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Beauty, grit & grace November Newsletter 2019


The Wind Down Betty Chee PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

As the LPGA and PGA players wind their way through the Asian Tours, we at home begin our wind down for the season. There is a distinct pattern here at Ladies’. It starts with the colourful fall scenes on our beautiful course. The leaves in the trees seem to change their colours overnight, then delicately hang in wait to be documented in those perfect photographs before falling to the ground. The irrigation system gets drained and blown-out. The greens get a dressing of sand to help prepare for the off-season. Members don additional layers hoping to stretch the golf rounds into those few days of brilliant sunshine. And, finally, members tugging golf bags begin to scatter from the club and the back shop to begin their off-season routine. (After, of course, promising to see each other in December at the Poinsettia Luncheons, the Dickens Dinners and the Brunch with Santa.) The Ladies’ board and committees have a routine as well. We review the year-end survey results. We summarize the work this year and note the great, the good, the missteps, and the little oops-we-won’t-bedoing-that-again things. We check our results against the strategic plan and make preparation notes for the next season. We review the operating and capital budgets for the 2020 season. And we review the compelling list of nominees for next year’s board. The year-end survey yielded good results in a year where members came prepared to roll up their sleeves on committees and to support various initiatives from learning clinics in the Golf Academy, to clubhouse activities, special dinners and culinary events, to Monday fun golf tournaments, to attending various member consultation sessions, to being completely positive about the future of our club. Our general satisfaction percentage rose to 81.3%, clubhouse operations is at 89.7% with staff courtesy at an all-time high of 96.8%. Not only were members engaged and supportive, our staff have gone the distance in their effort to serve members above and beyond the call of duty. They are to be commended and applauded. The survey results are reported in more detail on page 4 in the GM’s message. Thank you to all members who 2 | BEAUTY, GRIT & GRACE

took care to fill out the survey and provide comments. The survey results and comments continue to be informative and helpful in planning each new season. The Nomination Committee has given us three excellent candidates for the 2020 board. We at the board are excited to have them stand for nomination at the next AGM on February 12, 2020. They are Mary Pat Frey, Terri McKinnon, and Daryl Watts. And from the existing board we have nominated Wendy Girvan as the incoming vice president. Joan Anderton, the current vice president, will provide the leadership next year as the president. Thank you to the new candidates for allowing their names to be put forward for nomination. And many thanks to the members of the Nomination Committee. And a big thank you to past-president Monica McIntosh for her work during some challenging and change-making times. We continue to monitor the rezoning application for the Tridel project. We’ve had many meetings with city councillors to give them an opportunity to know what we’re all about and our stewardship of this land. The application will appear on the agenda of the Markham Development Services Committee meeting in late November. There will be further eblast on this subject in the coming weeks. The work of the Implementation Committee continues with the replacement hole project and will run through the fall into the winter months. Please stay tuned for eblasts which will communicate the progress as well as the member consultation format in the coming months. If you feel the itch to swing a club and find yourself still here in the frozen north (as some of our snowbirds keep reminding the rest of us) then come to the Winter Academy. Book a lesson or just drop in to hit a few balls. But you might want to bring a pair of snowshoes. There are those who will take the opportunity to see our course in a very different setting. Go discover a new scene beyond the woods where lonely golf balls rest and marvel at the beautiful winterscape at Ladies’.

