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LA DE DA ISSUE 9

Naz&Court

Featured designer

Discover this duo’s passion for sustainable and ethical eco-friendly fashion

goodbye summer

One last look at sunny days with a refreshing editorial shot by Vania Elise

Editorial Photographers Vania Elise Marlon Farmer Ledokollov Cliff Lipson Tina Picard Jessica Portillo Julio Sancho Peter Van Alphen


LA DE DA magazine


Contents Jessica Portillo Dasha

6

Tina Picard Flip Side

12

Ledokollov The Last Gypsy

18

Featured Designer Naz&Court Sustainable Modern Classics

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Vania Elise Hot Hot Heat

32

Julio Sancho Le Jardin

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Peter Van Alphen Sunkissed

52

Marlon Farmer Incite of the Siren

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LA DE DA TEAM CREDITS Jennifer Chabri

Editor-in-Chief Creative Director

Argie Mitra

Copy Editor Layout Editor We currently have an open submission call for upcoming issues. Designers and artists of all media are also encouraged to submit their press packs for consideration as featured artists. For info and guidelines, please visit

http://www.ladedamag.com/submissions All photography and art are featured in LA DE DA with consent of the artist(s). Design and editorial content of LA DE DA Š 2015.

CONTRIBUTORS Courtney Barriger Vania Elise Marlon Farmer Naz Harounian Ledokollov Cliff Lipson Tina Picard Jessica Portillo Julio Sancho Peter Van Alphen


Dasha Photography Jessica Portillo

Model Dasha Tatarnikova Two Model Management Makeup Alicia Wheeler Hair Leah Rutledge Styling Anna Galle Assistant David Wang

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dress THREE FLOOR

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suit & shoes TOPSHOP necklaces SPRING STREET

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dress THREE FLOOR opposite page: suit & shoes TOPSHOP necklaces SPRING STREET

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Flip Side 12 | LA DE DA www.ladedamag.com

Photography TINA PICARD MODEL EDEN ELMER OLSEN MODELS MAKEUP MELANIE VIGER


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jacket Roberto Cavalli jeans dsquared2 earrings i am cuff a jewelry

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The Last Gypsy photography Ledokollov

model Elena Kostikova styling Edna Shindinde hair Olga Shuljak Makeup Masha Sheffa

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dress GASANOVA bustier & knickers Gasanova Lingerie shoes yves saint laurent bracelet I AM opposite page: dress & bodysuit GASANOVA earrings diva

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dress Barbara Bui earrings I AM opposite page: jacket Roberto Cavalli jeans dsquared2 earrings i am cuff a jewelry

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LDD Featured Designer

The story of Naz & Court comprises two beautiful filmmaking creatives, a passion for sustainable and ethical eco-friendly design, and the desire to educate tomorrow’s generation. Read on the following pages for the not just the story behind Naz Harounian and Courtney Barriger’s eponymously labeled fashion line, Naz & Court, but also to learn about the sustainability of various textiles

Photographer Cliff Lipson Models Naz Harounian & Courtney Barriger Makeup & Hair Victoria Payne

