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DECEMBER 2012 | L3MAGAZINE.COM

MORGAN HERITAGE THE RETURN

SHEBA

THE QUEEN OF HEARTS M

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KONSHENS THE REALEST

OBAMA WINS SECOND TERM | UPDATE ON SEKHOU | MUSIC CHARTS NEW MUSIC RELEASES BY BERES HAMMOND AND MORE!


LIFE

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REMEMBERING DONNA SUMMERS

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SKYFALL

DANIEL CRAIG IN SKYFALL PAMELA MCCLINTOCK & TODD MCCARTHY OF THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

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L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

B

ond pic Skyfall easily seduced the North American box office with a potent $87.8 million debut, bringing its worldwide cume to $518.6 million. Returning Daniel Craig in the role of 007 for a third time, MGM and Sony’s Skyfall nabbed the biggest domestic opening for a James Bond picture. It also marked Sony’s ninth No. 1 opening this year. Quantum of Solace debuted to a series-best $67.5 million in mid-November 2008, and Casino Royale -- marking Craig’s first turn as 007 opened to $40.8 million in November 2006.


SKYFALL

Skyfall is doing massive business overseas, where it grossed $89 million during the weekend for an international total of $428.6 million. The pic began rolling out two weeks ago overseas. The 23rd installment in the Bond franchise is certain to surpass the $586.1 million earned by Quantum of Solace and the $594.2 million grossed by Casino Royale in their entire worldwide runs. “It’s been a wild, fantastic ride,” Sony president of worldwide distribution Rory Bruer said. “The holds have been extraordinary and people will want to see this film again and again.” Domestic box-office revenue was up an impressive 27 percent over the same weekend a year ago thanks to Skyfall and a strong crop of holdovers including Wreck-It Ralph, Flight, Argo and Taken 2. Skyfall generated stellar numbers for IMAX theaters, which took in $13.1 million, the best debut for a nonsummer opening. IMAX’s worldwide weekend number is expected to come in at $15.8 million for a $28 million cume. Produced by Bond house EON Productions, Skyfall’s domestic opening was buoyed by an A CinemaScore and stellar reviews. The film skewed older, with 75 percent of the audience over age 25. Males made up 60 percent of those buying tickets. This time out, cinema’s most famous spy must save both M again played by Judi Dench and MI6 from former operative-turned-villain Raoul Silva (Javier Bardem). The movie also stars Ralph Fiennes, Naomie Harris, Berenice Lim Marlohe and Albert Finney. The movie James Bond is now 50 years old and wearing his years very well in Skyfall. The most significant reset of the 23-film series that’s unconnected to a change of the actor playing 007, this longawaited third outing for Daniel Craig feels more seriously connected to real-world concerns than any previous entry, despite the usual outlandish action scenes, glittering settings and larger-than-life characters. Dramatically gripping while still brandishing a droll undercurrent of humor, this beautifully made film will certainly be embraced as one of the best Bonds by loyal fans worldwide and leaves you wanting the next one to turn up sooner than four years from now.

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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SKYFALL

Bond watchers have been especially eager for Skyfall to arrive for several reasons, particularly to see if the Craig sequence of films can bounce back from the crushing low of Quantum of Solace after starting so high with Casino Royale, and to evaluate what fresh perspective might be delivered by big and unexpected talents like director Sam Mendes and cinematographer Roger Deakins. The answers are “yes” to the first proposition and “quite a bit” to the second. Whereas Casino Royale tasted like a fine old vintage served in a snappy new bottle, Skyfall seems like a fresh blend altogether, one with some weight and complexity to it. Much of this, to be sure, stems from Mendes, who, with series veteran writers Neal Purvis and Robert Wade along with John Logan, yanks Bond, M and MI6 out of the world of colorful megalomaniacal villains and into the vexing world of shadowy terrorists and cyber warfare. In the process, they also give Bond not only a few aches and pains, but a sense of mortality, exemplified by a credits sequence festooned not by silhouetted naked women, but by images of the secret agent’s tombstone and of his being sucked to his doom underwater. Since it happens in the 10-minute action opener, it’s giving nothing away to say that -- after an elaborate and logistically outrageous chase through the streets and bazaars and over the roofs of Istanbul, and then on top of a train into the countryside -- M is seen writing her veteran agent’s obituary. He’s survived, of course, but his brush with death has been so close that Bond goes Jason Bourne for a while, holing up anonymously on a tropical beach with a babe and drinking himself to oblivion. But when the modern new London headquarters building of MI6 explodes in a terrorist attack, Bond reports back for duty to a boss who herself is being none too gently being shown the door by intelligence and security committee chairman Gareth Mallory (Ralph Fiennes). In fact, all British agents embedded within terrorist organizations have been compromised and are beginning to be killed, making M look incompetent and Bond seem a bit of a dinosaur whose wits and brawn are no match for high-tech warriors. “So this is it, we’re both played out,” he says to her, prematurely, as it turns out, although Bond still is put through some arduous tests to re-earn his old job back. Bond has never endured so many rude remarks about his physical prowess since Sean Connery made his middle-aged one-shot return to the role in the ill-advised Never Say Never Again. For her part, M plays a more central role here than she ever has before, and Judi Dench, as usual, makes the most of the opportunity, investing her authority role with great dignity undercut with a sliver of insecurity.

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SKYFALL

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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SKYFALL

The globetrotting continues to Shanghai, where the striking high-rises make a terrific nocturnal backdrop to Bond’s stealthy pursuit of the assassin/hard-drive thief he narrowly missed in Istanbul. From there it’s on to Macau, where the old Bond reemerges in a tuxedo to drink his martini (very smartly shaken, not stirred, by a deft lady bartender) in a casino where he gets hot and heavy with the striking yet nervously neurotic Severine, who is given a distinctive preoccupied edge by Berenice Lim Marlohe. Trailing along behind to keep an eye on things and trade dry banter (and perhaps more than that) is field agent Eve, very engagingly played by Naomie Harris. It is Severine who can take Bond to the man who’s causing all the trouble. In a scene of surpassing beauty and weirdness, by yacht the two approach a strange island city, from which the entire population has just fled. It has just been taken over by a strange tall man with dyed blond hair, insinuating humor and heavily armed henchmen. At the 70-minute mark, Javier Bardem makes his fabulously staged entrance as Silva, who, like many Bond villains of the past, is half persuasive and half-lunatic, has delusions of exceptional grandeur and is partial to explaining many things to his captive before he means to kill him. He also has a theatrically sexual side that brings something new to the gallery of Bond villains. In all events, Bardem makes him a riveting and most entertaining figure.

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SKYFALL

Even if Bond is able to turn the tables on Silva and bring him back to London as a prisoner, that’s far from the end of it, as Silva is one resourceful chap whose advanced computer skills test the expertise even of the new Q, the MI6 weapons and technology guru now reimagined as a very young man and wonderfully played in full geek drag by Ben Whishaw. The scene in which he and Bond meet for the first time in an art gallery is an instant mini-classic. Ultimately, there is a very conscious, even articulated effort to balance the old and new, the traditional and the modern in Skyfall -- stylistically, dramatically and thematically. Longtime series producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli have never gone so far as to hire a full control-demanding auteur to direct one of their films, and while Mendes is certainly the most distinguished outside director they’ve ever brought aboard, he’s one as tradition-minded as he is innovative. Many of the dramatic scenes would do justice to a non-genre film, and the same can be said of the quality of the acting. The traditional quips surface at times in low-key form; some of them are quite good and they’re never corny. The action, much of it presumably staged by veteran second unit director Alexander Witt, is consistently strong (even if a motorcycle and jeep chase through the jammed streets of Istanbul reminds, as did a recent one through Manila in The Bourne Legacy, that motorized chases through thick urban crowds are never entirely convincing). Tonally, the fundamental seriousness of the film places Skyfall at the other end of the Bond spectrum from the monkeyshines of some of the silliest Roger Moore entries, such as Moonraker and A View to A Kill. The long climax, set at an isolated old house in Scotland presided over by a thickly bearded Albert Finney, plays out partly like a highly elaborated version of Straw Dogs, albeit with far heavier artillery. The moving and highly satisfying ending nicely tees up the ball for the next round. Cinematographer Deakins’ work is dense, colorful and impactful, noticeably a notch or two above the series’ norm. Production values are similarly at the high end of things, and Thomas Newman’s score is far from generic, finding many moods while delightfully allowing room for Monty Norman’s immortal Bond theme when the moment calls for it. And, oh yes, there’s Daniel Craig. He owns Bond now, and the role is undoubtedly his for as long as he might want it. Perhaps a tad less buff than in Casino Royale and certainly more beat up, he entertains the ladies less here than perhaps any Bond ever has. But two other women, his boss and the Queen, have first call on his favors, and he repays them for their confidence many times over -- as he does the audience. Production: MGM, Columbia, Albert R. Broccoli’s Eon Productions Cast: Daniel Craig, Judi Dench, Ralph Fiennes, Naomie Harris, Berenice Lim Marlohe, Ben Whishaw, Albert Finney, Rory Kinnear, Ola Rapace Director: Sam Mendes Screenwriters: Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, John Logan Producers: Michael G. Wilson, Barbara Broccoli Executive producer: Callum McDougall Director of photography: Roger Deakins Production designer: Dennis Gassner Costume designer: Jany Temime Editor: Stuart Baird Music: Thomas Newman PG-13 rating, 143 minutes L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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BARACK OBAMA

