Issuu on Google+

DIGITAL PUBLISHING

ISSUE N0.1


Westerdals School of Communication

Student assignment by Longo © 2014

issue � 1 • spring 2014

A MAGAZINE ABOUT DIGITAL PUBLISHING


[con路tra] prefix 1. against; opposite. "contraception"


4-5

buffering‌


•CO NT E NT S

07 Introduction

10 Article

23 Guide

TABLE OF CONTENTS


6-7

52 Interview

58 Top Ten

62 Tutorials

TABLE OF CONTETS


8-9

Welcome to the first issue of CONTRA, a magazine about digital publishing and the future of editorial design. Magazines have existed for centuries, but it's no secret that print medias have seen better days. Technology is pushing beyond paper itself, with tablet magazines as the latest frontier. Over the next five years, many print magazines will be transformed into digital publications. The magazine audience will move to electronic formats and adapting to new technologies to consume their favorite content. They will be given access to video capabilities, adding a whole new dynamic to the magazine experience, and the magazine publishers will have the ability to share the magazine with a wider audience through effective social-media channels. Digital publishing is slowly, but surely taking over the market. But is print really dead? We at CONTRA have had a little chat with REDINK, if it is still possible to launch print magazines in the current media environment. In addition, we have also an article about Katachi Magazine, including a guide about how to structure and design the magazine and it's key elements.

We hope you'll enjoy the launch of CONTRA!

Longo E D ITO R IN C HI E F


AN EXCLUSIVE

KATACHI

MAGAZINE

WI T H KEN OL L ING

WITH KEN OLLING


10-11

buffering‌


•A RT I CL E

Katachi will show the world what can be done on the iPad.

Text: Longo & Katachi Photography: Katachi & Grafill

K

atachi ("form" in japanese) is an exclusively magazine designed for the iPad,

But the great thing was they were creating their own tools that allowed them to constant-

that was created by Ken Olling and Axel Haugan late one night in 2010, at a bar in Texas.

ly push their ideas forward, find completely new ways of doing editorials and dream big.

The night was spent devouring beer, BBQ and reflecting on the possibilities of the newly announced Apple iPad and how it could change publishing forever. The idea was simple: to publish the most interactive magazine in the world. But it turned out to be not that easy as they thought it would be. When they started to make Katachi, they quickly realized that there were no tool excited that could what they wanted to do or tap into the possibilities of the iPad's

The content in Katachi is about design, people and business. It is an incredibly interactive iPad magazine, and chronicles global design culture, individuals who transform society and the ideas that fuel our collective imagination. They're approaching publishing from a content specific point of view, where content forms design, and not the other way around. They tailor the design of each story to reflect and further the content.

touch interface. Even more daunting, no-one outside of Apple had any experience designing and communicating with touch screens. So they literally built Katachi from scratch. They needed to find a way to develope a form for art publishing tool, and had to make everything by themselves from the technology, the design tool, the app, the layout design, the typeface and the content. This long and extremely difficult process was back and forth for about 18 months and is still happening now. They bring a lot of respect, inspiration and experience from web and print into publishing for the iPad, and as much they love the two platforms they couldn't translate either one to the tablet and think it is going to work.

ARTICLE

“THEY BRING A LOT OF RESPECT, INSPIRATION AND EXPERIENCE FROM WEB AND PRINT INTO PUBLISHING FOR THE IPAD”


12-13

Katachi's typical audience is between 20-to 40, largely media related, culturally literate and widely travelled men and women. They say most of their readers are in the design business or related creative industries like advertising, fashion etc. The magazine is also published in English, Japanese and Norwegian. Katachi’s design and editorial direction is a collection of East and West, modern and classic. They weave these pieces together, reflecting today’s complex world through a graphic, colourful and most importantly, interactive approach. Although only on it’s fourth issue, Katachi continues to set the standards of future iPad magazines very high. The core team behind it all is Ken Olling, editor and creative director. He run Katachi and manage all of the aspects of it. Max Alexander Berg, editor and is responsible for the Katachi Magazine and oversees other magazines. Erland Halvorsen is their CTO and work on the development of Origami Engine. Karianne Hjallen runs the book publishing part of the business and helps with the licensing of their tools.

