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CANVAS CREW creative director + publisher DANTE COLOMBATTI

editor-in-chief REBECA ARANGO

art editor

SHANA NYS DAMBROT

design

JIMMY MNOIAN DAVID SALAZAR RACHEL MANY

photography CHRISTOPHER CAPTAIN EMILY BRADLEY HEATHER GILDROY TRISHA ANGELES MACEO PAISLEY RACHEL MANY EMMA GARR

illustrations

style editor

ERIN DENNISON

account managers MATT OLSON JANESSA MOLINA

+crew MAX EHRLICH JUSTIN FITZWATER MEGAN ADAMS ROSS GARDINER KYLE GIANGRANDE LOUIS FIERROS DJ RAYLUS OLIVER

ERIN DENNISON

1778 N. MAIN ST. LOS ANGELES, CA 90031 P:(323) 352-3250 E:PR@LACANVAS.COM LACANVAS.COM

Copyright 2012, by LA CANVAS. All Rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without permission in writing from LA CANVAS. LA CANVAS makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information it publishes, but is not responsible for unsolicited or contributed manuscripts, photographs, artwork or advertisements. LA CANVAS is not held responsible for any consequences arising from errors or omissions.


CONTENTS MUSIC musician FATHER JOHN MISTY

16

venue THE CENTRAL

19

playlist YEAH...YOU CAN KICK IT

20

ART street art

22

artist TOM EVERHART

24

gallery openings

26

museum THE HAMMER

27

book LA INK STAINS

29

STYLE editorial BEACH PARKING

30

designer ROARK

38

store DEUS EX MACHINA

40

# trending

37

FOOD chef PERFECTO ROCHER

44

food scoops BEACH BITES

46

restaurant PLAN CHECK

49

bar BLIND BARBER

51

drink THE AVOCADO PROJECT

52

LA CULTURE noted

12

day trip BEACH DATE

43

calendar JULY

58

calendar AUGUST

60

last look CANTSTOPGOODBOY

64

CHECK OUT THE EXTENDED VERSION OF THIS ISSUE AT LA CANVAS.COM


NOTE editor-in-chief REBECA ARANGO Some songs have a way of constantly resurfacing in your life, adding tone and meaning to stuff that’s not actually all that exciting—the way slap bass punctuates Seinfeld, or Phantom Planet’s “California” romanticizes the OC. For LA CANVAS, that song is starting to seem like the Notorious B.I.G.’s “Juicy.” I know, that’s so inappropriate, we’re supposed to be on team Tupac—understood. But you don’t get to choose your song. It chooses you. Let me explain. Last issue, the lyrics “I Used to Read Word Up Magazine” appeared in our street art spread as tagged by the artist Benjamin Alejandro. And in a nice bit of synchronicity, when the LAC team arrived at painter Tom Everhart’s Venice studio to shoot this issue’s artist feature, he was bumping none other than “Juicy.” Like, BLASTING it. Apparently, Tom listens exclusively to hip-hop when he paints; the cadence keeps him going, furthering his mental and physical momentum—something you’re going to need if you want to cover a gigantic canvas with thousands of strokes of paint. Lyrics like “Don’t let ‘em hold you down, reach for the stars” won’t hurt either. As it turns out, “Juicy” easily relates to both the life of a magazine and the life of an artist. It’s the classic hip-hop narrative, Biggie vividly contrasting his one-room shack origins with a 5-karat future atop a money-green leather couch. Don’t get confused, the lesson isn’t get rich, it’s ignore the haters, ‘cause “you know very well who you are.” Or at least—if you’re going to make art, you’d better figure it out. This issue is all about “summertime,” an idea that’s meteorologically kind of irrelevant in Los Angeles. If anything, June, July and August are just an ultra-heightened version of our lives year-round—sunshine, surfing, skating, hiking, barbeques, tequila, kale, yadda-yadda-yadda. But in between sunscreen applications and shotgunned cans of Tecate, a much more interesting sub-theme arose: mischief. We didn’t plan for it, but this issue features only men, most of who seem to be slightly up to no good in the best way possible. Artist Jim Mahfood, aka Food One, spins comic-strip style antics in his new book Los Angeles Ink Stains, reviewed by Shana Nys Dambrot on page 29. In the style section on page 38, Erin Dennison explains why Roark’s Andrew Steiger is the kind of dude you’d want to get into trouble with. And for our musician feature on page 16, I got to talk to ex-Fleet Foxes drummer Father John Misty, who we at one point photographed sitting at a kiddy table, holding a rifle. Yeah, he’s funny. So at the end of it all, what we figured out is this: something about the leftover heat of a summer night just invites mischief, like in language arts class when the sub leaves the room. People get weird. I don’t know about you guys, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.


X


NOTED C RU I S E C O N T RO L

K N OW-I T-A L L S

You thought the geniuses over at Globe had their skate-wear game on lockdown, but then they came out

Who

with these retro Bantam Cruiserboards and totally stepped it up. Inspired by vintage 60s and 70s boards,

neighborhood on Fairfax between 3rd and Beverly

the colorful plastic decks harken back to the dawn of skating while modern technology means they’re

would blossom into the epicenter of all things art,

tougher than anything else on the market. Seriously, they’ve already survived several months in the

food, music, and just plain cool? At the heart of

LAC Clubhouse, so they must be indestructible, right?

the hood’s renaissance is one of our favorite spots,

G L O B E .T V/ G L O B E S K AT E

Known Gallery. While Known has been on the

knew

the

historically

old-world

Jewish

scene for a few years now, the talent of its artists just keeps getting better, and its relationship to legendary street art collective The Seventh Letter Crew makes it all the more interesting. Even your uncle Moishe would find this place fresh. K N OW N G A L L E RY.C O M 4 41 N O R T H FA I R FA X AV E LOS A NGELES, CA 90036

K I C K , P U S H , PL A N T A T R E E So what do Suri, Kingston and Zuma all have in common (besides A-list parents, weird names and insane bank accounts)? They’ve all been seen rocking Etnies via the new “Buy A Shoe, Plant A Tree” initiative. Through a partnership with leading anti-deforestation non-profit Trees for the Future, the footwear giant will plant one tree within and around the city of São Paulo for each pair of Etnies Eco sneaks purchased. The program is slated to plant 100,000 trees within the Atlantic Rainforest region of Brazil throughout 2012, so if you’re in the market for some rad skate shoes and into O2, you know what to do. E T N I E S .C O M / B L O G / B U Y-A- S H O E -P L A N T-A-T R E E

14


FIX IT UP

Welcome to the future. The wheel may not have been re-invented, but we’re happy to report that it has certainly been refined. Solé Bicycle Company was started in 2009 by two fixed-gear fiends at USC who, frustrated by the lack of affordable bikes on the market, decided to build one. The bikes they’ve developed are sleek, stylish and versatile; they can be lifted with just two fingers and ridden as fixies or cruised at single-speed. And at $350 a pop, you might just call them affordable too. Mission accomplished. S O L E B I C YC L E S .C O M

| 1515 PA R K R OW V E N I C E B E AC H , C A 9 0 2 9 1

L I S T E N U P: B E AT M A S S

L I S T E N U P: G R E E N H O R S E Offstage, the three dudes from local electro-rock outfit Greenhorse don’t look like much— but onstage, they reveal themselves to be, in fact, very powerful synth-lords. With records spanning from upbeat and buoyant to moody and dark, Greenhorse have crafted a dynamic live performance most notable for its artful and complex sonic textures, which are always impressively mixed and executed. The whole thing looks pretty cool too…I mean, you gotta love a band with their own smoke machine and purple LED lights. That’s dedication. G R E E N H O R S E M U S I C .C O M

You might run into dread-locked DJ Jake Brenan, aka Beat Mass, any old day around the Historic Core, or on a Thursday Night at the One Eyed Gypsy, or you know, while you’re hanging out in Madrid… as we all do every so often, no big deal. The jet-setting DJ’s potent blend of futuristic electro, house and dubstep caught our attention when he opened up this year’s inaugural DTLA Prom. We don’t really remember what happened that night…but one thing’s for sure, Beat Mass really started things off right. Thanks dude. S O U N D C L O U D.C O M / B E AT- M A S S

YO U G O C H I C A!

Hey there 7th street, lookin’ good girrrl. Is that another new outfit? You bet it is. Chef Ricardo Zarate, the young mastermind behind West LA’s Peruvian-Japanese eatery Picca, has finally opened up the new-andimproved version of his original concept, Mo-Chica. Cleaning up nice next to neighbors Brigade, Mas Malo, and Seven Grand, this sleek bar & restaurant is now supplying Downtown with traditional Peruvian comfort food re-imagined as modern tapas. Did we mention the interior walls are adorned with graffiti? You know we’re suckers for some street art. M O - C H I C A .C O M 514 W 7 T H S T L O S A N G E L E S , C A 9 0 0 14

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DOT COM LA’S BEST ART, MUSIC, FOOD, STYLE AND EVENT SOURCE

LET’S KEEP IT SUPER REAL. You’re all on the internet every single day, selectively liking your friends’ status updates, compulsively refreshing twitter feeds, being the first to post the new Die Antwoord video (so zany!), and carefully curating a list of links to share from Gawker or the BBC (whatever’s most meaningful today). Well, so are the freaks here at LACANVAS. We’re pretty much just internet

thugging all day long, looking for cool, weird shit to post

on LACANVAS.com. On it, you’ll find an up-to-date calendar loaded with LA’s best events, including concerts, art openings, parties, food festivals, and sample sales, happening everywhere from Downtown LA to Beverly Hills to the Beach. You’ll also find the LA CANVAS blog; it’s where we post serious art reviews, creepy music videos, streetfashion photos, and all the things we’re probably not allowed to print. If you’re looking to get invited to our crazy parties, tag yourself afterwards, or sneak a behind-the-scenes-instagram-peek at our shoots, make sure to follow us on twitter (@LACANVAS) and facebook (facebook.com/lacanvas). Divas, divos and convenience enthusiasts alike can subscribe to the LACANVAS Weekly; we’ll deliver the seven best events of the week plus three blog posts straight to your inbox. Help us help you.


