alongs..............................................35 Grand Performances....................................................35 Griffith Observatory.......................................................40 Halloween Party for Downtown Kids...........................35 Holiday Season Lighting Ceremony............................34 IMAX Theater................................................................38 Japanese New Year.....................................................34 L.A. County Holiday Celebration.................................34 L.A. Film Festival...........................................................35 L.A. Food & Wine Festival...........................................35 L.A. Kings Holiday Ice at L.A. Live..............................34 L.A. Live...................................................................10, 38 Lantern Festival.............................................................34 Las Posadas.................................................................34 Last Remaining Seats..................................................35 Live Talks L.A................................................................33 Los Angeles Clippers....................................................35 Los Angeles Kings........................................................35 Los Angeles Lakers......................................................35 Los Angeles Marathon..................................................34 Lucha Vavoom..............................................................34 Mid-Autumn Moon Festival..........................................35 MOCA............................................................................26 National Train Day at Union Station............................35 Nisei Week....................................................................35 Pershing Square Friday Night Flicks...........................38 Pershing Square Ice Rink............................................34 Pershing Square Summer Concerts...........................35 Psomas Paper Yacht Challenge..................................35 REDCAT........................................................................38 Regal Cinemas.......................................................38, 79 Richard J. Riordan Central Library..............................40 SCI-Arc Speaker Series...............................................33 Speaker Series.............................................................33 Springfest.......................................................................34 Stairclimb for Los Angeles............................................35 Summer on the Plaza at FIGat7th...............................35 Town Hall Los Angeles.................................................36 USC Trojan Football.....................................................35 Walt Disney Concert Hall.............................................23 World City......................................................................35 Zócalo............................................................................36

COMMUNITY contacts

Downtown Representatives and Advocacy Groups.........................................................84 Places of Worship.........................................................84

DISTRICTS

Arts District......................................................... 6, 41, 54 Bunker Hill.......................................................... 6, 42, 55 Central City East.......................................................7, 43 Chinatown........................................................... 7, 43, 56 City West............................................................ 8, 44, 58 Civic Center...............................................................8, 55 Downtown Adjacent......................................................58 El Pueblo/Union Station.................................... 8, 44, 56 Fashion District................................................... 8, 44, 59 Figueroa Corridor....................................................10, 60 Financial District............................................................60 Furniture & Decorative Arts District........................12, 48 Historic Core...............................................12, 48, 54, 65 Industrial District..............................................................7 Jewelry District................................................. 12, 50, 67 Little Tokyo........................................................ 12, 50, 69 Old Bank District.............................................. 13, 53, 71 South Park........................................................ 13, 53, 72 Toy District.................................................................7, 41

EVERYDAY ESSENTIALS

Beauty/Spa Services....................................................87 Drug Stores/Pharmacies..............................................85 Farmers Markets...........................................................85 Fitness...........................................................................88

Grocery Stores..............................................................84 Movie Rentals/Theaters...............................................86 Pet Services..................................................................85 Pizza Delivery................................................................86

EXCURSIONS

Bullocks Wilshire Department Store............................40 Echo Park/Angelino Heights........................................40 Greek Theatre...............................................................40 Griffith Park....................................................................40 Hollywood Bowl.............................................................40 La Brea Tar Pits............................................................40 Los Angeles County Museum of Art............................40 Los Angeles Zoo...........................................................40 Mid-Wilshire...................................................................40 Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits........................40 Petersen Automotive Museum.....................................40 Southwestern University School of Law................................................................40 Universal Studios..........................................................40 Wiltern Theatre..............................................................40

HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE & sites

Angels Flight Railway...................................................14 Arcade...........................................................................20 Avila Adobe...................................................................26 Bradbury Building..........................................................14 Broadway Theater District............................................20 Cameo Theater.............................................................20 City Hall.........................................................................14 Coca Cola Bottling Company.......................................14 Doheny Mansion...........................................................16 Eastern Columbia Building...........................................16 Fire Station #30.............................................................16 Globe Theatre...............................................................20 Go For Broke Monument.............................................16 Herald Examiner Building.............................................16 Italian Hall......................................................................26 L.A. Times Building.......................................................18 Loew’s State Theatre....................................................20 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.................................37 Los Angeles Theatre.....................................................20 Mayan Theatre..............................................................20 Millennium Biltmore Hotel.............................................18 Million Dollar Theater....................................................20 Olvera Street.................................................................26 Orpheum Theatre.........................................................20 Oviatt Building...............................................................18 Pacific Electric Building.................................................18 Palace Theatre..............................................................20 Plaza Catholic Church....................................................8 Pico House......................................................................8 Rialto Theatre................................................................20 Richard J. Riordan Central Library..............................18 Roxie Theatre................................................................20 Tower Theater...............................................................20 Union Station.................................................................19 United Artists Theatre...................................................20 USC...............................................................................10 Vibiana...........................................................................19

HOTELS

Ace Hotel.................................................................78, 80 Best Western Dragon Gate Inn...................................81 Cecil Hotel.....................................................................80 DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown..........................................76, 80 Figueroa Hotel.........................................................78, 80 Hilton Checkers Los Angeles.................................76, 80 Historic Mayfair Hotel..............................................78, 80 Holiday Inn Express................................................73, 81 Hotel Solaire............................................................78, 81 Howard Johnson.....................................................73, 81 Hyatt Regency Los Angeles Downtown................76, 80 JW Marriott Hotel....................................................75, 80 Kawada Hotel..........................................................78, 81 Knights Inn Los Angeles...............................................81 Los Angeles Athletic Club.......................................79, 81 Luxe City Center.....................................................76, 80 Metro Plaza Hotel...................................................78, 81 Millennium Biltmore Hotel.......................................76, 80 Miyako Hotel Los Angeles......................................77, 80 O Hotel.....................................................................79, 81 Omni Los Angeles Hotel at California Plaza.........76, 80 Quality Inn & Suites Hotel250................................77, 81 Radisson Hotel Midtown at USC...........................77, 80 Ramada Los Angeles/Downtown West......................81 Ritz-Carlton at L.A. Live..........................................75, 81 Ritz Milner Hotel......................................................78, 81 Rodeway Inn Convention Center Los Angeles..........81 Sheraton Los Angeles Downtown.........................77, 80 The Standard Downtown L.A.................................79, 80 Stay On Main..........................................................79, 81 Stillwell Hotel...........................................................79, 80 Vagabond Inn USC Hotel Los Angeles.......................81 Westin Bonaventure Hotel and Suites..................77, 80

KID-FRIENDLY DOWNTOWN

Bob Baker Marionette Theater.....................................39 Cathedral Garden.........................................................39 Colburn School.............................................................39

Exposition Park.............................................................39 El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument.....................................................39 FIGat7th Kids Club.......................................................39 Grand Performances....................................................39 Lucky Strike Lanes & Lounge......................................40 Music Center.................................................................40 Olvera Street.................................................................39 Orthopaedic Hospital Playground................................40 Richard J. Riordan Central Library..............................40 Target Free Family Saturdays at JANM......................40 Target Sundays at CAAM.............................................40 X Lanes.........................................................................40

MODERN ARCHITECTURE

Caltrans Headquarters.................................................19 Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels...........................19 Los Angeles Center Studios.........................................21 Museum of Contemporary Art, Grand Avenue...........21 Ramon C. Cortinez School of Visual and Performing Arts...........................................19 SCI-Arc..........................................................................21 US Bank Tower.............................................................21 Walt Disney Concert Hall.............................................21

MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

African American Firefighter Museum.........................26 California African American Museum....................26, 39 California Science Center.............................................39 Chinatown Galleries......................................................31 Chinese American Museum.........................................26 Chung King Road.........................................................31 Downtown Art Walk......................................................31 Downtown Galleries......................................................31 El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument.....................................................26 FIDM Museum & Galleries...........................................27 FIDM’s Annette Green Perfume Museum..................27 Gallery Row...................................................................31 Grammy Museum.........................................................27 Japanese American National Museum.......................26 La Plaza de Cultura y Artes.........................................26 Latino Museum of History............................................26 MOCA, Geffen Contemporary ....................................26 MOCA, Grand Avenue.................................................26 Natural History Museum...............................................39 Wells Fargo History Museum.......................................27

MUSIC AND PERFORMING ARTS

Ahmanson Theatre.......................................................24 Archway Studio/Theatre...............................................25 Bar Fedora....................................................................23 Bootleg Theater.............................................................25 California Plaza.............................................................19 Club Nokia.....................................................................22 Colburn School.............................................................23 Conga Room.................................................................22 Dorothy Chandler Pavilion...........................................24 East West Players........................................................24 Grammy Museum Sound Stage..................................23 Grand Performances....................................................22 The Hayworth................................................................25 Los Angeles Theatre Center........................................24 Mark Taper Forum........................................................24 Music Center.................................................................19 Nokia Theatre................................................................23 Nola’s.............................................................................23 One-Eyed Gypsy..........................................................23 Orpheum Theatre.........................................................23 Pershing Square...........................................................23 REDCAT........................................................................25 Redwood Bar and Grill.................................................24 24th Street Theatre.......................................................25 Second Street Jazz......................................................24 The Smell......................................................................24 Staples Center..............................................................23 USC’s Bovard Auditorium.............................................25 Walt Disney Concert Hall.......................................21, 23

NIGHTLIFE & BARS

Angel City Brewery.......................................................28 Association....................................................................28 Bacaro...........................................................................28 Badmaash.....................................................................24 Bar 107..........................................................................28 Belasco Theatre............................................................28 Broadway Bar...............................................................28 Caña Rum Bar..............................................................28 Casey’s Irish Bar & Grille.............................................28 Cole’s.............................................................................28 Conga Room.................................................................28 Corkbar..........................................................................28 The Down & Out...........................................................28 Ebanos Crossing..........................................................28 Edison............................................................................28 Elevate Lounge.............................................................29 Escondite.......................................................................29 Exchange LA.................................................................29 The Falls........................................................................29 Far Bar...........................................................................29 Figueroa Hotel...............................................................29 First & Hope..................................................................29 Gallery Bar.....................................................................29 Golden Gopher.............................................................29 Grand Star.....................................................................29 Hank’s Bar.....................................................................29 Icon Ultra Lunge............................................................29 King Eddy’s Saloon......................................................29 L.A. Brewing Co............................................................29

La Cita...........................................................................29 Las Perlas......................................................................29 Library Bar.....................................................................29 Little Bear.......................................................................29 Lucky Strike Lanes & Lounge......................................29 Mas Malo.......................................................................29 McCormick & Schmick’s...............................................30 Mignon...........................................................................30 Nirvana Bar & Grill........................................................30 One-Eyed Gypsy..........................................................30 Onyx Restaurant, Lounge & Bar.................................30 Pattern Bar....................................................................30 The Perch......................................................................30 Pete’s.............................................................................30 Pour Haus Wine Bar.....................................................30 Public School 612.........................................................30 Redwood Bar and Grill.................................................30 Salvage..........................................................................30 Seven Grand.................................................................30 Silo Vodka Bar...............................................................30 Spring St. Bar................................................................30 Standard Downtown.....................................................30 Suede Bar & Lounge....................................................30 Tapas and Wine Bar C.................................................30 Terroni............................................................................24 321 Lounge...................................................................30 Tony’s Saloon................................................................30 The Varnish...................................................................30 The Vault........................................................................30 Villains Tavern...............................................................30 Weiland Brewery Underground...................................30 Wurstküche Restaurant................................................30

