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Kyuyeon Park Architecture Portfolio 2018


Kyuyeon Park kpark01@alumni.risd.edu | www.kyuyeonpark.com


EDUCATION

Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) | Providence RI | 2018 Masters of Architecture Sogang University | Seoul Republic of Korea | 2011 Bachelor of Science in Physics Bachelor of Engineering in Electronic Engineering

WORK EXPERIENCE

TA Coordinator | RISD | Providence RI | Fall 2016-Spring 2018 Assist with Structural Analysis, Steel Structure, and Concrete Structure Course in Architecture Department. Lead weekly tutorial session for homework and grading quizzes and homework. Assistantship for 2017 Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism | PRAUD Architecture | Seoul, South Korea | Summer 2017 Mapping, model making, biennale preparation for Pyongyang city, North Korea exhibition. Research Intern | RISD, RI Commerce Corporation | Providence, RI | Summer 2017 Researched and analyzed resilience problems for small commercial businesses and suggested potential solutions. Defect Analyst/Engineer | SK hynix Semiconductor | Republic of Korea | 2011-2013 Managed and improved yield by analyzing defects in DRAM semiconductor.

AWARDS

U.S. Department of Energy SBIR Phase I Award | 2018

RELATED EXPERIENCE

Artificial Archipelago Design Studio | RISD | Fall 2017 Built an artificial island to create an archipelago. Using the unique environment in the middle of the ocean, designed a floating island for underwater research. Urban Design Principles Studio | RISD | Fall 2016 Designed residential space in the city of Central Falls, RI reconnecting separated neighborhoods. Environmental Design | RISD | Fall 2016-Spring 2017 Studied concepts of Human Environmental Comforts in terms of temperature, humidity, heat transfer, air movement, and hydrostatics. Analyzed and applied the principles using simulation programs such as DIVA, Archsim, and Cool-vent.

SKILLS

Computer Skills Rhinoceros and plug-in programs (V-Ray, Grasshopper, DIVA, and Archsim) / Revit / 3D Max / Sketch Up / Auto CAD / Arch GIS / Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator / Microsoft Office Excel, Word, PowerPoint Representation Skills Strong hand sketch and model making Language Korean native speaker, fluent English

ACTIVITIES

Student Association President of RISD Korean Graduate Student Association | 2016-2018 Music & Performance Dancer in K-pop dance club ‘DAEBAK’ at Brown University | 2016-2017 Primary vocalist in Hip Hop & R&B music club ‘Abyss’ in Sogang University | 2005-2010


Contents


I. REDUNDANCY FOR CHANGE Program Flexible Building| Master Degree Thesis | RISD 2018 II. ANCHOR ISLAND Undersea Research Center | Advanced Studio | RISD 2017 Fall III. HOLD THE FLOW Urban Design Principle Residential Project / 2016 Fall IV. San Giovanni Battista Architectural Analysis / 2016 Spring V. FROM RISK TO OPPORTUNITY Infrastructural Ecology Urban Design/ 2017 Spring VI. Office building design Integrated Building Systems/ 2017 Fall VII. LIBRARY environmental design II / 2017 Spring VIII. CARVING THE AIR & FLIPPING SPACE Design Principle / 2015 Fall IX. MEASURING 3D SPACE Architectural Projection / 2015 Fall X.SUBWAY EXIT DOME MODELING

XI. CUBIST LIGHTING CONTEST

XII. ART WORKS


REDUNDANCY FOR CHANGE Program Flexible Building | Thesis | RISD 2018 Spring


TIME IN ARCHITECTURE

demolition of a Pruitt–Igoe building, St. Louis We live in a world where efficiency is the best quality. A building is the same. We try to maximize the efficiency of the use of space and energy. However, is this design still efficient in the long term? Most modern commercial buildings are designed for a specific program such as residential or school and have little extra space or capacity to maximize the efficiency for now. It makes it hard for the building owners to change the building’s floor plan, programs, and facilities. Buildings should be able to change its program, structures, and mechanical services over time to adjust to the social, economic, and climate changes instead of being torn down and replaced by a new building. Nature is the most resilient system, even though it is not as efficient as machines and one of the key reasons is the redundancy. My question is how redundancy in architecture can help increase the resiliency. Redundancy in architecture can mean extra capacity of the structure, extra space, extra height of the ceiling, and extra infrastructural systems such as plumbing. I focused on the question of how the design principle of redundancy and loose-fit can make the building more flexible and resilient.