17


NO REST FOR THE

WICK ED

EX-FLEET FOXES DRUM MER JOSH TILLMAN CONQUERS HIS FEAR OF FUN AS FATHER JOHN MISTY “Explicit honesty is ultimately the idea,” proclaims Josh Tillman. He’s sitting back, his six-foot-two frame halved beneath a backyard patio umbrella as he discusses his latest album with steady, almost serene intensity. Fear Fun, released this past May on Sub Pop, is Tillman’s debut album under the moniker Father John Misty. The choice of pseudonym was an arbitrarily ridiculous one, but anybody who knows Tillman knows he’s kind of ridiculous. Originally from Seattle, Tillman has just returned home to Los Angeles after a twomonth national tour. It was his first time out from behind an acoustic guitar or a drum set, but the process of finding his inner frontman was actually “frighteningly natural.” The patently silly dance moves he performed on Letterman aren’t the affectations of a persona or a character, they’re just Tillman being Tillman—making jokes, causing trouble. Though for a long time, he did anything but. “I really thought that when creativity had merit, honesty and truth, it would have a certain aesthetic quality.” So for five years and seven solo albums, Tillman hit his head against the wall and sang with a voice that expressed all of his angst and none of his humor. Then, deciding it was time for a good maniacal laugh, he said so long to Seattle, jumped in a van and started down one of those long American roads. At the end of it, there was an album. Fear Fun is an all-American cocktail of folk, country and rock-and-roll with a thoroughly Western, adventurous flavor. Unafraid of kitsch, it’s a bold embrace of musical forms that are borderline cliché or undeniably pleasurable—in other words, accessible. But the art is in the undercurrent. “The title is basically the decoder ring for all the lyrics. These kinds of morose, fatalistic themes juxtaposed with these bright, bubbly sounds. That’s the magic trick for me, and the root of my sense of humor—those seeming contradictions.” The album opens with the sardonic lullaby “Funtimes in Babylon.” Over a soft bed of silky ooohs flanked by schmaltzy mandolin trickles, Tillman announces plans for big-city debauchery, singing “Before the star of the morning comes looking for me / I’d like to smoke everything in sight with every girl I’ve ever loved / Look out Hollywood, here I come.” You can hear the irony in Tillman’s deadpan bellow—there are no stars in his eyes. “The story of somebody coming to Hollywood to do some big thing is what this place was built on—so to contrast that with me and my experience was very funny, because I just didn’t feel like a candidate for that sort of thing.”

text REBECA AR ANGO photo EMMA ELIZABETH GARR


As the second song unfolds, it becomes clear that our protagonist isn’t a candidate for greatness at all. “Nancy From Now On” sees him falling further down the LA rabbit hole, describing a pathetic bender towards oblivion over folksy disco beats. It’s an arc that begins with pouring another drink and ends with “breaking shit like Howard Hughes.” A stitch of sarcasm stains the lyrics “Milk and honey flow / Just a couple states below,” because Los Angeles, the abundant paradise in all its sunshiny glory, is a place that’s ripe for Dionysian self-destruction. Despite the apocalyptic themes, there’s still a hopeful, aspirational thread to Tillman’s whole story, and it’s tied to his move to L.A. “When I want to find grotesque, morbid, crazy shit, it’s here, but this place is pretty innocent too. If I were in Seattle and I said, ‘Oh, I’ve got this idea for a music video’ my peers would probably be like, ‘Music videos are dumb,’ whereas here they’d say, ‘Alright, let’s do it!’ There’s an innocence, a feeling that good things can still be done.” It was only in shedding some of his jaded Seattle skin on a trip down the coast that Tillman was able to pour an unfiltered version of himself into his very fist novel. Packaged with the physical release of Fear Fun, the novel is about a first person narrator working on a proposal for a video game called Bed Bug Mountain. Metaphorically, the fantasized bed bugs represent a plague of “ubiquitous philosophy that kind of permeates everything,” and the proposal is a way of exploring Tillman’s own “deeply ingrained suspicions about the world.” But, “Ultimately it’s a funny book. It’s absurd.” And he had fun writing it, which was the most important part. The process allowed Tillman’s voice to emerge for the first time, his sense of humor surfacing conversationally alongside his despair. “It’s like having an honest encounter with your instincts that you don’t squelch out of fear.” After that moment of clarity, the music came right out—no banging-his-head-against-the-wall required.


16


“There’s a reason people think artists are insane,” Tillman explains. “It’s because their idea of clarity, their suspicions that the universe is chaos, that life is absurdity, that meaning is meant to be created and not found—all of those things look like craziness to people.” Maybe Tillman looked crazy dancing on Letterman, but that was just Tillman being Tillman—wickedly playful, irreverent, neither too serious nor flippant, and ultimately, explicitly honest. All that honesty reaches catharsis on Fear Fun’s heavy stomp “Hollywood Forever Cemetery Sings.” The song’s origin story goes like this: Tillman was at a party at Hollywood Forever, making out with a girl in the graveyard, when he ended up thinking about his grandfather’s funeral a few months before. Set against the vivid experience of secret graveyard sex, the anesthetized funeral proceedings seemed all the more insincere. “I engage with death through my creativity, not by sitting quietly. So it was all kind of this fantasy of bringing this crazy girl to my grandfather’s funeral and just kind of fucking everything up.” The plot may be mischievous, but the resulting song is only benevolent—the feeling you’re left with is relief. The fantasy of self-destruction, or breaking all the rules or stirring up trouble, runs parallel to a desire to spill out every honest, secret thing inside you the way only art can. Or as Tillman put it, “These kinds of bizarre experiences that can’t be talked about at a funeral, or in polite company—they’re why we’re here. And they’re made not only relatable, but beautiful by virtue of the fact that it’s a cool song. That’s what songs do best—they elevate familiar sensations. Well shit…that’s out of my pay grade. I won’t explain why songs are good.” Although he kind of just did, didn’t he?

17


18


DIVE IN THE CENTRAL SAPC STARTS A LOW-KEY DANCE SCENE IN SANTA MONICA text REBECA ARANGO

MAYBE

i t ’s t h e f ir e p l a c e , t h e e x p o s e d

Versus is the Central’s flagship night, offering a

brick and the low wood rafters, but

Hollywood-level party with a casual Westside vibe. It’s

something about being at the Central SAPC just makes you

free with RSVP and known for upping already solid DJ

feel oh-so-warm-and-tingly inside. In fact, it just might be

line-ups with major secret guests like Dillon Francis, AC

the coziest place on Earth where getting kinda drunk and

Slater, D. Ramirez, and Congorock. While DJs make up

grinding to some heavy electronic music is both acceptable

about half of the Central’s programming, band nights

and encouraged. Aside from your living room, of course.

skew electronic as well, particularly on Fridays and Saturdays and often during the free Tuesday residencies.

The Central first opened in 2010, transforming the old 14Below space into a spot that feels like a dive bar, acts

But don’t be scared— even if you wouldn’t be caught

like a venue, and bumps like a nightclub. Originally

dead in a festival pit on MDMA fist-pumping to

touted as the Central Social Aid and Pleasure Club in

“Levels” with glow-sticks falling out your ass, the

reference to a type of classic New Orleans community

Central really isn’t that sor t of joint. Remember, this

venue, it’s recently been rocking the shorter acronym,

is a place with a warm, crackling fire and a rotating

mostly in response to local suspicions that the

selection of fine micro-brews on tap all priced at

lengthier title might indicate someplace dirty. Also,

around five bucks a pint. You can’t get Stella here,

SAPC is just so much more google-able.

and you cer tainly can’t get Nat ty Light, but that

Though that ’s not to say the venue’s given up on social aid—it hosts charit y events ever y Monday night. And you’ll be pleased to know the pleasure par t is still

doesn’t indicate pretension. In fact, this place is so low-key, we bet you wouldn’t even get the side-eye for arriving in flip-flops. Welcome to the Westside.

going strong too. Early last year, the Central joined forces with powerhouse electro blogs Danceism and Gotta Dance Dirty, enlisting the tastemakers to curate its Thursday Night dance par t y: Versus. 13 4 8 14T H S T S A N TA M O N I C A , C A 9 0 4 0 4 C E N T R A L S A P C .C O M

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YEAH... YOU CAN KICK IT Okay, we know—“Dynamite” by Taio Cruz is totally the definitive summertime anthem of our lives, period. On the other hand, it might actually be “Can I Kick It?” by A Tribe Called Quest. Eh, it’s good to have options. Anyway, this playlist is definitely more of the “kick-it” variety; it’s a solid hour of thick, languid electro, rock and hip-hop ideal for lazing around on the damp grass in the sunshine. Because you can always throw your hands up in the air later.

“Nancy From Now On” Father John Misty

“I Am the Lion King” PAPA

“Here Now” Sean Bones

“Body of Work” The Mynabirds

“Top Bunk” Gaunlet Hair

“Good As New” Vacationer

“Ice Water” Lemonade

“oooH The Intro” Def Sound

“3 Days” Rhye

“Miss Cigarette” Rizzle Kicks

“Champion Sound” Crystal Fighters

“Hornet’s Nest” Jonti

SCAN THE QR CODE TO STREAM THE EXTENDED VERSION OF OUR PLAYLIST AND CHECK OUT LA CANVAS ON SPOTIFY.