Betty


NOVEMBER 2019 | 3


Satisfaction Survey Results Paul Bussiere GENERAL MANAGER’S MESSAGE

Each year at this time, I’ve reflected on the Membership Satisfaction Survey and highlighted some of the areas that we have improved from the year before and where we still need to continue to work on improving. I am thrilled to say that the responses on the survey this year were fantastic. The overall satisfaction rose to 81.3% this year from 59.4% last year. In my conversations with members throughout the year, the common statement I received was how much more positive everything was this year. I thank all of you who took the time to express that to me and to all of our members for bringing that positivity to the club. In last year’s survey we identified some areas that needing a lot of attention this year. Clubhouse service was a real issue last year and I’m happy to say that Romualdo came in this year and did a fabulous job. Our clubhouse operations overall satisfaction rose to its highest mark since 2014 with an 89.7% rating. Up more than 30% from last year. The food and beverage overall satisfaction rose to 88%, its highest rating ever! Thank you to Chef Umesh and his team for ensuring the quality and presentation of the meals coming out of the kitchen look and taste amazing. Almost every area of the club saw improvement in the survey and the areas that we focused on from last year saw the greatest improvements. Even though we had a fabulous year this year we know we can always do better. If we’re not striving to improve the experience for the members then we are failing at our jobs. The staff are reviewing all of the comments in the survey to find the consistent themes in areas that we can be better. Some of the areas we have identified that still need more improving are the following: 1) The halfway house hours and offerings. Romualdo and Chef Umesh have gone through what worked well this year and where can do better. We will be coming up with some new healthier options at the halfway house and look at different options for our sandwiches, like wraps or different buns instead of the current bread we are using. We’re evaluating the 4 | BEAUTY, GRIT & GRACE

sales per hour and will look to adjust or expand the hours based on what can be handled in the budget. 2) Although our back shop services improved in the survey to 86.6% satisfaction rating, we still feel there are areas for us to improve in this department. More training will be given to the staff and attention to detail will be emphasized on the small things like cleaning clubs. 3) We have already started to look at ways to manage the pin placements on the difficult greens and we will continue to try and find solutions for this going forward. 4) The purple tees will also be addressed to see how we can improve them even prior to the course enhancements planned for the future. 5) The Golf Shop phone not being answered was a comment heard many times this year and in the survey. Although the satisfaction rating for the front shop rose to 91.7% we feel we can do better in this area as well. The staff are reviewing current procedures to see how best to address this issue. There are many more items we will be looking at improving for next year and I want to thank everyone for coming to the club with a positive attitude this year. It made for a fantastic year and the staff love coming to work every day when they are greeted with smiling members and guest card holders. Feedback is always important. We appreciate all of the comments in the survey and I want to remind you that there is an option on our website to provide feedback at any time during the year. My door is always open if you want to come to me directly with your feedback. I love hearing from everyone, whether its positive feedback or where we can improve, feedback allows us to know how we are doing in the eyes of the members. Enjoy the end of the golf season and we hope to see you in December at our holiday lunches and dinners.

Paul


NOVEMBER 2019 | 5


Putting the Gardens to Bed Cindy Chamady HORTICULTURALIST

We as gardeners have been conditioned to clean up our gardens in the fall until they look like tidy, swept versions of our living rooms in preparation for winter. The idea being that we want to limit the overwintering of bugs and of course make cleanup easier in the spring. However, in forests and natural areas, there are no humans to meticulously clean up in the fall, and yet those areas come back healthy and strong with an abundance of wildlife. Perhaps with all that we are learning about encouraging our natural ecosystems, it only makes sense that nature knows best. In this article, I will outline the benefits of relinquishing the task of cleaning up the garden in fall as it applies to most of the garden and provide you with some guidance on a couple of areas requiring modest attention.

Other beneficial insects - Such as lacewings, assassin bugs, ground beetles and damsel bugs will also find suitable hibernation areas in the garden. The more the merrier when it comes to predatory insects.

One of the most important natural processes is the overwintering of insects. Yes, some harmful insects will find homes among the debris left in place. But so will many insects that are beneficial to the garden. With all those insects finding winter residences in our garden, we are in turn providing a protein rich food source for the birds. Inspiring a balance leads to a healthier ecosystem.

One area that does require some modest cleanup in the fall is your veggie garden. Any unharvested, frost bitten fruits and veggies should be cleaned out and composted as well as any diseased plants. In our veggie garden we are taking a no-till approach which means we will cut the remaining plants down while leaving the root systems in place to decay naturally. A fresh layer of compost on top and we are ready for next season.