THE PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA...

BARACK OBAMA 12

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012


BARACK OBAMA

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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DECEMBER 2012 | NO. 016 CEO & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF VP & CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER PUBLISHER ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

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LIFE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR The belly of the beast is not a lip service statement; it’s a remarkable place to be. That place is the location where we’ve come to the reality of not liking where we are, and the reality of the insistence of making a change – most times for the better. In our community, several people are in the belly of the beast. Some know it and some don’t. They are not the important ones. The important ones are the people who see the beast coming, and see the belly which is about to give birth. These people are most important because, when the contents of the belly are born, we must be the ones to assist and reshape and offer hope as this path, the good and better path is the one not known to the one who just came from the beast. If the path was known, the person wouldn’t have been in the belly of the beast to begin with. Especially when it comes to the arts, I find some of the most talented and the most brilliant have a darker side which is what they wish to escape. We make it harder for those people with our judgement and insistence of not helping usher that person into the light. Has it ever come to mind that their transformation from darkness to light is a story the world needs to hear, and that our ignorance of their transformation actually prevents another light from shining, as in, I light my candle from you, you light your candle from Mary and so on? When he that is in the beast is trying to change, don’t discourage him - work with him for he is awakening to the positive - moving away from the negative. That is the aim of mankind and that is what I believe the aim of Tommy Lee to be. We welcome him to the light, and after all, this is the season that we’re in right … welcoming people to the light! P.S. I’m sure many of you want to give me an earful so, tell me >>> @NatashaVonC

Natasha Von Castle

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LIFE

LIFESTYLE NETWORK THEFAMOUSFACE.BLOGSPOT.COM TROPICALFETE.COM EDGE-AGENCY.COM MY.COM L3MAGAZINEBLOG.TUMBLR.COM BEHANCE.NET/L3DESIGNS BECAUSEIAMAGIRL.CA FFAWN.ORG iTUNES.COM REGGAE4US.COM HARBOURFRONTCENTRE.COM SOUNDCLOUD.COMBYZEONE CONCRETELOOP.COM WWW.DAFLAVARADIO.COM WWW.TOKYOTRINBAGO.COM

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ROBIN CLARE

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ROBIN CLARE

NEW PAINTINGS BY ROBIN CLARE

W

ith her opening held on November 30th 2012 at China Heights Gallery, L3, 16-28 Foster St, Surry Hills, Sydney based Jamaican artist Robin Clare’s new work continues to explore Jamaican pop culture with a series of large scale cinematic images combining elements inspired by vintage comic books and elements of Dancehall culture, imagery and songs. Inspired by stories told to her by her grandparents and parents about childhoods spent eagerly anticipating the arrival of the latest comic book imports from the US, Robin has incorporated the theme into her recent paintings. American culture has always influenced the island of Jamaica, just as in turn Jamaican culture has managed to influence American culture through fashion, dance styles and music influences. Robin’s recent paintings explore this cultural clash through large scale romanticised cinematic poster like images taking inspiration from vintage comic book imagery and Dancehall culture. The work specifically references a short run comic from the 1950’s titled Bulls Eye by comic artist team Simon and Kirby. The comic followed the adventures of a western sharp shooter who also went by the name Bulls Eye. Her choice to focus on the western theme was mainly led by early dub and ska music titles which often referenced western movies and characters. Robin was also inspired by one of her favourite movies, Jamaican cult classic ‘The Harder They Come.’ This tells the harrowing story of folk hero and gun slinging outlaw Ivanhoe Rhyging Martin. To see more pieces by Robin or to order Canvass prints, visit www.robinclare.com or twitter >>> @TwittingRobin

CONTRIBUTED

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AVAILABLE NOW ON ITUNES! Grab your copy here today!

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WANT LOVE KIRKLEDOVE RECORDS

DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION

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LOVE

LOVE ADVICE

Model: Desyray Photography: Jerome Dupont courtesy of New Era Photography

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L3MAGAZINE.COM | JUNE 2012


LOVE ADVICE

MISS DECEMBER 2012

L3MAGAZINE.COM | JUNE 2012

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L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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D I G I TA L D OW N L OA D S

DOWNLOAD

L3’S

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“Pop Champagne”

9

“The Girl is Mine”

SWITCH FT. OCTAYNE MORGAN HERITAGE

CHAM FT. O 10 “Back Way”

1 2 4 5

“Gimme Little”

12

“The Next Chapter”

13

“This Morning”

LAZA MORGAN DELLY RANX

JESSE ROYAL

“Ah So Mih Tan”

14

KING ALI BABA FT. OCTAYNE

15

“Can I Have You”

CHAM

16

“Pick Me Up”

CHARLY BLACK JLOGIX FT. FIRE LION

CHAM FT. O 17 “Tun Up” NOAH POWA 18 “Care Zero”

ALISON HINDS

19

PATEXX

20

“Superstar”

3

11

KONSHENS

“Lawless”

“Claaaaaty Again”

“Party Hard”

6

“Baddy”

7

“Wine n Go Dung”

Charts are based on the most active DJ downloads via the L3 Music Distribution service.

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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SHABBA RANKS

“Who Win The War”

FAZE FT. PATRICE AMMOYE

CHAM

“Stripper Pose” (New Entry)

EVII FT. NATEL

“Around the World” (New Entry)


RICO VIBE’S TOP 10 VIDEO PICKS FOR

TOP 10 CHARTS

DECEMBER

Compiled by Rico Vibes

1

POPCAAN

2

RDX

“GIRLS MEDLEY”

6

ELEPHANT MAN FT. KHAGO

7

JESSE ROYAL

8

TARRUS RILEY

9

ALISON HINDS

“SLAP WEH”

3

COURTNEY JOHN

4

BUSY SIGNAL

5

MR. VEGAS

“IT’S GONNA BE ALRIGHT” “REGGAE MUSIC AGAIN” “BRUK IT DOWN”

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“JUMP” “THIS MORNING”

“SORRY IS A SORRY WORD”

“FALUMA MAKELELE”

PROTOJE “KINGSTON BE WISE”

ALISON HINDS “FALUMA MAKELELE”


INDEPENDENT TASH REGGAE

TOP 10 CHARTS 30

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

INDEPENDENT TASH TOP 10 REGGAE MUSIC CHART Compiled by Independent Tash

1

ETANA

2

BERES HAMMOND

3

JAH CURE

4

GYPTIAN

5

KONSHENS

6

RDX

7

BUSY SIGNAL

8

BERES HAMMOND

9

TARRUS RILEY

10

“REGGAE” “IN MY ARMS” “THAT GIRL” “OVERTIME” “STOP SIGN”

“JUMP”

“MISSING YOU”

“CANDLE LIGHT”

“SORRY IS A SORRY WORD”

MORGAN HERITAGE “STAND UP”

*All songs on this chart reflect the most played hits as confirmed by Program Directors (PD’s) throughout the Caribbean via reporting radio stations and night clubs.


