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MAY 2013 | L3MAGAZINE.COM

MISSION CATWALK GEARS UP FOR ANOTHER SEASON TAMU CHAMBO & A PUNCH WITH A TWIST MUSIC REVIEWS AND MORE!

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AN INTERVIEW WITH

MIX MASTER DAVID THE DIRECTOR

KEVIN CROWN

NATURALLY BORN TO KILL THE CLUB

CEN’C LOVE

THE HIGHEST GRADE

OMI’s FIREWORKS


LIFE

L3MAGAZINE.COM IS NOT JUST A MUSIC MAGAZINE IT’S LIFE, LOVE & LYRICS

ADVERTISE WITH US EMAIL L3MAGAZINE@HOTMAIL.COM | CALL 1.289.217.2800

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WELCOME

REMEMBERING DONNA SUMMERS

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C RY S TA L G R A N A D O

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CRYSTAL GRANADO PR AND MUSIC! JENNIFER MENSTER

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eing a female in the industry of entertainment is difficult. Try being a female who is not only in the industry, but creating her own lane in the Caribbean in entertainment! That would be a good opening description for Trinidad & Tobago’s Crystal Granado. Working with a roster of clients, which include corporations, Turntable DJ’s and Artists, Crystal specializes in bringing people together through the arts, and does so through her company www.WeLimin.com / We Limin Promotions International. We caught up with Crystal in Trinidad and Tobago for a quick chat to discuss her background and career! JM: You’ve been surrounded by music since birth, and choose to build a career from that surrounding. Has the music industry been what you expected given that you have great knowledge from the inside? CG: In some ways the industry has surpassed my expectations and in others it hasn’t. My exposure as a child growing up in the industry was never in the business aspect, but rather the creative side. However, I do come from the corporate world; and I presumed that, the day to day business of the music industry would have been much more professional. But, unfortunately this is not the case and we are not quite there yet. There is still a lot more room for growth, change and development. My mentors and the people who have groomed my creativity growing up always encouraged me to further develop my skills, so naturally I expected the more mature artistes and cultural workers to be just as eager and supportive of the younger generation, but as well all know younger artistes don’t always have or get that assistance which need in order to develop their brand. But what I can tell you though, is that this generation; artistes my age are much more equipped with the fundamental skills & tools, educational background and business savvy that will surely push their career to that next level.

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You are professionally trained as a PR and Marketing specialist. How have you been able to balance that with your love and passion for music? The advantage I have when compared to a publicist or marketing expert in the corporate world is that there is no need for me to find balance with the love affair I have with Caribbean music and my career. My job description allows me the opportunity to witness first hand the process by which music is developed and produced and then taking that final product to the fans. It is a pore raising experience. I am surrounded by different genres of Caribbean music on a daily basis... Music is what I live and breathe; it’s food for the soul and I am fortunate enough to be able to combine all my loves and make money while doing it (Crystal flashes her magnificent smile). In addition to PR, Marketing and music, you are a writer with a few titles under your pen. Has it been difficult to multi-task career, music and writing? Juggling my career and writing definitely has been difficult. I work 20 hour days, 7 days a week. Leisure time is a luxury that I am rarely afforded. So my personal writing has taken a back seat. The difference now is that I am actually writing business proposals and press releases rather than poetry and pieces on social issues. But I do still write and scribble a few lines daily. While some people pray before they sleep, I tend to write before I go to bed. My supporters can look forward to something from me in the not too distant future; as I am currently working on a short socially controversial piece. ;-) Tell us about We Limin Promo and what you do for the company! When did that come in to being?! I am the CEO of We Limin and I handle most of the day to day operations of the organization. However while the final decisions are left up to me; I involve my team in the decision making process. A good leader also knows when to follow. The team members at We Limin are all university graduates and business professionals who have experience within the music industry; giving Team We Limin a competitive advantage. While everyone has clearly defined roles, we do work together in an effort to ensure that the clients’ needs are ALWAYS met. We Limin is a boutique agency, and we provide all business services for artistes/cultural workers. Those services include; Artiste Management, Marketing, PR, Sponsorship Acquisition, Social Media Management, Email Blasts, Event Management & Promotion, Website Development & Design etc. The story of how we came about is rather long as it stems years back. But in a nutshell; I acquired We Limin in 2010 after lengthy negotiations with the previous owner of the organization. Initially We Limin was an online entertainment promotions company supplying services to first generation immigrants in the USA. When I acquired We Limin, I re-branded and formed a team. I found that artistes needed a trusted & professional organization that they could base themselves, that would allow them to focus and concentrate on producing & developing their art; while being assured ALL of their business needs would be met.

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You work in an industry where women are sometimes not taken seriously. How do you handle those obstacles? There is this saying; “Women who try to be equal to men lack ambition.” I tend to apply that to my life, both professionally and personally. It may sound crass, but as a woman your aim should be higher. Over time I have developed a no nonsense attitude and approach when dealing with people. In addition to strengthening my professional skill-set, my stamp, my brand is distinctive enough that, while not intimidating, sets me apart! I would be lying to you if I said I have never had persons disrespect me. BUT, I’ve had those very same individuals then turn around after seeing my work; respect my work ethic and recommend my organization to other clients. It’s all about being professional and allowing your work to speak for itself, so that sex and gender never enters the equation. You work from Trinidad & Tobago but do you see yourself expanding so you work from the US, Canada or the UK? Actually we do have an office in Miami Florida. Most of our clients live abroad and those that are here travel extensively. We do envision ourselves expanding in the future to both Canada and the UK. Our mission and goal at We Limin is to take Caribbean Music to the international arena. Hence, we cannot limit ourselves to only North America and Trinidad & Tobago. Trinidad Carnival is the hottest party! What are some of the activities you get involved with for the season? Trinidad Carnival really begins for me sometime in June/July every year and becomes even more hectic after Miami Carnival is over. During the official season of Carnival; I handle bookings, PR, marketing, sponsorship acquisitions, presentations for clients who have entered the Soca & Chutney Soca Monarch Competitions etc. This year was definitely my craziest year that’s for sure. We have DJs and artistes on our client roster; so ensuring everyone is booked, they get paid for those bookings, that they have presence in the media, managing their time and ensuring that they meet project deadlines are all part of the craziness that I am involved in. But as crazy and hectic as it may be; as I sometimes go days without sleep, forget to eat and I’m always on the go, I wouldn’t have it any other way. Nor would I dream of doing anything else. I thrive in it all. Carnival is my time.

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Are you working on any initiatives to brand Soca on an international level? In June, 2012 we developed the “Boom Connect” initiative. This was designed to further brand Caribbean Culture and take it to the international arena. We believe that in order achieve this, we all need to work together. The slogan for Boom Connect is in itself self explanatory; “Each One Teach One! Each One Support One! Boom Connect!” Beyond the Boom Connect Initiative we are also currently working on individual and group projects with our clients to increase market share for both the We Limin Brand, our clients and by extension Soca Music in order to take our culture to that next level. Where would you like to see your company and what you do in the next 5 years? In the next five (5) years, I would definitely love very much to have more members on Team We Limin where each client is assigned a key account manager, and to see We Limin grow from a boutique agency to that of an internationally recognized Caribbean Entertainment Management Company. What advice would you give young women who want to be like you?! My advice to young people (young women AND men) would definitely be first of all; in order to gain respect in an industry dominated by a small group of long-standing stalwarts; you need to demand your respect. Generally, while the entertainment industry is much more laid back than the corporate world; be professional. Allow your work to speak for itself. Never bite off more than you can chew. Never ever tell a client that you can paint a wall when you’re not equipped with the paint, brushes and correct skill set to do so; you need to find your lane and own it. Ensure that you have a support system and if you don’t; you need to be that support system for yourselves. Invest in your dreams, and I don’t mean only financially. You have to invest your time and do the extra hours. Entertainment and the business of entertainment never sleeps. Everyone has to pay their dues in this industry, so if it means that you have to mid-tern or intern for someone or an organization then do it, you need all the experience you can acquire in order to be successful. Nobody is willing to take a chance and place their careers in the hands of someone they don’t know anything about or who is inexperienced. Most importantly, always remember you have a responsibility towards your clients and their career hinges on your ability to execute your job effectively and efficiently. Last but certainly not least; network your butt off! Keep up to date with Crystal and the We Limin team via Twitter >>> @WeLiminPromo

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MAY 2013 | NO. 021 CEO & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF VP & CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER PUBLISHER ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

NATASHA VON CASTLE DOMINIQUE RAPHAEL L3 GROUP OF COMPANIES - KEVIN SMALLS PAIGE HARRIS

EDITORIAL MANAGING EDITOR & LIFESTYLE EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR & CARIBBEAN AFFAIRS EDITOR CONTRIBUTING EDITOR & MUSIC EDITOR TRAVEL EDITOR MUSIC REVIEW EDITOR BEAUTY EDITOR COPY EDITOR SENIOR WRITER CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

ALLIE MASON TRICIA SPENCE TRE CARN SAIDAH GOMEZ JILL MAHONEY LONDYN NIKOLE XAVIER RAPHAEL STARLEETAH BROWN HEIKE DEMPSTER, MARCUS WELLER, NIYAH MYC, KARLA ASHLEY, ANASTASIA SARADOC, AEYOLA GEORGE, MIMI MAMICHULA, MARCO, ZAKADA MILTON, LANRE DAVIES, KERRY K. TAYLOR, KENDON POLAK, JENNIFER MENSTER SHENEA ‘PIA’ JORDINE INTERNS EDWARD BISHOP, ALICIA KEMP, JONATHAN NEWTON ART

ART DIRECTOR SENIOR DESIGNER ART ASSISTANT RETOUCHER INTERACTIVE WEB DEVELOPER

SANDRA HERNANDEZ SANCHA DESIGNS JAMALL THOMPSON JEROME MABINI TENIKA JONES

ADVERTISING ADVERTISING & PROMOTIONS MANAGER CHRISTINE HALL ADVERTISING ASSISTANT TERESA MAGLOIRE CIRCULATION CIRCULATION/MARKETING DIRECTOR RICHARD NEILSON SINGLE COPY SALES MANAGER NIGEL COLLINS

“L3” (ISSIN 1020-2000) is published monthly (Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, June, July, Aug, Sept, Oct, Nov, Dec) by L3 Group of Companies, 123 blank street, Scarborough, ON L1R2H2. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. Copyright © 2011. Title “L3” registered CAN Patent and Trademark Office. Printed in Canada. MANUSCRIPTS AND ART: The Publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts, art, photos or negatives. SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES (CAN) 1-289-217-2800 or l3magazine@hotmail.com. SUBSCRIPTION RATES and Possessions: 14.95 CAD/Year plus applicable taxes. SUBSCRIPTION PROBLEMS call 1-289-217-2800 or email l3magazine@hotmail.com.