So who do we want to encourage in our gardens? Bees - Some native bees search out hollow stems to lay their eggs and hibernate in. Leaving plant stalks can provide much needed habitat. Butterflies - Although Monarch butterflies migrate south, there are many species that overwinter either in adult form, as a chrysalis or in caterpillar form. Adults might tuck themselves into peeling tree bark or nestled in leaf litter. You might find a chrysalis hanging from a plant stalk. Caterpillars hide in fallen leaves or in the seed pod of a host plant. Ladybugs - Our native ladybug species prefer to hibernate tucked under a pile of leaves or at the base of a plant often in large groups. Encouraging them to overwinter in our garden means that they are right where we need them come spring! 6 | BEAUTY, GRIT & GRACE

Birds - All of these happy insects and caterpillars hibernating in the garden means more food for the birds. They will also enjoy picking at seed heads and berries on perennials and shrubs. It’s quite common to see tiny goldfinches perched atop coneflowers and black-eyed Susans munching away. Of course, leaving some structure in the garden is also pleasing to the eye. Seed pods with a dusting of snow, ice glistening on arching grasses and birds flitting about are lovely sights on a sunny, cold winter day.

In the rest of the garden it is still important to pull out any remaining weeds and removed diseased plants. You can also prune any shrubs that have crossing limbs or dead branches but be wary of pruning back any spring flowering shrubs as they have already set their buds for next year. Removing next year’s buds means no flowers. So, take a break this fall and enjoy your garden in all its natural beauty. As we strive toward creating a healthier, more natural habitat at Ladies’, we hope you enjoy the winter sights around our garden as well.

Cindy


NOVEMBER 2019 | 7


Holiday Season at Ladies’ Umesh DiWaker EXECUTIVE CHEF

I am very thankful for our members and guest card holders for their positive feedback so far this year. This feedback continuously motivates me and my team to improve our food. Overall, this year went really well for clubhouse services, and we are quite pleased with the survey results. We are considering all the suggestions very carefully and aim to keep food and service standards at their highest quality during the upcoming festive season. Winter is almost here, which means the holiday season is just around the corner. Ladies’ culinary team is very excited to keep the traditions of the club and introduce the Poinsettia Lunches, Dickens Dinners, and Brunch with Santa. I am hereby inviting you, your family and guests to these lovely events and to enjoy our variety of delicious seasonal dishes. Our Poinsettia Luncheons and Dickens Dinners will offer a delicious combination of soup, salads, appetizers and different types of proteins to choose from. The soup will be made from wild mushrooms, and our garden herbs. There are a variety of salads and appetizers to choose from as well, all with great combinations of different flavours and textures. The proteins offered will be turkey, salmon, lamb shank, rack of lamb, and beef short ribs. This year I also added butternut squash and shrimp risotto, which can be turned into a vegetarian option as well by eliminating the shrimp. I designed this menu by prioritizing your preferences and incorporating your valuable feedback from the season, while still maintaining the format of this Ladies’ tradition.

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Our short ribs and lamb shank will be braised with a lot of attention and care for 6 hours. During this process the meat will be cook very slowly, and all the flavors will remain inside while cooking. We will be serving turkey that is brined for 24 hours and it will include a combination of white and dark meat. You can always let our server know if you prefer only white or dark meat. All the proteins will be served with seasonal vegetables and starches. To top off both the Poinsettia Luncheons & Dickens Dinners, all meals will be followed by the Chef’s choice dessert table. The dessert table will feature various kinds of homemade and Christmas-themed sweets including bread pudding and plum pudding. The Brunch with Santa will feature a good spread of different breads, salads, cheeses, soup and main courses and desserts including Christmas pudding and homemade sweet treats. All our menus have been designed with various dietary restrictions in mind. I am very open to any requests from members, guest card holders, or guests if they have any concerns during any of our events. We can always create something extra if you bring guests and they have specific dietary needs. My team and I welcome all of you, as well as your family and friends to these upcoming holiday events! Culinary Regards,