TOP 10 CHARTS

SOCA

INDEPENDENT TASH TOP 10 SOCA Compiled by Independent Tash

1

PATRICE ROBERTS

2

IWER GEORGE

3

MACHEL MONTANO HD

“A LITTLE WINE” “BUBBLE” “SHE READY”

4

BUNJI GARLIN

5

MACHEL MONTANO HD

“DIFFERENTOLOGY” “BOTTLE OF RUM”

6

VEGAS & ALISON HINDS

7

LIL RICK

8

ALISON HINDS & EDWIN YEARWOOD

“BRUK IT DOWN” REMIX “I LIKE MUH SELF”

“HIT A NERVE”

9

RICARDO DRU & EDWIN YEARWOOD “THROW ME OUT”

10

KES FT. DAVID RUDDER “LIVE YUH LIFE” (LIKE YUH PLAYING MAS)

*All songs on this chart reflect the most played hits as confirmed by Program Directors (PD’s) throughout the Caribbean via L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 2 reporting radio stations and night clubs.

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CANADIAN

TOP 20 CHARTS

DJ RON NELSON’S TOP 20 CANADIAN CHARTS Compiled by DJ Ron Nelson

1

AMMOYE

2

NKRUMAH

3

SHALLI FT. TIWONY

4

TERMINAL DG

5

FATHER PRICE FT. EYESUS & FYAH LION

“REGGAE MY-LYTIS” “I FLY” “GLASSES DARK”

“AM TWINKLING”

6

AMMOYE

7

TONY ANTHONY

8

CHUCKLEBERRY

9

EYESUS

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“RADIO”

“PICK ME UP” “SIMPLE GIRL”

“WINE GAL” OLD SKOOL MEDLY “GOOD FRIEND”

BELINDA BRADY “WISHING YOU WERE HERE”

KING 11 SAMPLE “MISS MIH FRIEND”

16

FAZE FT. PATRICE

12

17

TONYA P

NEW BALANZ FT. PEARLA “PARTY ALL NIGHT”

“CAN I HAVE YOU” “RIGHT HERE WITH ME”

CHAPANORE 13 PUPPI “HOW DO I GET OVER YOU” 18

MARVIN CHIN

19

TRINITY CHRIS

20

TASHA T

14

FYAH LION “BAZZLE AND I KNOW IT”

B 15 ALTY “LOVE AH COME DUNG”

“BUBBLE SUH”

“PON DIH POLE”

“TEARDROPS”

The above top 20 songs from Canadian artists are based on polls from Radio DJ’s playing Reggae and Dancehall across Canada.


NEW RELEASES

BERES HAMMOND

KAYLA BLISS

DIGITAL B

SHASTA WALLACE FT. EXCO LEVI

One Love, One Life

Adam & Eve Riddim

Literal Love

Storms of Life


LOVE

MUSIC NEWS

K-OS MAKES BIGGEST AND BOLDEST STATEMENT WITH DOUBLE ALBUM BLACK ON BLONDE ANASTASIA SARADOC

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nnovative, provocative, ground-breaking, fearless and incredibly talented – k-os is yet again leading the charge of our musical landscape’s next chapter. What better way to do that then with a double album – out through Crown Loyalist/EMI Music on November 27, BLack on BLonde is two slamming records: one album of rock tunes, on which k-os sings and plays drums, guitar and bass, and one album of old-school hip hop jams. Recorded at Hayden Christensen’s deserted Laurel Canyon mansion, BLack on BLonde is Canadian hip hop’s first double album and the only thing large enough to contain k-os’ big musical ideas. Amidst the glitz of LA, k-os fell in love and from his ecstasy and heartache come the most personal and revealing lyrics of his career. First single “The Dog is Mine” with it’s in-your-face punk rock confidence is already on the cusp of becoming k-os’ biggest Modern Rock radio hit ever, while “NYCE 2 KNOW YA” goes to Top 40 and Hot AC radio this week, offering fans a succulent taste of pop hip hop as only he can deliver. “It’s all about coming full-circle,” says k-os, who very deliberately references both Mos Def and Bob Dylan in the name of his album. “People don’t generally want to take things too far. However, like Bob Dylan I felt trapped by my birth into the music industry as a hippy or folk hip hop singer, I’m kind of over that feeling, you know? It’s time to go electric and a song like “NYCE 2 KNOW YA” is a celebration of that.” “The Dog is Mine” is currently out digitally and “NCYE 2 KNOW YA” will be available on October 9. “k-os is one of Canada’s most profound creative forces with significant global influence,” says Deane Cameron, President of EMI Music Canada. “His innovation knows no boundaries and his message is always powerful. It has been rewarding for EMI Canada to watch k-os progress over the years, where today he gives all of us his most thrilling music to date.” With an impressive history to say the least…he’s twice gone platinum, toured with Drake, recorded with The Chemical Brothers, won a Source award, won multiple JUNO and MMVA Awards (with a staggering combined 34 nominations!) and was a 2005 Grammy-nominee, k-os continues to challenge himself and the industry as a whole. “I consider myself to be hip hop’s first alternative/emo-rapper, and now it feels like the game’s finally caught up to me,” says k-os. “It’s my job to take the music to the next level.”

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MUSIC NEWS

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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MUSIC NEWS

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MUSIC NEWS

BLack on BLonde features exciting collaborations with Travie McCoy, Metric’s Emily Haines, Black Thought (The Roots), Corey Hart, Sam Roberts and Sebastien Grainger (Death from Above 1979). “My friends say this is the record I’ve been waiting my whole life to make, there’s a confidence now,” says k-os. “It feels like it’s my time.” BLACK 1. Diamond Sky 2. Like A Comet (featuring Corey Hart) 3. NYCE 2 KNOW YA 4. C.L.A (featuring Travie McCoy) 5. Nobody Else 6. One Time (featuring Emily Haines) 7. Mojo On 8. Try Again (featuring Black Thoughts) 9. MTV 10. Vous Deux 11. Spaceship BLONDE 1. The Dog Is Mine 2. Don’t Touch (featuring Sam Roberts) 3. Alone In My Car 4. Put Down Your Phone 5. Billy Bragg Winners 6. Surfs Up (featuring Sebastien Grainger) 7. Play This Game 8. BLondes 9. Wonder Woman 10. GO! Connect with k-os on Twitter >>> @kosinception

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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MUSIC NEWS

UPDATE ON SEKHU!

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eggae artiste Sekhu is gearing up to release his sophomore album in early 2013. The conscious singer from St Croix in the US Virgin Islands is working hard to take his career to the next level with the new project. Ultimately, he wants to produce lasting and timeless reggae music for the world to appreciate and perform on stages around the globe. Sekhu is part of a striving reggae scene in the USVI, which has produced international artists such as Pressure. The universal appeal of reggae and its messages of consciousness, righteousness and upliftment resonate with many reggae lovers around the world and Sekhu is no exception. Even though he has never traveled to Jamaica reggae appeals to Sekhu’s Caribbean aesthetic and the rhythm is in his blood. Since the young artiste has the talent to sing and perform and he loves music from his heart he decided to use his gifts to uplift his community and provide inspiration to people everywhere via his music. His community inspires him on a daily basis and he wants to give back. He considers himself a versatile and positive artiste who is not afraid to address injustice when the people need someone to speak up. In 2011 Sekhu released a 15-track debut album entitled ‘Do Your Best.” The album is a conscious culture music experience with clear Jamaican influence but also a unique stamp of Sekhu’s identity as a Virgin Islander as his experiences, culture and the history of his home are a constant source of inspiration. For 2013 Sekhu is ready with the sophomore album, which is still untitled. His new work is more mature as he has gathered experiences and grown as a man, musician and performer. He has learned more about the industry and life, has traveled and performed more and has developed his style. He says he has a lot more to give and is consistently writing new material and recording as he lets his creativity flow freely. Talking about his new album the artiste lets his excitement show, “Music keeps us strong on the journey of life,” he explains and adds, “This new album is about community togetherness and endurance on the journey of life.” The album will be crafted from start to finish featuring songs ranging in topic from everyday issues to political injustices, family, friends, love and good times. Caribbean melodies and vibes will be mixed with strong and positive lyrical content and consciousness. “On this album I have something for everyone!” says Sekhu.