20


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CHICANO BATMAN (8/9)

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STREET ART photos EMILY BRADLEY SEND US YOUR STREET ART PHOTOS: PRESS@LACANVAS.COM FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @LACANVAS

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23


IT'S ABSTR ACT EXPRESSIONISM, CHARLIE BROWN! VENICE PAINTER TOM EVERHART TAKES BASQUIAT AND PEPPERMINT PATT Y TO THE BEACH text SHANA NYS DAMBROT

photos MACEO PAISLEY

Venice painter Tom Everhar t ’s time in NYC’s East Village in the 1980s gave him an up close and personal view of the bir th of street ar t as we know it. The 55 Great Jones Street studio he called home was t wo doors down from Jean-Michel Basquiat’s, who had been on the block since 1980 crashing with director Glenn O’Brien while appearing in his ar t documentar y New York Beat. The row quickly became an epicenter for a crew of painters that included Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, and Kenny Schar f. So as far as the current fetish for street ar t goes, to say he’s seen it all before is a bit of an understatement. “I’ve been waiting for it; I totally expected this. They say it takes 30 years for the mainstream to catch up to avant-garde ideas— and it’s been 30 years, and now it’s couture.” Everhar t has covered a lot of ground himself in those 30 years. Now a 15 -year resident of Venice Beach and a wildly successful painter whose work has launched a global editions and merchandising empire, Everhar t’s work truly contains the traces of ever y stop he made along the way—from the once-seedy Great Jones Alley to the sun-drenched Ocean Front Walk bike path, plus Baltimore, London, the Louvre in Paris, and the Peanuts comic strip’s inner sanctum in Santa Rosa. But to understand how Everhar t marks this time on his canvases, we have to travel back in time ourselves—to 1980, the year that launched a thousand paintings, and the career of this happy-go-lucky, serious theor y-wonk superstar who least expected it.


In 1980 Everhart met Peanuts creator Charles Schultz, beginning what would blossom into the most

important,

influential,

and

affectionate

the “Snoopy guy”—his prolific, lively, dark, and hilarious art depicting the Peanuts characters has captured imaginations around the world. “I had been thinking a lot about symbolism at that time. I was painting skeletons, feeling stripped down.” There were cartoons and comic images everywhere in art, but Pop wasn’t really Everhart’s bag. Also in 1980, there was a mammoth art show in Times Square, like 300 artists. “There was so much cartooning, I couldn’t believe it.” But he was interested instead in semiotics, the theory and science of deconstructing symbols in language. “The French Structuralists (New Wave filmmakers mostly) were way out ahead in trying to apply Derrida’s ideas about analyzing linguistic codes to the visual arts—and that was precisely my question. How do we apply these ideas to images? I was searching for something different. The skeletons were so tired...” And 1980 was also the NOVA convention: a symposium for creativeminded semioticians. “We all got our minds blown, asking how things really get their meaning.” Right

af ter

that,

Philip

Guston

died

(this

becomes impor tant) — an ar tist who means a lot to Everhar t and whose abrupt 19 65 switch from

Abstract

E xpressionism

to

flat tened-

out, illustration-based narrative made a deep impression on his whole generation. It ’s June

impression that Schult z had been upset about something. Turns out, he was bummed about Guston’s death; the man had been a hero to him as well. “I’ve since come to realize that the whole

relationship of Everhart’s career and leading to Everhart being known, for better or worse, as

with Schult z in his studio, but he leaves with the

SO I GUESS I OWE GAGOSIAN A THANK YOU FOR TURNING ME ONTO VENICE BEACH. ALTHOUGH IT’S CHANGED A LOT SINCE THEN, TO SAY THE LEAST. FOR ONE THING, WE DON’T WORRY ABOUT GETTING SHOT ON OUR OWN BALCONY ANY MORE.

Peanuts universe is populated with homages to Guston — light bulbs, bricks, closet doors.” So 198 0 was already shaping up as a watershed year, and the capper was Jean-Michel moving in nex t door. “He’s ‘starring’ in this movie, he’s get ting a lot of at tention and a lot of ego, and he has a big fight with his SAMO par tner (yes he had a par tner, no one knows that) so he star ted painting inside instead.” Af ter that, Everhar t saw quite a lot of him. In 198 3 Everhar t took his first impor tant trip to L A. “Larr y Gagosian and Fred Hof fman brought Jean-Michel out here in 1982- 8 3, set him up with a studio in Venice on Market Street, and a bunch of us flew out with him. Until about 1986, we sor t of all used that studio, even when JeanMichel wasn’t there. We had our own keys, we came and went, we slept on the floor. So I guess I owe Gagosian a thank-you for turning me onto Venice Beach. Although it’s changed a lot since then, to say the least. For one thing, we don’t worr y about get ting shot on our own balcony any more.” That’s the balcony of the insanely gorgeous live-work studio he shares with his wife and business manager, photographer Jennifer Everhar t, overlooking one of the busiest blocks on hipster Mecca Abbot Kinney Boulevard. He’s right, it was a war zone when they moved there from Baltimore fif teen years ago. But considering

198 0, and within a few days of Guston’s death,

that the rear window of Jennifer’s Baltimore

Everhar t is to present some drawings to the

apar tment was the location for the rat-sex scene

Charles Schult z organization. Long stor y shor t,

in their good friend John Waters’ film Pecker,

Everhar t finds himself spending all day drawing

they were pret ty much fine with it.


26


Bet ween 198 0 and 198 8, Everhar t worked with Schult z frequently, but it wasn’t until 198 9 that he first used Peanuts in his paintings. That ’s kind of a crazy stor y actually. In 198 9, Time Magazine was put ting Peanuts on the cover. Everhar t ’s job at the Schult z Empire, having learned to draw the characters, was to take gigs from Met Life ads to PSAs of f Schult z’s hands so he could concentrate on the strip. But it wasn’t until Schult z called him in for the Time cover that Everhar t realized he was the only other person Schult z had taught to do the drawings. Right around then, Everhar t became seriously ill, moved to Baltimore to treat it, died t wice in the hospital, and was told he had t wo years to live. He just thought, “Well, fuck it, I don’t need permission from the ar t world for any thing. Let them hate me. I’ll be dead in t wo years any way! I wanted to figure out how to fuse these t wo halves of my life, my Peanuts and my painting. I hated those skeletons I was doing. I wanted a bet ter reason to paint than chasing ar t-world acceptance.”

“ WE ALL GOT OUR

MINDS BLOWN, ASKING HOW THINGS

REALLY GET THEIR

MEANING .

” He threw caution to the wind and produced the first of the paintings that would become his greatest work— work he’s still doing in an evolved form to this day— many, many more than t wo years later. Then in 19 9 0, the Louvre Museum in Paris of fered Schult z a sur vey exhibition, and he said he wouldn’t do it without Everhar t and his new work. “So in 19 9 0 I finally get my first solo show, and it ’s at the Louvre!” People loved it and that was that. Schult z, ever the gentleman, says “‘Let ’s get this set tled so you’re safe legally. One day, the players may change.’ There was no licensing; people think that but no. It ’s just an agreement that I can use the characters as I see fit in my ar t ‘ for the term of my natural life.’ Remember, we both still thought I was going to die any second!” “So I’m doing legal appropriation with permission, what a paradox!” But despite appearances, the ar t’s not about Snoopy at all. The real subject is making marks on canvas; over the years these “marks” have been 3-D pours, stamped-on circles, pointillism, drips from a wet brush, solid paint bent of f the canvas like architecture, in black and white and technicolor. The figures/characters are a visual cue for establishing scale in the pictorial space and a means to clarify Everhar t’s abstract language. The presence of the characters gives the stylistic evolution a reference point from the “real” world. They aren’t stories the way the strips were, they aren’t Pop Ar t, and they aren’t sentimental in the least. They are about creating space and marking time through the ar tist’s repeated gestures. “These paintings are the old semiotic question answered, the one about fusing image and meaning, at least in one way. Space is made of time, you know.” Yes, Everhar t is definitely a real Venetian now.


GALLERY OPENINGS JULY 2012 KAMIKAZE EXHIBITIONS PØST July 1-31 Openings: Every day in July, 7-9pm About once a year, the subversive artist-friendly Downtown gallery PØST loses its mind and revisits the wildly popular lunacy of the “Kamikaze Exhibitions”—31 different shows, one per night all month, in a fast-paced relay across the style and media spectrum. Try to catch as many as you can. post-la.blogspot.com COLIN CHRISTIAN & RISK Corey Helford Gallery July 7-31 Opening: July 7-10pm In his 27-year career, RISK helped define graffiti as an artform in LA and globally—and his new work is tighter and fresher and smarter than ever. Colin Christian finds inspiration for his silicone sculptures in old sci-fi movies, pin-up girls, and anime. Maybe the most anticipated two-person show of the summer. coreyhelfordgallery.com CONTEMPORARY MEXICAN PHOTOGRAPHY Kopeikin Gallery July 14 - August 25 Opening: July 14, 6-8pm Photography-centric Kopeikin Gallery has an affinity for pictures of the world—especially far-flung locations, exotic landscapes, and the strange familiarity of foreign cities. Curated by Alejandra Cartagena, this group show brings together new voices in the genre from our closest, but sometimes least-known, neighbor. kopeikingallery.com LINE DANCING RAID Projects July 21-28 Opening: July 21, 7-9pm Mark Moore Gallery’s senior staff are workaholics, and 5790projects is their labor of love. This third of their quarterly pop-up group exhibition features five unrepresented LA-based artists working in the medium of painting, sculpture, and drawing: Amir H. Fallah, Christine Frerichs, Kyla Hansen, Marissa Textor, and Adam Tullie. 5790projects.com JOSE RODOLFO LOAIZA ONTIVEROS La Luz de Jesus August 3-26 Opening: August 3, 8-11pm José Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros’ new exhibition Disasterland uses the childhood icons of the Disney cartoon empire as grist for his mill of sick humor, pop-culture indictment, and gleeful gore (Cinderella pulls a Britney—ouch!). His finely painted flip-offs show alongside the Jury Winners from the recent open-call Laluzapalooza. laluzdejesus.com

WINNER!