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LA DE DA: Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from and what got you started in design? Naz&Court: The world brought us together a year ago in Southern California on the set of a nationally televised reality TV show. The chemistry was instantaneous, bonding over late night facebook chats and a love for Jeff Buckley, we discovered that not only did we share a similar taste and aesthetic, we could survive and conquer the stressful world of reality TV and walk away best friends and budding business partners. Courtney Barriger: A few years ago, I was working on a rewrite for my novel Sleepwalk to The Face while traveling through South India. In that lush and beautiful landscape, I saw the ramshackle complexes that housed laborers for the textile industry and the people who worked there, smiling big with calloused hands forever shaped by the machines they crowd over. This image has never left me, and as my life in Los Angeles shifted landscapes from performing in front of the camera as a model and actress, to a place where I can in turn be the director and visionary behind the concept, I want to tell a story through the wardrobe as well. The story is a clothing line that supports the ethical treatment of its manufacturers and has the lowest impact on our environment possible. Naz&Court is that brand, and I couldn’t be more excited to start something that has the potential to better the world we live in. Naz Harounian: My journey was a little bit different. It started on a dreadful Monday, the first Monday after I had decided to take a hiatus from law school. I was in a place of academic and career limbo, asking myself if I was meant to be an attorney and how I was going to figure out the answer to that question. Never being a morning person, I devised a plan so I wouldn’t sleep: I’d wake up at the crack of dawn, drive my brother to his leather clothing manufacturing company where I would read my law books and apply for law-related jobs. The plan worked, but while I was there I started to dabble in design, making myself a handbag, just for fun. At night, after racking my mind and working to find direction in my life, I’d unwind by going to trendy exclusive Hollywood lounges and clubs. While I was there something unexpected happened: numerous people would stop me every night and ask about my purse and inquire where they could purchase one.

Had I fallen into a fashion design career? It was

something I had always wanted and the answer was yes, although the challenge ahead of me was a difficult one, dare I say one harder than law school. I designed couture handbags for a while, then a few years later I went to film school and became a screenwriter; needless to say, I decided not to go back to law school. Fashion design and filmmaking, thus far in life, have become my passions and careers. In the fashion sector, I currently have an activewear and streetwear line, S.C. by Naz Harounian, a couture evening dress line, DMT by Naz Harounian, and a sustainable, ethical line, Naz&Court with one of my best friends and general amazing, creative, and awesome human being, Courtney Barriger.

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LDD: What is unique about your designs and makes them stand out? We have searched the globe for the most sustainable fabrics to date, like our Ahimsa silk from India. Sustainable to us means working with fibers and skins that have the lowest carbon footprint and the cleanest decomposition rate possible. We have been to the facilities that make our vegetable tanned leathers and silky smooth lyocell and modal. After careful consideration of the materials, our product is assembled in Los Angeles to ensure the ethical and fair treatment of garment workers. We offer a collection that combats “fast fashion.” Each piece is a legacy designed to replace unsustainable favorites with sustainable modern classics. LDD: What made you want to start a sustainable ethical clothing line? We became aware of the impact today has on the future, and decided to take initiative to create new modern classic apparel with unparalleled dedication to sustainable sourcing and ethical manufacturing. Presently, the garment industry is saturated with synthetic fossil fuel fibers and chemically treated organic materials that are processed in facilities that shed harmful waste into the environment, contributing to carbon pollution, biohazardous waste and disease. LDD: What is the most gratifying part of conceptualizing a design? Watching an idea come to fruition is the most gratifying part of conceptualizing a design—especially when those ideas and clothing pieces can lower the carbon footprint of consumers. As cliché as it may sound, we are literally trying to make the world a better place and because of that we find our work highly gratifying. LDD: What matters to you most as a fashion designer? Creating a line that is fashion forward and that speaks to people who are like-minded when it comes sustainability and ethics. People have busy, hectic lifestyles. We want to be the brand they can trust and that speaks on behalf of their style: the fashionable, conscious consumer line. We want to improve the environment, the lifestyle of the workers, and make life simpler for our clients. LDD: How do you prepare for a fashion shoot or show? Any special rituals? First and foremost, we put in all the legwork, and make sure all of our ducks are in a row. Once that’s done, we try our best to eat healthy and exercise, meditate, and get our heads in the right place. After everything serious is taken care of, we let loose. The last time we got ready for a red carpet, we put on En Vogue’s “Free your Mind” and made a lip sync video—true story! continued on page 29