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Sekhu is working with local producers in the Virgin Islands such as his main producer Clint Codrington. He records with his own band and has some still secret collaborations in the making. He wants to incorporate even more live instrumentation on the new album to achieve the flair of a live performance. Drums, acoustic guitars and bass guitars will feature prominently and Sekhu is very keen on achieving the right sound he envisions, staying true to reggae roots and the sounds of the USVI to create captivating world music. Once the work for the album is completed Sekhu is planning to tour around the world. He has graced the stages on many stage shows and concerts in the Caribbean and would love to bring his music to a wider audience. His growing fan base keeps Sekhu going and he works hard to earn the appreciation and respect of the people. He wants to please, inspire and spread joy and positivity and nothing can bring an audience closer to the artiste than a live performance. Sekhu is ready for the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, the USA, Canada, Latin America , Australia and Africa, which is especially dear to his heart. “I am ready to travel the world and spread my music and positivity to everyone,” says Sekhu “I would especially love to perform in Africa. I know it would be a great journey to travel the African continent. It would be an overwhelming joy.” Connect with Sekou on Twitter @Sekhu_reggae L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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REGGAE VIDEO AND SINGLE PREMIERE: HORNSMAN COYOTE & JAH MASON BELLY OF THE BEAST

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MUSIC NEWS

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alkan Music Box Agency released a video and a single Belly of the Beast on its YouTube channel and CDBaby. It is the first official collaboration of two internationally known reggae artists from Jamaica and Serbia. Hornsman Coyote, Reggae artist from Serbia, is more active than ever, building a parallel solo career in the world of reggae, playing trombone for the new albums of legends Max Romeo and Lee Scratch Perry, playing trombones and collaborating with numerous well-known reggae artists from all over the world, and at the same time creatively leading comeback of his reggaemetal band Eyesburn. Stubborn not to be stopped by the obstacles and traps of Babylon, Coyote is currently in a process of a new album post-production. The result of author’s maturing is the purity and power of his message - Rastafarian, politically engaged or emotionally involved, yet always layered and contrasted. In addition, serious singing experience gave him the ability of complete control over his voice, the fluctuation in power by the message, but in harmony with the sound of trombone that often leads the songs. The album, which is currently in post-production, is announced by title single Belly of the Beast, a collaboration with Jamaican Jah Mason, a distinguished representative of nu roots sound who has toured Europe and rest of the world extensively in last decade and has a number of successful albums. Mason’s vocal from the native well of reggae tradition easily spread love and spirituality, while his muffin adds the strength of insurgency to the song. The video for the song was recorded and produced by Balkan Music Box at selected locations in Belgrade in constant interaction with the city and its inhabitants. Video is traveling with actors through the basic natural elements, as much as they are available in urban areas. The song Belly of the Beast is the first official cooperation of internationally known reggae artist from Jamaica and Serbia. Thematically, it is dedicated to the common problems that the devil’s time brought to all of us, but felt in a most difficult or closest way in ghettoized environments like Serbia and Jamaica are. Poem transfers sincere desire to burn down Babylon and not to give in to his evilous ways. In addition to Jah Mason, Coyote’s new album hosts another reggae artist from Jamaica - Lutan Fyah, while the production of riddims is in the capable hands of the House of Riddim. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bv_GEGT0RMw

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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DELLY RANX VIDEO FOR THE NEXT CHAPTER NEAR COMPLETE! CONTRIBUTED

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ne of the most anticipated music video’s here in the L3 office is the music video for Delly Ranx song “The Next Chapter!” The artist was in Jamaica in October to shoot the video, which, not even Hurricane Sandy could stop the Worl general from pleasing his loyal fan base who, along with Team L3, can’t wait to see the mini movie in music video format! The lead song from his album of the same name, tops charts in North America, Europe and his home of Jamaica, prompting the artist to add a visual element to compliment what fans hear on the radio. Teaming with veteran music video producer Terminal 4 Media, scenes for the video were shot at various locations throughout Kingston, and concluded with a full day of indoor shooting in front of a green screen. As if speaking to fans directly, Delly sat on a couch while reasoning with the camera, which acts as the eyes and ears of his fans. In some scenes, the artist reasons in relaxed casual attire, in other scenes, a little more formal. “The video is more like a story about the next chapter of my life,” said Delly while on break from shooting. “People will relate to it because as the lyrics say ‘different meditation for a different stage’ which is an experience we all have. We all go through changes especially as we mature which is what the song is about.” The self reflective song, which discusses changes in the artists personal and professional life, embraces a new path and direction. Transitioning from yesterday to today, Delly includes fans on the newest chapter of his journey. The song is an international success. The video will officially be released in December, and will be available to all markets internationally. The 18 track disc is available on all major digital retail outlets including iTunes and Amazon. Physical format discs are available via www.dellyranx. com. Fans can connect with Delly on Twitter via @DellyRanx L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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2-Lined Music Hut Malvern Town Centre 31 Tapscott Road 416-264-3999

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L3MAGAZINE.COM | JUNE 2012

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GABRIELLE FINDLEY

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abrielle Monay Findley has been singing ever since she can remember and always loved performing for her peers and family. Having been inspired by watching various artists on TV, she knew that singing was what she wanted to do in life. In her own words, her first career choice she expressed to her mother was “mommy I want to be famous.” Ever since then, all she could see herself doing was standing in front of a large audience and entertaining them. While attending middle school, she became very emotional as she cried at the podium upon winning the “Maplewood Middle School 8th Grade Grammy’s.” Some may find it humorous that the award still sits on top of her dresser as an inspiration to win a real Grammy soon. Presently, Gabrielle is actively writing and singing; having found her creative niche in Lab Records. She writes all of her songs as the white and black keys help her create the lyrics that she hopes would connect to her future fans. She relates to music as if it is a person, because music inspires, heals and builds. Her musicality has graduated to one of maturity as she integrates pieces of every genre. Currently attending Montclair State University, her mind is focused on school, and her heart heavily set on music. She has had the pleasure of performing with other artists like Chris Akinyemi, TySu, and Chris Shaw at Harvard, Columbia University and various New York music spots. With a wide variety of singing the Barney and Disney theme songs, to screaming out songs of icons like Beyonce, Randy Newman and Lady Gaga, Gabrielle Monay Findley is a voice to be heard. She believes in her music and the power of music. She depicts a young lady in this generation with creativity and drive. In one word, she is “unique” in her own way and a voice for ears to be tuned in. Gabrielle’s newest single “Can’t Have Me” is doing well internationally. Connect with her on Twitter >>> @GabSweay

CONTRIBUTED

L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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ON BEING JERMAINE RILEY CONTRIBUTED

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ritish-bred singer/song writer (and former 1/3 of UK R&B group FDM), Jermaine Riley has been looking up to many a hero of R&B/pop culture for quite some time. Michael Jackson being the first, as Jermaine spent hours in front of the TV as a child, emulating the icon. “I wouldn’t go anywhere without my white socks and black plimsoles, it didn’t matter what else I was wearing” he says. “I wanted to be him.” With MJ at the top, this list soon grew, along with his anticipation to see his very own name on it. Fast forward to adulthood; hundreds of shows, several tours, a few music videos and an everlasting back catalogue of songs later, and you will find Riley flying the skies once again, stronger than ever. “Making music and being on stage performing comes second nature to me… but doing it by myself makes everything new again.” An adept dancer and entertainer (not to mention a professional graphic designer, creating all his album artwork and promotional designs), Jermaine’s song writing and signature tone have garnered the acclaim of fans, artists and producers far and wide. Most recently, such noteworthy talent skipped managers and publishers but landed him on platinum UK rapper Chipmunk’s new album Transition, as the voice behind the emotive autobiographical track “Then And Now.” Giving him the boost he needed amidst turbulent times. “I wrote that when I was broke” he exclaims. “The irony of it becoming my first major song placement is crazy to me!” Now, amidst penning songs for many different artists and producers, both upcoming and established, Riley has unleashed a trilogy of conceptual bodies of work to date; Goodbye Krypton: The Mixtape (2008), Nine Ten Eleven: The Refixes (2011) and the critically acclaimed Hello Earth (2012), which he insists the world refer to not as a mixtape, but a ‘free album’. “It’s all original material this time. I think its quality enough to allow people to put the album stamp on it, despite it being free... “Mixtape” makes it sound disposable to me and I want people to pay attention.” Sprinkled with a star-studded cast of producers (Harmony, Dready, Parker & James) and several notable features from upcoming talent, Hello Earth has achieved over a staggering 150,000 downloads online, with an influx of devoted fans showing sincere support since Jermaine’s FDM days. Consequently capturing the attention of Japanese independent label P-Vine Records and placing the project on shelves in over 600 record stores across Japan. The self-penned offering has definitely set a positive tone for his impending mixtape scheduled for November 2012, entitled Ten Eleven Twelve and his 2nd album set for 2013, already in the making. With everlasting creativity, an unwavering work ethic and commitment to music, Jermaine Riley’s potential for superstardom is substantially apparent. Up, up and away...! Connect with Jermaine on Twitter >>> @Jermaine_Riley