2010 Tony Award for BEST PLAY ®

“WHAT WE SEE, above all, is an artist seeing, and it’s impossible not to feel thrilled by the privilege.” —The New York Times

RED Donmar Warehouse production of

JOHN LOGAN directed by MICHAEL GRANDAGE with JONATHAN GROFF and ALFRED MOLINA by

scenic and costume design by Christopher lighting design by Neil Austin sound design by Adam Cork

Oram

AUGUSTUS THOMPSON & CHRIS LUX New Image Art August 4 - September 8 Opening: August 4, 6-9pm San Francisco-based artists Augustus Thompson and Chris Lux don’t seem to have a lot in common besides their current hometown. Thompson’s paintings—mostly portraits—are rough and loose, and a little violent; while Lux comes to the world of abstract graphics and pop-surrealism by way of graffiti murals. newimageartgallery.com XAVIER VEILHAN: ARCHITECTONES VDL/Neutra House August 9 - September 16 The iconic Neutra House in Silverlake hosts Xavier Veilhan’s sculptural installation Architectones, featuring sculptures by the noted French artist throughout the property, from the front garden through the ground fl oor and domestic quarters to the rooftop refl ecting pool. Public events throughout the show will be announced. facebook.com/veilhan

ZACKARY DRUCKER & HER FRIENDS Hammer Museum Event: August 22, 7:30pm As part of the Hammer’s ongoing biennial exhibition “Made in LA,” performer, agent provocateur, and multimedia artist Zackary Drucker hosts an evening of film screenings and conversation examining the poetics and politics of conflated gender, performative documentation, and queer cinema. hammer.ucla.edu

GET MORE OF L.A.’S BEST OPENINGS AT LACANVAS.COM

Aug 1–Sept 9 Mark Taper Forum Pick your exact seats online!

CenterTheatreGroup.org/Red 213.628.2772

28 Alfred Molina in the Donmar Warehouse production of Red. photo by johan persson/arenapal.


HOMEGROWN CULTURE THE HAMMER MUSEUM’S BUMPER CROP OF ART, FILM, MUSIC, BOOKS, AND MADE IN LA BIENNIAL MADNESS text SHANA NYS DAMBROT

LA

is a pie char t, not a melting pot; and

screenings, and public events. A KCRW DJ serie s

this summe r, the U CL A A rmand Hamme r

running Thur s day s from June 28 - Augus t 9 s tar s

Museum helps you get a slice. From its footprint

Jason Bentley, Chris Douridas, Jeremy Sole and Anne

on a full cit y block of shiny downtown We st wood

Litt dropping music inspired by the exhibition. And

by the UCL A campus, it administers an impressive

for all you techies, grab the Made in L A Soundmap

p e rmanent colle ction that s tretche s fro m old

app. Free on iTunes, this site -specific soundtrack

Eu r o p e a n m a s te r s to f r e s hly a c quir e d w o r k s by

w a s cu r a t e d b y t h e c r o s s - p la t f o r m g e niu s e s a t

modern icons and promising young artists, including

Dublab for moving to, between, and inside the shows.

a dedicated video -ar t galler y. To fur ther its public

Using far- out geo -locator software, their audio and

educational mission and honor its unique history as

artists’ and curators’ site-specific content generates

an institution, it recently built the state- of-the-ar t

as you travel through the cit y that inspired it all.

Billy Wilder cinema on the premises where among other things, it pulls gems from the mammoth UCL A

Be side s the app, our favo rite par t has to b e the

Film & Television Archive and hosts conversations

enchanting and hilarious sidebar, the Venice Beach

with the world’s most acclaimed authors and visiting

Biennial. Happening over the weekend of July 13-

ar tis t s . But even Dire cto r Annie Philbin and her

15, the VBB is curated by Ali Subotnick in a cheeky

ambitious staf f of full-time and adjunct curators,

reference to b oth the famously highbrow Venice

public engagement liaisons, publications wizards,

Biennale in Italy and the infamously populist artistic

a n d a d v i s in g a r t i s t s h a v e n e v e r t r i e d a n y t hin g

heritage of L A’s be st-known and most subversive

a s cr a z y a s this ye ar ’s MA DE IN L A Biennial.

creative enclave — the Venice Boardwalk. Ar t will

Bringing together more than six t y ar tists who live

tat too -parlor televisions, and some line s are just

be installed in the allot ted vendor space s and on and work in greater L A, the curatorial team sought

bound to be crossed. From Barbara Kruger to Arthure

to identify no single trend or look per se, but rather

“Funky Pussy” Moore, Drew Heitzler to Mr. T V, the

provide a real-time snapshot of this time and place

min g lin g o f hi g h a n d l o w, in s id e r a n d o u t s id e r,

in ar t. It opened on June 2nd and spreads acros s

per formance, sculpture, and video ar t is a fit ting

the Hammer, Barnsdall Ar t Park in Los Feliz, and

tribute to both the liberating zaniness of the location

L A X ART in Culver Cit y; and by the time it close s

and the curatorial adventurism of the museum itself.

on September 2nd, it will have presented literally

B e c a u s e y o u h a v e t o l o v e a n in t e r n a t i o n a l a r t-

hundreds of projects, performances, panels, parties,

world event that requires flip -flops and sunscreen.

10 8 9 9 W I L S H I R E B LV D LOS A NGELES, CA 90024 M A D E I N L A 2 0 1 2 .O R G H A M M E R .UC L A .E DU

29


MERRY

KARNOWSKY

N ICOL A V ER L ATO

GALLERY

PRESENTS

ZERO GRAVITY

AUGUS T 11 - SE P T E M BE R 1, 2 01 2 OPENING RECEPTION SATURDAY AUGUST 11, 8-11 PM

M E R RY K A R NOW S K Y GA L L E RY 1 7 0 S . L A B R E A AV E N U E L O S A N G E L E S , C A 9 0 0 3 6 P H O N E : 3 2 3 . 9 3 3 . 4 4 0 8 W W W. M K G A L L E R Y. C O M 30

E M A I L :

I N F O @ M K G A L L E R Y. C O M


THIS WILL GO DOWN ON YOUR PERMANENT RECORD JIM MAHFOOD’S LOS ANGELES INK STAINS PARTIES AND TELLS text SHANA NYS DAMBROT

JIM

M a h f o o d (a k a Fo o d O n e) i s a b u s y g u y, w o r k in g c o n s t a n t l y in illu s t r a t i o n , a d v e r t i s in g , co mic b o ok s , mur als , fine a r t, and animation, app e a ring in the p a ge s of Playb oy,

S p i n , U R B , t h e H o l l y w o o d R e p o r t e r, a n d M a d M a g az i n e , p l u s i l l u s t r a t i n g K e v i n S m i t h ’ s C l e rk s c o mic s an d r e g g a e le g e n d Zig g y M a rle y ’s M arijuanaM an — n o t to m e ntio n r ele a sin g lite r ally s c o r e s o f i n d i e t i t l e s o f h i s o w n . B u t t h i s J u n e h e p u t o u t t h e m o t h e r s h i p o f a ll t i t l e s : L A I N K STAIN S , a c o mp endium of chr o nic mis a d ventur e s in th e s tudio and th e unruly s t r e e t s of this cit y. The first installment went up on the internet on Januar y 1st, 2009, and its vivacious four-row, one-sheet vignette set the tone for the whole phenomenon that was to follow, depicting a jaunty, stylish, black-andwhite world where nothing much goes on but everything happens. #1 was fittingly a New Year’s Eve bender. In #13 he paints five murals at Meltdown C omics, hits Shepard Fairey’s bir thday at L a Cita, at tends a live - drawing par t y, and ends by de stroying a painting that had gone all wrong. By the last installment (#6 3 pos ted April 12 of this ye ar), Jim and his crew had under taken hilarious, frequently ille gal ar t and par t y shenanigans all acros s the cit y from Burbank to the beach. There are pot cookie s, strange dreams, DJ sets, drama, lots of time in the studio in between benders, and the idea for the book itself. “I star ted posting strips on my blog for free during the economic crash when we were all out of work. J o b s picke d b a ck up in 2 010, bu t I ke pt it up fo r th e f ans w h o lo v e d it. T h en o n c e th e b o o k id e a to ok hold I s t ar te d wo rking tow ard that, s o now the re are 30 + pa ge s of new, unrele a s e d mate rial.” There are photo - collage s of par tie s and event s like a ye arbo ok would have, with picture s of the re al people at the back, their drawn por traits nex t to self-selected headshots. It’s ever yone who has ever app e ared in the s trip b e they famous o r unknown. It ’s re ally a love let ter to L A , and how “ever yone he re jus t figure s their own shit out and make s it re al.” Sp e aking of making your own shit re al, you c a n c a t c h M a h f o o d J u l y 18 t h a t Tr ! c k s t e r, a c r e a t o r- o w n e d v e r s i o n o f C o m i c - C o n i n d o w n t o w n S a n D i e g o . H e ’ll b e t h e r e , s e lli n g a n d s i g n i n g I N K STA I N S a n d t h e n e w l y r e l e a s e d “ Ev e r y b o d y L o v e s Ta nk Girl” 3 - is su e mini - s e rie s — a n d m a y b e g a th e rin g m a te rial fo r INK STAIN S Volum e Tw o. J I M M A H F O O D.C O M F O O D O N E A R T. B L O G S P O T.C O M T R I C K S T E R T R I C K S T E R .C O M

31


hair/muaBARBARA YNIGUEZ

stylingNATALIE HOWELL

photoASHLEY BARRETT

viaNEXT MODEL MANAGEMENT

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39


Evolution of Man Tribe Mentality and the Roark Gentleman

Y

a full team of creators (visual artists, installation

ou know those people you meet and instantly

I was taken aback, but of course my answer was

recognize as the kind of person you might

“Yes!” She needed someone to design a menswear

artists, film makers, editors, musicians) here to

like to cause trouble with? Roark founder Andrew

collection for an art show she had coming up (set

put this into play allows us to use multiple types

There’s a subtle spark

to take place on the day of my graduation) so I

of media to tell our story.

of rebellion in his eye signaling an adventurous

called Chris Allison and Misti Huskey, and within

Steiger is one of them.