Grand Hyatt Playa del Carmen Resort, Cancun


DESIGN PROJECT DESIGN GOAL: BASED ON THE IDEA OF REDUNDANCY AND LOOSE-FIT, DESIGNING FLEXIBLE AND RESILIENT BUILDING TO THE DIVERSE SCENARIOS SUCH AS DIFFERENT TYPES OF PROGRAM AND CLIMATE CHANGES.

DESIGN CRITERIA 1) By different scenarios_Programs a. RISD school building: studio/office/cafeteria/ gathering space b. office building c. residential building d. divided into two buildings 2) future extension of building 3) By energy consumption/environmental design(sun/daylit/water cycle) 4) Natural disaster & climate change 5) Beauty of space 6) Design in a diverse layer such as material, furniture, mechanical system.

POSSIBLE SCENARIOS IN RISD 1) student increase and decrease 2) new department 3) merge of departments 4) low budget 5) program change


SITE SELECTION CRITERIA 1) Open space/Lot 2) Diversity of neighboring buildings 3) Urban context, infrastructures 4) Environmental sustainability: Solar, water resources 5) Possibility for future expansion 6) Space for parking 7) Good context with both RISD and outside RISD (public) 8) Value for future sale


MASS DESIGN-FUTURE USE OF COURTYARD& POSSIBILITY OF EXTENSION

We live in a world where efficiency is the best quality. A building is the same. We try to maximize the efficiency of the use of space and energy. However, is this design still efficient in the long term? Most modern commercial buildings are designed for a specific program such as residential or school and have little extra space or capacity to maximize the efficiency for now. It makes it hard for the building owners to change the building’s floor plan, programs, and facilities. Buildings should be able to change its program, structures, and mechanical services over time to adjust to the social, economic, and climate changes instead of being torn down and replaced by a new building.


RELATIONSHIP WITH EXISTING CONDITIONS AND THE GROUND


CONNECTION TO THE SOUTH MAIN STREET


100.00

GROUND

GROUND 100.00

100.00

40.00 40.00

12.00

12.00

12.00

84.00

84.00

84.00

12.00

12.00

12.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

40.00

84.00

84.00

84.00

40.00 40.00

40.00

GROUND


GROUND CONDITION

10ft

45ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

10ft

45ft

4’

10ft

45ft


12ft

12ft

12ft

10ft

4’

45ft

10ft

45ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

4’

4’

SCALE: 1/4”=1’-0’’

10ft

45ft

10ft

45ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

12ft

4’

4’

SCALE: 1/4”=1’-0’’

SCALE: 1/4”=1’-0’’

15ft

45ft


DESIGN PROPOSAL

REDUNDANCY IN ARCHITECTURE : EXTRA CAPACITY & SPACE Then, what does the redundancy mean in architecture and how can we benefit from it? Is it extra space, structural capacity, facilities such as plumbing, or extra core? Which one can make the floor plan more flexible and make the building more resilient to the climate changes.


interior space_view of third floor space from fourth floor walk way.


EXTRA PERIPHERAL SPACE

Main space : rooms

Extra peripheral space : core&circulation In the RISD buildings floor plan study, I have learned that cores and circulation are critical factors that decide the floor plan. In other words, core and circulations are the most restrictive elements that limit the flexible use of space. Therefore, I decided to move the core and circulation space to the most flexible layers of building, which is peripheral of the building. The main space inside the main structure will be the space for rooms and programs and the extra-peripheral space will be the space for the cores and circulation as well as extra space for main rooms such as terrace.

Different Layers of Space


Structure/frame

conventilanl frame

increase in structural capacity & loose strctural grid

extension of structure

extra space

Infrastructure _plumbing and electrical system

Conventional shafts are running through the thick wall and they make it hard to make an open space in the building because of the density of shaft walls, especially in the case of residential buildings. However, by moving the shafts around each column, the main space becomes shaft wall free. The closest span between columns is 40ft and the number of shafts is enough for the studio size residential building.

conventional shaft

shaft combined with structure


HIGH CEILING & ADDIBLE FLOOR

Structural Hierarchy & Load Transfer

To add more floors, we can use the main floor and structure as a load-bearing structure. We can either build the additional structure onto the floor or hang the structure under the major structure, depending on which space you want to make "structure free open space". Because the major structures are strong enough, we can add more floors and walls wherever we need.