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THE NATURAL MYSTIC OF NANY MYSTIKK CONTRIBUTED

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owerful, strong, artistic and always real are some of the adjectives used to describe the music and personal of Nanny Mystikk. As straight as a horses mane, so is her Lioness attitude towards Reggae music. A lyrical singjay and chanter of the first order, Nanny Mystikk lays it on the line, no-holds-barred in the way she performs, writes and produces. When asked, she commented by saying “I stick to di grass root of it... ah mystical approach. What I do is just sing chant, music is my release and I am seeking to find myself and the father through music. ” The listening audience found that out when the artist debuted “Rasta Luv” which has fans hooked. Drawing on the influences of the souls of revolutionary ancestors like Nanny of the Maroon, Peter Tosh and Sophia George - three of the artists who inspired her during her formative years -it-is musical statements that have made Nanny Mystikk a pioneer in the realm of today’s reggae musical greats. To be honest “No Nuclear War” has a serious message she says passionately, for “people who use these weapons of mass destruction to kill and destroy should not be in power when there are so many hungry mouths to feed. I’m saying, “the children need a better place where we can rid of guns and those weapons of mass destruction, Jah called upon di youths because they are strong, and we have a responsibility to treat them right.” Listening to Reggae legends like Marcia Griffiths, Sophia George, Rita Marley, and Peter Tosh and performing their songs in her classroom in front of friends, as a teenager, Nanny Mystikk was destined to pursue a career in music even though at one point she shares, “I enrolled in university to study International Development Studies at York University and ended up dropping those studies. In life yuh have to be willing to make a sacrifice... because something got to give” she says strongly. Finding herself on the edge of cutting edge creativity, Nanny has found a deep meditative strength and a natural high when she composes new works. Nanny has been nominated for “Female Singer Of The Year” 3rd Annual Promoters. Entertainers And Business Owners (P.E.A.B.O) Award taking place Nov 25, 2012 in Cambridge, Ont. Her newest single “Can We Go” is a collaboration with Empress Minott and is available on iTunes. It is also on the Top 10 charts on the Karma Reggae Show hosted by DJ Steve in the UK! Connect with Nanny Mystikk on Twitter >>> @NannyMystikk L3MAGAZINE.COM | DECEMBER 2012

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RADAMEZ

THE TIME IS NOW

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CONTRIBUTED

ow does one stay true to who they are, in an industry where conforming seems to be popular? Truthfully this is not a difficult feat, though many find it hard to accomplish. If you want to know how this can be done, simply ask Radamez. Radamez, born Ramel Joseph Williams, has just released his best body of work to date. On Experience the Experiment: Valium One, Radamez invites you into his lab and forces you to take notice of his versatility. He demonstrates how to remain an individual, while spitting lyrics of substance and riding a ‘hot’ beat. This piece of work is already bearing comparisons to that of Common’s “Electric Circus” and Mos Def’s “The New Danger”. Radamez prides himself on making music of substance which has not gone unnoticed. At the ASCAP Expo 2009 his song The Archeologist, from his album Innovative, was chosen for the Hip-Hop panel out of thousands of entries. He draws a great deal of inspiration from Jay-Z and Lauryn Hill, which has enabled him to bring a certain level of consciousness to his music. He writes lyrics as if he were asking himself, “How can I feed the hip-hop nation?” Though the story of his life reads like a book, shared by many, it is his execution of life that distinguishes him from others. The many life lessons learned while growing up in Corona Queens, New York are expressed in his music. Radamez is not to be mistaken for one of those artists who speak on subject matter, in which they are not familiar - he lives his lyrics. His music chronicles his life from New York to Kansas, where he earned a B.S. in Psychology to Indianapolis, where his musical career has begun to soar. An artist first, Radamez is also owner of Team Triumph Publishing Company. His music is very important to him and this is apparent to his fans and critics across the country. Once he reaches his level of satisfaction, as an artist, he plans to venture off into other facets of the entertainment industry. Radamez is making things happen and is an exceptional example of how you can stay real and still receive admiration and accolades from the masses. Connect with Radamez on Twitter >>> @RADAMEZ29

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KONSHENS THE REALEST NATASHA VON CASTLE

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onshens is our kind of artist. He’s serious yet relaxed, hard yet understanding and ambitious without pause. He is the voice of reason within yourself telling you to accomplish what you set out to do in life while cautioning you when you’re about to make a wrong turn. How can such a person be wrapped in a young twenty something year old body?! I spoke to Konshens from the comfort of his bed! Touring has been grueling, and this interview had to be done; I didn’t complain about the location, and the Dancehall Superstar didn’t complain either. He was very accommodating and even referenced that our interview is somewhat in keeping with the title of his sophomore album ‘Hotel Room!’ At 10am Jamaica time, the backdrop was set and the mood right. Ladies … this is the result of my time with Konshens! With a firm thought process in place, the people of Trinidad & Tobago shaped and built a nation that is economically self sufficient, and leaders in fields such as Oil and Gas, Carnival Arts and Sports and have taken a leadership approach to innovations in technology, giving birth to some of the most brilliant thinkers in that area.


L3: First we have to say congratulations on your success! How is the view from where you are these days?! K: I like it! I like the movement. I’m not 100% satisfied with where I am, but I do like the movement and I am happy with that. I can see how much I’ve grown from year to year, so I’m definitely happy with the growth. You are not new to success in that you’ve had several hit records early on in your career. What would you say is the difference between early success and now success; or is there a difference? The volume. I think this success is more widespread and it’s definitely in focus. The success I had before was not in focus and more narrow. This success I’m experiencing now is in focus and covers the globe. Early on, the focus was in Europe and Jamaica, now it’s definitely the world – more worldwide and all at one time. There’s a saying that says ‘to whom much is given, much is demanded.’ Would you say that there are many demands of you because of your status in the industry? That statement is 100 percent true, and there’s no other way to say it or go around it. With the success, the demands have come and the expectations have come with the territory. Not one to limit your options, you developed and are successfully running Subkonshus Records. Tell us about the label, and how it came about from concept to reality! The label basically came about because I like to have control. This is music and besides the fact that it’s a business, it’s very, very personal to me. I like to have control over all of my music and all creative aspects of it for as long as I can. I know eventually I’m going to have to let go of some of it but the label was created initially so I can have a home where I do my personal work and control over my stuff. From there it morphed into artist management, and eventually became a place where a younger artist could learn based on my mistakes so that they don’t make the mistakes I did. I’m constantly looking for new talents to enter the music industry. One of the things we think is brilliant about you is your being ‘in the pulse’ in the industry. You recognize the huge role that dancers play, and how they’ve become stars as much as the artists and even producers. Do Sum’n the song, as well as the video showcased your thought process. Tell us about working with all those dance crews for the video! The key word you just said is recognition. For years we’ve seen music videos and for years we’ve seen shows and everything that involves the music and entertainment value and we’ve seen dancers on the sidelines basically. Dancers are 50 percent of the production. I had to big them up. They do so much work; half as much work as the artist does so I had to give them some props.