Katachi is divided into six main sections. Cargo Cult (above) is one of the readers favourites.

There are also fourteen other people who are working with Katachi on daily basis. Eight of them in Oslo, three in St. Petersburg and two in Berlin. In addition there are thirteen freelancers who works worldwide. This said; they all wear many hats on daily basis. »

ARTICLE


01 - Heroine

3 7 pages

The flagship issue of Katachi explore the life of female heroes, both in daily life and on the global scene. Get to know some of the most inspirational role models,scene-makers and advocates of style today.

02 - From

3 4 pages

The second issue of Katachi examines the products, the people, and the services that surrounds us daily but we never really think about. We trace products to sources, movements to ideas, and people to heritage.

THE ISSUES


8-15

03 - Gold The third issue of Katachi looks at gold, the most sought-after commodity for more than 3000 years. Gold is a source of power, prestige and conflict. We aim to show you why everyone loves gold.

04 - Sweat

X pages

The fourth issue of Katachi lets go of control to see if our best work happens when we feel the heat.

THE ISSUES

14-15

2 0 pages


THE COVER All magazines starts here. When you see our cover you've already purchased the magazine so it's not reason for it to bang you over the head with information and reasons to buy. We wanted to strip it down, drawing inspiration from old Colors covers. Each time you touch the screen various illustrations bursts out in a circle before fading off the edges of the screen. The thought was to touch through to the theme 'Heroine', and show how different people have different sides and different layers within them. And of course do things you can't do in print; have random cover images and feature interactive works from fantastic illustrators.

THE LOGO This is the Katachi Media and Katachi Magazine Logo. It's inspired by the shapes of Origami which is the traditional Japanese art of paper folding.

FEATURES


PARALLAXING The photo is made up of numerous layers. By tilting the iPad from side to side different layers reveal themselves to the reader, creating a 3D-like effect. Playing with layers gives this fashion shoot that

in future issues as it has great storytelling potential.

CARGOCULT The idea was to show all the products we feature, and to do it in a highly interactive way. When you swipe upwards you travel forward, the overlay text disappears and you move through the five featured products. If you swipe down you travel back to the opening screen. In this feature we wanted to play with how to handle video. Usually people think of video as horizontal, we swipe left and right to move through time. The same can be done by swiping up and down. In Cargo Cult, what you're doing is swiping back and forth in a video. We hired the heaviest dolly in town, mounted a boom to it and attached a DSLR at the end. After hours of tripping silently back and forth we got the shot we wanted and it turned out quite nice in the end. If we didn't plan it in the beginning exactly as we wanted it to work it could never have been presented on the iPad like it's done. When you're creating content specific for the iPad the idea is as important as the execution.

FEATURES

16-17

little touch it needs to be elevated from print material. Working with contributors has at time been difficult as many of the methods we use haven't really been used before. We'll see more of this technology


HERZ BAG Sliding your finger from left to right unveils the front and back of the bag. An easy way to show products, but also a feature that can be used to great effect in other editorials. The text is written to be read as one sentence altogether, or be read as two separate sentences when you're browsing either side. Yes, we paid for our writer's painkillers.

DYNAMIC VS STATIC CONTENT The launch issue of Katachi will be as easily accessible when we (hopefully) launch our 100th issue as it is today. It'll always be available for new and old readers through the bookshelf. A lot of our content is static in the way that it won't change after the issue has been published, something more in line with print magazines. At the same time we're publishing on a dynamic platform connected to the Internet and have to give readers ways to interact with each other and with the magazine. The story "Visage" (below) argues that all women at some point or another will be a heroine to someone, encouraging them to upload a picture of themselves through the app (or our webpage if you're on an iPad 1). Once a picture is uploaded it's pushed to all other readers.

FEATURES


THE SIDEBAR Digging up information about contributors to a print magazine can be a hassle. We wanted to give our contributors as much love as possible. We've done away with all credits on-page, instead putting all

like? Contact them instantly.illustrators.

THE PAGE FLIP Print is beautiful. The tactile experience and the feeling you get from flipping through a well-composed photo story is great. On the iPad the page flip tries to emulate that experience, but it just does not work. The iPad is not print. We wanted to translate that feeling onto the iPad, not the page flip itself. So we thought about what we like about print, and one of things is this subtle expectation you get from flipping through it. For our photo galleries we make the picture come forth from underneath. The motion is the same as when you normally scroll and it won't be in the way if you do it quickly. However, if you spend time with it you'll hopefully get that subtle, emotional feeling you get from print.