Chef Umesh


NOVEMBER 2019 | 9


Winter at Ladies’ John McLinden GOLF COURSE SUPERINTENDENT

One of the most common questions I am asked is what you do in the winter once the course closes. Often some responses I receive from people are that it must be nice to have the winter off. Sometimes we wish we did have the winter off! Although the maintenance end of work is not done in the winter there is a multitude of work to carry out in a short period of time. Below are examples of what happens here during a typical winter: Mid November to Christmas Once the course is closed there is still plenty of work to be done to prepare the course for winter. Seasonal staff continue to rake the remaining leaves and debris and clean the course until snow falls so that there is reduced clean up and preparation in the spring. Aerification is completed in November. Aerification is an essential cultural practice to help alleviate compaction and thatch build up in the soil. It is done at this time of year to minimize disruption to golfers during the prime playing season (July-September). A late season dormant fertilizer is applied to greens, tees and fairways to encourage early green up in the spring. All remaining course furniture and amenities are brought in for the winter to be cleaned or painted. The fiscal budget year at Ladies’ ends on November 30 so all seasonal staff are laid off at this time for the winter until April. Four full time staff remain for the winter. In early December tree removal, pruning and wood splitting begins around the golf course. Staff initiates their work at the back end of the course first before any significant snowfall as it becomes difficult to access the back through the valley. Once the snow falls, work is shifted to the middle and front sections of the course. All branches and logs are mulched on site and this creates a large amount of chippings that are distributed under trees throughout the golf course. When there are periods of snowfall attention is diverted to plowing and maintaining the road and walkways. We have our own plow that allows the road to be cleared quickly and efficiently. The roadway into the club is long and winding and requires a great deal 10 | BEAUTY, GRIT & GRACE

of attention. Along with plowing the main roadway and parking lots; walkways are shoveled, and all surfaces are sanded and salted. January and February All staff return after New Year’s and continue to concentrate on pruning, removals and splitting. This is an excellent time to remove larger trees as the ground is usually frozen and does not cause any damage to the turf when it falls. Road and walkways clearing continues when snowfall events occur. There have been years in the past when a lot of attention has been given to snow removal as snow accumulation may be very high. There are some days during this period when it is too cold for equipment to operate properly or conditions may not allow staff to work outside. These days are set aside for doing inside work. Benches, water cooler stations, garbage cans, etc. all need to be painted and staff spend these days cleaning and preparing amenities for the course opening in the spring. There is also plenty of work required to be done to the buildings. Painting, repairs, touch ups, small projects are done during the winter months in preparation for spring opening. Shortly after New Year’s, attention is focused for the upcoming season. We start to advertise and interview for seasonal staff; update staff training; re-certify to meet government requirements; update Health and Safety programs; and update our knowledge of new cultural techniques, new technology, environmental issues and regulations; and overhaul more than 50 pieces of equipment. March Once March rolls around, a spring thaw starts to occur. Some years the thaw has happened in early March while other years it happens in late March. If there is still excess snow on the greens staff will blow it off to assist with a quicker melt of this sensitive turf. If there is enough melting on the course staff will begin their spring clean up as soon as possible. Most times staff will walk the course as it is too soft for vehicles or equipment to travel on the ground.


There is plenty of clean up to do from the winter months. If the weather is too poor to work outside there is still some general painting or clean up to accomplish. Pruning of trees ends in March as the sap begins to flow in trees and it is not recommended to open wounds on the tree to allow sap to flow freely. April Seasonal staff returns to work on April 1. Clean up of branches, leaves and debris continues until complete. The month of April is unpredictable and weather dictates when cutting can begin. Typically cutting begins in the second week and all areas of the course are cut a minimum of two times before the course opens in mid-April. Freshly cleaned and painted furniture and amenities are place out on the course

and the irrigation system is started. Washrooms are also cleaned and prepared. Usually by the end of April full maintenance routines are in place on a daily basis. Summary The winter months are a short period of time to achieve many tasks. Although this is a typical winter schedule it does not take into account such things as winter storms, larger projects or any other unforeseen event such as ice build up on the turf.