I think it’s important to work with the dancers and help them reach their level of success because if you start to rise, and you move away from the people who helped you get where you are, it’s going to be a problem and a conflict so just to identify and acknowledge the dancers, that video had to be done. It’s always fun. They have the most vibes and the most energy. From my standpoint it’s vocal but in the physical aspect. I can’t dance to save my life by the way! Switching gears and looking at your song writing (or song writing team) for the song “So Mih Tan,” your lyrics describe you as a man focused on earning. Is that a 100% accurate description of you as an artist? As a person I’m focused on earning. It’s a serious life that we’re living. It’s a life that if you’re not earning, you’re in trouble as we have to pay for everything. We have to earn in every situation; as an artist, it’s more personal. Personal to make sure that after 2 months or 2 years, I can look back and say ‘yes, that song reflects me and what I stand for.’ If we could compare you to an alcoholic beverage, we would say Vodka because, it creeps up on you slowly and before you realize it you’re intoxicated, and we’re intoxicated by you! What drink would you compare yourself to? I like that comparison, and I like the Vodka. It’s one of my favorite drinks so I’ll stick with that. Your first time in Canada saw you perform at the Montreal International Reggae Festival. An estimated 20,000 plus fans came to see you perform. Was Canada what you thought it would be? I had no thoughts. I approach every situation with an open mind cause I’ve been on the road since 2005, before people knew who Konshens was, so the experiences on the road taught me that we approach every situation with an open mind. The response was a slight surprise. I didn’t know the people would be that much into it, and to be there for the first time on a major festival too, it was a surprise and wonderful.

“WE’RE DOING MUSIC FOR THE FANS, AND THEY’RE THE ONES WHO MAKE THE HITS NO MATTER WHAT THE RADIO PEOPLE, MANAGEMENT OR OTHER PEOPLE SAY; FANS MAKE THE HITS.”


You were recently in New York where you played sold out shows. There was so much pandemonium, or, Fan-demonium that there was literal road block. Even with your success and you being used to that success, do sights like that tickle you … even a little?! You can never get used to that you understand. We’re doing music for the fans, and they’re the ones who make the hits no matter what the radio people, management or other people say; fans make the hits. When the fans come out and show that much Love to that extent; and you see the Fire Marshall come out, and you look around and see that you’re the only person on the bill, it’s really an incredible feeling, and you can’t get used to it no matter how much you try. If it happens today and if it happen tomorrow, you’re still going to be humbled by it. The business of music can be very tricky if we don’t navigate the waters well (this goes for artists, producers, media – everyone). Your wisdom says that you have experience so what was the earliest lesson you remember learning about the right way to handle the industry and some of its’ pitfalls? The earliest lesson I would say I learned is not to act impulsive; not to act too soon. Take some time to look around. I don’t think it’s just about music, it’s about every situation. Take some time to look around. Your perspective and his perspective might be two different things. You work with your brother Delus in the recording booth and on the road of life. Are you satisfied with how his career is progressing? No I’m not satisfied. I think for the type of work he does he’s not appreciated the way I would like but we’re working and the appreciation level will change. No one can accomplish without a team! How do you keep your team motivated, or is it the reverse where your team motivates you?! I think it’s back and forth. They motivate m and I motivate them. Success is individual, but we share the same drive so we achieve individually and as a team and we use that energy. We like to have things, and we like simple things like being in a party and seeing the fans react to what we’ve done to get the job done. My team has been friends from childhood days so we grow with each other; we understand each other. You’re Sophomore album ‘Hotel Room’ is here! What’s the one thing you think fans will be most surprised to hear from you? No comment at all!


Why the title ‘Hotel Room’ for your album? The last album ‘Mental Maintenance’ had me on the road for the majority of the year, I was unable to go to the studio and voice as often as I would like. So we brought the studio on the road and voiced in the ‘Hotel Room’. My producer and engineer Mark Hize is also my DJ when on the road, so more time after a show we vibe and voice a song. On this album if you hear a Soca song it’s possible that we just finished a performance in Trinidad and then went back to the Hotel Room and voiced a song. You may hear a bad one drop and we were probably in Africa at the time. So the title really signifies the hard work we put in this past year on the road, thanks to ‘Mental Maintenance’ and the work we continue to do while on the road and voicing every chance we get in and out of the ‘Hotel Room.’ The name of our Magazine is L3, and each L has a meaning. The first L is for Life, the second for Love, the third for Lyrics. What general advice can you give our readers on Life, on Love and on Lyrics?! Life; you only get one. Love is real. Lyrics; I know nothing about that topic because anything I put in my music is 100% real – it’s basically a conversation of my life! Connect with Konshens on Twitter >>> @KonshensSojah P.S. At the time of this interview, Konshens made the short list for potential Grammy nomination for Best Reggae Album for Mental Maintenance. We hope he gets the nod!


MH MORGAN HERITAGE THE RETURN

TRICIA ‘ZJ SPARKS’ SPENCE

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had heard through the grapevine that Morgan Heritage was returning and needless to say I was teeming with excitement. Any true fan of Reggae music would understand the feeling, so when I got the call to interview them I hurriedly grab my recorder and made my way through the heavy traffic to meet them at the studio where they were laying down some tracks in Kingston. When I arrived, Mojo, Gramps and Peetah were seated with eyes heavily focused on the computer monitor. Music was blaring loud through the speakers, but I didn’t mind because the sweetness of their vocals already had me enraptured. Peetah decided to represent for the group; his infectious smile and personality made the interview cool like a sweet Jamaican evening breeze, the kind you feel when you start entering December in Jamaica, our winter.


TS: Morgan Heritage took a break and each one of the members did their own thing and had great success. For you though, what was it like going off on your own? PM: In the beginning, it was nerve wrecking because you are away from your comfort zone. I was so accustomed to looking to my left on stage and seeing Gramps and looking to my right and seeing Una, Lukes and Mojo next to me and when you are on stage it’s like you are all there, but when you go solo, you are in an ocean by yourself. It was strange, but I worked with people like Don Corleone, Shane Brown from Jukeboxx Productions, Busy Signal was close to me too when I was starting out so after a while I became comfortable with it, I would say about after one year. Were persons receptive to you as a solo artiste or were they skeptical? In some places yes and in some places no, but after two years into it persons started coming around and realized wow, this is actually working. When we first decided to take a break, people thought we were crazy and were wondering why. We wanted to be challenged, we wanted to do something that was different from what we were comfortable with doing and knew how it worked and that was Morgan Heritage. We built it for so many years and we wanted to do something different and we also wanted to spend time with family. By the third year a lot of the fans started loving it and we also gained a lot of new fans. We also got the chance to work with a lot of artistes from other territories like the South Pacific and Africa. What were some of the greatest lessons you learned from being a solo artiste? One of the greatest lessons that I have learned is that being in a group like Morgan Heritage with my family is unique and I have gained a greater value for my siblings. I have learned that every artiste that is just a solo artiste, make that an artiste has a rough road because all the weight is on your shoulders cause there is no one there to share the load with. When you gotta promote, write and record your records and travel to work with other producers it’s just you alone. There is no one to help you out, no one you can turn to and say, alright you tek dah song yah and mek mi jus relax pon dah song yah. There is nothing like that when you are a solo artiste. It’s just you, if you wanna have that career to be there and maintain that career, it’s all on you. Intially, when you had decided on the split, had you all decide on a time period, like a 4 year or a 5 year before you would get back together? Oh yeah, we did (he nods vigorously and chuckles). Five to seven years is what we had said, but we knew it was not going to be less than 5 years. We wanted to see if we could push it to seven years, but the demand from the fans, the demand from people like yourself (radio people and sound personnel) and the whole world about when they were going to get Morgan Heritage made 5 year the limit it seemed. When did you originally split? (His eyes bulge like he about to have a coronary) Split? We didn’t split. (I correct it) Ok, take a break … It was in 2008 after our Summer Tour behind The Mission in Progress Album. Our last was 2008 and our next album will be 2013. So it’s been 5 years since our last album. I heard two of the singles off the upcoming album The Return and The Girl Is Mine and I have to tell you The Girl Is Mine got me. That’s a classic Michael Jackson. (He gives a hearty laugh, pure bliss) I like that; I like that ….