Setion

conventional section

high ceiling & addible floor

Circulation

conventional circulation

Floor Plan

peripheral circulation

conventional floor plan

loose-fit & expandable floor plan


ARCHITECTURAL HIERARCHY

A building has many elements such as structure, rooms, core, circulations, mechanical services, and facade, and there is a hierarchy among them. Some elements restrict the other and some can be changed easily compared to the other. Even though the element is critical to the other elements, however, it does not mean that it needs to be fixed. Core, in this building, is in the most flexible layer of the building and the shafts are located in the most fixed space next to the columns. By making some frames and elements extra-strong and redundant such as structure and shaft, the rest of the building elements are able to be more flexible such as stairs, elevators, walls, and windows. Loose-fit in this building means to provide a capacity and the frame that the other elements can be filled within.


Facade

A facade is a very important element in a building not because of its beauty and characteristic but because it is the key element that controls the temperature, humidity and the light conditions in the room. The extra peripheral space will give us many options for designing a space as well as the way that controls the heat gains and loss. This space is a buffer space from the outdoor conditions, being an overhang, indoor or outdoor terraces, and space for shading system. This extra space also has a lot of special opportunities.


DIFFERENT SCENARIOS

RISD Scenario_First floor and courtyard for studio work space


RISD Scenario_First floor and courtyard for RISD commencement


10’

45’

10’

SCALE: 1/16”=1’-0’’

40’

2FL_South Main St Level

10’

45’

100.00

10’

RISD BEB ARCHITECTURE BUI

12.00

16 feet

FUTURE SCENARIO: Residential Building 84.00

RISD BEB ARCHITECTURE BUILDING PRESENT SCENARIO: RISD(Rhode Island School of Design) Studio


PRESENT SCENARIO I. RISD(Rhode Island School of Design) Studio


10ft

45ft

0’

4’

16’

12ft

12ft

? ft

7.7ft

12ft

9ft

12ft

10.5ft


RISD BEB ARCHITECTURE BUILDING

PRESENT SCENARIO: RISD(Rhode Island School of Design) Studio 10’

16 feet

45’

10’

40’

2FL_South Main St Level

84.00

12.00

100.00

SCALE: 1/16”=1’-0’’


RISD BEB ARCHITECTURE BUILDING

FUTURE SCENARIO: Residential Building 10’

16 feet

45’

10’

40’

2FL_South Main St Level

84.00

12.00

100.00

SCALE: 1/16”=1’-0’’


Water & Energy Management

As the climate gets warmer and there is a higher risk of heat waves, drought, and the flood, buildings are required to have a higher capacity to store water and manage the water use. Not only have a bigger water tank and facilities, the system needs to be decentralized in case of emergency and for the future scenario of being used as two independent buildings by different owners.


MODEL PHOTOS


ANCHOR ISLAND

Undersea Research Center | Advanced Studio | RISD 2017 Fall


THE PHANTOM ISLAND, FRISLAND This artificial island has started from the story of the phantom islands, Frisland. This island existed in a map for more than 200 years but no one could find the island. It turned out that the island does exist but in a different location and tiny scale. This story shows how rumor without ground transformed among people as well as on a map over 200 years. This phantom island is like a floating island drifting all around the ocean but has a root in the tiny island. Rumors sometimes become a truth because people do not see the other side of the story. We also can not see the other side of the water surface, where we can find the truth, the island does not put down its root into the ground. Because a floating object does not have a fixed location, orientation, and relation to its surroundings, it will need universality. From this story, I brought the idea of "transformation", "the other side", and "universality" to start this man-made island.


The concept of floating island from the story of phantom island


THREE DESIGN PRINCIPLES : TRANSFORMATION, THE OTHER SIDE, AND UNIVERSALITY

trasnformation


Design principles of transformation and the otherside


TRANSFORMATION OF LIGHT & THE OTHERSIDE Light transforms as it passes through different spatial conditions. In turn, those unique light conditions reveal the space differently, giving a sense of separation. Therefore, without physical walls or barrier, we can feel one space is different from the other.