Could you tell us about how the warehouse works?

spirit—it’s what’s at the crux of the design house’s

two months we had completed a collection. People

identity and what ultimately sets the Roark man

responded positively, encouraging us to take it more

apart from all the other fashion-forward, co-

seriously. So we did. Soon after, we got a warehouse

We trust that each member of the team is doing

op-frequenting gentleman. Steiger has quickly

Downtown

Nelson

everything in their power to make this beast what it

become a heavyweight in the international fashion

Campbell, and started to accumulate the collective.

needs to be. We’re blessed to have eight of us living

community, along with designer Chris Allison and creative director Misti Huskey. The collection is currently in its fourth season and has established a retail presence in NY, Berlin, Zurich, Moscow and London. With all of this momentum behind them, the crew has decided to broaden their horizons and set to work on a new kind of creative endeavor: the Roark Warehouse. The 11,500 square-foot industrial building has

with

our

business

partner

We are currently nine days away from presenting our SS’13 collection. Again we were invited to Milan for the WHITE HOMME show, where we’ll be in the basement of a large industrial factory “super studio” showing the new collection, which includes an art installation and an audio-visual concept story. What’s your take on the RTW Menswear status quo?

here at the warehouse, which is where everything goes down. We like to think of this place as our home. The space serves as a breeding ground for all those creative endeavors. We have a film studio here, a design room, a showroom, and lots of floor space that we rent out to other creative projects. We are always looking for new artists to work with and events to collaborate on to expand the creative platform and support the community.

Most brands try and squeeze you into a box. We’ve

previously functioned as a live/workspace, and is

found that trying to live up to someone else’s

now open for private rental and multimedia events.

expectations puts absurd pressure on people. Plus

Suffice it to say the gang is thrilled to collaborate

So how do you see the future panning out for you guys?

there’s very little sincerity in that. Our garments cater

We’re just evolving and sharpening our process.

with other artists in the space that inspired their

to a wide variety of people; we ask them to come as

Each

own creative journey.

they are and be open-minded along the way.

new technical elements, find new innovative

We sat down with Steiger in the haunting, yet

Designing garments are only one part of a label’s

environmentally aware design practices.

beautiful warehouse to chat about the past, present

aesthetic. Tell us a little bit about your campaigns—

season

we

get

smarter,

learn

about

fabric resources, push ourselves, and explore

and future of Roark, getting some insight into the

how do you come up with each season’s concept?

evolution of this innovative collective.

Do they start with the pieces or does the collection follow a pre-determined narrative?

You guys are on your 4th collection. Tell us a little bit about Roark’s evolution.

Each season starts with a word, a feeling, or a

We’re also becoming more community-oriented. There are some very cool things happening Downtown right now that we’re really pleased to be apart of. As an artist collective, we’re executing smarter productions and trying to become more

photograph that has not yet been taken. From

sustainable. Along the way, we’re meeting some

It started with three of us, but grew quickly. Several

that, our creative team is able to interpret it and

amazing folks that are doing some powerful

of us went to FIDM, and right before graduation I

sculpt it into a full-figured being that has very

things. It’s all about collaboration.

was approached in the neighboring Ralph’s by a

specific emotions attached to it. It’s about giving

woman who asked, “Are you a fashion designer?”

something the full integrity that it deserves. Having

text ERIN DENNISON photos IAN MORRISON


41


ALL THINGS GO DEUS EX MACHINA’S AUSTRALIAN MOTORCYCLE CULTURE ARRIVES IN VENICE text ERIN DENNISON photo CARBY TUCKWELL

DEUS

ex Machina (L atin for “god from the

level that you’d expect droids from the future to be

m achine”) ro are d o nto Aus t r ali a’s

manning the counter. But really sex y droids smelling

cultural c ons ciousne s s in 2 0 0 6 w ith s ome ne atly

of absinthe and vanilla, dressed in Comme des

c u s t o m i z e d m o t o r c y c l e s a n d t h e “qu a i n t n o t i o n

Garçons with the minimalist charm of Heming way—

that doing something is more fun than just owning

you know, literate and st ylish, kissable and quiet.

something.” Six years later, Deus Ex is more than just a brand—it’s a culture, now neatly encapsulated by a

While the store flawlessly blends Australian sur f,

new Venice outpost housing every thing from Yamaha

skate, and motorcycle culture through the exper t

S R4 0 0 s to f i xe d ge ar b ike s , cl o t hing an d f re shl y

curation of apparel and gear, the experience goes

pressed Handsome cof fee.

beyond the retail. “We’re big on hosting events

Feeling a lit tle Foucult y? The new shop is aptly

Venice, we just hosted the Carnival of Go and Flow;

that celebrate dif ferent aspects of the culture. In named “The Emporium of Postmodern Activities,”

we invited bike builders, car builders, sur f shapers,

though it ’s not as snoot y as it sounds. “We tried

designers, and ar tists to show of f what they were

to make the most pretentious name we could think

doing. It ’s the opposite of that head-up its-ass

of,”

explains

Special

Projects

Manager

Stefan

hipster culture where if you don’t know you’re not

Wigand. “We’re fans of the expression ‘postmodern

allowed in. We’re fans of inclusiveness.” And that,

activities’ because essentially, that ’s what we do. In

my dears, is how you establish a cult following.

architecture, postmodernism can be a derogator y term, and it doesn’t need to be. If strictly defined

If only all lit tle boys made of slugs and snails and

as referencing old stuf f in a contemporar y way, then

puppy- dog tails grew up to be aesthetically-pleasing

in a literal sense, it ’s not a bad thing.”

gentleman with a masculine-sensibilit y and a dash

True — a spoonful of deconstructionism with your

st ylish masculinit y does not star t, nor does it end

black fair-trade cof fee and soon enough you’ll be

with you. If the fascism of modern design is star ting

of self- deprecating humor. So fuck of f, Helvetica;

humming along to Phillip Glass and spending an

to make your eyeballs bleed, head over to Venice,

entire af ternoon perusing books, bikes, and ar t.

where the Deus E x formula is both innovative and

Where Lincoln meets Venice, you’ll enter a space

locally appropriate.

that feels aged and holistic yet so supremely nex t10 0 1 V E N I C E B O U L E VA R D , V E N I C E B E AC H , C A 9 0 2 9 U S . D E U S C U S T O M S .C O M /

42


Live. Create. Inspire.

A space ďŹ lled with memories, designer collectibles and a variety of items that ďŹ t any style of budget.

Hudson | Rory Beca | One Teaspoon | Joie | Patterson J. Kincaid

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DAY TRIP BEACH DATE We know…it ’s tempting to s tay inside. Golden Girls is on, and the Game of Thrones bo oks ar en’t jus t going to r e ad themselve s. Pause. S top and smell the salt water. T his is the summer to grab our +1s, LO L at the mono tony and carpe diem. S o le t ’s put away our Judy Funnie costume s and explor e the edge of the continent, shall we?

9 AM

BREAKFAST AT TAMMIE’S CORNER HOUSE CAFÉ

10:30 AM

11:30 AM MANHATTAN BEACH PIER

MANHATTAN DENIM

Bluf f C ove in Palos Verde s may be

Af ter your hike, you’ll want to head

How about stopping in downtown

You’re late. We’ve made this whole

What’s for lunch? Sandwiches— ice

f am o u s f o r i t s g r e a t w a v e s , b u t

up to Hermosa and chow down at this

Manhattan Beach to stroll down the pier

itinerar y and y ou don’t even car e.

cream sandwiches that is! Because the

HIKE AT BLUFF COVE

12:30 PM

1:30 PM

ICE CREAM AT BEACHY CREAM

it ’s also the be st place for an epic

beloved neighborhood spot. Tammie’s

and ogle all the lovely beach houses?

I t ’s co ol — do y ou.

A aany y y w waay,

folks over at the newly opened Beachy

morning hike. This stretch of coast will

is known for their delicious house made

Between volleyball courts, surfing, shops

Manhattan Denim is the bomb ‘cause

Cream in Santa Monica are making

transpor t you out of Los Angeles and

pies, muffins, and gourmet coffee, but

and bars, you’ll get some pretty good people

the dr e ssing r o oms ar e r o omy, the

them fre sh ever y day fr om lo cally

into a whimsical, fog-laden fantasy

they also shake up power-smoothies for

watching in. But if bi-pedal mammals

selection is ex tensive (Hudson,

sourced, organic ingredients—just how

landscape made of deep green hilltops,

those of you on that health tip. Though

aren’t really your thing, you can always

Splendid, Citizens of Humanit y) and

us Californians like ‘em. With flavors

yellow clay paths and steep cliffs that

once you see those beautiful baked

visit the aquarium and pet the starfi sh.

the sales reps go hard on salutations

like “Key Lime Cowabunga” (key lime

drop down into the ocean.

goods all lined up in a row, they may be

Echinoderms need affection too, you guys.

and really know their shit.