WELCOME

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Greetings! One of the most difficult tasks to perform, especially under pressure, is leadership. To lead a group of people, a team, a country is an assignment that very few can do. External pressures combined with internal pressures, combined with behavior beyond control make an otherwise smooth terrain, difficult to navigate. The month of April was an extreme test of leadership. You had to hold your family together in the face of world events that have nothing to do with you, but affect you. You had to explain why a leaders’ threat of action against a neighboring country would have ramifications on your family even though you’re thousands of miles away. Closer to home, you had to explain why 2 people and possibly others would plot to hurt and kill innocent civilians as they participate in an event. What’s more, you had to explain an earthquake in Iran, and earthquake in China, and a fertilizer plant blast in Texas; all of this while explaining why the paycheck is shrinking while the bills are expanding; tough. In this months’ issue of L3, we speak to people you will be interested in, especially OMI and Kevin Crown who each had to show incredible leadership during a tough time; OMI with the passing of his Father, and Kevin when someone stabbed in the midst of a robbery. Neither of them allowed adversity to distract them from what they were born to do, and both of them used those events as fuel to make themselves and the people around them better. True leadership. If nothing else, the lesson to be learned is no matter what hardship we are facing, the show must go on! Connect with me >>> @NatashaVonC

Natasha Von Castle

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LIFE

THE YOUTH CODE

AN INTRODUCTION TO

OUR MISSION THE YOUTH CODE

SHORT: Enabling children recovering from abuse towards a life beyond surviving. LONG: The Youth Code is dedicated to supporting children recovering from abuse – We will create new initiatives and support existing programs that inspire and nurture children in recovery. Our objective is to provide “high risk” children with creative, supportive spaces in which they can heal and dare to dream of a life beyond surviving.

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THE YOUTH CODE

WHO WE ARE. WHAT WE DO. WHY IT’S IMPORTANT?

There are many forms of intervention and support available to child victims of abuse such as The Children’s Aid Society and shelters across Canada. The Youth Code, while partnering with these organizations will also create and implement new initiatives and programs of our own that are driven by our own unique focus. The Youth Code will provide children in recovery the funding to participate in arts and recreational programs such as: music, drama, visual arts, dance, martial arts, soccer and other such programs. These programs are a more appropriate form of therapy for child survivors. We believe that more funding and new programs that support art and movement therapy are desperately needed in our society. Our initiatives offer a child something to ‘do’ besides talking. As studies show, many children resist a verbal approach to therapy. One of the reasons for this is that small children simply may not have the language skills to tell what happened to them. Older children may distrust verbal communication because their abuser may have lied to them or threatened them. Some children simply do not want to talk to adults out of the fear that the adult may not believe them. Beyond therapy, as adults, we understand, well, the importance of art and physical activities upon our cultural and civic programs. However, these programs really go beyond these dynamics. For children who suffer from traumatic events, these outlets are a way in which to express feelings and emotions. Child abuse has long-term consequences. Abuse causes stress that is associated with disruption in early brain development. Extreme stress can impair the development of the nervous and immune systems. Consequently, as adults that were abused as children, are at increased risk for behavioral, physical and mental health issues. Art and movement therapy is more widely being used to further the emotional, cognitive, physical, and social integration of these children. This adds further value to THE YOUTH CODE our initiatives and makes it a crucial component to recovery. Some of the obvious benefits to children are: • Space to vent frustrations in a constructive way • Social adaptation • Ability to express feelings and emotions through play and creativity • Belonging to a community outside of the stigma of foster care and shelters • Improved self-esteem. • Normalcy of being a child

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THE YOUTH CODE

For more than three decades, art therapy has been documented as an important method in addressing the emotional pain of young survivors of violence. Research has shown it to be effective in the treatment of trauma disorders and is being increasingly used to address child abuse. Further studies that prove how high-quality, multifaceted programs focused on artistic and physical activity alters the course of intellectual development in young children. In many countries it is often a primary form of therapy with children who are recovering from physical or sexual assault, verbal abuse, and neglect. Some of the less obvious yet crucial benefits of exposure to these programs include: • Gaining a multisensory experience in which children are able to bond their emotional and logical sides of thinking. • Encourages children to express and understand emotions through artistic expression and through the creative process. • Higher IQ and cognitive performance. • Decreased need for special education. • Delayed parenthood. • Higher reading and math achievement scores thus improving literacy levels. • Prevention of high-risk sexual behaviors. • Alleviation of depression • Less inclined to become a smoker. • Lowered rates of alcohol and drug misuse • Less prone to heart disease, cancer, suicide and sexually transmitted infection in adult life. • Lowered rates of obesity. • Lowered risk of becoming a perpetrator or victim as an adult. Additionally, these programs place children in “pro-social” environments that are vital for positive development in young children and adolescents. These programs are structured leisure environments that are to be attended on a voluntary basis, with no obligation to continue participation. These activities provide a positive environment for participants who may eventually want to further themselves and challenge their interests. This positive environment influences children’s perception of values; if they are learning in social environments and enjoying the experience, they will hopefully continue to pursue their own interests and develop an enhanced reaction to education, peers and their own development. Research shows that children participating in art or physical based activities are using and learning key skills for future development, such as leadership, teamwork, initiative and ownership of their learning and achievements. These programs encourage a sense of community among peers. The activities may also discourage negative attitudes toward school, authority and life in general. Beyond the health and social benefits of early intervention and support in young survivors lives, there are many positive economic impacts, including lowered costs of hospitalization, less need of mental health treatment resources, increased child welfare awareness, and longer-term reduction of health costs to name a few. Visit The Youth Code online to make a donation, or get involved >>> http://www.theyouthcode.com/

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R A G G A M U F F I N E N T E RTA I N M E N T

FROM BLOGGING TO PERFORMANCE

RAFFAMUFFIN ENTERTAINMENT ADANNA ASSON

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opularly known for her controversial blogs, Carla “Babbzy” Babb is the third most followed Bajan on twitter and is passionate about Caribbean music and all things Caribbean. The female emcee has been actively involved in the entertainment circuit for a number of years and is turning things up a notch by forming her own entertainment company; Raggamuffin Entertainment. Raggamuffin Entertainment promises to be an entertainment company like no other, offering unique music consultation, bridging the gap between artistes and producers and the marketing of produced music initiated by Raggamuffin. “It sounds simple, but in all honesty it is a lot of work, I am not complaining though because I am enjoying every moment of it” were the words that slipped through Babbzy’s smile. Conceptualized approximately six months prior to its launch on January 01st 2013, Raggamuffin Entertainment has already secured a relationship with five talented Caribbean artistes. Her reasoning behind selecting these artistes is honest and as real as it gets, according to Babbzy, “These artistes in my opinion have gone unseen and un-noticed for too long and I wanted to get them into the space that is available.” The artistes she refers to are Antiguan Tian Winter and Bajan artistes Buggy Nhakente, Tabitha Johnson, Miguel White and Omar McQuilkin. On Monday April 01st 2013 the first collaboration between Raggamuffin Entertainment and the five talented artistes mentioned previously was released; a reggae riddim. The question of whether or not the Caribbean will be ready for it lurks in the minds of all those involved. Why? Babbzy says it best “Their voices are some of the sweetest I have ever heard, people are going to be really surprised about what they are bringing to the table.” Keep up-to-date with via Facebook >>> Raggamuffin Entertainment

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SUMMER SHAPE UP

SUMMER SHAPE UP!

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FRUGIVORE MAGAZINE

ummer is coming and we want you to look fabulous in that new dress, or your new outfit. Thanks to our friends at www.FrugivoreMag.com, we have a few exercises you can do at the office which take minimal time and can give you maximum results aka the body you want! *Before you begin any fitness regiment, consult your family physician.

1. If you want to work out your abdominal muscles, it is possible to do right from your own desk. To do seated crunches, make your sure feet are lying flat on the floor with your knees bent and you’re sitting up straight. To make sure you have good posture, adjust your chair so that it sits straight up and lean against the back. Keep your hands in your lap and take a deep breath. Every time you release your breath, push the lower part of your back against the chair as you tighten your abdominal muscles. You will feel a burn in your upper and lower muscles after several repetitions.

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SUMMER SHAPE UP

1. 2. The hamstring pull will stretch out your hamstrings while giving you more strength and flexibility as a result. To do the hamstring stretch, maintain a sitting up position with a perfectly- aligned back and torso. Place both of your hands on one of your knees, with both palms resting on your hamstring. Lift the opposite leg slightly toward your chest, while maintaining the bent position. Repeat for 5-10 repetitions, and switch to the other side to do the same. 3. A great exercise that works out your chest and shoulders can also be done while sitting at your desk. Again, you will want to be sitting straight up with good posture in your office chair Put both of your hands on the chair’s arms for balance, and lift your bottom off the chair slowly. When you lower yourself back down to the chair, avoid reaching the seat completely; and hold the stretch. Do 10-15 repetitions or as many as you can. 4. To get a good leg workout, sit up in your chair with excellent posture and lift one of your legs off the seat. Extend the leg straight out and hold it there for 2 seconds. Lower your foot until it almost reaches the floor and hold for another 2-3 seconds. Switch to the other leg and repeat these steps. Continue alternating leg stretches until you have done 15 repetitions on each leg. 5. If you enjoy the benefits of yoga, but don’t have time for a class, there are exercises you can do right at your desk. One of them is a stretch that is easy to do and will relieve a lot of stress and tension. Simple sit straight up and turn your head to the left while your torso turns slightly to the right, holding the stretch for 5 seconds. Repeat for 10 repetitions, then alternate sides.