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continued from page 27 LDD: How would you define your personal style? Naz: I never knew exactly how to define my personal style because I’m attracted to so many different aesthetics from the simplest white T-shirt and jeans to crazy couture McQueen gown, but recently a friend of my mine told me that I always looked effortless. I realized that is my style: no matter what I’m wearing, I’m never trying to be something I’m not, hence taking out the effort. So I guess based on that definition, my personal style is effortless. Court: I have always admired the chic simplicity of French fashion. There is something beautifully understated in the way solid colors and simple patterns bring out the characteristic of the person who wears them. I love an edgy, clean look. LDD: With that said, how would you define the style your line exemplifies? Our line is a happy marriage between both our styles, which are similar and different at the same time and the nexus of where they meet is Naz&Court. LDD: Where do you get inspiration? Where don’t we get our inspiration from?! Moreover, we are both filmmakers, so we are very inspired by fashion in cinema. For Naz&Court we are inspired by our fabrics. Because we are creating a sustainable line, our fabric options are limited, so we look at our options and think, “What is the most awesome wearable piece of clothing we

can design with this fabric?” From there we improve it until we are in love with the design and we have to share it with everyone! LDD: Who are some of your favorite designers? Naz: My favorite old school designer is Gianni Versace because he was able to so beautifully merge the architecture of Italy into his designs and make innovative awe inspiring gowns. The truth is I think there are so many amazing designers out there making gorgeous innovative pieces that I can’t choose. Bravo! Court: One designer who I feel accomplished something spectacular in his work was the British designer Ossie Clark. His designs were ethereal and stunning, timeless capsules that evoke a feeling of wonder. I would love to emulate his wife’s pattern printmaking. They had something special. LDD: What advice do you have for aspiring fashion designers? This is a business, learn it and trust your unique voice, it’s the only thing that’s going ing back and paying it forward. to set you apart. Shop online and keep up with LDD: Beyond the clothing line, how are Naz&Court at their website, you spreading your message? www.nazandcourt.com We’ve created the self-funded grassroots educational movement What’s on Keep reading to learn more Your Back? The program is designed to about textiles and what sets inform youth about impact the clothes Naz&Court materials apart. they wear has on the environment. When you purchase Naz & Court you are giv- continued on page 30 ISSUE 9 LA DE DA | 29


Naz&Court fabrics are cutting edge technology married with old-world craftsmanship, bringing the movement to protect our planet into everyday, new, modern classic clothing.

TEX TILES COTTON

Regular Cotton is not eco-friendly. More chemicals are used to produce cotton than any other crop in the world. Cotton uses about 3% of the world’s farmland and accounts for 25% of worldwide pesticide use. The EPA has listed many of the pesticides commonly used in cotton production as known carcinogens. Naz&Court Organic cotton is certified organic. Certification requires crops free of pesticides, synthetic chemicals and herbicides. Organic cotton grown in the US must follow the conditions outlined by The National Organic Standards Board and Organic FoodsProduction Act.

SILK

When regular silk cocoons are harvested, the silkworm is boiled and tossed aside during metamorphosis, killing billions of larvae and disrupting the ecosystem. The process for dying regular silk is toxic to the environment. The chemicals used to produce many silk dyes are often carcinogenic, or even explosive. The chemical Anililine, the basis for a popular group of dyes known as Azo dyes are considered deadly poisons, dangerous to work with and highly flammable. Naz&Court ahimsa silk is very different. Ahimsa means “non-violent,” and was popularized as a term used by Gandhi as an ethic during the political movement that led to India’s independence. Naz&Court Ahimsa silkworms complete their metamorphosis into adult moths. When a single moth hatches, it lays hundreds of eggs which 30 | LA DE DA www.ladedamag.com

The truth is Not all fabrics are equal. An alarming majority of textile manufacturers utilize harsh chemicals, producing bio-hazardous waste as a result. Naz&Court considers the environmental impact and carbon-footprint for every fabric we choose. Our materials are locally and internationally sourced, creating an unparalleled sustainable apparel line. Find out the difference between regular and Naz&Court materials.

feed on mulberry leaves that don’t require pesticides or fertilizers to grow. “Ahimsa silk” is the term in India for Bombyx mori (cultivated) silk. Textile manufacturers are contracted with local South Indian silk mills to save their breeder cocoons. The cocoons are collected and spun and woven in small local mills and villages; often in homes with limited electricity and using hand looms. Naz&Court Ahimsa Silk is a highly renewable resource.

