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LIBRARY LINGO

Borrow

Take and use something belonging to someone else with the intention of returning it.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘I would like to borrow this book from the library.’

Return

Give, put, or send something back to a place or person. Example: ‘I finished reading my book, so I returned it to the library.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Renew

Make available for a longer period of time.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘I have not finished reading my library book. Please may I renew it for another three weeks?’

Reservation

The act of keeping back, witholding or setting apart.

Example: ‘The book I want is on loan to someone else. Please can I reserve a copy?’


LIBRARY LINGO

Fine

Sum of money exacted as a penalty.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘My library book was overdue so I had to pay a fine.’

Overdue

Retained longer than the period allowed.

Example: ‘I have kept my library book for longer than three weeks so now it is overdue.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Contents

A table of contents lists the names of the chapters in a book and the page on which each chapter begins.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘Contents pages can help you decide if a book is relevant to your research.’

Index

Alphabetical list of names, places, subjects and their page numbers typically found at the end of a book.

Example: ‘I found information about the Vietnam War by looking in the index of a book on American history.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Edition

The entire number of copies of a publication issued at one time or from a single set of type.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘There is a new introduction by Jonathan Bate in this edition of King Lear.’

Blurb

A short summary usually found on the back cover of a book. Example: ‘I decided to read The Knife of Never Letting Go because the blurb made it sound exciting.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Glossary

An alphabetical list of subject terms and their meanings usually found in the back of a book.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘Use the glossary in that bird book to find out what an aviary is.’

Bibliography

An alphabetical list of all the items that form the background reading for a piece of work.

Example: ‘There were several articles I did not quote from in my essay so I listed them in my bibliography.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Periodical

Publications which are issued at regular intervals, such as journals, magazines, and newspapers.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘Periodicals are a good source of current information about a subject.’

Catalogue

A list of all the books and resources in a library.

Example:‘The School Library catalogue, Eclipse.net, can be found in the list of favourites in Internet Explorer.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Reference book

Book commonly used to find brief facts or background information on a topic.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘Most reference books may not be borrowed.’

Encyclopedia

A book, or set of books, containing articles on various topics, usually in alphabetical order, covering all branches of knowledge. Example: ‘An encyclopaedia is a good starting point for an overview of a subject.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Plagiarism

‘Plagiarism is a specific form of cheating and is generally defined as presenting someone else’s work or ideas as your own.’ Pears, R. and Shields, G.(2010) Cite Them Right. 3rd edn. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘Copying and pasting someone else’s ideas into your essay is a form of plagiarism.’

Citation

Quotation from an authorative source used as corroboration. Example: ‘When you quote somebody you must give them credit by citing your source.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Keyword

A significant word indicating the main term, concept or subject in a document.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘Choose keywords to represent the most important concepts of your topic before you start an online search.’

Referencing

Referencing means acknowledging the sources of your information. ‘A reference tells your reader where the evidence for what you say has come from.’ Williams, K. and Carroll, J. (2009) Referencing and Understanding Plagiarism. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Example: ‘Harvard Referencing is one of the many styles of referencing.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Skimming

Rapid reading of text in order to get a basic overall idea of the content.

LIBRARY LINGO

Example: ‘Skimming the text helped me get a general idea of what the article was about.’

Scanning

A reading technique for locating a specific fact or piece of information. Example: ‘I quickly scanned the list for the name of Shakespeare.’


LIBRARY LINGO

Abstract

A brief summary of the main points of an article or book. Example: ‘Abstracts help readers decide whether it is worth reading the whole book or journal article.’

Photograph of open book - image 000006892972 from iStockphoto.com Layouts created by L. Watts - updated January 2017


Library lingo