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INFLUENTIAL WOMEN

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N AT U R A L B E A U T Y

NATURAL BEAUTY WITH APPLE CIDER VINEGAR

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pple cider vinegar (ACV), particularly the raw, organic, unfiltered kind, is one of those undiscovered natural remedies for skin and hair. Some people call it magical, and say that regularly incorporating a small amount of the vinegar into your diet can result in copious health and beauty benefits. Some also use it topically on their skin. As apple cider vinegar is a natural substance, many feel better about ingesting it than manufactured chemicals, but of course, it must be done in moderation. While ACV has great benefits, it is an acid therefore consume no more than a few teaspoons per day, and never drink it without diluting it with water or juice.

THE STYLE LIST

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N AT U R A L B E A U T Y

Here are some of the beauty benefits we’ve found: • Clear skin problems and stop acne. The acidity in the vinegar will dry out the blemish allowing new, healthy skin to take its place. • Regulate the pH of your face: mix 1 part ACV with 2 parts water and use as a toner using a cotton ball and lightly blotting around t-zone (forehead, nose, and chin). • Soothe a sunburn: add 1 cup ACV to your bath, and soak for 10 minutes • Give your hair body and shine: after you shampoo, apply 1/2 tablespoon ACV mixed with 1 cup of water, then rinse. • Encourage hair growth: ACV will stimulate hair follicles, and can also treat dandruff and an itchy scalp. • Give yourself an at-home pedicure by soaking your feet in equal parts warm water and ACV. Its anti-fungal properties will keep your feet healthy, soft, and clean. • Help with varicose veins because of its high levels of vitamins, which will work to deter and reduce the veins • Target age spots: mix 1 tablespoon orange juice with 2 tablespoons ACV to fade age spots In addition, ACV has many health benefits since it’s high in potassium and malic acid. It can also: • Lower cholesterol and blood pressure • Stop heartburn • Promote proper digestion • Control weight by breaking down fats so that your body can use them, rather than store them • Regulates blood sugar (key for those with Diabetes), as it will lower glucose levels in your blood • Fights sinus infections and sore throats by breaking down mucous Most strive for these benefits by consuming a little bit of Apple Cider Vinegar each day. Many create drinks with it; it is not advised to drink it alone, again, we suggest combining the vinegar with water or juice. We’ve also heard of a sweetened version: with about a cup and a half of water, 2 tablespoons ACV, a splash of apple juice and honey to taste. Others use it in homemade salad dressings. Apple cider vinegar has a potent odor, but if you can find a way to eat or drink it that you like, you’ll likely see some of the benefits we’ve described above. If you have one of the more severe ailments it is said to help (such as diabetes, high blood pressure or high cholesterol) we’d recommend speaking with your doctor before partaking.

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Available Exclusively in Canada

Buy You YOLO Rasta Bracelets Now! 2-Lined Music Hut - Malvern Town Centre TreaJah Isle Records & Tapes - 1514 Eglinton Ave. W. Twitter: @2LINEDMUSIC | @TreajahIsle 26

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M I S S I O N C AT WA L K

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M I S S I O N C AT WA L K

GET READY FOR SEASON 3 OF MISSION CATWALK!

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uilding on the successes of the previous 2 years, Mission Catwalk is back for season 3 and features a spectrum of talent ready to put scissors to fabric to create designer master pieces. The goal this season is to go from Runway to Retail! Here’s a look at this years contestants including the country they represent. For our friends I the Caribbean, Mission Catwalk airs on TVJ. Please check your listing for times!

CONTRIBUTED

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M I S S I O N C AT WA L K

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FROST SEASON

FROST SEASON:

SPRING & SUMMER TRENDS EDWARD BISHOP

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t has been a bizarre four seasons. The cold seems to have taken precedence with the weather, leaving us in a rut of darkened skies. With the chilly over-cast, a few of our winter pieces will be shining into early April. The seasonal change has been slow but normality is steadily accompanying us - meaning the time to focus on spring and summer trends are upon us. Purchasing a few items, whether they are clothing or accessories, will allow us to roll with the punches. Creating a new look with a mix of the old effortlessly. Many make the mistake of thinking being trendy requires buying every eye-popping trend marketed from their favorite stores. Having a mind-set allowing you do this can be quite strenuous for the pockets and at times for the sight. This season repeating the famous rule: “keep it simple!” prevents costume-like attire. It is extremely easy to end up looking like a costume party attendee with the taste of spring/summer. Expect bohemian with a 60’s twist sprinkled with some very interesting vivid prints to be on the retail and fashion styling platters. ZARA - CHECKERED PRINT DRESS - $59.90

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FROST SEASON

Colorful shoes will be the most organic way to update a wardrobe into the seasonal mix. One particular shoe which you will be seeing just about everywhere is the Boat Penny Loafer. Wearing heels 360 days a year, or 250 if you happen to reside in the vicinity of Real Housewife of Atlanta, Porsha Stewart (hope you caught that episode!), is a bit of a stretch for the regular commuter. The Boat Penny Loafer can make the mind a bit confused as to what to look for, however the shape is certainly a fit for a take on the “Now Flat.� Just imagine a casual boating shoe colliding with a conservative loafer and you get a fun twist on a flat that is slightly androgynous. What makes this shoe very eye-catching is the extremely playful colours, which can add some pizzazz to a conservative or casual look.

A.P.C. - $290.00

Pairing these chic loafers with an outfit creates an extremely fashion forward vibe, especially with a skirt or dress. Semi-sheer and sheer garments tied together with the seasonal footwear will have you feeling and looking fashion forward. Sheer is a big contributor to what is new and it happens to create a modestly vintage appeal.

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FASHION

FROST SEASON

ZARA - PRINTED DRESS - $79.90

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FROST SEASON

When shopping, you will find that every trend to be expected has unexpected twists. Some celebrities jumping on this bandwagon are Angela Simmons and Beyoncé who has made it clear she wants to see some bow action going on for this year. Typically we wouldn’t see Beyoncé pair black and white printed dresses with anything other than the regular go-to flats or heels, however the old-new loafers with the 60’s inspired prints can dress up or down a comfortable look, depending on your accessories. Whether venturing on a casual or professional outing, the key to rocking numbers for the season is confidence and maybe even a pull-over in case spring/summer decides to give some unpredicted frostbite.

ADIEU - $630.00

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO - $225.00

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FOOD

ORANGE MANGO RUM PUNCH

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ORANGE MANGO RUM PUNCH

A PUNCH WITH A TWIST! PETRA LAPTISTE OF WWW.CARAFRIQUE.COM

A

s we’re coming in to the spring and summer season, this beverage is sure to compliment the menu served at special occasions and intimate gatherings!

ORANGE MANGO RUM PUNCH ½ cup brown sugar ½ cup water ½ teaspoon orange zest 2 cups mango nectar 2 cups premium white rum, chilled 2-4 drops Angostura Bitters 2 mangoes peeled and mashed Ice cubes

Directions

In a pot simmer water, brown sugar, orange zest, mango nectar and mashed mangoes or 5 minutes until smooth. Remove from heat and pour in a glass container and chill overnight in the fridge. One hour before serving, strain the mixture and let it sit in the freezer (it will not completely freeze). When ready to serve, remove from the freezer and combine ice cubes and Angostura Bitters. Blend until smooth. Served in chilled glasses and garnish with orange peel! L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | M AY 2 0 1 3

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FOOD

D E S S E RT W I T H TA M U C H A M B O

L3’S ENTREE MENU SELECTIONS WITH JIMMY TAMBOU

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D E S S E RT W I T H TA M U C H A M B O

SWEET POTATO FRIES Seasoning Mix:

Directions

EGGPLANT BURGER

Directions

2tbsp sea salt 1tbsp brown sugar ½tbsp cinnamon 1tbsp chili powder

1 large eggplant, peeled and cut crosswise (I cut 1/2-1 inch wide) 1 tablespoon sea salt 4 cups breadcrumbs 1 cup grated vegan cheese 1 tablespoon chives 1/2 cup of ground flaxseeds 1 cup of hot water 1/2 cup of wheat flour 6 tablespoons olive oil

MARINATED MUSHROOMS 1/3 cup red wine vinegar 1 tbsp olive oil 1 small onion, thinly sliced 1 teaspoon sea salt 2 tablespoons parsley 1 teaspoon ground dry mustard 1 tablespoon honey 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed 1 1/2 cup of shiitake mushrooms

1. Cut 2 sweet potatoes into 1/2 inch matchsticks. 2. Fry sweet potatoes until gold brown once finished immediately toss with seasoning mix.

Start by draining the eggplant: layer sliced eggplant with gentle sprinkle of salt in a colander and place a plate or lid on top). The eggplant will leak out about 2 tbs. of moisture (about a half hoursometimes). I lightly wipe excess salt off with damp paper towel. Heat oven to 425 degrees; prepare cookie sheet with half the oil and heat in oven while dipping/breading the eggplant. Mix together vegan cheese, chive and breadcrumbs put in large Zip-lock bag. Dipping process: 1. Mix flax seed meal with boiling water and allow to sit for 3-4 minutes then beat with a whisk- the mixture will appear thick and somewhat slimy. This is our egg substitute. 2. Place about eggplant slices in flour and shake to coat lightly. 3. Dip eggplant in beaten egg substitute (flaxseed batter) 4. Dredge in bread crumb mixture. 5. Line eggplant onto cookie sheet. 6. Bake for about 10-15 minutes until bottoms are lightly browned, and flip and finish cooking the other side. 7. Remove and cool on a wire rack.