John

NOVEMBER 2019 | 11


And the 9H Winners are... Kathy Constantinou 9H CAPTAIN

The 9H Closing Dinner was enjoyed by all – from the food, to awards to impromptu prizes for all. In case you did not make it out to the evening, this is a list of winners: 9H Championship: Low Gross Winner: Erin McCafferty Low Gross Runner Up: Joan Elliott Low Net Winner: Kathy Constantinou Low Net Runner Up: Sharon Anderson & Nadine Segal (tied)

Low Net 3rd Runner Up: Kathy Constantinou Ringer Board Winner: Kathy Constantinou Runner Up: Erin McCafferty 3rd: Sharon Anderson Most improved players: Overall: Jean Davy Runner Up: Winnie Kwok Most Improved over 40 handicap: Helen Charles

Beth Matheson 4-ball Match Play:

Chip In’s

Winners: Jo-Anne Applebaum & Mary Pat Frey

Winner: Carol Heller-Mepham

Runners Up: Carol Heller-Mepham & Sharon Anderson

Runner Up: Kathy Constantinou 3rd: Erin McCafferty / Brenda Touzot (tied)

Flo Jowsey (best of each hole over 3 rounds) Low Gross Winner: Erin McCafferty Low Net Winner: Carol Heller-Mepham Low Net Runner Up: Joan Elliott Low Net 2nd Runner Up: Saeeda Foss

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Kathy


A New Home for Ladies’ Hole-in-One Plaque For years Ladies’ has been documenting member’s holes-in-one and adding them to a plaque. This plaque features holes-in-one dating back to Ada Mackenzie in 1936. Unfortunately, it was not seen by many as it lived in the basement of the clubhouse. This year, the decision was made to move it upstairs to be prominently displayed across from the Ladies’ Club Championship plaque in the clubhouse foyer. By displaying it upstairs, we are better acknowledging our member’s hole-in-one achievements and providing another opportunity to have their accomplishments archived forever. The official unveiling took place at both the 9H and 18H Closing Dinners. This year’s additions to the plaque include; Ellen Carter, Monica McIntosh, Rachel Moran, Deborah Pankhurst, and Theresa Tsiang. Congratulations! Next time you are in the clubhouse – take a look, and maybe your name will be added next!

9H members, Wanda Ho, Erin McCafferty & Maria Speyer smile next to the hole-in-one plaque that displays their names at the 9H Closing Dinner.

18H members who have achieved holes-in-one smile next to the newly unveiled plaque at the 18H Closing Dinner. NOVEMBER 2019 | 13


18H Awards and Accomplishments for 2019 Jan Flott 18H CAPTAIN

In accepting her reward, Jane Kirkpatrick credited her 12 chip-ins to her putter and the fact that she played more than 100 rounds. Fifteen members who also participated in the contest won certificates for Tim Hortons.

Two of our members passed special milestones by breaking 90 for the first time, Donna Wagg with 86 and Donna LePan with 87.

Handicap reduction awards were earned by Monica McIntosh, Donna Wagg, Wendy Goodman, Elly Muchnik, Daryl Watts and Claudia Egger. In their short acceptance speeches, credit was given to Jaime, retirement and simply playing more often.

The match play winners were all given their moment of fame as our President, Betty Chee did the honours of presenting all the plaques and interviewing the winners.

Denise Tobin and Jo-Anne Boyd winners of the Green 4-Ball 14 | BEAUTY, GRIT & GRACE


Ann Specht and Brenda Humphreys winners of the Red 4-Ball

Denise Tobin winner of the Sally Cameron. Sadly the trophy, which has been played for since 1955, disappeared and had to be replaced by a plaque in 2018.