FEATURES

18-19

information regarding each page into the sidebar. All information like website, e-mail, and portfolio about contributors to that particular story is accessible inside the magazine. Find something you


TYPOGRAPHY This typeface was created for Katachi Media as a corporate font and for Katachi Magazine. Targeted mainly for the iPad, but also for web and print. This was conceived from the start as a super family of 6 weights in Serif and San Serif. The typeface was designed by AndrĂŠs Torresi based on ideas, sketches and art direction from Ken Olling and the Katachi editorial team. This was an intense project between AndrĂŠs in Argentina, and Katachi in Norway, which took place over 14 months. The typeface is to be a transitional design with a serious tone and built with a minimal of lines and an aggressive cut. Many of the characteristics are designed to be quirky and odd as a reflection of a modern international world.

FEATURES


20-21

FEATURES


GUIDE

07 KEY ELEMENTS IN EDITORIAL DESIGN


Design is an important part of a journal's identity, how it is perceived the magazine and it's key elements.

Text: Tidsskriftforeningen

T

he visual design is supposed to arrange the material so that the reader gets the best possible experience . It also does editorial work easier both in the planning and production by creating overview and system. Whether you want to communicate with a designer or trying to put together a magazine on your own, you must first ask yourself a number of questions. What kind of blade should you create? Who should read it? How should you organize your fabric? How do you get someone to want to read it?

The design should help to : Give the journal a distinct identity that provides the desired signals on the content and audience. Organize subject areas and structure, to the benefit of both reader and editorial. Dramatize the text layout, typography choices and any picture laying. Âť

WHY THINK DESIGN ? A successful magazine design works because it helps to convey the contents of the magazine, in line with the editorial intentions. This means that the spirit should be thought out and clearly articulated, and that an agreement on how they should be communicated exists between editorial and a designer.

DESIGN

22-23

and read. In this guide we will show you how to structure and design


BR A ND IDEN T I T Y IS T HE ICON OF YOUR PRODUC T. I T IS T HE BA DGE T H AT REPRESEN T S T HE BR A ND A ND T HE REL AT IONSHIP WI T H T HE CONSUMER.

— The Russo Group Branding


01 ‌identity


[iden¡ti¡ty] – the fact of being who or what a person or thing is.

Text: Tidsskriftforeningen Photography: Magplus & Forge

hat is the magazine's personality and voice?

How can it be communicated visually? Try to define some "personality traits" of the magazine by thinking contradictions and where the magazine is based on inspections a scale between them. Eg: Sophisticated - folk / Authority - friend / Objective - subjective / is a sombre - noisy. Look at other periodicals and trying to analyze what you like / not like and why. Which feature of the design is consistent with the identity of their magazine? It is the cover of magazine which as the face, represents its personality that defines its identity. Consistency defines the personality of your magazine and also gives a unique identity to it. Why should we create a personality of a magazine? Because the key to success of any product is the differentiation. A magazine should be identified clearly even in the crowd of its own genre. If you hide mast-heads of indifferent magazines, even

If a magazine doesn't have its different identity, it gets lost in its

their regular readers won't be able to identify them. Even for the subject like photography, guide lines can not be over-ruled in the name of creativity or topicality.

own genre.

IDENTITY

26-27

W


NO T ALL RE ADERS ARE LE ADERS, BU T ALL LE ADERS ARE RE ADERS. — H ar r y S. Tr um an


2 0 02 ‌readers


How the cover of the magazine looks and how it is designed, helps to reach a specific target audience.


[read·er] – can mean a person who is reading a text, or a basal reader, a book used to teach reading.

Text: Tidsskriftforeningen Photography: Cargocollective

W

ho are the readers and what is the target

audience for your magazine? How do they use the magazine? What do they want to obtain/absorb

difficulty to read small size fonts? Think, how you can adapt the magazine so the readers get the most out of it. Finding your target audience isn’t quite the same thing as reaching them. But both are important for making your direct mail effective. Finding your target audience has to do with figuring out who and where your customers are. Reaching them has to do with establishing the kind of person-to-person connection that makes people more likely to engage with your message and, hopefully, buy from you.