Directions

In a medium saucepan, mix red wine vinegar, olive oil, onion, salt, parsley, dry mustard, honey and garlic. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat. Stir in mushrooms. Simmer 10 to 12 minutes, stirring occasionally. Transfer to sterile containers and chill in the refrigerator until serving. You can catch Jimmy in Toronto every Saturday afternoon at 1514 Eglinton Ave. W. with this and other recipes.

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BEAUTY

MOISTURIZER TIPS

ADVERTISE WITH US Contact Rohan ‘Dillinger’ Beckford to have your ad placed in L3 Magazine! Phone: 289.217.2800 (Canada) | 347.370.6829 (U.S.) Twitter: @Mangoheadilings 44

L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3


LIFE

AVAILABLE NOW ON ITUNES! Grab your copy here today!

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MARCIA GRIFFITHS

&

TANYA STEPHENS

WANT LOVE KIRKLEDOVE RECORDS

DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION

AVAILABLE NOW ON ITUNES! Grab your copy here today!

L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | J U LY 2 0 1 2

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ON THE SCENE WHEN DUBS DID NICE 2013


LOVE ADVICE

MISS MAY 2013

Photographer: Jerome Dupont © 2013 Model: Kirstin

L3MAGAZINE.COM | JUNE 2012

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L

O

V

E

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L A F FA I R S

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DJs WE LOVE TO HEAR SPIN AND YOUR EARDRUMS WILL FALL IN LOVE TOO! OLIVA LEWIS

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L A F FA I R S

HERBALIZE IT SOUND Herbalize It Sound was born and raised in East Holland in the city of Enschede (pronounced En-Ska-Day). Created by Stef in 1995, the musical essence of Jamaica was the foundation upon which the sound was built. In 1998 Sultan joined the Sound, followed by Daddy Jim in 2001 and D1 in 2005. Not long after, Fyahmunk, Carlito and Souljah joined making the sound what it is today. A Herbalize It Event means attending and energy filled occasion packed with energy, excitement and an element of surprise! For more info on Herbalize It Sound, visit them online at www.herbalizeit.nl

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LOVE

D I G I TA L D OW N L OA D S

DOWNLOAD

L3’S

1 2 3

“Come Shock Out”

CALI P

“Sweetest Thing”

KONSHENS

“Ah So Mih Tan”

4

“Don’t Give Up”

5

“Stop Sign”

6

7

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BUSY SIGNAL

BUGLE

KONSHENS

MORGAN HERITAGE

“The Girl is Mine”

MICHIE MEE

“Bad Gyal Bubble”

CHRONIXX

8 9 10

DELLY RANX

MAVADO 15 “Always On My Mind”

CBLOCK

MIRIAM SIMONE 16 “Dem Ah Chat” MAHR FT. 17 IBA JAH MALI

“Got It Forever”

“Wifey”

CHAM

“Stripper Pose”

11

“Lawless”

12

“Baby It’s You”

13

“Love For Mama”

14

“Judgement”

CHAM

AMMOYE

DEMARCO

CHRONIXX

“The Time is Now”

18

“Superstar”

FAZE FT. PATRICE 19 “Can I Have You” RANDY VALENTINE 20 “Bring Back The Love”

Charts are based on the most active DJ downloads via the L3 Music Distribution service.

L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | M AY 2 0 1 3

KING ALI BABA FT. OCTAYNE


RIDDIM SELLERS

TOP

HOTTT DANCEHALL RIDDIM SELLERS IN CANADA Compiled by Jah Chozen from TreaJah Isle Rcords and Tapes

1

JA PRODUCTIONS

2

REAL LINKS PRODUCTIONS

3

GUTTY BLING RECORDS

4

UIM RECORDS

5

ARMZHOUSE

AFTERLIFE RIDDIM

FYAH BOUNCE RIDDIM SNEAK PREVIEW RIDDIM JUPITOR RIDDIM FIRST CAPITOL RIDDIM

HOTTT REGGAE RIDDIM SELLERS IN CANADA

1

CASHFLOW RECORDS

2

OVERSTAND ENTERTAINMENT

3

LIV UP PRODUCTIONS

4

DON CORLEONE

5

SILLY WALKS DISCOTEQUE

TROPICAL ESCAPE RIDDIM ROOTSMAN RIDDIM ASPHAULT RIDDIM SCRIPTURES RIDDIM HONEY POT RIDDIM


SOCARIFIC SELECTIONS

AMERICIAN TOP 10

1

SUPER BLUE “FANTASTIC FRIDAY”

2 BLAXX “LEH GO” GARLIN 3 BUNJI “DIFFERENTOLOGY”

4

MACHEL MONTANO HD & KERWIN DUBOIS “POSSESSED”

RHYTHM INTERNATIONAL’S MC FIRE KYLE TOP 10 SOCA Compiled by Rhythm International’s MC Fire Kyle

5

BUNJI GARLIN

6

MACHEL MONTANO HD

7

CASSIE

8

5 STAR AKIL

9

FYAH EMPRESS FT. FAY-ANN

“SAVAGE” “FLOAT” “WHISTLE & HORN” “PARTIER”

“RUM PLEASE”

10

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FIRE.KYLE Twitter: http://twitter.com/mcfirekyle

LYRIKAL “25/8”


D I G I TA L D OW N L OA D S

RICO VIBE’S TOP 10 VIDEO PICKS FOR

TOP 10 CHARTS

MAY

Compiled by Rico Vibes

1

KONSHENS FT, DARRIO

2

PROTOJE

3

BUSY SIGNAL

4

AMMOYE

5

TIFA FT. SPICE

“GYAL SIDDUNG” “KINGSTON BE WISE” “REGGAE MUSIC AGAIN” “RADIO” “WHY YOU MAD”

6

LADY SAW

7

KONSHENS

8

ALISON HINDS

9

JAH CURE

10

“HEELS ON” “COUPLE UP” “FALUMA MAKELELE” “THAT GIRL”

TARRUS RILEY “SORRY IS A SORRY WORD”

JAH CURE “THAT GIRL”

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MUSIC REVIEW

A TRIBUTE TO SWEET TALKING AND A RETURN OF SINGERS! CONTRIBUTED

58

W

ith a focus on Singers, not DJ’s and not Sing-Jays, and taking a page from Studio One and Treasure Isle records from the late 60’s and early 70’s, Raggamuffin Entertainment makes a triumphant announcement to the Reggae community with the Tribute to Sweet Talking riddim. Just as Reggae lovers looked forward to the voices of Alton Ellis, Leroy Sibbles, and Phyllis Dillon, the team at Raggamuffin Entertainment want you to look forward to the voices of Tabitha (the only female on the roster so far), Miguel, Tian Winter and Buggy Nhakente (pronounced Na-Ken-tay). After listening to the riddim, we have to say that this bass heavy joyride is exactly what the doctor ordered, and is exactly what keeps the songs on repeat. Tabitha sings of “Paradise,” Miguel sings of being “Lonely,” Marz wants a “Hideaway” and Buggy goes the historical route with “Slave Master.” Tian Winter covers the song “Another Sad Love Song” which was picked up by the ears of a very prominent singer (whose career began by singing covers) and let’s just say the singers reaction was approval of Tian’s performance. Nice. Considering it’s their first time out, we have to rate this riddim as 3.4 out of 5!


NEW RELEASES

FIRST RIDDIM

Another Roots Production

POPSTYLE RIDDIM RELOADED

ME MUMMA RIDDIM

YOUR EYES

THE REAL ONE

BETTER TOMORROW

FORGIVENESS

4PLAY RIDDIM

Khalilah Rose

Craig Voicemail

Khago

UIM Records

Wilefiya Inc

Etana


LOVE

MUSIC REVIEW

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MUSIC REVIEW

REGGAELAND HAS US HIGH ON LOVE!

G

reetings! Experiences teaches wisdom and we would say experience keeps the duo called ReggaeLand producing quality hit riddims that make us want to move! The High on Love riddim is an uptempo Lover’s Rock styled flow that makes us optimistic about love and life. Featuring diverse voices from Jamaica and Europe, the riddim is built to be enjoyed in all markets. Although every song on the riddim is good, the stand out is Anthony Que’s song “Rastaman House” in which the Rasta artist gives an invitation for his lady to join him on home. Using a simple analogy, the artist sings “you make me high, high, high on love, you’re like my high grade weed.” Every woman wants to know she has this effect on her boo so it’s no wonder that it’s so popular with ladies around the world. We only recommend the best, and this riddim ranks up there! Make sure you get it on iTunes! L3’s rating is 4.5 stars out of 5!

CONTRIBUTED

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MUSIC REVIEW

P MYSTIKAL REVOLUTION’S DIVIDE AND RULE CONTRIBUTED

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utting Roots Reggae front and centre, Mystical Revolution uses the genre to spread messages of awakening and positivity as well as Love as featured on track 3, “Love Me” which features Queen IFrica. That track, performed as a duet reminds us of words that would have been exchanged between Romeo and Juliet except that death is not the ending, instead, facing life together hand in hand is the course this couple is charting. We hope to hear this song on radio it’s that good. Additional stand out tracks include “Never Get Away” in which wrongdoers receive a warning that they no matter how much wrong they do, and despite thinking no one is watching, they’ll never get away. “Gangster Story” shares the perils that befall youths who choose that lifestyle, and “Love Won’t Leave Me Alone” is an excellent showcase of the bands arrangement skills as the song falls more in the Jazz zone than Reggae. Considering Mystical Revolution is a young band, they have done enough on their album Divide and Rule to catch our attention. A stand out element would have been to hear them cover a classic Joseph ‘Culture’ Hill song, or even a Dean Fraser song; that move would engage younger and mature fans. L3’s rating is 3 stars out of 5


MUSIC REVIEW

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LOVE

MUSIC REVIEW

MIRIAM SIMONE DOESN’T CARE DEM AH CHAT!