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2:00 PM BIKE RIDE

3:00 PM

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LEMONADE STAND

WINE BREAK

5:00 PM

MALIBU LUMBERYARD

7:00 PM

SUNSET DINNER AT PARADISE COVE

Okay, so we know it’s a thing, but there’s a

At this point, you’ve digested your ice

That lemonade didn’t really cut it, did it?

Rela x , Buf falo plaid enthusias ts —

If you’ve made it this far, it’s time to pat

reason things are things. Renting bicycles

cr e am, ar e low on sugar and c ould

It’s 5 pm mountain time and you totally

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yourself on the back. You’ve put in some

in Santa Monica and riding them down

r e all y us e s ome c old, s w e e t lemon

used to date a kid from AZ, so it’s time

e c l e c t i c a s s o r t m e n t o f h ig h - e n d

real work today, and the only suitable

to Venice is sort of what’s up. Witness

f lui d .

On your way to return the

for a real grown-up drink. Get yourself

stores, unique boutiques, and trendy

reward would look a lot like a Corona

all the zany sights from the Ferris wheel

bikes, stop by our favorite lemonade

over to Tar & Roses in Santa Monica

small-plate eateries await. It’s the

Commercial. Finish off the day with dinner

on the pier to the sexy weight lifters on

stand, which is actually called “Hot

for a nice glass of wine or an ice-cold

kind of aesthetically pleasing spatial

right on the beach at Paradise Cove Cafe.

muscle beach and all the freaky little

Dog on a S tick” (they have those too).

beer. And remember, if you’re need of a

experience that inspires the box water

You can dig your toes into the sand, order

shops along the way without collecting

No neighborhood brats plus they take

little nosh, there’s no shame in ordering

drinker (for the t ypography) in all of

a big bucket of fried calamari, and watch

lower back sweat while driving on the PCH.

visa and mastercard.

s ome bac on - chilli p op c o r n. N one .

us… not to mention the Lumber yard

the sunset. Don’t roll your eyes—even

is home to L A’s largest freestanding

thugs and punks like sunsets.

Instagram or it didn’t happen.

aquarium. You fancy, yah. BIKEANDPARK.COM/CIT Y/SANTA-MONICA

HOTDOGONASTICK.COM

TARANDROSES.COM

MALIBUCOUNTRYMART.COM

PARADISECOVEMALIBU.COM

1555 2ND STREET, UNIT A

1633 OCEAN FRONT WALK

602 SANTA MONICA BLVD,

3939W V W CROSS CREEK RD

28128 PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY,

SANTA MONICA CA 90401

SANTA MONICA, CA 9040

SANTA MONICA, CA 90401

MALIBU, CA 90265

MALIBU, CA 90265

45


PERFECT TIMING

SPANISH CHEF PERFECTO ROCHER GETS READY TO RUN TWO LOS ANGELES RESTAURANTS

text REBECA ARANGO photo HEATHER GILROY 46


When you hear the name “Chef Perfecto Rocher,” you think—is that the evil culinary antagonist from Ratatouille II: Remy Goes to Spain? How intimidating. But despite fancy biographical accolades like “Third Generation Paella Maker” and a resume that includes stints at avant-garde, Michelin-star rated restaurants like El Bulli in Spain and Canton Place in San Francisco, the real Perfecto Rocher is a cheerful, casual young dude who likes punk rock and family-style dinners. Who knew? This past March, Per fecto took over as executive chef at Michael Cardenas’s popular Lit tle Tokyo eater y Lazy Ox Canteen, and he’s been serving up big family-st yle Spanish specials and globally-influenced small plates ever since. We sat down with the Chef to get the scoop on his culinar y background, his new Lazy Ox menu and his upcoming Spanish concept in Santa Monica. SO YOU’RE A THIRD GENER ATION PAELL A MAKER—WHAT ’S THE STORY ?

WHAT ’S YOUR FAVOR I T E NE W L A Z Y OX ME NU ?

DISH

ON

YOUR

My grandfather star ted a restaurant when he was ver y young, a small place that made only paellas and traditional food from Valencia. Then my father got the place and made it bigger

People love the Huevo Andoni—it’s a French fry purée

and bigger. It was a wood-fire place, cooking rabbits, quail etc. Af ter I was there all my life, I

with caramelized onion, bacon, chorizo, and egg cooked

thought: I don’t want to be a chef, I hate it! I want to be a punk rocker! Because my friends

Andoni style. For me, that’s a good one, but if you

used to play soccer on the street, and I was inside helping my father! I hated it.

think something is too good you stop thinking and lose

SO HOW DID YOU END UP A BECOMING A CHEF THEN?

doing something great tomorrow—it’s a challenge for

the passion, so I like every new thing I make. We’re me because it’s an American dish—we’re making chili

I went to London when I was 17 years old, and I

con carne, like they do in Texas.

worked in construction—I worked in everything

We’re marinating the meat today—

but food, and I was in a punk rock band—and then finally, I started to work in a restaurant because I didn’t have any money. So I learned the restaurant thing again, and it turned out I liked it when my father wasn’t there. There were a lot of other people, so it was more fun. And now I love it. WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE THING TO EAT AS A KID? ANYTHING YOU’RE MAKING NOW? I love fuet*—it’s a very traditional Valencian and Catelan sausage, like a chorizo, but different.

the brisket, the short ribs, and the

I DON’T WANT TO BE A CHEF, I HATE IT! I WANT TO BE A PUNK ROCKER!

My grandmother used to make fuet and longaniza at home, and my family would hide it. They’d always hide the food because if they

fat—for one night with whiskey and brandy. So that is my favorite dish for tomorrow! CAN YOU TELL US A BIT A B O U T T H E N E W S PA N I S H RE STAUR ANT

IN

SANTA

MONICA YOU’RE OPENING WITH MICHAEL CARDENAS? We’re hoping to open it at the end of September; we’re going to start construction in July. It’s going to be called Taberna Arros Y Vi [Rice and Wine], and it’s going

left it out, I’d eat it in one second—I loved it. I’m going to make fuet next week. I’m already making

to be a wood-fire place like my grandfather and my

longaniza, and blood sausage too. [*Fuet is a Spanish thin, cured, dry sausage of pork meat.]

father used to have serving only traditional food from

WHAT’S IT BEEN LIKE WORKING AT LAZY OX?

place where you can drink and get some tapas. The

Lazy Ox is like a new American family restaurant, you can mix anything, food from Mexico,

place. I think it’s going to be like a family Valencian

Valencia. It will have a taberna-style bar, a stand-up other side will be a traditional, sit-down family-style

48

from Thailand—and I think that’s a good thing. I love cooking because it’s like music, you

restaurant; a place you go to with your family to eat

never stop learning. I think if you only focus on food from one country, you’ll stop learning,

paella, some tapas, wine and beer—and that’s it. Very

but if you go around the world, you’re never finished, and everything is good.

simple, but casual and simple is good.


49


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A Midsummer

Night’s Dream


dress Purple Lace Dress

NAMI

photo

wardrobe

CAITLIN BELLAH

OLIVIA CROUPPEN

hair

make up

ERICH MAGANA

ANTHONY NGUYEN

model

via

DIANA

ELITE MODELS LA


dress

headpiece

Black Lace Dress w/ Ruffle Tiered Skirt

STYLISTS OWN BESPOKE PIECE

ADOLPHO SANCHES

opposite page-dress Short Black Dress w/ Tool, Lace & Beaded Detail

RACHEAEL CASSAR


dress

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STYLISTS OWN BESPOKE PIECE

AIISHA

opposite page-dress White Dress w/ Silk Skirt & Lace Top & Swarvski Back Detail

AIISHA

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BEACH BITES Parking by the beach is no joke—when you find a spot, you hold on to it. So if hunger strikes, why not leave the wheels behind and take a little stroll to one of our favorite west-side eateries? Whether you’re looking for tacos, vegetable juice, or a fancy dinner, this list has you covered.

MERCADO

WHERE:Santa Monica Beach PEEK:Elegant, modern takes on Mexican classics are what’s for dinner at brand new Santa Monica hotspot Mercado. A streamlined yet rustic space sets the scene for chef Jose Acevedo’s simple, refined flavors. PERK:If you’re looking for pre or post-beach margaritas, look no further—Mercado’s tequila list boasts 70 varieties broken down into blancos, añejos, and reposados. Also, the flan is possibly the best we’ve ever had. mercadosantamonica.com 1416 Fourth St, Santa Monica, CA 90401

MOON JUICE

BBQ & LOUNGE 738 East 3RD ST, Los Angeles, CA 90013 213.680.3008

WHERE: Venice Beach PEEK: Word on the street is solid food is so 2008—all the cool kids are juicing now. But in all seriousness, sometimes you need to up your liquid vegetable game, and Moon Juice’s bright, sunny storefront on Rose Avenue is one of our favorite places to do just that. PERK: Each ultra-tasty bottle of Moon Juice is packed with three pounds of raw, 100% organic produce that’s full of vitamins and minerals. Try a “Goodness Greens,” it’s blended kale, celery, dandelion, spinach and parsley—it tastes better than it sounds. moonjuiceshop.com 507 Rose Ave, Venice CA, 90291

PICCOLO

WHERE: Venice Beach PEEK: Perhaps the only real date spot on the Venice Boardwalk, this quaint, intimate Italian restaurant is just where we might head for a romantic dinner after a long walk on the beach. Everyone likes those, right? PERK: From the owners of Hostaria Del Piccolo in Santa Monica, Piccolo serves up some truly exciting dishes—not just your every-day Italian fare. Adventurous foodies will be psyched to see items like roasted Japanese pumpkin ravioli or wild nettle and langoustine gnocchi. piccolovenice.com 5 Dudley Ave, Venice CA, 90291