How did you choose that song? Well actually, a friend of ours name Jason, a producer, Jamaican but based in Miami, J Vibes Production, he had the track and he was like ‘Peetah I have this track, but is only two person mi can hear a sing it, you and Gramps.’ I was like ‘what, alright send it lemme hear it’. He was like ‘I swear, I thought about it for months and is only you and Gramps can do it’. When he sent it, he said ‘when you hear it you going know what it is’. He didn’t even tell me what it was. When I listened to it, I called him and said ‘Forget it, I got you on this, we gon do this’. I did my part and then I flew to Atlanta where Gramps was and we finished it along with our sister. To be honest Michael Jackson is an artiste that we grew up listening to, one that we idolized, so had to make sure that we got it right. From the musical side, Jason did it justice by the production and reproducing the song in Reggae. It’s a classical song and we did not want to mess up. Some people take a risk and do certain songs that you shouldn’t touch and this was one of those kinds of songs, so we were skeptical about how we performed on it. It came out to be something very nice and people are loving it. Morgan Heritage album is scheduled for release in 2013, which part, the early part? The first quarter, by March, we don’t wanna pass March and it should have about 12 - 13 songs, we don’t want to exceed 14. Sometimes when you put too many songs on an album, tracks get lost and sometimes it feels like it’s dragging on too long. When you have 12 strong songs, when people listen to the album, they will be like ‘the album done already’ and will play it again. So we wanna stay between 12 and 14.


Have you come up with a theme for the album? (He sighs and pinches his right ear, looking off to the wall) That’s a good question, a very good question. (He starts massaging his beard and looks to the ground) I don’t think we have a theme per se, we know that we will have a good amount of love songs because that is a big part of our audience, the women love that. Ever since we did She’s Still Loving Me, that side of our audience has grown and they love when we do those kinds of songs. We also have a strong cultural following, which is why the EP which came out September 25, we had to give you the two singles that are the two sides of Morgan Heritage, the Cultural side and the Lover’s side. It’s almost like Dennis Brown, he did it the best, he would give you his cultural music and his Lover’s music and different sides of his audience would love him for that. We kinda like have that essence which is why we have ‘The Return’ which deals with social commentary, culture and our roots and returning to that; then there is ‘The Girl Is Mine’, originally done by Michael Jackson and Paul McCartney which deals with the Lover’s side. I know you are intimately involved in your works, what percentage of the production work on the album will be done by the group versus other producers? I would say about 50 / 50 maybe 40%, we don’t like to over do it. If we work with someone who has a stronger song than one that we have done then we use theirs. I have to ask you this because Jamaica celebrated 50 years of Independence and we pretty much did reverse colonization in London for The Olympics, we copped a lot of medals in a country that colonized us for so long … tell me, you have travelled extensively and realize the worth of Brand Jamaica, so what can Jamaican Artistes, Entertainers, The Government do to use this as a good leverage for Brand Jamaica in terms of Entertainment? We have to honestly understand that the world loves Reggae music. We love Dancehall music and there are people out there who love Dancehall, but on a global scale Reggae is loved and appreciated more than Dancehall. Why is that? Reggae music is real. You haffe understand that when Bob Marley and The Wailers, Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff,

Steel Pulse, Third World, Toots and The Maytals, when they travelled the world and promoted Reggae music from the 70’s - 90’s it set a lot of people free. It was a music that broke the bands of captivity and set a lot of people free in South Africa and Africa. Europeans see Reggae as a music that bring them closer to reality and connects them closer to the Earth. So it’s a music that is spiritually connected to people, and a lot of people don’t even understand it and why. So how can the Government capitalize on this because Reggae is one of our gifts to the world? The Government (he pauses) You know the problem I see with The Government and it have a lot to do with Rasta too. Who have made Reggae music popular around the world is Rasta (he starts counting on his fingers) Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Bunny Wailer, Jacob Miller, Third World, Steele Pulse, Gregory Issacs, Freddie McGregor, you name it. The best of Reggae is from Rastafarians and we know say Rasta get a fight ah Jamaica. In today’s society Rasta get more acceptance, but inna dem time deh there were many barriers that Rasta had to break through. Those pioneers and Fathers of the music went through a lot to establish this thing. Rasta is a people of culture, discipline and we are rooted. People around the world love that. For a lot of people that love Reggae and Rasta they think that Red, Gold and Green are the colors of Jamaica, when Red Gold and Green are the colors of Ethiopia, you understand. Jamaican Rastas have made the colors of Ethiopia more popular than any Ethiopian inna di world. We as Jamaicans led and continue to lead that movement. It is only now that people are realizing that is Black Gold and Green are the Jamaican colors even though it goes hand in hand with the Red Gold and Green. Jamaica and the Government have to understand that in the same way that they support Blue Mountain Coffee, Sugar Cane, Bauxite or Green Banana, they have to realize that Reggae music is something that they need to support and embrace because other countries are taking on to it and running with it. If Jamaica nuh want it somebody ah go tek it, believe mi. You mentioned earlier that it is the Jamaican Rastas who did the bulk of the work to make Reggae known and they are now more accepted in our society; do you suppose that this acceptance has worked more against


the Rastas now because a lot of persons are now commenting that a lot of these Rastas now behave more like glamour Rastas and that they no longer want to sing any of the cultural things that a lot of persons used to identify with Rastafari. Do you think the acceptance by society of Rastas have made them complacence and become pretty much like how you have glamour rappers you have glamour Rastas who are no longer exerting for that movement of rebellion and change? (He laughs wildly) I can’t say it’s too much of an acceptance. Yes there are a few Rasta that say dem a bad man Rasta, Flossin Rasta and I am like what is the meaning of that cause Rasta is Rasta. Rasta ah people weh rooted and cultural, so you can’t say that you a badman Rasta cause that is an oxymoron. Rasta don’t promote badness and gun ting and rae rae, granted wi nah go mek nobody push wi over and wi not gonna sit deer and say if you slap mi on this cheek we gonna mek you slap us on the next cheek, no, we are not lambs to the slaughter, we are lions, conquering lions. Wi nuh inna di badness thing. The reality is what denomination of Rasta society decides to promote. We have to realize that for a time in the music in Jamaica, the violence in the music was the most popular part of Dancehall music and some Rasta dat say dem a badman Rasta push violence too and they were pushed in that era of the badness. So you have Rasta mix up inna badness and baldheaded mix up inna badness and you jus have a lot of people get caught up in a web that they didn’t belong in. Even today you still have Rastas still making good cultural songs, Tarrus Riley makes good cultural songs, we Morgan Heritage do, Tony Rebel, Queen Ifrica even Etana and you have other singers, but the question is, is it being played, is it being promoted. Maybe, we are not spending the amount of money to market and promote our stuff like the Dancehall artistes. We are in an era where marketing and promotion are a major tool in getting music out there. Morgan Heritage has no problem with that either because at the end of the day if you are signed to major record company in America or the UK, every company has a budget for their artiste, where they spend a certain amount of money to market and promote their artiste. Inna Jamaica we want fi chastise and call it payola, it’s NOT payola, it’s MARKETING AND PROMOTION (he says it with emphasis). When you see a Pepsi or a Red Stripe paying for Billboards they are marketing their products so why we as artistes feel that we fi mek a song and a radio man fi jus tek it up and play it, no, you have to market you thing, you have to promote you ting. Print up some posters, print up some flyers, invest in some radio ads for your music, it’s not payola, it’s about Marketing and Promotion. When people can look at it in a positive sense, when people nuh haffe a hide and a do it, then maybe constructive Marketing and Promotion for good music will come to the forefront cause right now is who have the fattest pocket and that is the bottom line.