S

o this young lady who goes by the name of Miriam Simone has made international waves. She’s done it with no tricks, and no gimmicks. She did it with hard work (and is still working) and a pure heart which comes through in her music! Miriam’s new project is the release of her mixtape ‘Dem Ah Chat’ which is based off her hot new single of the same name, produced by Giark, son of the legend Bobby Digital. Capitalizing on the fact that she has the international Reggae communities attention, Miriam gives us 14 of her songs that allows listeners to get to know her catalog. Adding to the goodness of the release, Carlito from Herbalize It Sound from The Netherlands is at the mixing controls and drops a few signature jingles amping up the goodness we hear in Miriams voice. Big up Mr. Swingback on the mastering! And by the way, Salute to Cali P for giving us that nice surprise at the end of the mix! This is definitely a must add to your collection, and, when Miriam comes to town, get out to her show and support. More from this artist coming soon! Enjoy the mix here >>> https://www.box.com/s/qp31tsthaw32sogunzev

CONTRIBUTED

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MUSIC REVIEW

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LOVE ADVICE

2-Lined Music Hut Malvern Town Centre 31 Tapscott Road 416-264-3999

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LOVE ADVICE

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ON BLAST

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ON BLAST

CHI-SALAAM

CREATING HITS IN PEACE!

C

reative and Quality driven are just a couple of words that describe music producer and songwriter Chi-Salaam, his name is an acronym which stands for (C)reating (H)its (I)nPeace. Prior to 2011 he was known by the stage name Plaboy-Chi. The Windy City native prides himself on innovative beat-making skill, songwriting ability, and song conception. Along with vocal production and song mixing ability, Chi-Salaam is the producer who is always determined to take a song from point A to Z with great results. Now living in New York, Chi-Salaam has worked with a number of artists including Paul Wall, Bobby Valentino, Slim from the group 112, Rza, Lil Kano, Brooklyn Zu, Lafonda, Gina Rose, Colt Ford, KarLethal Brigante, ASCAP Compilation albums, and many others. Chi-Salaam has also landed multiple licensing deals placing his production on MTV, VH1, BET, Spike TV, and Fox. His music appeared on various television shows including but not limited to: “True Life,””The Real World,”“My Super Sweet 16,” “The Shop,” “College Hill,” “Unique Whips,” P.Diddy’s “Making The Band” and “106 n Park.” He has also produced music for radio and television commercials for clients such as Burger King, Soft Sheen, and others. Being a hands-on producer and songwriter, Chi-Salaam works on all facets of the recording phase with artist and songwriters. Under his company, Sleeplesspro Entertainment Group LLC., he has always believed that one of the most important aspects to being a successful producer is “breaking” new artists. His production and songwriting has helped multiple up and coming artists in New York, Washington D.C, and other markets win Underground Music Awards. He was also nominated “Best Emerging Producer” in New York’s Underground Music Awards, considered the “Grammys of the underground” by Riggs Morales, Director of A&R of Shady Records. Chi-Salaam also works with various songwriters, musicians, and reference singers sprinkled throughout the United States and Europe which helps him to continue to provide full quality Pop, R&B, and Hip Hop songs to recording labels, publishing entities, artist’s managers and the like. Inspired by a variety of music legends ranging from Quincy Jones to Prince and from Timbaland to the Rza, producing and songwriting continue to be his passion. Formally trained in Audio Production, Music Editing, and other aspects of the music business at Chicago’s Columbia College, Chi-Salaam has a wealth of experience and knowledge, and brings versatility to any project with what he refers to as a “pretty gritty” style, often using the perfect balance of hard and soft elements in his music. So keep your ear and eyes open, you’ll definitely hear more of Chi-Salaam for years to come.

CONTRIBUTED

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ON BLAST

THE SMOOTH GROOVES OF

L-UNIQUE

H

e is a singer, songwriter and producer. He is smooth, he’s got groove and he is Lamar a.k.a. L-Unique! With a style best described as contemporary R&B with a touch of Hip Hop, this artist from Trenton, New Jersey started writing rhymes at a young age. Developing an interest in rap, L-Unique became one of the hottest underground MC’s in South Jersey. As a child, L was surrounded by music, and recalls his Mom singing R&B classics which ignited his passion for singing. The first step was working on demos! Working on demos and producing, creating instrumental tracks for other artists in and around the Tri-State area (New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia) was a natural extension of his budding talent. As a producer / engineer L’s mixing and mastering skills became well respected and allowed him to be known as “the go to guy” to get a mix. With soulful R&B vocal styling’s that have been compared to R.Kelly, David Hollister and Musiq Soulchild, his songwriting skills evoke memories of Curtis Mayfield making his voice one of the most requested. What’s more, most musical compositions are written, sung and produced by himself. He is a truly talented and gifted artist who is bringing soul and passion back to music. After years of grinding, recording demos and performing live shows, this incredible artist is ready to have a break-out year which will undoubtedly bring him closer to achieving the level of success and recognition he deserves. Preview L’Unique’s song “Girl You Got Me Open” on Box.com!

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ON BLAST

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ON BLAST

SOUTH AFRICA’S ICE QUEEN

CLEO!

S

outh African Hip Hop awards nominee 2012 , Cleo Ice Queen’ is a 23 year old Zambian born Hip Hop artist catches anyone’s attention as soon as she enters the room. Cleo began listening to hip hop music from the tender age of 6 years old and started rapping since the age of 11 and this is where her passion for the entertainment industry really begun. Cleo relocated to South Africa in 2007 to further her education and music career. The name Ice Queen was derived from her love of jewellery which is called ‘Ice’ in Hip Hop slang; “Ice Queen no villain” as she puts it. Ice Queen is currently working on a few of mixtape projects. Her recently released Topic Of Discussion mixtape features collaborations with JK, and has also shared the stage with the likes of Zone Fam, Amber Davis , Maky2, B1 Mr perfecto, Fameboy Hydro, Crisis from Zambia, Morale, Sean Pages, Muzart, Hanni of Big Brother Africa, CPWAA of Uganda and LIC of Nigeria. Cleo’s biggest feature of 2012 happened when she recorded with Khuli Chana on the official ‘Tswa Daar’ remix. As an aspiring actress and model, we can safely say Cleo a.k.a. The Ice Queen is entertainment as a whole, and this is what she has a passion for. Look out world, because here comes South Africa’s finest! Connect with the artist on Twitter >>> @Cleo_icequeen

CONTRIBUTED

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ON BLAST

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L Y R I C S


O OMI’s

FIREWORKS NATASHA VON CASTLE

W

hen you have the right musical composition matched to the right voice, matched to the right lyrics, you have the recipe for an International Superstar. When you have the right heart, matched to the right task, matched to the right intent, you have the support of the universe and I am here to tell you that OMI is that artist who is perfectly matched! He is humble and assertive. He is intelligent and feeling. He is multi-dimensional, and a person we are cheering for. All who have ears, let them hear ‌ OMI!


NVC: OMI! Language is interesting when it comes to music. You can be a hit in your country where you speak a certain language, but not outside that country because the language is not understood. Your language is universal. Was that by design?! OMI: In Jamaica, patois is a dialect so we are an English speaking country. But having the ability to speak English, proper English, I tend to use it mostly so there isn’t a communication barrier where it comes to understanding my music. Your apple hasn’t fallen far from the tree. Your Dad (rest in peace) is Jah Ken who was a noted musician and artist. What is your earliest experience with music, and with him in music? Well growing up as I a child I have always been around my father. When he was composing his music his lyrics; I’ve always known him to be a real lover as he always sings about love. I’ve always been fascinated by his songs and his sounds. It was not though my high school years that I discovered my talent in music. I have a talent to write, and in my early 20’s I discovered my sound. I’ve said a few times before that an artist will sound like a million and one other people before he or she discovers their true sound or their signature. That has been the journey for me. My earliest experience with music comes with my Dad who died when I was nine years old, and I was always fascinated by how he did it. I feel obligated to carry on the baton so to speak. I read that you decided to pursue music as a means of keeping your family together after your Dad’s passing. Do you feel you accomplished that goal and is it difficult to maintain as you become more popular / famous? Yes in a sense because the more famous you become is the more you will be on the road, and you’ll hardly have time for family (in the physical sense of being there), but on the basis where my Father used to do this and he was loved by the rest of my siblings and my Mother, maybe they are quite proud of me and I’m growing; growing in his image. I kind of remind them of him. It’s a tribute to him; that’s how they view it. They are proud! Even though I am not there physically, they know that they can pop in and see me and listen to their brother do his thing. Why do you think music chose you? By the way, we think music made the right choice, but why you? First of all thank you very much for the compliment. I think music evaluates people and as you say it chose me, and that’s because of my qualities. The passion that I have for it; it knew that I would treat it good. It knew that I would pursue my goal as a musician, and it knew that I wouldn’t stop until I produced the best product and I guess that’s why it chose me. Maybe too because of my ethics which is of key importance.


As we said, music made the right choice. Your lyrics are like paint on a canvass and they tell us stories. With that said, how do lyrics come to you? Do you need to be in seclusion, or do they come from anywhere? Here’s the thing, and I’ve always said this. I don’t think an artist can experience everything. At some point you will have to solicit information through other people’s lives and see it through their eyes and their perspective and create music from there so that is how I view it. Yes I work better in isolation, but the topic has to come from somewhere and will have to go out there to get those topics, then come back to the studio and put it in the form of a musical so it can be interpreted by the people after we finish creating it. Tell us about the creation of “Cheerleader” and “Fireworks.” Alright! I wrote “Cheerleader” a long time ago and it wasn’t even supposed to be a complete song. It got completed when Mr. Dillon heard it and said ‘we have to add another verse to that song.’ He loved the concept and I think the reason why he felt that way is because A cheerleader is really someone who is there for you and cheering you on through the thick and thin when your dreams and goals and aspirations seem impossible to accomplish. That person is there in your corner cheering you on so it’s pretty self explanatory in terms of the lyrics, but just to confirm, that’s what it’s all about. Anyone can be a cheerleader and not just a significant other! So Team L3, and L3 Magazine can be one of OMI’s official cheerleaders?! (Laughing) Exactly! As for “Fireworks,” I want to create mystery around having sex. As I mentioned before, the topics in life never changes, it’s a matter of how the artist interprets the topic and puts it in song. Everything is the same: love, sex, broken heart, social commentary and so forth. How an artist interprets the topic makes the difference, so, this is the element I want to incorporate in my music. I wanted to create a song talking about sex, but singing from a metaphoric perspective. The music video for “Fireworks” is humorous and tells a great story! How involved were you with the visual / treatment / creativity behind the concept of the video?! First of all it was team work; let me point that out from the beginning. The director had his take, but the camera sees this the way the viewer sees it so there are certain things that we were improvised to add my element. It may not have been in the treatment, but it came out during the filming based on the ideas the team brough forward. There were things I was doing on set that couldn’t be asked to come out of me, it was just things that I knew to do and that’s what I did. Tim Cash the director did his part, Specialist did his part giving me the idea of what he wanted me to bring across in the video and I in turn interpreted that and tried to deliver in the visual. It is a team effort.