TRANSFORMATION

Transforming floating structures


TWO DIFFERENT LIVES

This floating island has two different lives, when it drops the anchor to the island building a relationship with visitors from other islands, and when it is focusing on exploring the world undersea floating all around the world. Like we all do, this island needs to adjust itself to both public life and private life. Using buoyancy, the core system is moving vertically to give a better circulation and programs to fit to each life. Residential units are also flexible to diverse family types as well as to hotel rooms. Due to the uncertainty of orientation, asymmetry in the quality of space and light, and circulation(corridor) is needed to give a sense of location.


section

Residential Unit

When the island drop the anchor to the other island:

When the island is floating on the ocean:

PUBLIC PROGRAMS hotel cafe restaurant gallery Library aquarium bar shops museum

RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS Residential units market hospital gym cleaner shops

Underwater Research Center -Office -Research laboratory -Conference room -Mechanical room -Submarine station


TRANSFORMATION BY BUOYANCY

max. 140m deep


CORES AS A PATH OF PEOPLE & LIGHT A core is very important in a circulation as well as the identity of the area. These floating cores are changing their elevation using buoyancy depending on the characteristic of the island, public or private. When it settles down to the other island, it floats up to introduce the visitors into the structure and when it explodes on the ocean, the core sinks down back to be part of the main structure and work as an interior core system. In addition, to give a sense of location and orientation, each core provides unique light conditions. These cores are creating a different neighborhood in each district, giving them the identity in this giant structure.


RESIDENTIAL UNIT :UNIVERSALITY

residential units


HOLD THE FLOW

Residential Project | Urban Design Principle | RISD 2016 Fall


CENTRAL FALLS AS A PIVOT CONNECTING FRAGMENTED NEIGHBORHOOD

B

B water stays

A A

new building

A

B

B

existing building

people stays

A This site will be a pivot point which will reconnect the many areas divided by Blackstone River, Highway 95, and railway. This site in Central Falls, RI is located at the gateway from a different city, Pawtucket as well as different state, Massachusetts. The red dashed lines are major streets connecting those neighboring areas and the site for this project is located in the key position. Using the benefit of easy access from different areas and beautiful landscape such as wetlands and unique waterfalls, this site will make people not just pass by but flow into the site and spend time relaxing. This project will provide a solution for the fragmented areas reconnecting human and nature.

catch the flow into gathering space


site at a pivot point of main streets from neighboring cities


se c ti on

NATURE LIBRARY : learn about plants and ecosystem BOOKSTORE

CAFE

entrance 2 entrance 3

RESIDENTIAL UNITS (upper floor) : living with nature in a private space

LOUNGE

LIVING MACHINE WATER FALL WETLAND GARDEN

GREEN HOUSE &LIVING MACHINE :transition from nature to human space

se c ti on

entrance 1

RESIDENTIAL UNITS & WETLAND GARDEN

WETLAND&GARDEN : purify contaminated river and storm water to create extraordinary landscape


studio

St

ud

io

St

ud

io

St

ud

io

1B

ed

2B

ed

2 bedroom 2B

ed

2 bedroom 2B

ed

2B

ed

2B

ed

2B

ed

2B

ed

1B

ed

1B

ed

0

1

2 4 6 10 14

ft

1 bedroom

Semi-private terrace : view to the wet land hidden behind the corner of each unit


TRANSITION MOMENT FROM NATURE INTO ARCHITECTURAL SPACE The two tips of this building are the extension of the nature, one end from tranquil wetland and the other end from garden(greens). The first end becomes library, where we can study more about nature, and the other end becomes greenhouse, where we can experience the nature. LIBRARY

GREEN HOUSE

1 FLOOR PROGRAM TRANSITION SECTION

RESIDENTIAL GREEN HOUSE

LOBBY (indoor)

LIBRARY Entrance 1

Entrance 2

Transition zone

Transition zone

PLAN

LIBRARY

LOBBY (indoor) STAIR TO 2F

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

UNIT

UNIT

UNIT

UNIT

GREEN HOUSE STAIR TO 2F

PROGRAM TRANSITION

UNIT

UNIT

UNIT

UNIT

VERTICAL CIRCULATION


SEMI-PRIVATE TERRACE MORE THAN JUST CORRIDOR

This unique corridor provides not only a nice view of the wetland but also is the key to temperature control throughout a year. To manage solar gain, I place the open single loaded corridor along the south and west facing facade. This corridor plays a role of shading with corridor windows open in summer and greenhouse with the windows closed tight in winter. The thick walls of residential units along the North and East facing facade will block the cold Northeastern winter wind, reducing heat losses. This L-shape building also keeps the central gathering space between the existing building and a new building from frizzing winter wind.