DENIM COTTON

The process to make regular denim is very bad for the environment. About 1,500 gallons of water is required to produce the 1.5 pounds of cotton used to make a single pair of jeans, not including the water used to dye and finish the fabric. Moreover, cotton crops are drenched in pesticides—fibers are stained with toxic dyes—and the resulting fabric is sandblasted and chemically softened. Regular denim Cotton yarn is typically “sized” with starch to increase its strength for weaving, bathed in oil-derived paraffin to smooth and lubricate it, and, in some cases, “mercerized” in caustic soda, which gives it a worn look. Starch biodegrades, but when dumped in waterways the microbes that eat it also consume oxygen. Aquatic life depends on that oxygen, and starch is just one of many chemical treatments, including dyes, that deplete it. Caustic soda, a key ingredient in Drano, can kill aquatic life and burn the workers who handle it. Naz&Court Denim is a thick organic denim twill which uses very little water in its production. The organic denim also has a strong twill weave structure that makes it particularly


durable. The dyes used are azo-free, and the cotton used to weave the denim is organic and completely biodegradable. The spinning, weaving and dyeing of the organic denim is done in a cooperative and certified Fair Trade facility by the WFTO. As it is a hand-made product, the process uses virtually no electricity—even in the spinning process. Naz&Court Denim is Azo-Free, Co-Op, Fair Trade Certified, Low Energy, Low Impact Dyes, Low Water, derived from Non Genetically Modified Crops, Organic (Uncertified), Sustainable, VOC-Free and Accredited by WFTO (World Fair Trade Organization).

LEATHER

Regular Leather and Synthetic Leather (Pleather) are also bad for the environment. Turning skin into leather requires massive amounts of energy and dangerous chemicals. Mineral salts, formaldehyde, coaltar derivatives, and various oils, dyes, and finishes, some of them cyanide-based are many of the components. Most leather produced in the U.S. is chrome-tanned; all wastes containing chromium are considered hazardous by the EPA. Tannery effluent contains large amounts of pollutants, such as salt, lime sludge, sulfides, and acids. The process of tanning stabilizes the collagen or protein fibers in skins so that they actually stop biodegrading. Studies suggest that the environments local to tanning facilities–often outsourced to developing countries–are at risk of chemical exposure. Reports of unusually high cancer within populations near tanning facilities are possibly caused by exposure to toxic chemicals used to process and dye the leather. Arsenic, a common tannery chemical, has long been associated with lung cancer in workers who are exposed to it on a regular basis. Synthetic Leather, vinyl and petro-chemical derived materials take 500 or more years to decompose. Pleather is essentially made of fossil fuels. The jacket material that attracts the lion’s share of environmentalist ire is polyvinyl chloride, better known as PVC. Greenpeace calls it “the most damaging plastic on the planet.” The organization claims that PVC production releases dioxins and persistent organic pollutants, and worries about further toxic emissions when rubbished PVC is burned in garbage incinerators. Polyurethane, the versatile substance is also made from fossil fuels, emitting carbon dioxide during production. According to the Association of Plastics Manufacturers in Europe, producing a pound of polyurethane foam emits 3.7 pounds of CO2.

Naz&Court vegetable-tanned leather is an old-world artisanal product. Vegetable tanning compounds utilise the tannic acids found naturally in plants, using bark, branches, leaves and even some fruits in the tanning technique. Great in durability and strength, vegetable-tanned leather is more effective than the majority of the synthetic materials - It can last an entire lifetime and is biodegradable. Naz&Court vegetable-tanned leather is obtained from free-range ranches in the state of California. Naz&Court Open Blue Cobia leather is probably one of the materials we are most excited about. Sharing a passion for a clean future, Naz&Court and Open Blue Cobia have become partners in sustainability. The result is our vegetable-tanned Cobia Leather. Located miles offshore, Open Blue fishing facilities are a safe distance from sensitive ecosystems, eliminating nutrient and waste buildup, and minimizing the risk of disease. Bottom line: it’s better for the environment and for the fish. They have established a 2,500-acre commercial no-take zone, making it a protected marine zone. They also monitor their surrounding environment constantly and are proud to say there has been no traceable impact to the ecosystem around them. Open Blue is considered one of the most sustainable deep sea fisheries in the entire world.