“I THINK MUSIC EVALUATES PEOPLE AND CHOSE ME... BECAUSE OF MY QUALITIES. THE PASSION THAT I HAVE FOR IT; IT KNEW I WOULD TREAT IT GOOD.”


Your newest single “My Old Lady” speaks for every single child who couldn’t find the words to say thank you to their Mother. And it’s so much more than that. Words like those exemplify our point that music made the right choice. What was your Mom’s reaction when she heard the song? OMI: Oh boy! She cried. She felt so proud; it was an overwhelming moment. She came up to the studio, and sat down. Before I share that side of the story, I had been telling her over the phone ‘Mommy, I wrote a song for you’ and she said ok. As I am now living in Kingston, and that’s where the studio is, she had to come to hear the song. She came and we sat down and it did everything that I wanted it to do. I wanted her to truly know how I felt about having a Mother like her. I am not disappointed in the least by the effect it had on her, and the effect it’s having on people right now right around the world. All the fame and success you’ve experienced so far is fantastic, but tell us how your faith has played a role in where you’ve reached so far and where you’re aspiring to go! Faith. I was raised in a Christian home. I don’t do anything without asking God’s guidance. If I should leave my home and don’t pray for the whole day (which doesn’t really happen) it feels like something’s wrong; something’s missing. I ask him (God) to ordain everything I’m doing. This business is a tough one to break into; it’s competitive and has its ups and downs. This is really what I want to do with my life, so I always ask for his guidance and blessings in my endeavors. I have not gone through many struggles musically as it relates to trying to find my place. Specialist met me as an artist who was untouched. I was never ‘out there’ on the scene before so I was not under the management of anybody else. This ties in to faith and walking with God to know what to do and what not to do. It is by Faith that I was ready at the time I was. Unlike other younger talents, you are blessed to have Da Specialist and Robert Livingston in your camp. Those two are responsible for names like Patra, Shabba, Shaggy and so many more. How do you feel do be working with them? Overwhelming. Yes. Intimidating, no! The reason why is because we have an understanding. One of the biggest downfalls of the Artist / Management relationship is when you don’t have understanding. You have to take the time out to get to know each other as a person first; that relationship can cost the business aspect fo the relationship. Here’s where I’m going with this… This is who you are (artist to management), this is what we’re looking for (management to artist), this is what we expect from you (management and artist to each other), then we shouldn’t have a problem and that’s how we get longevity in the relationship. I see it going much further than this with both Mr. Livingston and Clifton ‘Specialist’ Dillon. I see it going much further because we have an understanding; everyone plays a role; it’s a team effort. The sooner you understand that as an artist, the better it will be for you. There is no one man team out there.


One of the ideologies both producers believe is there is no such thing as ‘no’ and ‘can’t!’ Have you ever said the words ‘no’ or ‘can’t’ as a slip of the tongue, and if you did, what was their reaction?! No I’ve never said that! I am of the same opinion and that’s how I’ve developed the rating that I have thus far; both managers agree that I will get it done. I am not one to say ‘I am going to try’ or ‘it’s going to be difficult.’ Your goal was to use music to keep your family together; you accomplished that. What is the next goal or goals? I see myself helping people. You can’t live for yourself. Not only helping people with their goals musically but to help people in unfortunate situations. If I should be here, do good music, then die, and not have more impact on people’s lives, I wouldn’t feel happy in my grave. I want to help people musically yes, but in their life situations as well; whatever that is. I’m talking about helping people around the world, not just in Jamaica. It has to be worldwide as that is where my music is reaching … worldwide and not just in Jamaica. The name of our magazine is L3 and each L has a meaning. The first is for Life, the second for Love and the third for Lyrics. What general advice can you give our readers on Life, on Love and on Lyrics? Life. Life is like a portrait. It’s like a painting; very expressive and like an abstract painting. Sol many different interpretations; diversity in culture, people’s thinking. That is what life is. Love. Love is a perception. What is love to you may not be love to me. My interpretation might be too much for you, your interpretation might be too little for me, but when we both say ‘I love you,’ there are certain general things that should be inside that word such as compassion, feeling, selflessness and understanding as well as compromise. Lyrics. Lyrics is a way of expression; speaking in a way that you can capture an audience. You’re using words to paint a picture of Life! Connect with OMI via Twitter >>> @OMIMUSICONLINE


M D AN INTERVIEW WITH

MIX MASTER DAVID HEIKE DEMPSTER

HD: Tell us about yourself. Where are you from? MMD: I am from St Andrew, Jamaica. I grew up with a very supportive family, they provided me with a grounded upbringing. Education, discipline, respect and hard work were instilled in me at a young age which was the foundation for my business ethics today. How did you get started in the business? Music has always been a huge part of my world. It was always been an outlet for me. Every day after school, I would play music with the community sound system and by the age of 10 I was convinced that music was my calling. When I was 16 I was given the opportunity to be a part of a major Sound System called “Super Saint Disco� in Stony Hill. This allowed me the opportunity to travel across Jamaica to perform in sound clashes and dances. I had a friend, Christopher Muncey aka Zj Capone, who was an engineer at the time at a popular radio station called Hot 102 FM. Sometimes he would invite me to visit the station and eventually I learned how to operate the equipment and produce radio programs. I was noticed by the station manager, Junior Chong and I started to run four award winning and top rated current affairs radio programs for Hot 102 FM.


Share some career highlights with us. What is the most outstanding experience you had when playing? I’ve been blessed to have many highlights in my career. Some of the moments that stand out to me are Twisted Spirits at the Jamaican Dream Weekend, Igloo in Miami, Florida, with a crowd of about 6,000 people during MLK weekend, a Beres Hammond Concert in Atlanta, Georgia and CIAA weekend in North Carolina. Being able to be a part of such amazing events was a humbling experience for me. Seeing the energy of the crowd as they felt my music was amazing. It felt great to know that I contributed to the success of the event. Who are your favorite artistes and why? I have a wide variety of artist that I listen to right now. Some of my favorites are Cold Play, Kings of Leon, Drake, Bruno Mars, Kendrick Lamar, Bob Marley, Sizzla, Peter Tosh, Black Uhuru, Adele, and Stevie Wonder. I am impressed how the music style has changed over the years and is still changing today. I love these artists because of their substance and messages they relay through their music. You are currently based in Atlanta. How is life in Atlanta? Life in Atlanta is like no other city that I have experienced. The musical influence is very strong here as Atlanta is a melting pot for culture and diversity. There is always something to do here, this city doesn’t sleep. What tips and hot spot recommendations would you give someone traveling to Atlanta? Atlanta is definitely an experience. I would recommend Buckhead Bottle Bar. It is a lounge with a diverse following. You can find me there mixing every Wednesday night for their International Night. The food in this city is something in itself to come visit for. They have a great Caribbean restaurant in Little 5 Points called Stir -It -Up. The fall-apart-tender brown stew chicken, jerk chicken, and fried fish are standouts. What is the key to success as a DJ? The key to success as a DJ is to make sure you grow with your audience. You always want to keep the music fresh and new but maintain a sense of authenticity. My purpose as a DJ is to take my audience on a musical trip through the night where they enjoy vibing with their friends and to the music. You returned to Jamaica for a few gigs last year after a long absence. How was the experience? Refreshing. It’s always nice to be back home and show support to those who support me. Coming back home always gives me a greater motivation, it defines my inspiration. I started DJ’ing in Jamaica so coming back home and performing means the world to me.


What’s different about playing in Jamaica? Jamaica is home so I will always have an appreciation for the energy the crowd brings when I play. People in Jamaica do not only enjoy the music but they understand the lyrics of the music I play. It’s a nice difference. People are completely responsive to the energy I bring when I am home. Unless you have been to Jamaica and partied, you will not understand the pride the people have in their country and their love for music. We come from a background of music so vibing with the audience creates such an exciting and memorable experience. What’s your take on the music currently coming out of Jamaica? Jamaican music has been a powerful force on a global scale. There is however a demand for musical education right across the board., like lyrical content, business management, marketing and brand development, performance and on stage presentation and I can go on, but that’s for a another, more intense conversation we should have some time soon. You are working on some new productions and riddims. Can you tell us more? Yes, I am working on a few dancehall and reggae beats with artist such as Wayne Marshall, Delly Ranx and Dre, who is an Atlanta based reggae and dancehall artist. I am also working on some reproduced remixes. Do you have any other news you would like to share with the readers of L3 Magazine? I am in the process of starting a non-profit organization called MixMasterDavid Foundation, catering to youth in west rural St. Andrew, Jamaica. Our mission is the integration of music into the curricula of disadvantaged schools in order to enhance students’ academic performance. In a community where so many children face each day without a chance to creatively express themselves, I want to open that door for them and give them that opportunity. It is important for me to cultivate the next upcoming generation of young artist by providing them with the resources to explore their hidden musical talents. We want to develop young live reggae bands, marching bands as well as guitarist and allow the community to be involved and keep the music education foundation alive. As we continue to develop this organization, I will keep you in the loop on our future progress. I have new projects and collaborations coming up that I am very excited about. I am always updating my fans and friends with the latest on my social media sites. Make sure you stay updated with everything I have going on. Stay connected via Twitter >>> @MixMasterDavid