Open Space

heating and cooling in summer and winter

Open Space

SUMMER

WINTER

Corridor =Shading

Corridor =Greenhouse Effect

Enclosed Space

Cooling

Heating

Green House : Absorb heat

SUMMER

WINTER

Corridor =Shading

Corridor =Greenhouse Effect

Enclosed Space

summer natural Green House : increase thermal mass ventilation and humidity

winter wind

Cooling

Heating

Green House : Absorb heat

Green House :

thermal mass summer increase natural and humidity ventilation


semi-private garden&terrace along the corridor


garden

green house

residential units

entrance

lobby


cafe

bookstore

library

wetland

entrance

0

1

2

4

6

10

14ft


SAN GIOVANNI BATTISTA The Church of Autostrada / Architectural Analysis / RISD 2016 Spring


TREE BRANCH COLUMNS

This unique corridor provides not only a nice view of the wetland but also is the key to temperature control throughout a year. To manage solar gain, I place the open single loaded corridor along the south and west facing facade. This corridor plays a role of shading with corridor windows open in summer and greenhouse with the windows closed tight in.


HAND DRAWINGS Detail_Axonometric (above) Axonometric view(right) Plan(below)


DIGITAL DRAWING


DIGITAL DRAWING_EXPLOSION Roofs

Branch-shaped colunm structures

Wall extruded from floor plan

Floor plan as a starting point

Walls extruded under floor plan

Floor level


ROOF GEOMETRY & TRANSFORMATION OF PROJECTED FLOOR PLAN BY UNROLLING ROOF

Roofs top view with projected floor plan

22 roof surfaces seperated according to unique geometries (top view)

Unrolled roof surfaces and transformation of floor plans


SPACE CREATED BY FLATTEN THE ORIGINAL ROOF SURFACES

This unique corridor provides not only a nice view of the wetland but also is the key to temperature control throughout a year. To manage solar gain, I place the open single loaded corridor along the south and west facing facade. This corridor plays a role of shading with corridor windows open in summer and greenhouse with the windows closed tight in winter. The thick walls of residential units along the North and East


FROM RISK TO NEW OPPORTUNITY Tidal energy plant | Infrastructural Ecology | RISD 2017 Spring


TIDAL ENERGY PLANT

Among many issues in the Providence waterfront area, flood and sea level rise is one of the most important. It has a Field Point Waste Water Treatment Facility on the site and so many kinds of water inflow such as rainwater from the hill, tidal water and storm surge from the sea. Furthermore, its low elevation and gentle slope make it more vulnerable to flood. However, if we can control the water flow, we will be able to take an advantage of those movements. The map shows how this site goes underwater as the water level rises and the middle part goes underwater first because the topography is lower and flat than surrounding land. That means this site can hold the water if we block only one side of the site. Therefore, by building a dam on that side, we can control the water flow and eventually utilize that water to generate electricity. Depending on the phase of sea level, types of water inflow vary. Until water level rises enough for tidal water to come in, we can use treated water from the facility instead of just releasing onto the river right away.


diverse water inflow


2018

2050

2090

50MGD (Million Gallons per Day)

50MGD

50MGD

avg depth (ft)

4

6

8

area (ft2)

300,000

640,000

2,700,000

capacity (Gallon)

5MG

14MG

80MG

Treated water from facility (Gallon per Day)

Reservoir

amount of water from waste water treatment facility and tidal flow in each time phase


UNIQUE EXPERIENCE OF THE DYNAMICS Twice a day, the tidal energy plant lets in the seawater at high tide, holding the water, and then releasing the water out in low tide generating electricity. On top of that water flow, 50 million gallons of treated water from water treatment facility will fill the reservoir. This dynamics of water will give a very special experience on this site, making spatial quality different every moment. The relationship between water and land is changing depending on the water cycle.