Jill Mason and Cathy Shaw winners of the Yellow 4-Ball Virginia West was travelling at the time of the awards dinner and had to accept her trophy outside the golf shop. This special trophy was first played for in 1930 and has the history of the club written all over it. Check out the other names for a history lesson Mark your calendars for May 12 for the 2020 season opener for a shotgun and dinner. Best wishes from the 18H committee,

Georgia Leon is the 7th winner of the Red Marriott

Jan Flott, Brenda Humphreys, Anna Kinastowski, Jill Lavine, Donna LePan, Verna Lister, Donna Livingstone, Dee McKenzie, Cathie Moffat, Nora Montgomery, Patti Moore, Jessica Pastorek, Marie Storto, Rosemary Thomson, Donna Wagg, Pat Ward and Leslie Wilson NOVEMBER 2019 | 15


Reflecting on 2019 Course Changes Jean Davy COURSE & GROUNDS COMMITTEE, CHAIR

There are only a few hardy players out on the course among the leaves, mud and occasional sun; and there is a definite chill in the air. It is the end of another wonderful golf season and time to reflect. This past year saw changes to the course – a pilot program to lower the rough; widening of some fairways for more bump and roll shots into the greens; more latitude given to carts to move around the course; and the initiation of a daily message warning of course conditions and delays. The majority of the members and GCHs who responded to the member surveys appreciated these changes and are finding the course looking well maintained and fabulous. However, there is always room for improvement, and you have given us some good ideas. Next year, the focus will be on improving the quality of the purple tees and ensuring better pin placements, especially on the troublesome greens. A few years ago, purple tees were added to the course. It is common for new tees to be implemented by first putting the tee markers in the fairway or rough; observe their use; adjust the location based on play and safety; and then build permanent official tee decks slightly higher than the fairway that are flat and maintained like all the other tee decks. We are investigating changes for next season to improve the location of the most troublesome purple tees. Meanwhile, an initiative is planned to scope out the building of permanent official purple tee decks. Increased green speeds have made it difficult to have fair pin placements on the back-to-front severely sloped greens like hole #7. This past summer, more flexibility in the pin placements was allowed by moving away from the normal 1 front/1 middle/1 back pin placement every 3 holes to 6 front/6 middle/6 back pin placements over 18 holes in whatever order made sense to allow for fair pin placements on all greens. Later in the season, there was some tweaking 16 | BEAUTY, GRIT & GRACE

of the height of the grass on the severely sloped greens to slow them down very slightly. Options continue to be investigated to provide more fair pin placements until long-term solutions that address the playability of these greens are possible. The flower gardens have been gorgeous all year and the expanded vegetable gardens provided lots of tasty vegetables and herbs for Umesh’s delicious culinary delights. Once again, bees have provided us with our very own honey to enjoy. And this winter, the maple trees will again be tapped for maple syrup. There are butterfly perennials in the gardens and milk weed on the course for the monarchs. All these initiatives and the club’s commitment to the environment have contributed to the club recently being re-certified as an Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary. A huge thank you to John, Amanda, Carol, Fred and all the seasonal groundskeepers for making the 2019 golfing season so pleasurable. Thank you to the Course & Grounds Committee members – Sharon Brubacher, Helen Folker, Margaret Auld and Peta Lomberg – for your enthusiasm, commitment and dedication. Thank you to the members and GCHs for your thoughtful questions, feedback and comments. Enjoy the winter season and we will see you out on the course in the spring!