CL CEN’C LOVE THE HIGHEST GRADE

A

AYEOLA GEORGE

s a teen she wanted to be an opera singer with a “big voice that needed no microphone,” and though she is now fully entrenched in the Reggae genre, Cen’C Love’s big voice is being heard and loved by fans around the globe. She was born in Kingston Jamaica and raised in Atlanta Georgia by her yoga-loving, militant mother who instilled in Cen’C and her children, a passion for justice, love for Mother Earth and an undying creative drive. She surrounded them with an eclectic range of musical offerings from the folk reality of Tracy Chapman and the sultry jazz sounds Billie Holiday, the unapologetically rebellious cries of Nina Simone to authentic Reggae grooves of bands like Black Uhuru and Steele Pulse and while dropping some Janis Joplin in between. It also helped that she went to Dekalb School of the Arts, a performing arts high school for high achievers where she was trained in classical voice by Jamaica-born opera singer, Mrs. Dawn-Marie James nee Virtue. There along with talents such as R&B crooner Lloyd and professional dancer Saidah Nairobi, she studied music, dance, and drama. Her return to Jamaica in 2011 coincided with the release of ‘Love Letter,’ a Reggae album with touches of R&B and soul and pregnant with lessons on life. Her soulful and sultry voice teaches on universal issues like social justice infidelity and self-image issues in songs like “Cystem,” “Cassanova” and “These Lies.”


She’s collaborated with notable Reggae artists including Richie Spice (“Yours Alone”) and Capleton (“Stand Firm”). Of course her musical roots run deep and Cen’C has worked with her cousin Andrew Tosh (“Creation”) her brother Asadenaki (“Cystem”) and her father, living legend and Reggae icon Bunny Wailer. Her song “Save The People” was featured on his album. She has opened for and shared the stage with her father at several events including Reggae Sumfest, but has held her own, at shows in Jamaica, St. Croix, Los Angeles, New York and Amsterdam. She does this while rocking eclectic fashions from her mom’s Ites International line. Read on to learn more about this 21st century renaissance woman, her relationship with her famous dad and, what drives her passion. AG: Your name is Cen’C love and I am sure on hearing it most people think sensi as in marijuana, but you spell it C-E-N-C Love, can you tell us the story behind why you chose that name? CL: Well, it’s still associated with sensi in a sense, it’s just spelt different. It actually means “highest grade” because people call sensi the highest grade of marijuana. So it’s like when you smoke sensi you doh want no weed fi like three days (she laughs). Also, marijuana leaves also represent nature, you know, herbs of the field; the bible talks about herb is for mankind you know, and they also found weed on King Solomon’s grave, so it kinda ties into an ancient as well as a natural kind of levity, as well as the highest grade, so everything that’s associated with marijuana/ sensi is what it [Cen’C Love] represents, not necessarily in a literal sense. What is the accomplishment that you are most proud of to date? My son! I had him in 2009 and for me, my career and my life are inter-related. For me it’s one and the same. Some people separate their life from their career, some people you don’t know anything about their real life, you just know them by their hit songs, but for me, it’s important that both reflect each other. My son is affected by how I look at myself and how I look at my responsibility, which is more than to make a hit song. It’s to make music that my children will be proud of when they get older; and to set a good example for the children coming up because they are the future. It’s interesting that you mention children because a little birdie told me you are expecting. You’ve had some practice with your son so how do you feel this time around? I’m excited! You know I’m the type of person when I was a kid I said I wanted 8 children, and people were like “you crazy” and yeah I realize I was crazy (she laughs again). I cut that number in half so I said I want to have four. But it’s good for me to start somewhere you know, we’re not getting any younger and it’s better to have them and kinda get them out of the way so when you hit the road, they’re kinda independent. Cause sometimes you wait and then it’s never the right time. As far as my work, when I was having my son I did not have a lot of work, but this time I’ve done interviews, I’ve had a lot of appearances, small stuff here and there but I’ve just been on the road like every week. I don’t even have time to be sick in bed like I would like to be.


If you could have a super power what would it be and why? I wanna fly. Who don’t wanna fly?! I could be here, I could be there, I could be back in bed! If you weren’t a musician what do you think you would be doing? Hmm, that’s… so many things I could be doing. Well the thing is, I’m a musician but all the other things that I would be doing, I do. I’m a fashion designer, I’m a writer, um, I’m working on my first fiction novel. It’s like a science fiction kinda thing (I’m not gonna give it a way now) but I am a creative writer. I don’t dance as much as I used to. I used to choreograph. I would probably be doing more of that if I wasn’t singing. You know it takes energy to do each different thing, but at the same time, sometimes you need those different things. If I have a show and I need something to wear, I make the clothes. I may have a video where I have a dance number or something, I can choreograph that, so that’s when my skills will come in. What’s it like having your mom as your manager? It’s good, because she’s here, she’s with me all the time. She wears many hats, she’s my babysitter as well. So it’s not like somebody where I have to separate my professional and my personal life, so it works really well. And then, she knows me the best. She’s my biggest fan and then she also expects more of me. Sometimes we argue too cause I’m like “gimme a chance to grow,” you know, but she knows where I need to be and where I can be, so she’s always pushing me. We spoke about your mom, and you have a famous dad. Some kids who have a celebrity for a parent, sometimes they want to disassociate themselves from that parent, not necessarily because they don’t love them or they don’t want to be their child but they want to make it on their own merit. Did you ever go through a phase like that where you were like nobody knew that you were Bunny Wailer’s daughter and you were doing your own thing? When I just started, cause I was living in the States, yea, nobody really knew. In the States most people think all the Wailers are dead anyways so they’re like “awww Bunny Wailer is your Dad, he used to be part of the Wailers right?” (she laughs). They wouldn’t say “Oh my God” like Jamaicans who might feel like I’m rich and there is all this money. So there I wouldn’t really have to talk about it, but here ever since I broke into the business doing Reggae which is the genre that I identify with now, I’ve never really had the chance to separate myself from it. But my music speaks for itself and me as a person, my personality, my image, is totally different from his image or from the Wailers, while at the same time, the depth and the quality of the music is still the same. It’s funny you mention the depth and quality of your music because sometimes in speaking to you and in listening to your music it seems like you’re an old soul. Do you feel like you belong in a different era? Yep. I’m a blast from the past and Imma look into the future know what Im sayin?!’ I’m definitely not of this time. I know that for sure. It’s good to be ahead of your time, though cause at least you know when people catch up they say “yow a long time she a do dat fi true” and you know I’m never intimidated by the fact that people try to compare me. There is no one like me. I’m actually proud of that. I’m the type of person I don’t even like to go nowhere and see somebody in my outfit or my shoes. Mi like fi just different, everyting-that’s in my image, that’s in my personality, that’s in my music. My sound is like Jazz with old-school R&B and soul, but then it’s where we are going though; because I see other artists coming out now, doing kind of the same thing.


If you could have a super power what would it be and why? I wanna fly. Who don’t wanna fly?! I could be here, I could be there, I could be back in bed! Is there any cause that you are passionate about? Um, I’d like to say natural living but I don’t like to be limited in that because sometimes you say that and people assume “oh veganisim.” I believe in balance. Like in my pregnancy- sometimes mi want meat, sometimes mi want chocolate, sometimes mi want ice cream, like straight up, sometimes mi want goat! You know, I’m not gonna be a hypocrite. But at the same time I believe in trusting your body I believe in connecting with nature, you know, respecting that everything has a soul and so you start to separate even what you eat. Maybe one day soon I will get more vigilant. I believe in women having a superior power as far as our bodies go. I have started with natural birth. I had a natural birth with my son and I plan to have a natural birth with my next child. I am a serious advocate of breast feeding. My son has never really been sick. And I think part of that is because he had a natural birth and he was breastfed. I try to feed him good food natural foodthat kind of thing. We create our children even though God creates them, yes, but we also help to mould them into what they will be in the future in turn that helps to create a better society. I’m definitely an advocate of natural birth, and natural birthing practices. What is your favorite childhood book? “Jamaco and the beanstalk”. It’s part of a series with traditional fairy tales but told from an afrocentric perspective. My son reads them now! Last few questions… 1.

Q: Beach or river? A: River

2.

Q: Knowledge or wisdom? A: Wisdom

3.

Q: Mango or ackee? A: Mango

4.

Q: Hat or jewelry? A: Hat

5.

Q: Bathe me or massage me? A: Massage me


KC THE DIRECTOR

KEVIN CROWN NATURALLY BORN TO KILL THE CLUB NATASHA VON CASTLE

I

n the world of Turntables and DJ’s, there is only one man in New York who wears a crown, and that’s Kevin Crown. With a reputation that is known as the party rocker, and the respect of his colleagues in the industry, we had to sit down for a few words with this musical maestro, no, scratch that, this natural born club killer, who, even when stabbed in the arm and disabled, still played with one arm. Read on…!