READERS

30-31

when they reading? Are they looking for reference information? Specialization? Will they catch up quickly on a specific field? Have you older readers who have


T HE K E Y T O SUCCESSFUL LE ARNING ENVIRONMEN T IS S T RUC T URE.

— Cara Carrol


03 …structure


The structure of a magazine is based upon a certain order that many publications follow. It maintains professionalism and makes it easier for readers to process the information quickly and efficiently.


[struc¡ture] – the arrangement of and relations between the parts or elements of something complex.

Text: Tidsskriftforeningen & Magazine Designing Photography: Magazine Designing & Katachi

B

uild a template structure. Just like each page has

its own structure so does the magazine. Todays magazines follow the same structure and although there are magazines that do not follow this approach we can say that this is a default one. What needs should the magazine fulfill? How is the

of images to be integrated? These are all considerations that should be included in the planning. Make a list of possible needs and look at how these can be addressed in the design. By creating a clear structure of the magazine, it can obtained: Easier editing and organizing. Faster and cleaner production. Recognition of the readers, easier navigation. Rhythm and variation.

STRUCTURE

34-35

content structured? Is there much text? Regular columns? Different departments by theme? Need facts and information texts? Long source lists? A lot


T Y POGR APH Y HAS ONE PL AIN DU T Y BEFORE IT AND T HAT IS T O CONVE Y INFOR MATION IN WRITING.

— Emil Ruder


04 ‌typography


[ty·pog·ra·phy] – is the art and technique of arranging type in order to make language visible.

Text: Tidsskriftforeningen & Speckyboy Photography: Magazine Designing

H

ow will the magazine be read? The text level do

you need? How can typography choices relate to the magazine's visual identity? Content is king, but typography is the crown and design is the throne. Typography and design both help content maximize its potential and withstand the test of time. Applying the principles of typography, designers break up text into blocks and offer visual shortcuts that let users sift through masses of information — making it

tent is organized efficiently. The more information a user gets from one glance, the quicker he achieves his goals on a web page and the less time he spends staring at the screen. Typography isn’t just about fiddling with fonts and tinkering with typefaces. Typefaces are to designers as glass, steel and stone are to architects. Typography is about assembling those resources into something sensible and robust—like an architect utilizing industrial materials to build a skyscraper that can withstand the test of weather and time.

TYPOGRAPHY

38-39

easier to scan for information. It’s more convenient for users to decide where to begin reading if con-


IT IS MORE IMPOR TAN T T O CLICK WIT H PEOPLE T HAN T O CLICK T HE SHU T T ER.

— Alfred Eisenstaedt


05 ‌images


It is important that the images conntect to the articles when you are working with editorial design.


[im¡age] – a representation of the external form of a person or thing in art.

Text: Tidsskriftforeningen Photography: Magplus

T

he picture speaks more to the heart than

the brain. The general rule is that the images are not meant for decoration, they will support information. The advantage of image include that it can reproduce reality in a realistic manner. What kind of image expression is consistent with the magazine's identity? Reporting and news images? Visualization of abstract concepts? Formal / informal? Personal expression? A person may appear to be bad or threatening, strong or weak, pretty or ugly in a picture. Much depends on how she is lit, where she is placed in the image, and how the picture angle.

to create a consistent expression within the available resources. Picture bases, both the free and the affordable, is a good starting point, but it requires some work to identify the images that contribute to the dissemination rather than just fill space on the page.

IMAGES

42-43

For a low-budget magazine challenge will always be


S T ORY T ELLING IS T HE MOS T POWERFUL WAY T O PU T IDE AS IN T O T HE WORLD T ODAY.

— Robert McKee


06 …storytelling


Use the images and layout to tell the story.


[sto·ry·tell·ing] – is the conveying of events in words, and images, often by improvisation or embellishment.

Text: Tidsskriftforeningen Photography: Magplus

W

hat is the main message of the text? How can

this be enhanced and expanded with the help of pictures and designs? Think dissemination of content, not just form. PHOTOS which simply repeats the text message, or add a picture unimportant aspect, gives the reader several entrances to the story. Is there a parallel narrative that can contribute to the understanding of the text, which can be brought forward through the images? GRAPHIC GRIP: can portions of text be extracted and made ​​visible to enhance the dissemination? Imagine fact boxes, quotes, graphs, etc.