THE TRIPEL

WHERE: Playa Del Rey PEEK: An updated, modern take on your local neighborhood pub, The Tripel serves up gourmet comfort food in a casual setting with a curated, rotating selection of international craft beers and wine—along with some very tasty beer and wine cocktails. Who needs vodka anyway? PERK: The Pretzel Burger is a must-try for any burger fiend; it’s caramelized onion, poppy seed slaw, and aged cheddar on a savory pretzel bun. Throw in some sweet potato tots with spicy aioli and you’ve got yourself a meal. thetripel.com 333 Culver Blvd, Playa Del Rey, CA 90293

NORTH END CAFFE

WHERE: Manhattan Beach PEEK: This gourmet short-order spot in Manhattan Beach is the ideal place for hungry beach-goers to grab some breakfast…or lunch if you’re not much of an early bird. Espresso is freshly pressed and the bacon is always crispy. You can’t go wrong with any sandwich on the list, but the Alicia is our favorite—it’s like a hot turkey BLT with avocado in lieu of lettuce, melted cheddar and chipotle mojo on a fresh baguette. PERK: North End Caffe was featured on the Food Network’s Diners, Drive-ins and Dives. Guy Fieri approves. northendcaffe.net 3421 N Highland Ave, Manhattan Beach CA, 90266

HOT’S KITCHEN

WHERE: Hermosa Beach PEEK: Cooking up all the eats of your wildest, most gluttonous dreams in just one spot—including 10 types of burgers and a whopping 50 tacos—Hot’s Kitchen will take you around the world and back. Crispy orange-ginger wings? Mexicali burger? Chicken curry or BBQ taco? Oh, the places you’ll go… PERK: Hot’s Kitchen’s commitment to green living extends from their sustainable design to their appliances, paper products and right down to their hormone-free meat and produce. Plus, Mike’s daily Dank Deals means $3 drafts and $6 glasses of wine. Score! hotskitchen.com 844 Hermosa Ave, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254

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600 S. Main St., Los Angeles, CA 90014 213.622.6333 artisanhouse.net

59


MODERN AMERICAN PLAN CHECK REDEFINES COMFORT FOOD IN LITTLE OSAKA text REBECA ARANGO

DID

you guys know there’s a neighborhood in

in love with onions and pickles all over again, pitting

Los Angeles called Lit tle Osaka? Yep. As it

them against Americanized dashi cheese and an insanely

turns out, Japanese immigrants have been posting up

juicy akuashi red wagyu beef patty. The Chef’s Favorite

around Saw telle bet ween Santa Monica and Olympic

Burger might be your new favorite hangover cure—this

since the 1950s, populating the boulevard with a lot

hulking beast boasts bacon TWO ways. Thick juicy slabs

of delicious Japanese food. So while Chef Ernesto

of it sit on a bed of hot sauce and baconaise (one of

Uchimura’s new restaurant Plan Check is one of the

Plan Check’s knowledge sauces made from bacon bits,

only on the strip to specialize in Modern American

mayo, and bacon fat), topped with a sunny side-up egg

Comfor t food, it ’s no surprise to find the menu full

and plenty of melting cheese. Both burgers are elevated

of items like yuzukosho cocktail sauce, rock shrimp

by another creative Plan Check innovation: ketchup

tempura, and even plum wine and sake cocktails.

leather—it’s like a fancy fruit roll up that distributes the house made ketchup neatly across your bun.

The cultural influences don’t end there. We’re in L A after all, so Plan Check’s take on “Modern American”

While the sandwiches are cer tainly drool-wor thy and

is appropriately diverse. This is a place where kimchi

the entrée s are undeniably comfor ting (pot roast?

hangs out with pastrami and Tapatio mingles with beer.

getting cozy just thinking about it), Plan Check is also

An enticing list of house-made pickles showcases

the ideal spot to kick it on the patio with some snacks

everything from bay leafs to sirracha to chorizo sausage.

and cocktails — oysters, beer nuts, and a selection

And, you can wash it all down with a nice Belgian ale.

meats and cheeses make this the per fect happy hour hang. To top it all of f, there are some piped-to-order

Now let’s get to the burgers, shall we? Plan Check’s

donuts that are seriously the bomb. You’re probably

concise menu has five sandwiches to choose from, each

going to need a doggy bag.

of which was carefully designed to exude a dangerous amount of flavor (Uchimura spent months on the buns alone). The PCB (Plan Check Burger) will make you fall

18 0 0 S AW T E L L E B O U L E VA R D W EST LOS A NGELES, CA 90025 P L A N C H E C K B A R .C O M

61


TALKING SHOP NYC’S THE BLIND BARBER BRINGS THE URBAN GENTLEMAN OUT WEST text REBECA ARANGO photo TRISHA ANGELES

SOME

boys never learn to do their hair, but

Blind Barb er ’s co ck t ail program is as ele gantly

the thre e gentlemen re sp onsible

restrained as its grooming menu. Six signature cocktails

for st ar ting the Blind Barb er are, unsurprisingly,

each showcase a different spirit, never drowning it in

p h e n o m e n all y w e ll g r o o m e d. Yo u t h o u g h t y o ur

sugar or allowing it to steal the show. Tequila lovers can

moustache was snappy, but Jef f L aeb takes it to a

count on the Hot Heather, a sweet and tart drink where

whole ‘nother level. “Growing up in NY, Jef f hung

Milagro and amber agave mingle with grapefruit, lemon,

around the salons a lot with his mother,” explains

pineapple and ginger. If you’re a “whiskey, neat,” kind of

co-founder Josh Boyd while Jef f lays back in an old-

drinker, the Blackjack will not disappoint; blackberries,

school swivel seat get ting his ears lowered. “Then he

lemon and Grand Mariner combine to bring out the best

decided to go to school for Cosmetolog y, where he

of good ol’ Jack. A rotating list of seasonal libations

developed a passion for all the social aspects of the

should be enough to keep things interesting, but Blind

salon—the real life things going on with the ladies and

Barber LA serves food too. Their menu is stocked with

the relationships that would build. He really wanted

gourmet grilled cheeses, salads, soups, and bar snacks.

to embrace that in a barbershop.” With a sprawling, comfortable back bar entered through And what better way to push the social aspect of a shop

the front shop’s towel closet, the new Culver City space

than to add liquor to the equation? In lieu of law school,

is much larger than its NYC counterpart. Formerly a

Jeff started working on a business plan for a barbershop

Citi Bank on Washington Boulevard, the team spent

with a speakeasy in the back. The only problem was, he

about four months gutting and re-building it to evoke

didn’t know the first thing about the hospitality business.

the quaint, ‘20s-style charm of the original location.

Luckily, an ex-girlfriend knew somebody who did. In

“There’s great synergy between New York and LA,” says

early 2010, Jeff’s ex introduced him to Josh Boyd and

Josh. “It was just a perfect number two.” As if being

Adam Kirsch, who were working together at one of Josh’s

bi-coastal weren’t cool enough, the Blind Barber is

several NYC bars. A couple of months later, the trio

now global thanks to a clever line of alcohol-infused

opened up their first location in the East Village, a cozy

grooming products. Two pomades, a shave cream, and

two-seat barbershop with a boozy secret. “We offer very

an aftershave are available in stores and online to keep

simple, yet quality services,” explains Adam, “We do

dudes looking sharp long after they’ve left the shop.

a haircut, a straight razor shave, and a hair or beard

So put down the hair gel boys, it’s time to step up your

trim—that’s it. And every service comes with a cocktail.”

game—after all, dapper will always be a good look.

10 7 9 7 WA S H I N G T O N B LV D. C U LV E R C I T Y, C A 9 0 2 3 2 B L I N D B A R B E R .C O M

63


FEELING GREEN JULIAN COX REINVENTS THE DAQUIRI WITH THE AVOCADO PROJECT text REBECA ARANGO photos RACHEL MANY

THE

first feeling you experience upon sipping “the Avocado Project” is

definitely surprise. You eat avocados all the time. You think you know exactly what they taste like. Turns out, you don’t.

The cocktail menu at Picca, Ricardo Zarate’s Pe r u v i an Fu si o n re s t aur an t in We s t L A , features exclusively L atin spirits like pisco, tequila, or mezcal, and “the Avocado Project” is no dif ferent. Head bar tender Julian Cox enlists Five Island White Rum to create what is essentially a ver y sophisticated, densely flavorful avocado daiquiri—a feat much more dif ficult than it sounds. Julian and the Picca team spent weeks trying to develop the perfect consistency and flavor for this tang y green drink (it was a project). Muddling led to absurdly alcoholic, thin liquid, whereas blending in ex tra avocado caused milkshake-like results. The secret? “We ended up finding out that if you mix the avocados with agave nectar, and then run them through a tamee —which is a circular device they use to fine strain pastas—it gives them a great texture, and then when you shake it all up it incorporates the flavor really well.” And boy is it flavor ful. This drink is sweet, t ar t and lusciously smooth, per fectly well balanced with acid from fresh lime juice and a kick of Vitamin C that preser ves the pret t y green color. Skeptics rest assured—i t tastes nothing like guacamole, we promise.

RECIPE: 1.5 oz Five Island Rum 1 oz lime juice 5 oz raw agave nectar 2 spoonfuls avocado puree Shake long and hard, double strain up in cocktail glass. Garnish with a pinch of salt.