Jean


A New Handicap System for Next Season Christy DeMont HANDICAP COMMITTEE, CHAIR

Beginning in January 2020, revisions to the handicap system will be implemented. The changes that will come into effect at that time are intended to create a single handicap system that will be used worldwide (currently there are six different handicap systems in use around the world). Most of the changes to the system are in the calculation and determination of handicaps – your process of scoring a game and posting scores will be generally the same as they are now. However, there are a few changes required to keep the score of your game, and you may see more variability in your handicap as you post scores. First, fewer scores will be required to establish a handicap. Only 54 holes of golf are required to establish a handicap, and the 54 holes can be based on any combination of 18- or 9-hole scores. So individuals will be able to establish a handicap more quickly, allowing them to participate in events and competitions more quickly. Second, on an ongoing basis your handicap will be calculated based on the best 8 scores of the last 20 rounds you played. The calculation will also account for historic performance by considering “previous demonstrated ability” to average out your scores. So one or two poor scores will have less of an effect, but it will be important to post all your scores so that the outlier scores are identified.

There will even be a calculation that takes abnormal course and weather conditions into account (so making sure you have posted your score on the right date will also be important). In terms of overall handicap calculation, a higher upper limit for handicaps has been established. In 2020 the new maximum handicap will be 54 (currently in Canada we max out at 44). This is intended to be more welcoming to higher handicap players, help them get involved in events and competitions sooner, and be able to play with a handicap that treats them more fairly. There will also be a change to the maximum score per hole – in 2020, the max score will be a net double bogey – so the maximum score for a hole will be par + 2 strokes + handicap strokes for that hole. This max is intended to encourage players to pick up when their max is reached and maintain pace of play. The new process for calculating handicaps is expected to create a bit more volatility in handicaps – so if you get on a hot streak your handicap will come down faster than it does now – but getting in the habit of carefully posting all your scores will result in an appropriate handicap for your game.

Christy

NOVEMBER 2019 | 17


Ladies’ Winter Golf Academy Jaime Steedman HEAD TEACHING PROFESSIONAL

One of the questions I’m asked the most as the golf season ends is what happens in the off-season. Do I head south to warmer climates and play golf all winter long? Do I caddy? Do I teach in the US? These are a few of the more common questions. The truth is, once the last outdoor lesson of 2019 is taught, usually sometime in late October or early November, the focus becomes two pronged; first, preparations for indoor lessons in the Winter Golf Academy ramps up, and secondly, we plan for next year’s LGA Programming. Planning for Next Season Planning for both the Winter Golf Academy and for the 2020 LGA tends to start around September, but the nitty gritty begins in the last two months of the year. We had a banner year for the LGA – record high participation rates, the most programs ever run, the most participant spots filled, and an increased number of member involvement. Overall, we have many positive things to build on for next year. The fall and early winter are when we sit down and make some assessments, contemplate improvements, modifications, brainstorm the many ways to enhance what we offer for next year. Each year, we draw on the LGA survey results, member feedback over the course of the season as well as through the satisfaction survey, subscriptions levels, challenges we took note of as instructors, and next year’s programs are established. The next step is developing curriculum and then the task of plotting out over 150 clinics/sessions in and around club events, tournaments, etc. Around the same time, the Winter Golf Academy is set

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up, and indoor teaching begins. This year, the indoor facility opens November 18 and runs through midMarch. Winter Golf Academy Many folks may not know it, but the Golf Shop is transformed from a retail operation into a winter golf-improvement wonderland. The space allows us to offer a very large practice space for one or two players at a time, creating a boutique teaching/ practice experience. We have TrackMan radar technology which allows students the opportunity to see their ball’s likely flight, distances, and data that helps with game improvement. It is open seven days a week, and lessons can be arranged with me, Paddy, or Dylan. It’s also available for practice sessions, and we have several packages that combine practice access as well as lessons and instructional programs. There is the ability to putt, chip, pitch and even play a little table tennis. There are several benefits to taking lessons and training in the off-season, but one of the biggest benefits is simply keeping your body moving and keeping the golf swing active during the nearly 6 months in between golf seasons. I always liken this to running or working out – sure, you can take half a year sabbatical in between, but when you return from that time off, we’re generally not back to our finest form immediately. With the golf season being so short to begin with, it’s always nice to come out of the gate with some momentum. I would describe this as winter maintenance. Avoid any dust from settling on your clubs, or your swing.