46-47

STORYTELLING


YOU WILL NE VER GE T A SECOND CHANCE T O MAK E A FIRS T IMPRESSION.

— Robert McKee


07 ‌the cover


The cover is the first thing the readers will see. Thats why it is the most important page of the magazine.


[cov¡er] – is any protective covering used to bind together the pages of a book.

Text: Tidsskriftforeningen Photography: Magplus & Cargocollective

T

he cover is your sales poster. But where will it

sell? Do you have primarily subscribers, and little single copy, you can choose other solutions than if you seem at Narvesen. Do you have high recognition the readers can prioritize identity rather than communication, but if you are going to attract the casual reader will require more direct communication of the magazine's identity and content. A strong logo can help recognition, but can also make it difficult to develop the visual expression. A recognizable cover design can also function as a logo. A good photo will always work, but requires resources. A structured and strong graphic design gives you ability to vary the image use but retain recognition.

50-51

THE COVER


AN EXCLUSIVE

CHRISTEN

PEDERSEN

WITH REDINK


buffering‌

52-53


•IN T E RV I E W

Text: Longo Photography: REDINK

Christen Pedersen is a Oslo-based art director with a passion for magazines and editorial design. He graduated from School for Graphic Design in Oslo, and has worked as Art Director in the magazines FHM and Costume. Christen had also held a position as coach for Art Directors and designers of Bonnier Media and Benjamin Publications in Denmark where he has redesigned Woman, Boligmagasinet and Nova. He has also hosted a series of lectures in functional editorial design and what gets a magazine cover to sell. Now, he is working as Art Director at REDINK, which today is the largest and leading editorial agency in Norway. We at CONTRA were therefore thrilled to chat with Christen about his take on the future of the magazines.

INTERVIEW

THOUGHTS ON FUTURE OF MAGAZINE GENRE


“PEOPLE WILL ALSO PREFER PRINT MAGAZINES WHEN THEY ARE TRAVELING, VACATION, COTTAGE, BEACH ETC. THE QUESTION IS WHETHER THEY WANT TO PAY FOR THIS”

What is the future of magazine design? Will print magazine die out due electronic media? — Magazines sold in single copy will on par with newspapers gradually disappear. But there will be opportunity for niche magazines to survive.

Is there still a need for printed magazines? Will there be room for print? — When we look at our business Content Marketing, we are dependent on using print media to reach a large audience. We can't achieve this through digital media as users themselves seek out what they want to read. People will also prefer print magazines when they are traveling, vacation, cottage, beach etc. The question is whether they want to pay for this.

How will the future magazines look like? — Design is in line with fashion, it is constantly changing. So design wise there will be a wide range. But I think the content of all magazines will become more specialized.

What are the responsibilities of a graphic designer when it comes to magazine layout? — Your responsibility will be to get your audience to read the texts in the magazine. The design should always be adapted to specific target group and what mode they are in when they receive the magazine.

What types/categories of magazines do you think has the greatest chance to survive? — Niche magazines. For example, we see that pure fashion magazines like Costume is doing well, but not ones that will have a broader lifestyle content such as HENNE. Otherwise, many journals will survive and we see that in our industry, customer magazines take over much of the market. Shop-

INTERVIEW

54-55

ping mall may deliver lifestyle magazines and retail stores will be able to create for example, interior magazines.


REDINK PRODUCES MORE THAN 80 CUSTOMER MAGAZINES A YEAR. THESE ARE MAGAZINES THAT HAVE A JOB TO DO, WHETHER THE GOAL IS T O D E V E L O P I N T E R N A L C U LT U R E , S E L L P R O D U C T S O R B U I L D R E P U TAT I O N .

INTERVIEW


What are the advantages and disadvantages of digital magazines versus physical magazines ? — The advantage of print magazines is that you as a designer can determine the order in which the reader will read the magazine and build a nice read rhythm. While digital we can not do the same extent control reading order. One advantage of digital magazines is that we can use more images and video content that the will be a distinct advantage.