PARKS & OPEN SPACES

Biddy Mason Park........................................................36 California Plaza Watercourt..........................................36 Echo Park Lake......................................................40, 48 El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument.....................................................36 Exposition Park Rose Garden.....................................36 Grand Hope Park..........................................................36 Griffith Park....................................................................40 James Irvine Garden....................................................36 Kyoto Gardens..............................................................36 L.A.’s Grand Park.........................................................37 Los Angeles State Historic Park..................................37 Maguire Gardens..........................................................37 Pershing Square...........................................................37 Vista Hermosa...............................................................37

RESTAURANTS

Aburiya Toranoko..........................................................69 Alley Dog.......................................................................59 Alma...............................................................................65 Aloha Cafe.....................................................................69 Amante Pizza & Pasta.................................................59 Angry Chef....................................................................60 Arashi Sushi..................................................................72 Arda’s Cafe....................................................................67 Artisan House................................................................65 Authentic Thai...............................................................56 Azalea............................................................................69 Bacaro...........................................................................58 Bäco Mercat..................................................................71 Badmaash.....................................................................65 Bar Ama.........................................................................72 Bar & Kitchen................................................................60 Barragan’s.....................................................................58 Ben & Jerry’s Union Station.........................................59 Bestia.............................................................................54 Big Man Bakes..............................................................72 Big Wangs.....................................................................72 Birdsong’s Veggietaria..................................................57 Blimpie...........................................................................60 Blossom.........................................................................72 Blue Cow Kitchen & Bar...............................................60 Boca at Conga Room...................................................72 Bonaventure Brewing Company..................................60 Border Grill....................................................................62 Bottega Louie Restaurant & Market............................62 Bottle Rock L.A.............................................................72 Brooklyn Bagel Bakery.................................................58 Bunker Hill Bar & Grill...................................................55 The Cabbage Patch.....................................................62 Cafe Dulce.....................................................................69 Cafe Noa.......................................................................62 Cafe Pinot......................................................................62 Caffe Primo Downtown.................................................62 California Kabob Kitchen..............................................73 California Pizza Kitchen..........................................55, 62 Casa Nostra..................................................................73 Casey’s Irish Bar and Grille..........................................62 CBS Seafood................................................................56 Chado Tea Room..........................................................69 Chaya............................................................................62 Checkers Downtown....................................................62 Chego............................................................................56 Cherry on Top................................................................69 Chick-fil-A.......................................................................60 Chipotle..........................................................................62 Church & State..............................................................54 Chynna Dim Sum.........................................................69 Cicada............................................................................62 City Thai.........................................................................63 City Bean.......................................................................62 Coco Laurent.................................................................62 CoffeeBar......................................................................62 Cole’s.............................................................................65 Colori Kitchen................................................................65