64


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82 MERCER STREET

JUL. 22, 23, 24 2012

THE MANDALAY BAY

AUG. 20, 21, 22 2012

PROJECTNYLV.COM

VIMEO.COM/WATCHPROJECT

REGISTER AT PROJECTSHOW.COM

FACEBOOK.COM/PROJECTSHOW

@PROJECTSHOW


JULY

ART EVENT

Made in L.A. in 2012, all month long @ the Hammer

CONCERT

1

Beach House @ the El Rey

ART EVENT

Diverted Destruction 5 @ Loft at Liz’s

2

PARTY

Check Yo Ponytail 2 w/ Zebra Katz @ the Echoplex

CONCERT CONCERT

Ben BenHarper Harper++ Fitz Fitz&&the theTantrums Tantrums @@the theHollywood HollywoodBowl Bowl

3 DRINK EVENT

4

Hollywood Pub Crawl @ Various Hollywood Pubs

CONCERT

Family of The Year @ the Bootleg

5

CONCERT

Mates of State @ the Echo

ART EVENT

PARTY

Dev @ Avalon Hollywood

Colin Christian & Risk @ Corey Helford Gallery

6

OPENING

Sweet Crush Ice Bar @ Brentwood

7

EVENT

First Fridays @ Abbot Kinney

Will.i.am @ the Hollywood Bowl

8 9 CONCERT

Twista @ Key Club

CONCERT

CONCERT

10

CONCERT

Yacht @ the Echo

11

12

14

15

oOoOO @ the Central

Terraplane Sun Residency @ the Satellite

Origami Vinyl Presents High Five Fest, through 7/8 @ the Ace Hotel, Palm Springs

13 PARTY

CONCERT

POOL PARTY

Screeching Weasel @ the Fonda

CANINE EVENT

Dog Day Afternoon @ Downtown LA

CONCERT

THEATRE

Marina and the Diamonds @ the Fonda

CONCERT

Bouncing Souls @ the Mayan

La Cage Aux Folles @ Pantages, through 7/22

CONCERT

Saint Motel @ the El Rey

STYLE EVENT

Unique LA @ Barker Hangar, Santa Monica

FOOD EVENT

Bastille Day Party @ Papilles

PARTY ART EVENT

70

Contemporary Mexican Photography @ Kopeikin Gallery

Moby @ Photography Space, Century City

FESTIVAL

Bastille Day Los Angeles Celebration @ Kenneth Hahn State Rec. Area


MOVIE

The Nightmare Before Christmas @ Segerstrom Center for the Arts

PARTY

CONCERT

Fiona Apple @ the Palladium

Chris Douridas (KCRW) @ the Hammer

SHOPPING EVENT NoCo Week @ Old Pasadena

CONCERT

The xx @ the Fonda

CONCERT

Peace Be With You, Gil @ California Plaza

EVENT

The Moth Story Slam @ the Echoplex

FILM

Douglas Fairbanks’ Robin Hood @ the Orpheum Theater

CONCERT

CONCERT

American Royalty Residency @ the Echo

Frank Ocean @ the Wiltern

EVENT

Urban Hikes DTLA Cultural and Architectural Walking Tour @ Downtown LA

CONCERT

Talib Kwell @ the Roxy

PARTY

Miami Horror @ Drai’s

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

ART EVENT

Line Dancing @ Mark Moore Gallery

ART EVENT

The Sun and Other Stars @ LACMA

EVENT

FASHION SHOW

Third Wednesdays @ Dowtown Culver City

Kingpins Show @ Cooper Design Space

EVENT

US Open of Surfing @ Huntington Beach

FOOD FESTIVAL

FESTIVAL

LA Street Food Fest @ the Rose Bowl in Pasadena

Bloomfest @ Arts District, DTLA

FESTIVAL

6-Man Volleyball Tournament @ Manhattan Beach

CONCERT

T.Rex The Slider + Portugal the Man @ Photography Space, Century City

THEATRE

FOOD EVENT

DINE LA Restaurant Week

CONCERT

DubLab Presents ESP Residency @ the Echo

Memphis @ Pantages through 8/12

VISIT LACANVAS.COM FOR AN UP-TO-DATE STREAM OF LA’S BEST EVENTS.


AUGUST PARTY

Hood Internet @ the Central

CONCERT

Regina Spektor @ the Greek

PARTY

Chinatown Summer Nights @ Chinatown, Downtown LA

FOOD EVENT

Porchetta Roast & Ferragosto Celebration @ Cecconi’s

CONCERT

PARTY

Real Estate @ the Fonda

KCRW DJ Jeremy Sole @ the Hammer

CONCERT

Alabama Shakes @ the Fonda

CONCERT

Swamp Monster @ the Airliner

CONCERT

TOURNAMENT Nike 3 on 3 @ LA Live

1

2

FESTIVAL

Tennis @ the El Rey

FESTIVAL

Sunset Strip Music Festival

HARD Summer @ Los Angeles Historic State Park

3

4

9

11

12

CONCERT

13

14

16

18

STYLE EVENT

Raphael Saadiq + Band of Skulls @ Photography Space, Century City

LA Market @ Cooper Design Space

ART EVENT

FILM

Eat|See|Hear presents Purple Rain @ Marina Green Park

THEATRE

Mary Poppins @ the Ahmanson Theatre

Xavier Velhan: Architechtones @ VDL/Neutra House

CONCERT

The Kills @ the El Rey

FASHION EVENT

Agenda Trade Show @ Long Beach Convention Center

DRIVE-IN MOVIE

Pulp Fiction @ Devil’s Night Drive-In

MUSIC FESTIVAL ART EVENT

Art Walk @ Downtown LA

Rock the Bells @ San Bernadino

EVENT

Street Food Cinema 80’s Double Feature: Sixteen Candles + Valley Girl @ Exposition Park

THEATRE

Red @ Mark Taper Forum

ART EVENT

Augustus Thompson & Chris Lux @ New Image Art

72

FOOD FESTIVAL

LA Food & Wine Fest @ Santa Monica

FESTIVAL

Hester Street Fair @ Hollywood & Argyle


CONCERT

Diego Garcia and David Garza @ Levitt Pavilion, Pasadena

CONCERT

CONCERT

Wildcat! Wildcat! Residency @ the Echo

Grand Performances: He’s My Brother, She’s My Sister @ Bunker Hill, Downtown LA

ART EVENT

Zackary Drucker & Her Friends @ the Hammer

PARTY

CONCERT

Dub Club w/ Very Be Careful @ the Echo

Ghostface Killah @ the House of Blues LA

FOOD FESTIVAL

DRINK EVENT

Los Angeles Epicurean Festival @ the Vibiana

Wine Tasting @ Enoteca Drago

19

20

24

22

25

26 27

Project @ Las Vegas

Culprit Sessions @ The Standard Downtown LA

CONCERT

Celebrating Peace: Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Cindy Blackman Santana @ the Hollywood Bowl

29

CONCERT STYLE EVENT

PARTY

Ana Tijoux and Nomadic Massive @ California Plaza

THEATER Meet Me @ Metro Union Station

31 CONCERT

Niki and the Dove @ the Echo

PARTY

Spaceland Presents: Saturdays Off the 405 @ the Getty Center

1

MUSIC FESTIVAL

FYF Fest @ Los Angeles Historic State Park, through 9/1

CONCERT

Snoop Dogg & Ozomatli @ Los Angeles State Historic Park

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6/5/12 12:27 PM


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JUST GO WITH IT LION KING CANTSTOPGOODBOY text SHANA NYS DAMBROT

I ’d w atch e d Exit Throu gh the Gif t S hop an d all

These days, he doesn’t work out in the streets as

t he s e g re at do cum ent ar i e s . I kne w I ne e de d a

much, but he does cover a lot of gallery walls, and he

good name.” Like ever y young street ar tist, he has a

loves murals more than anything—which thankfully

personal relationship to the problematic equation of

are increasingly paid, permitted gigs. Speaking of

public succe s s versus law enforcement avoidance.

which, he’s been busy collaborating with System of a

H e’s b e e n c an t s t o p g o o db o y f o r ab o u t t w o y e ar s ,

Down frontman Serj Tankian on his latest solo album,

b u t h e w as “go o d b oy ” l o ng b efo re t h at — i t ’s his

creating the new cover art plus packaging and even

childhood nickname. One day he’s free-associating

the tour’s stage design. Not bad for a kid with three

and it comes to him: good boy. Then he star ts doing

weeks of art school. Although to be fair, goodboy is

these stop -sign sticker t ags with “c ant ” above and

not without fine-art schooling—his mother was a

“go o db oy” b elow the STOP. S o c ant stopgo o db oy is

classically trained painter. “She’d toss Playboy at me

really more of a challenge, or an obser vation, since

and tell me to draw! Yeah…I know. But I learned how to paint. Also, I remember this bookstore in Malibu

in retrospect, it ’s totally true.

was having a liquidation sale. I bought hundreds of His instantly recognizable images—the most visible

vintage art books for like fifty cents each. I went into

being the lion heads with auric crowns of photocollage-

every kind of found imagery—Japanese comics, DC

inspired rays—started going up around LA’s streets

blow-ups. The guys at Kinko’s (where I went to use

and into its galleries about nine months ago. Through

the paper-cutter) would freak out sometimes about my

perfect timing, business savvy, hard work, and genuine

shredding. One guy actually tried to stop me. And I was

talent, cantstopgoodboy hit like a meteor. “I know I

blacklisted at a comic book store, when they figured

skipped a bunch of steps. I went straight from being

out what I was doing.” But—you know what I’m going

nobody to being in galleries to being a brand in less

to say next—you cantstopgoodboy. Just go with it.

than two years.” He skipped more than that, dropping out of college after three weeks, but hanging around the Boulder campus for a spell to make art in secret.

C A N T S T O P G O O D B OY.C O M

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2012


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