More and more reputable print magazines transforms into digital edition. What is the biggest challenge of redesigning the printed magazine to a tablet magazine? — The challenge is that people do not bother to browse the iPad the same way as in a magazine. It has thus far been completely unsuccessful transfer PDF-files to iPad . An iPad magazine should be created from scratch without thought of a traditional print magazine.

What do you prefer yourself? Reading magazine on print or digital? — I prefer reading the magazine in print form, on the web I read short texts or watching videos.

Finally , what is "the keys" to success with a good magazine ? — Good content, good pictures, proper design, many inputs - at all create a product that provides information and entertainment that readers want to spend time on.

56-57

INTERVIEW


•TOP TEN

Here is a top 10 list over the digital magazines we think that are changing the publishing business.

— The iPad magazine is still a fairly new advancement for the magazine publishing industry. But there are some magazines that really nailing it in the iPad format. This magazines are keeping subscribers happy, and luring in new ones with their current iPad editions by offering user-friendly designs, interactive features and exclusive content.

0 1 _ WIRED Wired, a magazine all about tech, was one of the very first magazines to branch out to the iPad with a digital edition. The magazine knows how to take advantage of everything the iPad can do. Articles within the app include video and animation. Subscribers also have access to bonus content not available in the print version.

TOP TEN


0 2 _ THE NEW YORKER If you dig highbrow humor and thoughtful editorial, then you might already have a subscription to The New Yorker. The digital version is completely free for print subscribers. You even get access to an extensive web archive of back issues dating all the way to 1925.

0 3 _ TIME MAGAZINE Time's iPad edition includes all the content you'd normally find in each week's print version, but it also packs in bonus photos and videos and live news updates from Time's website.

0 4 _ SPIN Each edition of Spin magazine on the iPad is more than just an issue: It's also a playlist. Across the top of the app sits a persistent audio player UI that lets you hear much of the music being written about in Spin's pages. It feels like an obvious format for a music magazine, but seldom are legacy publishers quite this adventurous.

58-59

TOP TEN


0 5 _ ESQUIRE Esquire, a men's lifestyle magazine, has an award-winning iPad edition. Digital subscribers get exclusive content like cartoons, photography, video and more. Earlier this year, the magazine launched a weekly edition for the iPad that was downloaded nearly 90,000 times in its first weekend available in the App Store.

0 6 _ HUFFINGTON The Huffington Post launched an iPad magazine, Huffington, last year to complement its daily online publication. The magazine is kind of like Newsweek, but more modern. It incorporates content from all over and includes reader comments that are sometimes highlighted within the actual magazine.

0 7 _ TRVL At first blush, TRVL doesn't feel that different from a print publication, but its simplicity is actually perfect for its editorial mission. The iPad-only travel mag delivers a fluid, gridded layout of issues about different places around the world. Its straightforward blend of text and large, vivid photography has a way of making you feel like you're actually in Lebanon, Zimbabwe, or Lisbon.

TOP TEN


0 8 _ THE ATLANTIC For a magazine founded in 1857, The Atlantic is decidedly not old-fashioned. Not only does it feature some of the best tech writing out there, but the magazine's digital publishing efforts are pretty solid. Case-in-point: The Atlantic's tablet edition gives print subscribers everything they love about the traditional format while supplementing it with headlines from the web.

0 9 _ NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC National Geographic is a magazine known for its stunning photography, and that translates beautifully to its iPad app. The photos are accompanied by interactive features like pull-up maps. Subscribers can also read additional content that isn't available in the magazine's print edition.

1 0 _ SPORTS ILLUSTRATED Sports wonks no doubt already subscribe, but the iPad version boasts twice as many photos, videos, slideshows, exclusive Q&As with athletes and live sports updates.

60-61

TOP TEN


ACCESSIBILITY

ANIMAT

STRUCTURE

TECHNOL

24

SPACE


ION

OGY

COLORS

COVERS

EDITORS

FREEDOM

IMAGES

INFORMATION

INNOVATION

INSPIRATION

INTERACTIVITY

LAYOUT

LINKS

PERSONALITY

READERS

SIZE

SOUNDS

TRENDS

TYPOGRAPHY

VIDEOS

WORDS



CONTRA Magazine