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Colori at Figueroa.........................................................62 Corner Bakery Cafe......................................................62 Coronado’s....................................................................67 The Counter..................................................................62 Crepe X-press...............................................................62 Cucina Rustica..............................................................62 Curry House..................................................................69 Daikokuya......................................................................69 The Daily Dose.............................................................54 Daily Grill.......................................................................62 Demitasse Cafe............................................................69 Denny’s..........................................................................62 District BBQ & Lounge.................................................54 Doña Inez......................................................................59 Drago Centro.................................................................62 Dr. J’s Vibrant Cafe.......................................................72 D-Town Burger Bar.......................................................65 Dublin’s..........................................................................62 Dusty’s Bistro................................................................58 Eastside Market Italian Deli..........................................56 Eat.Drink.Americano.....................................................54 El Cholo.........................................................................73 Engine Co. No. 28........................................................62 Ensenada Restaurant...................................................65 Esaan Thai....................................................................55 The Escondite...............................................................56 ESPN Zone...................................................................66 Etchea............................................................................55 Farid Restaurant...........................................................67 Farmer Boys..................................................................56 The Farm of Beverly Hills.............................................73 Fatburger.......................................................................62 Fickle/TheSandwich Smith...........................................69 First & Hope..................................................................55 Fisherman’s Outlet........................................................56 Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar...................73 Flix Cafe.........................................................................58 Flying Pig Cafe........................................................63, 69 Frances Bakery and Coffee.........................................69 Freebirds........................................................................73 Frying Fish.....................................................................69 Full House Seafood Restaurant..................................56 Garage Pizza................................................................63 George’s Greek Grill.....................................................63 Gill’s Cuisine of India....................................................73 The Gorbals...................................................................65 Gourmet LA Bakery......................................................65 Gram & Papa’s.............................................................60 Grand Central Market...................................................65 Ground Floor Cafe........................................................65 Green Bamboo.............................................................69 Green Hut Cafe.............................................................63 Guild Restaurant...........................................................63 Gus’s Drive In................................................................58 Hakata Ramen Shin-Sen-Gumi...................................70 Hama Sushi...................................................................70 Hana-Ichimonme..........................................................70 Handsome Coffee Roasters........................................54 Hashi Ramen................................................................70 Hoan Kiem.....................................................................56 Homegirl Cafe...............................................................56 Hooters..........................................................................73 Hop Li............................................................................56 Honda Ya Izakaya.........................................................70 Horse Thief BBQ...........................................................65 Hygge Bakery...............................................................73 IHOP..............................................................................63 Il Mare............................................................................73 Indus by Saffron............................................................63 Industriel........................................................................63 Izakaya Fuga.................................................................70 Frying Fish.....................................................................64 J & K Hong Kong Cuisine............................................56 Juicy Lucy......................................................................63 Just Baked.....................................................................63 Kabab & More...............................................................65 Katsuya..........................................................................73 Kendall’s Brasserie.......................................................58 Kitchen Faire.................................................................63 Korea BBQ House........................................................70 Korean Kitchen Hibachi Barbecue..............................70 Kouraku ........................................................................70 Kula Revolving Sushi Bar.............................................70 La Golondrina................................................................59 La Luz Del Dia..............................................................59 La Parrilla .....................................................................58 L’Angolo.........................................................................60 L.A. Brewing Co............................................................65 L.A. Prime......................................................................63 L.A.’s Best Deli and Cafe.............................................56 Langer’s . ......................................................................58 Lawry’s Carvery............................................................73 Lazy Ox Canteen..........................................................70 Le Ka Restaurant..........................................................63 Lemonade.....................................................................55 Les Noces Du Figaro....................................................65 Liliya China Bistro.........................................................65 Little Bear.......................................................................54 Localita and the Badasserie.........................................65 Lucky Deli......................................................................56 Lucky Strike Lanes & Lounge......................................73 Mabel’s Chicken and Waffles.......................................73 Maccheroni Republic....................................................66 Manna Korean BBQ.....................................................70 Maria’s Italian Kitchen...................................................63 Market Cafe.............................................................55, 73 Market Restaurant........................................................60 Mas Malo.......................................................................63 McCormick & Schmick’s...............................................63