What advice would you give to young and upcoming artistes and producers because you have endured the test of time and your music is going to be amongst the classics? Imma be honest, today it is harder for young artistes and producer because of the state of the music. Number one, when you produce a song you don’t even get a chance to buy the song because as they produce something they blast it out via email and everybody get it within a few days. When people go overseas and they hear it and like and they go on iTunes and look for it they cannot find it, so you find some end up finding that some of them search sites just to find it for download and it’s not helping the music. We are acting against ourselves. The artistes who are coming up have to stay strong and find a way to make it work for today. In the same way that producers and artiste of the 60’s had to find a way to get their music out there, we have to find a way to break new artistes. Right now if you don’t have a Vybz Kartel, Mavado, Bounty or Beenie on your show nobody don’t want to go because dem man deh buss inna the era weh dem tings established. So when people hear of a show with these artistes they will go cause they know what they are going to get, but nobody nuh know these young artistes. These young artistes, however, go round and are saying ‘ah mi run di city, ah mi run di place’, who knows you, who knows your song. A lot of these artistes who are putting out songs, people don’t even know the names of your songs. Today the name of a riddim is bigger than any song on the riddim. You will hear people say ‘yup hear dah Tarrus deh pon da riddim deh, yup hear dah Vado (short for Mavado) deh pon dah riddim deh, you hear dah Heritage deh pon dah riddim deh’ yet no one knows the name of your song. So it gets lost. When you talk about Shabba music you know Trailor Load, when you talk bout Bounty you know Cellular Phone, when you talk bout Beenie you know Girls Dem Suga you know the name of these artistes song, when you go stage show you know which song you a go hear from Beenie. You have the Tommy Lee’s, the Popcaan’s but you don’t even know the names of their songs so you don’t even know wah dem a go sing. When dem start sing you might identify the song and then sometimes they go onstage with bands who don’t even play the music so you don’t really identify the song when it starts. Is when them open them mouth and say the lyrics you might say to yourself ‘oh ah dah song deh’. The representation, the packaging, the deliverance of the music to the public is poor and until we can realize this and stop treating our music like fast food and start treating it like an elite restaurant then we are going to continue struggling. What advice do you have for the reader of L3 magazine? The advice I have for you is to support the music. If you are a lover of Reggae and Dancehall music, buy the music. Stop ask you breddrin fi a burn offa him cd or put dis pon mi jump drive or email dah riddim deh to me. It’s not helping the music. Pop, Hip Hop, Latin, Reggaeton are successful because the audience for that music go online and buy the music, our music is not being purchased so it’s being lost. It’s being lost on the world wide web through email, download sites, torrent sites. You put out a song this week and it not lasting for more that 1 week, 2 weeks most 3 weeks, it’s gone cause a next hot riddim come out. There’s no steady promotion to the music. We gotta work together to preserve it, whether it’s Reggae or Dancehall. That’s the only way it will stand the test of time. Connect with Morgan Heritage via Twitter >>> @Heritage4Life


S SHEBA

QUEEN OF HEARTS HEIKE DEMPSTER

W

ho is the Queen of Hearts and why does she go by that name?! An Interview with Sheba Sahlemariam a.k.a. The Queen of Hearts!

HD: First up, tell us a bit about yourself Q: I’m a singer/songwriter/producer born in Ethiopia, raised mostly in New York City but also around the world; the Caribbean, Africa, Europe because my parents were international civil servants. I’m still relatively new to the music industry in the sense that people are still just finding out about me but I have been singing, writing and performing for many years, hoping to break through and one day sell out stadiums. I believe in my dreams, and I go hard for them.


Can you share some highlights of your career so far? My first single was a song I wrote and produced and put out myself on my own label called “Love This Lifetime.” It got a pretty good response from youtube, which led to DJ’s in the UK and in the Caribbean playing it. It charted in the UK, which led to remixing it with Bounty Killer, a legend in the Dancehall. That remix and the video for it got played in a lot of places. It wasn’t a huge commercial hit all over the world but it traveled far and wide; it charted in the UK twice more and got added to MTV UK and MTV Base. These are awesome results considering I was the sole person who ran the record label. It was pretty much just me, my laptop and tiny shoe string budget the whole time. Your new single and video is called “Technicolor.” What inspired the song? The song “Technicolor” was written as I was coming out of a really tough period in my personal life. The stress of being an independent artist was starting to take its toll. I was feeling very lost but there was still this inspiration in me to keep moving forward, especially when I thought of all the people that have touched my life. I was not in love with anybody in particular, I was feeling in love with life itself and that feeling is truly what keeps me putting one foot in front of the other. What is the concept for the video? It’s funny, I did not have a lot of money to make the video, so we got footage from a variety of sources. I went out with a camera and walked around shooting people that inspired me, then we edited it up to capture a feeling that was universal and inspired good feelings. I didn’t want the video to be about romantic love, because romantic love is only one type of love. It’s beautiful but agape is more interesting and I wanted the video to spark that in people. I literally want people to feel more alive after experiencing my sonic and visual work and hopefully take that out into their lives and relationships. I also did not want to be in the video. I’m sure I’ll have tons of chances to make performance videos in the future, but the stars of this song and video are all kinds human beings just being awesome and engaged in living a full life. The project is promoted as “Who is the Queen of Hearts” via a website of the same name. Why did you chose to go with such a secretive approach? I just feel that the business of promoting music has become about how far people can shove a brand down your throat. And as a consequence of focusing on sales and marketing, the music people are putting out, does not even necessarily feel that good going down. I wanted people to focus only on my music and like me for that, not for how much money I can spend on smoke and mirrors. Also I just finished an album called The Queen of Hearts (Valentine’s Day, 2013) so I thought it would be fun to introduce myself as the question, since most people are just hearing about me for the first time. Hopefully they like “Technicolor” enough to find out my real name.


Why “Queen of Hearts”? In 2009 right at the start of the new year, I wrote a song called “Queen of Hearts” that I knew was the start of an album as soon as I wrote it. It was a moment that a line got drawn in the sand and I knew everything that I wrote after that song was part of a new chapter in my life. Personally I was struggling with challenges and I decided to accept them and have them bring out the best in me. I felt like I was literally turning into a Queen of Hearts. I felt like my heart was being broken so it could grow stronger to have a even bigger capacity to love. The entire album is a chronicle of that experience. Which direction is your music taking now considering that experience? I like to think that popular music is a conversation that is happening all over the world, by many different people all at the same time and I just want to participate. I focus on writing the best songs I can write and producing them in a way that allows me to connect with as many people as I possibly can. I nearly got stuck in a genre box with the Bounty Killer record; everyone assumed I was a one trick pony that was only interested in Reggae/Dancehall. I love that music but it’s only one facet of what I do. My performances and production might traffic in a lot of culture because my life experience has me moving in and out of many world cultures, but ultimately I write, sing and produce pop songs. The songs dictate the production style and that has a lot to do with what is happening in music when I put the recording out. I want have a relevant voice in the pop conversation and make music that is universal so I can invite as many people to the party as I possibly can. You are a truly international citizen of the world. How do your travels inform your music? At some point, I realized that if I was being true to myself as an artist, the circumstances of my life: growing up in exile from Ethiopia, both my parents working at the United Nations, growing up in immigrant communities in New York, having to move and travel often... would have to be injected into what I did musically. It’s who I am so it’s going to get on my music. I think it’s a good thing, it informs my voice and style in a unique way and I love being able to authentically express all of myself. What else do you have planned for the near future? Right now the primary focus is on “Technicolor” but we have a lot of potential singles on this Album. I’m dusting off my Film degree and shooting a new video for every song. There will also be a lot of #WHOISTHEQUEENOFHEARTS? content coming almost every week. You will be able to log on to www.whoisthequeenofhearts.com and hear new songs and watch new video content weekly. Some of it will be funny, some of it will be inspiring, but all of it will keep be related to the topic of this album “The Queen of Hearts.” The next song I’ll release is probably “Free Falling” a cover of Tom Petty’s song, done in a style that you might not expect and then I’ll release the single “Queen of Hearts!” The new project is interactive. Please tell us how everyone can get involved! I am really asking a question: #WHOISTHEQUEENOFHEARTS? with the whole campaign. I actually want people to think about it and try to answer the question for themselves. Who is the Queen of your heart? It’s a good question. Life is about good questions, and answering them for yourself. The answers to questions like that tend to frame our lives and get us thinking about the important things. Tweet me with your answer, I genuinely want to know. The best answer wins a special Valentine’s performance from me. It could be for your Mom, your wife, your daughter, it could be you and for you and your girls. Depends on your answer! So tell me your stories! Connect with the artist on Twitter >>> @myqueenofhearts


Special Delivery: The First Decade 2001 – 2011

http://itunes.apple.com/album/the-1st-decade/id563207951?v0=9988&ign-mpt=uo%3D1


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M I X

STORMS OF LIFE SHASTA WALLACE FT. EXCO LEVI

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L3 MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2012 | NO. 016  

Canada's Leading Caribbean Urban Magazine

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