It’s also a fantastic time to set goals for the next season, and embark on an improvement plan, adjusting the swing and using the time without any pressure. One of the most important aspects of learning is failing. This is one of the Winter Golf Academy’s biggest opportunities for golfers – it takes away the outcome, offering students an opportunity to focus on the process alone with the freedom to fail without any scoring consequences. Plus, there’s no one there to see you hit a bad shot! In addition to these aspects, it’s also a great venue for anyone heading south for a golf vacation or getaway get back into the groove before the trip. Finally, I’d like to highlight that on Saturday, December

7 the LGA Winter Golf Academy will host a Pajama Drive to benefit the Yellow Brick House, a place for abused women and children in York region. Free 15-minute lessons will be given to anyone who brings in a pair of brand-new women’s or children’s pajamas. It’s a great opportunity to give back to the community, come check out the Winter Golf Academy, and improve your game at the same time. Hope to see you this winter!

Jaime

NOVEMBER 2019 | 19


LADIES’ WINTER GOLF ACADEMY Winter Golf Academy - In our Golf Shop November 18, 2019 to March 15, 2020

Closed between December 23, 2019- January 4, 2020 for the holidays

Hours of Operation

Member Perks

Monday 12pm-5pm Tuesday 9am-5pm Wednesday 9am-5pm Thursday 9am-5pm Friday 9am-3pm Saturday By appointment Sunday By appointment

Complimentary indoor practice available to Ladies’ Members Tuesdays and Thursdays between 12pm-1pm.

Indoor Private Lessons For individual lesson pricing, please see our flex plan here.

Learn to Golf Package $275 This program offers newcomers to the game a warm, welcoming, fun and comprehensive introduction over 4 thirty minute sessions. Plus, enjoy 4 practice sessions to practice in between.

All Winter Maintenance Program $800

*Limited spots available* This winter-long program gives students access to the practice facility once a week, in addition to bi-weekly lessons totaling 6 hours of instruction (12 lessons total), TrackMan evaluation, and video analysis.

Indoor Practice Full Season Practice Membership $325

Practice sessions up to 45 minutes per day.

Single Practice Session $15 Forty five minutes of practice time. 20 | BEAUTY, GRIT & GRACE


NOVEMBER 2019 | 21


November 2019

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

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Clubhouse Open 12-4pm until November 10

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5

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9 Last Par-TEE of the year

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12

Last day of play

All services of Golf Shop & Course are closed for the season

Clubhouse open for private events and parties only

18

Last day to take home clubs, caddies & pull carts from Back Shop

13

14

15

16

19

20

21

22

23

26

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30

Range closes for the season 17

Winter Golf Academy Begins

24

25

22 | BEAUTY, GRIT & GRACE


December 2019

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Poinsettia Lunch

Poinsettia Lunch

Poinsettia Lunch

Poinsettia Lunch

9H Dickens Dinner

Dickens Dinner

Dickens Dinner

LGA Pajama Drive

10

11

12

13

14

Poinsettia Lunch

Poinsettia Lunch

Poinsettia Lunch

Poinsettia Lunch

Dickens Dinner

Dickens Dinner

Dickens Dinner

Dickens Dinner

17

18

19

20

21

Poinsettia Lunch

Poinsettia Lunch

Poinsettia Lunch

Poinsettia Lunch

Dickens Dinner

Dickens Dinner

Dickens Dinner

Dickens Dinner

8

15

9

16

Brunch with Santa

22

Dickens Dinner

23

24

25

26

27

28

Club Closed

Club Closed

Club Closed

Club Closed

Club Closed

Club Closed

29

30

31

Club Closed

Club Closed

New Year’s Eve Club Closed

NOVEMBER 2019 | 23


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Beauty, grit & grace - November 2019  

Beauty, grit & grace - November 2019