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The Melt.........................................................................63 Mendocino Farms...................................................55, 63 Men Oh Tokushima Ramen.........................................70 M Grill.............................................................................58 Mignon...........................................................................66 Mikawaya.......................................................................70 Mitsuru Sushi and Grill.................................................70 Mo-Chica.......................................................................64 Morton’s The Steakhouse............................................64 Nazo’s Bakery...............................................................64 New Mikado..................................................................66 New Moon.....................................................................60 Nick & Stef’s..................................................................55 Nickel Diner...................................................................66 Nick’s Café....................................................................57 Nirvana Sports Bar & Grill............................................70 Noe................................................................................55 Nola’s.............................................................................54 The Novel Cafe.............................................................54 Ocean Seafood.............................................................57 Ocho Mexican Grill.................................................56, 64 Octopus Japanese Restaurant....................................64 Oleego by Parks BBQ..................................................64 Olive Bistro....................................................................67 O’Mamamia...................................................................60 Onyx Restaurant...........................................................66 Oomasa.........................................................................71 Original Pantry Cafe.....................................................73 Original Tommy’s..........................................................58 Pacific Dining Car.........................................................58 Palermo.........................................................................58 Palm Downtown............................................................73 Panda Express ............................................................64 Panini Cafe . ...........................................................66, 74 Papa Cristo’s.................................................................58 The Parish.....................................................................66 The Park........................................................................59 The Parks Finest...........................................................59 Pasta Roma..................................................................60 Patina.............................................................................58 Peddler’s Creamery......................................................72 The Perch......................................................................72 Pete’s Cafe & Bar.........................................................72 Philippe the Original......................................................57 Phoenix Bakery.............................................................57 Pho 97...........................................................................57 Pho Broadway...............................................................57 Pho Hoa.........................................................................57 The Pho Shop...............................................................71 Picante...........................................................................60 The Pie Hole ................................................................54 Pitfire Pizza....................................................................66 Pizzanista!.....................................................................54 Plum Tree Inn................................................................57 Portofino Cucina...........................................................72 Pressed Juicery............................................................60 Purgatory Pizza.............................................................54 Qdoba............................................................................64 Queens Bakery.............................................................57 R23................................................................................55 Redwood Bar & Grill.....................................................66 Regent China Inn..........................................................57 Restaurant Standard....................................................64 Riordan’s Tavern...........................................................74 Rivera.............................................................................74 Rock’N Fish...................................................................74 Rosa Mexicano.............................................................74 Roy’s Hawaiian Fusion Cuisine...................................64 Saffron Indian Cuisine..................................................64 Sage Vegan Bistro........................................................59 Sai Sai Noodle Bar.......................................................67 San Antonio Winery & Maddalena Restaurant...........59 Sandwich Joint..............................................................58 Sandwich Shop.............................................................67 San Sui Tei....................................................................71 Sarita’s...........................................................................66 Semi Sweet Bakery......................................................66 Señor Fish.....................................................................71 Shabu Shabu House....................................................71 Shawarma Factory Place.............................................67 Shekarchi.......................................................................74 Shish Kabob and Much More......................................66 Shojin Downtown..........................................................71 Silo’s Slider Bar.............................................................66 Simply Salad.................................................................66 643 North.......................................................................57 Skews............................................................................56 Soi 7...............................................................................64 Soleto Trattoria & Pizza Bar.........................................64 The Spice Table............................................................71 Spitz...............................................................................71 Spotlight Cafe and Tina Tacos.....................................58 Spring for Coffee...........................................................66 Spring Street Smoke House........................................57 Starry Kitchen................................................................57 Stella’s Food & Cocktails..............................................74 Sticky Rice.....................................................................67 The Stocking Frame.....................................................74 St. Vincent Court...........................................................67 Suehiro Cafe.................................................................71 SugarFish......................................................................64 Sultan Chicken..............................................................67 Sushi Gen......................................................................71 Sushi & Teri...................................................................71 Sustain Juicery..............................................................67 Syrup Desserts..............................................................67 Taix.................................................................................59 Tangerine.......................................................................71 Takami Sushi & Robata................................................64

I N D E X | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES GUIDE

Tenno Sushi...................................................................71 Terroni............................................................................67 Threads Cafe & Lounge...............................................71 Tiara Cafe......................................................................60 Tierra Mia Coffee..........................................................67 Tommy Pastrami...........................................................64 Toranoko........................................................................71 Tossed...........................................................................64 Trader Vic’s....................................................................74 Traxx..............................................................................59 29th Street Cafe............................................................60 Two Boots Pizza...........................................................67 Umamicatessen............................................................67 Uncle John’s Cafe.........................................................74 Urth Caffe......................................................................55 Valerie Confections.......................................................67 Via Cafe.........................................................................57 Wakasaya......................................................................65 Water Grill......................................................................64 Weiland Brewery Underground...................................65 Westin Bonaventure Food Court.................................65 Wokcano........................................................................65 Wolfgang Puck Bar & Grill............................................74 Wood Spoon.................................................................60 WP24.............................................................................74 Wurstküche...................................................................55 Xlixe Pizza.....................................................................71 Yang Chow....................................................................58 Yard House....................................................................74 Yojie Japanese Fondue & Sake Bar...........................74 Yorkshire Grill................................................................67 Yxta Cocina Mexicana..................................................56 Zencu.............................................................................71 Zip Sushi Izakaya.........................................................55