L3: Your relationship with music goes back to when you were 12 and has developed and evolved over the years. This is clearly a commitment. Why do you think music chose you?! It’s funny you start with this question! I was told that I was a very cranky baby and the only thing that would shut me up is music. My Mother would throw on some Michael Jackson records and that would get me to stop crying. When I started walking, they would throw it on, and I would start dancing. As much as I love playing music, I love dancing as well. I think I love all elements of music like the vibe it brings and what it does to people is amazing. This is something that ever since I’ve been born I’ve been infatuated with. Speaking of moving to the music! It’s one thing to show up to a party and spin music; anyone can do that. You take it to the next level by telling a story and educating the masses. Professor might be an additional title! Laughs! I don’t know that you want to call it professor, I think it’s more like Director because as a DJ every DJ has access to all of the music so it’s really how you put it together that is the essential part. As for me, I pick up on different vibes and I put a song with a similar vibe together and that’s how I tell the story. As far as teaching people, I just set an environment where people are comfortable doing what they want to do. I think people go out to enjoy themselves. They sometimes go to places where the environment inhibits them, or they’re worried about what people will think of them. I just create an environment where people can do what they want to do. I would call myself a Director and I guide you to a place you already want to go! Brooklyn, which is where you come from, is the Mecca for Dancehall and Reggae in New York. What was the first Dancehall / Reggae party you played and why is it so memorable? Well actually, it was a little house party in my neighborhood and was memorable to me not because of the fact that I was playing in the party but because of what happened after the party! At that time, I was using my Father’s home set up because we didn’t have a vehicle. My friend and I got hand trucks and walked my records and equipment with no cases up the block. When I came home, my Mother and Father thought the house was robbed – they didn’t know what had happened! That stuck out in my head because they were actually going crazy, meanwhile, they’re crazy 16 year old son just took the equipment up the block! Looking back I can say it was funny … at the time, not so much! When you get together with your parents now as an adult, does that story ever come up?! Oh yeah (he laughs)! That story always comes up and there are other things that come up when we get together and other stories too because like I said, I’ve been doing this since I was 12 years old and they used to frown upon it during my teenage years and sometimes I would argue with them because I truly believed I was good enough to make this a career, but they just weren’t having it. And now we’re sure they’re proud of you! Oh yes and they show me in many, many ways that they’re proud of me and it’s a good feeling that you’re doing something you love to do, and are doing it on a level that many people don’t get to appreciate.


Natural Born Club Killers! The title is obvious, but tell us about it! When people hear Natural Born Club Killers, it comes off as being violent, but it’s really not violent at all. We are the Rock stars of the party. Anybody can DJ and spin a record, but when you talk about a Natural Born Club Killer, we’re coming with the look, we’re coming with the attitude, and we’re coming with the energy to kill the club. When you hear someone say ‘yo Kevin Crown killed it last night’ it’s not a violent thing; we didn’t hurt anybody, we just thrilled people to the max. I like to draw from the movie the Matrix. Do you remember the scene from Zion when everybody was partying? That’s the kind of atmosphere I try to set and I try to make sure it compares to no other. So that’s what Natural Born Club Killers is, and it’s evolving now too. People such as dancers, promoters, photographers; pretty much anyone who has anything to do with night life is claiming that they can be a Natural Born Club Killer and I love it! As a DJ, I can’t kill the club alone, I need the crowd and everybody who’s there to kill the club along with me so I love it. It’s a movement that’s growing and I love where it’s going! Playing for the home crowd (New York / USA) can be different from playing in another country! What have your international experiences been like so far? Well I’ve been to Japan several times and that is one of my most favorite places in the world to play because the people don’t really speak English. On the flight over there the first time, I was thinking ‘what am I going to say to the people who come to hear me play?!’ When I landed, I saw that there were posters of me everywhere and the music that was underground in New York city, was playing in the malls, restaurants etc. I’m not talking about Bob Marley, I’m talking about Vybz Kartel, and Bounty Killer. When we get to the venue, I had a few Japanese words in my vocabulary, and I’m playing music. Even though the Japanese couldn’t really speak English, they learned the words of the songs word for word. That really taught me that music transcends all cultures and once you can play, you can communicate with anyone in the world. Every time when I go back, it’s nothing but love and it’s to the point that they have to throw coats over us so we can run and hide from the girls. It’s an experience, and I love it! So we know that playing in other countries is great, but there’s nothing like playing for and in Jamaica! Tell us the feeling you had when you got that huge forward on James Bond Beach for Fully Loaded in 2009! Alright … that whole experience was crazy! I was told by one of the promoters, Sharon Burke, about me performing there, and due to circumstances, I wasn’t actually put on the bill. For some reason, I got an opportunity to make an appearance.


Now Fully Loaded and the people who perform at Fully Loaded, they prepare months and months in advance. I found out I was going to be playing less than 24 hours in advance. I’m hitting up all the artists trying to get dubplates and specials, and I ran into my friend, Queen IFrica, and on the Sunday, she went to the studio and voiced 2 dubplates for me! That’s how I started off my round. I walked around the stage and looked out in the crowd and saw 16 to 17 thousand people who didn’t know who I was. My heart was beating, but I did what I did and I played the music and they responded. I kept playing and deeper and deeper in my round they kept responding and it was a great feeling that I could do something like that! Fully Loaded! Having listened to as much music as you have over the years, you have a very fine tuned ear and you know a hit record when you hear it. Has there ever been a record that didn’t hit that you thought should have, and one the flip, has there been a record that hit that you weren’t feeling initially? The thing with hit records is that there can be a hit record in the Caribbean market, and then there’s a hit record that crosses over and goes worldwide. I can’t really say there was one that made it huge that I didn’t like, but there were some unexpected ones like “Like Glue” by Sean Paul. When that first came out it was a regular song then I would say a year and a half to 2 years later, it just blew up and I would have to say it blew up in a great way. It brought a lot of attention to Dancehall, and it brought a lot of attention to Dancehall dancing on an international level and I got to say big up to Sean Paul. In all honesty, when I first heard it, I didn’t think it was going to be the mega hit it turned out to be. How often do people get in touch with you for your opinion on records before they release them? Nowadays, as in the past 5 years, I get music in my email, and I’ve been fortunate to break a lot of records in New York City. Songs like “Man a Gallis,” “Bruk It Down” (Mr. Vegas), “Do Sum’n” “Gyal Ah Bubble” (Konshens), they came to me and said Kevin we want you to buss these songs in New York City for us. When I go in on a song, I really go in on a song. I’ll play a song on the radio for 20 minutes. When I play the song I a club, I’ll hype the song so the people feel like they no it. It’s funny to me to see a song go from no one knowing the song to 6 months down the line everyone requesting the song and it’s getting played on major radio. It makes me feel really good that I can be at the Mecca of that! Remixing is an art and it can also be used to ‘sell’ a record. What are your thoughts on remixes? I am a remixer. I’ve been remixing songs and my Dubplate specials for years. That again; every DJ has access to the same music, but when you remix a song, like a Reggae song that goes on a Hip Hop beat, or a Soca song that goes on a Pop beat, you help that remix tell your story the you want to tell it. That remix becomes something that only you have and it gives the record a different feeling, a different identity and it makes people look at it a different way. It also makes you stand out because your mixtape, radio broadcast and club set doesn’t sound like anyone else’s. I’m a big fan of remixes!


One of the hottest joints right now is French Montana and Nicki Minaj’s song “Freaks.” Coming from where you’re coming from, why do you think that song is hitting so hard right now? Well anytime Hip Hop crosses over to Reggae, it’s always gonna be a good thing. Reggae is about dancing and fun and Dancehall is about that raw Caribbean energy. With Nicki Minaj being on it, and her always identifying her strong Trinidadian roots, she basically is the new Queen of Hip Hop, she adds that flare to the record. French Montana representing for the Caribbean, and New York being full of Caribbean people, it’s just one of those records. The Little Vicious sample did it right there! I personally feel that the 90’s was the greatest era of Dancehall. The Murder She Wrote / Santa Barbara sample of the beat and the tempo; everything; all the elements just make it work. Do you think we’ll hear more of those types of collaborations especially with that records success? Definitely because there is always a trend in music. If something works for one artist, another artist will try and the Freaks record; I’m looking for a remix with an authentic Dancehall artist on it. Your brand has grown so much and is truly international. What are some of the projects you’re involved with (that you can share), that are related to music but show off your growth in the industry? Well we have the t-shirt line that is growing and has a nice cult following right now. As far as the music is concerned, we’re making a big appearance for New York Carnival! We’ll be on the parkway and my design team is designing costumes so people can play mass with us this year! Also, my website, www.kevincrown.com and the NBCK store coming out where you’ll be able to buy products such as back packs, jackets, t-shirts, ladies dresses and bikini’s and the list goes on. I’m actually working with some producers so fans will hear some Kevin Crown productions coming down the line. A lot of positive things … very good things. When you matured into music, did you ever think you would grow to this level? No it didn’t. I never picked up a record trying to be a household name or a super star. I did it for the love. All of this are things that just grew just as I grew as a person! All of this is amazing and I love it! Music is very demanding, yet it allowed you time to explore your martial arts. How much of a parallel is there in Music and Martial Arts?! Well I’m a very dedicated person. I believe that if you put your mind to something, you can do it. I think martial arts helps me deal with everything in my life. Being a DJ and the caliber of personality I am, it comes with a lot of politics, ups and downs and frustrations. Being a black belt in Tae Kwan do helps me deal with all of that because I have an outlet. If we opened a music school, what element of music would you like to teach if you could? Definitely the art of being a DJ. Things like reading crowds and musical selection. It’s definitely an art, and there are formulas that I have used and try to explain from the way to talk on the mic, to when to not talk on the mic and when to take it to the next level. That’s what I would teach which is an art!


What general advice can you give our readers on Life, Love and Lyrics? You really only have one life to live and it has a time limit and nobody knows when your time is going to be up. Live your life to the fullest. Try to see the world because the world is a very big place; see how other people live and enjoy themselves. Make your mark on the world; when you’re gone that’s how you’re going to be remembered and that’s how you’ll be immortal. As for Love, do what you love. If you truly love, no matter what it is, do that thing. If you sell yourself short, you will have regrets and there’s nothing worse. Lyrics; when you choose to speak, make sure you speak from your heart! You are living proof of that advice considering there was a time when you were badly injured. Yes a few years ago I was hurt. I was stabbed in my arm and I was disabled for a year. Even though that happened to me, I was still playing in New York and across the country, playing, mixing, talking on the mic etc. I was doing all of that with one arm. It’s the hardest thing I had to go through but that showed me that this is something I’m supposed to do. If I can kill the club with one arm, you know this is something I was born to do! Connect with Kevin Crown on Twitter >>> @KEVINCROWNMUSIC


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ISLAND FEVER

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L3 MAGAZINE | MAY 2013 | NO. 021  

Canada's leading Caribbean-Urban Magazine

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