OPEN/CLOSE STRUCTURE One of the interesting ideas is "open and close structure" working by buoyancy. When the water level rises, the structure starts to float, closing its structure againt the water pressure. When the water level starts to fall, the structure touches the ground and opens up its structure like a flower blooms and closes.


Sketch showing two different moments in a day


FLOATING LANDSCAPE

On the water, everything is floating around, not fixed. Water moves not only vertically but also horizontally. This flow makes floating gardens(living machines) on the water move back and forth. Nothing is in the same position twice. Every cycle rearranges them in a random way. Rather than stationary and fixed landscape, this floating gardens will provide undecided landscape in this waterside, making it more dynamic and special everyday.


floating garden sketch


scenarios of floating garden /vertical&horizonal movement of water


HOW WATER MEETS GROUND _BUILDING TYPOLOGY STUDY

The boundary condition in this site is especially important because it would experience more extreme change than any other waterfront. How built structures can interact with this movement and change. How we can experience the water in context of building and interior space.

Diverse transition conditions from water to structure


Mediation of Extremes | Environmental Design | RISD 2017 Spring


ROCKEFELLER LIBRARY, BROWN UNIVERSITY_NORTH FACING SPACE

The Rockefeller Library has an expansive, square or plan. All four sides of the building comprise of windows, inviting in natural light. However, each side has dierent conditions and characteristics of how the natural light enters. South-facing windows receive direct sunlight, whereas Nor th-facing windows are mostly exposed to reected light from adjacent buildings. Building has an ex pansive, sq uare floor plan. All four sides of the building possess windows, allowing the invitation of natural light. However, each side has different conditions and characteristics of how natur al lig ht enter s. Sou th facing windows receive direct sunlight, whereas north facing windows are mostly exposed to reflected light from adjacent buildings. KEY QUESTION How can we manipulate the reflected natural sunlight coming into the North facade to be less glaring and more comfortable for the occupants sitting in the line of carrels against the North windows?

high constrast between window side and bookshelf area


neighboring buildings on north side (below)


EXISTING CONDITION ANALYSIS _Lighting &spatial conditions

1. Natural light does not propagate all the way into the space 2. Narrow alleyway -> Disruption to study desks 3. Glare (by reflected light from adjacent white facade buildings) -> Discomfort to study desks


study space along north facing windows


DESIGN PROPOSAL

1. EXTRUSION OF SPACE -increase more surface area of wall for invitation of light -isolating from the extruded spaces & create private spaces. -lounge and outdoor space usage

2. CURVED WALL WITH VERTICAL SHADES ANGLED AT 30 -block reflected glare hitting from sitting eye-level & from below -maintain access to view through glass wall (vertical shades)

3. LIGHT SHELF -block glare hitting down from above -bring natural light deeper into space


Before Remove walls between columns to introduce more natural light

After Extrude interior space path to outside

Install verticals to prevent glaring


PLAN & SECTION

before

after


before

after


SIMULATION RESULT

before

after

Glare

Daylight Distribution


Top View

Daylight Autonomy


CARVING THE AIR, FLIPPING SPACE SHUTTLE MAN'S HOUSE | DESIGN PRINCIPLE | RISD 2015

plan&section drawings of shuttleman's house


SHUTTLE Inside How It Flys: This shut tle has simple geometr y but not the movement. It is symetry and this curved surface carves the air as it flys. When it reaches at the peak, it chooses where to go next, sliding onto frontside or backside. Because of this uncertainty, its movement gets more complex but the rule is really simple.

outside

Shuttle design folding 4 corners to make 4 wings

Inside space

outside space

carving the air with both blades


Shuttle Man's House I inside & outside spaces that the shuttle is carving

shuttle man's house initial model


Moment of decision

choice B

choice A

Moment of Choice Programing the space Just like shuttle makes choices at every peak, shuttle man have to choose which side of space he will go(inside or outside) at every level changes. When he goes downstairs, he can choose to go outside or stay inside of building. As he goes more downstairs, this moment of choice got multipled so the scenarios get more and more complicated, making more diverse program of the building.

decision making moment everytime it reaches the peak


Shuttle Man's House Programing the space


ROOF (DROPPING POINT)