SAFETY

Central City East Association.......................................83 Chinatown BID..............................................................83 Downtown Center BID..................................................83 Fashion District BID......................................................83 Figueroa Corridor BID..................................................83 Historic Downtown BID.................................................83 LAPD Central Division..................................................83 Little Tokyo BID.............................................................83 South Park BID.............................................................83

SHOPPING & SERVICES

American Apparel.........................................................50 Angelo:Home................................................................48 Art Lewin........................................................................44 Anzen Hardware...........................................................50 Apolis Global.................................................................41 Bank of America Plaza Farmers Market.....................85 Bark Avenue’s Pet Project............................................85 Beautiful Ful...................................................................48 Beauty/Spa Services....................................................85 Blends............................................................................53 Bliss................................................................................48 The BLOC.....................................................................42 Brigade..........................................................................48 Broadway.......................................................................48 Broadway Smoke Shop...............................................48 Brooks Brothers............................................................42 Bunkado........................................................................52 Buttons and Bows.........................................................48 California Jewelry Mart.................................................50 California Market Center..............................................44 Caravan Books.............................................................42 Central Plaza.................................................................43 Chapman Market..........................................................84 Chung King Road.........................................................31 City Hall Farmers Market.............................................85 City Target......................................................................42 Corazon de Los Angeles..............................................44 Crack Gallery & Boutique.............................................48 Denim Refinery.............................................................42 Dish Factory..................................................................43 District Millworks............................................................41 Downtown Flea.............................................................48 Downtown L.A. Bicycles...............................................53 Drug stores/pharmacies...............................................85 DTLA Bikes....................................................................48 DTLA Vets.....................................................................85 Dynasty Center.............................................................44 El Maestro Bicycles......................................................48 Farmers Markets...........................................................85 Farmacia Million Dollar.................................................48 FIDM Museum Shop....................................................44 FIDM Scholarship Store...............................................44 FIGat7th.........................................................................42 FIGat7th Farmers Market.............................................85 Fitness...........................................................................88 505 Flower.....................................................................43 556 S. Broadway Building............................................50 Flamingo Vintage..........................................................48 Flock Shop....................................................................44 Flower Mart...................................................................45 Fong’s............................................................................44 Fugetsu-Do....................................................................52 Gather DTLA.................................................................48 Gin Ling Gifts.................................................................44 Grand Central Market...................................................48 Grocery stores...............................................................84 Hammer and Spear......................................................41 Hats On.........................................................................43 Heirloom........................................................................52 Historic Core Farmers Market......................................49 Honey Zhuang..............................................................49 Icing on the Ring...........................................................50 International Jewelry Center........................................50