LYOCELL

Naz&Court Lyocell is a natural cellulose fiber found in eucalyptus, harvested from tree farms in Australia. The Material Safety Data Sheet for Lyocell rates the amine oxide solvent used to digest the wood pulp as being non-toxic and about 99% is recovered and recycled during the manufacturing process. The environmental press has often heralded lyocell as a new fiber that represents a milestone in the development of environmentally sustainable textiles. Naz&Court Lyocell has a flattering drape and is soft, luxurious, breathable, and naturally wrinkle-resistant. The fiber is produced via an advanced ‘closed loop’ solvent spinning process, with minimal impact on the environment and economical use of energy and water. Lyocell uses an amine oxide as a non-toxic solvent which is continually recycled during the production process. Production plant emissions into the air from smokestacks and from wastewater are significantly lower in comparison to many other man-made fiber operations. Waste products in the air and water from the manufacturing process are minimal and considered harmless. Lyocell fiber is eco-friendly since products made from it can be recycled and lyocell is biodegradable because it is a cellulosic fiber. Products made from lyocell can be recycled, incinerated, or digested in sewage. The fiber will usually degrade completely in just eight days in waste treatment plants. LDD ISSUE 9 LA DE DA | 31


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hot hot Heat PHOTOGRAPHY VANIA ELISE

MODELS MEGAN L @ NEW VERSION ANGELICA @ BMG TORI @ MODERN MUSE HAIR LAUREN TIRADO MAKEUP KAREN CABARELLO STYLING ARGIE MITRA WARDROBE Bikinis REBEKAH REBEKAH Jewelry Goldie Lockes

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fine jewelry Kiko Contreras Joyero shoes Miss GarcĂ­a watches Daniel Wellington

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le Jardin Art Director Manuela Suárez Photography Julio Sancho Models Raquel Maderuelo Pérez Tamayo models agency Sara Maderuelo Perez Tamayo models agency: Silvia Del Río Nieto Makeup Raquel Díez HAIR Roberto Juy Cantalapiedra FASHION DESIGN Irene dela Cuesta Couture LOCATION Gran Hotel Balneario Palacio de las Salinas

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fine jewelry Kiko Contreras Joyero shoes Miss GarcĂ­a watches Daniel Wellington

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fine jewelry Kiko Contreras Joyero shoes Miss GarcĂ­a watches Daniel Wellington

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Sunkissed Photography Peter Van Alphen

Model Francesca Roberts Viviens Model Management Makeup Natalie McDonald Hair & Styling Saloan Cilia

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INcite of the Siren Photography Marlon Farmer Editor Djimi Williams Model Samayah Jaramillo SMART Model Management Stylist Randy Luna Wardrobe RajĂŠ by Randy Luna

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This Page: accessories & wardrobe Rajé by Randy Luna bodysuit Elegant Moments Opposite Page: accessories & wardrobe Rajé by Randy Luna

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This Page: accessories & wardrobe Rajé by Randy Luna Opposite Page: bodysuit Elegant Moments accessories & wardrobe Rajé by Randy Luna

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bodysuit Elegant Moments

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LA DE DA Magazine Issue 9  

LA DE DA is a quarterly publication designed to celebrate creative talent in a visually aesthetic medium. Submissions welcome. See the websi...

LA DE DA Magazine Issue 9  

LA DE DA is a quarterly publication designed to celebrate creative talent in a visually aesthetic medium. Submissions welcome. See the websi...

Profile for ladedamag
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