Japanese Village Plaza................................................52 Jewelry District..............................................................50 Jewelry Theater Building..............................................50 Kapsoul..........................................................................49 Kimski Makes................................................................52 Kinokuniya Book Store.................................................52 Kool’s Clothing Store....................................................52 L.A. Mall.........................................................................44 L.A. Mart........................................................................48 L.A. Phil Store...............................................................43 Lara’s Jewelry...............................................................50 The Last Bookstore......................................................53 Little Tokyo Galleria & Woori Market...........................52 Library Store..................................................................43 LivingRoom SmokeShop.............................................50 Macy’s............................................................................42 Made by DWC..............................................................52 Michael Levine..............................................................45 MOCA Store..................................................................43 Monkey Pants...............................................................52 Morrie’s..........................................................................45 Moscatels......................................................................45 Movie rental/theaters....................................................86 Nicholas Bowes............................................................49 No. A..............................................................................52 Novecento.....................................................................45 Old Bank District Market...............................................53 Olde Good Things.........................................................48 Olvera Street.................................................................44 1 Man’s Trash................................................................49 Pershing Square Farmers Market.........................50, 85 Pet Services..................................................................85 Pizza delivery................................................................86 Poketo............................................................................41 PopKiller Second..........................................................52 Pussy & Pooch.............................................................78 Q Pop Shop...................................................................52 Ralphs Fresh Fare........................................................84 Rafu Bussan..................................................................52 Raggedy Threads.........................................................52 Raw Materials...............................................................53 Realm............................................................................43 Regal Cinemas.............................................................86 Rif...................................................................................53 Roger Stuart..................................................................48 Round2 L.A...................................................................49 Ross Cutlery..................................................................49 Ross Dress For Less....................................................49 Sanrio.............................................................................53 Santee Alley..................................................................45 Santee Street................................................................48 SCI-Arc Supply Store...................................................41 2nd Street Cigars and Gallery.....................................44 Shareen’s Vintage.........................................................44 Single Stone..................................................................50 Six Hundred...................................................................49 Skin.Graft.......................................................................53 Smart & Final Extra......................................................53 Stanton James..............................................................48 Stock & Bond................................................................49 St. Vincent Jewelry Center...........................................50 Sub Urban Riot.............................................................49 THVM Atelier.................................................................42 Tokyo Japanese Outlet.................................................53 Toy District.....................................................................43 Urban Outfitters.............................................................43 Virgo...............................................................................48 Vlado Footwear.............................................................48 Wal-Mart........................................................................85 Welcome Hunters.........................................................44 The Well.........................................................................53 Weller Court..................................................................53 Wing Hop Fung.............................................................44 Woori Market.................................................................77 Zara................................................................................43

SPORTING & CONVENTION VENUES

Dodger Stadium............................................................37 L.A. Live...................................................................13, 37 Los Angeles Convention Center..................................37 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.................................37 Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena...........................37 Staples Center..............................................................38

TOURS

Architecture Tours L.A..................................................32 Doheny Mansion Tour..................................................32 Downtown L.A. Walks..................................................32 El Pueblo.......................................................................32 Esotouric........................................................................32 Los Angeles Central Library Tour................................32 Los Angeles Conservancy.....................................20, 32 Metro Rail Art Tours......................................................32 San Antonio Winery......................................................33 Saturday Housing Bus Tour.........................................33 Segwow.........................................................................33 Starline Tours................................................................33 Undiscovered Chinatown Tour.....................................33 Urban Shopping Adventures........................................33 Walt Disney Concert Hall Tours...................................33

TRANSPORTATION

Amtrak...........................................................................82 DASH Downtown..........................................................82 Flyaway..........................................................................82 Metrolink........................................................................82 Regional Rail Services.................................................82 Rental Cars...................................................................83 Subway, Light Rail, Buses............................................82 Taxis...............................................................................82


PETE’S CAFÉ & BAR

2 BÄCO MERCAT

3 BAR AMÁ

118 West 4th Street bar-ama.com

75 PORTOFINO

4 ORSA & WINSTON

213.687.8002

122 West 4th Street orsaandwinston.com

Coming this fall!

6 BLOSSOM RESTAURANT 7 PIZZA

PIZZA 464 South Main Street portofinodtla.com

124 W 4th Street Coming Soon

213.239.9019

8 BIG MAN BAKES

9 OBD MARKTET & DELI

SUSHI

SUSHI 409 South Main Street

213.680.9000

421 South Main Street Coming Soon


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TASTE

OPENING FALL/WINTER 2013 CITY TAVERN | GENTARO SOBA | LOTERIA GRILL/TORTA CO. | NEW MOON CAFÉ | PIZZA STUDIO | TWIST & GRILL

com i ng 2014

D o w n t o w n L A’ s Premier shoPPing & Dining exPerience

figat7th.com 735 S. Figueroa Street, Downtown La


2014 Los Angeles Downtown Guide