STUDIO 5FL

BEDROOM 4FL

BATHROOM

EXHIBITION ROOM

3FL

3FL

2FL

2FL

2FL

plan&section drawings of shuttleman's house 1FL

KITCHEN


explosion drawings of shuttleman's house showing inside&outside space


OFFICE BUILDING&SURFACE STRUCTURE Integraded Building System | RISD 2017 Fall

solar panel

concrete beam

concrete column concrete slab

concrete wall

curtain wall window

concrete footing foundation offset core


Notes:

A.302

A

B 20’-0”

C 10’-0”

D 20’-0”

E 20’-0”

F

G

20’-0”

20’-0”

H 20’-0”

I 20’-0”

J 10’-0”

K 20’-0”

TOP OF PARAPET 52’ - 6”

TOP OF ROOF 40’ - 0”

THIRD LEVEL 28’ - 0”

SECOND LEVEL 16’ - 0” Client:

14’-0”

BRETT SCHNEIDER 2 College St Providence RI P.O. BOX 001

FIRST LEVEL 0’ - 6” Architect: concrete panel (4’-0” x 5’-0”)

double-glazed vision glass (4’-0” x 4’-4”)

double-glazed operable window (4’-0” x 5’-0”)

main entrance vestibule

2 College St Providence RI P.O. BOX 001 Site:

Title:

SOUTH ELEVATION

GROUP NENE

0ft

10ft

30ft

50ft

Scale: Drawn:

250 South Main Street Providence RI SOUTH ELEVATION

1/16’’=1’ NENE

Date:

12/01/17

Drawing#:

A.201


Notes: A.200

20’-0”

10’-0”

20’-0”

20’-0”

20’-0”

20’-0”

20’-0”

202

203

204

205

20’-0”

10’-0”

20’-0”

9

8

20’-0”

A.301

20’-0”

7

210

209

209

211

20’-0”

6 201 A.203

206

207

208

20’-0”

5

A.202 20’-0”

4

200 WORKING SPACE 201 CONFERENCE ROOM 1

A.300

20’-0”

200

3 20’-0”

2

202 CONFERENCE ROOM 2 203 CONFERENCE ROOM 3 204 CONFERENCE ROOM 4 205 MAILROOM 206 BREAKOUT ROOM 1

20’-0”

1

209 ELECTRICITY ROOM

B

C

D

2 College St Providence RI P.O. BOX 001 Architect:

211 STORAGE

E

F

G

H

I

J

Site:

K

Title: A.201

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

0ft 10ft 20ft

50ft

GROUP NENE 2 College St Providence RI P.O. BOX 001

210 SERVER ROOM

A.302

BRETT SCHNEIDER

207 BREAKOUT ROOM 2 208 COPY ROOM

A

Client:

100ft

Scale: Drawn:

250 South Main Street Providence RI SECOND FLOOR PLAN

1/32’’=1’ NENE

Date:

12/01/17

Drawing#:

A. A.102


Notes:

roof slope for drainage

concrete roof

curtain wall anchored to parapet

drainage pipes

03 A.801

roof slope for drainage 1/8”

07 A.803

1’-0”

concrete roof double-glazed vision glass

08 A.803

double-glazed operable window

concrete wall

04 A.801

concrete wall

curtain wall vertical mullion concrete floor slab

rigid insulation

rigid insulation

concrete beam concrete panel

concrete panel

double-glazed operable window concrete column seen beyond

09 A.804

concrete floor slab

05 A.802

concrete beam

egress stair

Client:

BRETT SCHNEIDER 2 College St Providence RI P.O. BOX 001

rigid insulation

Architect:

concrete floor

06 A.802

Site:

Title:

3. WALL SECTION

4. WALL SECTION

0ft

5ft

10ft

GROUP NENE 2 College St Providence RI P.O. BOX 001

10 A.804

concrete footing

20ft

Scale: Drawn:

250 South Main Street Providence RI 3. WALL SECTION 4. WALL SECTION 1/8’’=1’ NENE

Date:

12/01/17

Drawing#:

A.401


MEASURING 3D SPACE

HOW I KNOW THAT IT IS THERE | ARCHITECTURAL PROJECTION | RISD 2016


PART I. WE KNOW THE OBJECT BY SEEING AND OBSERVING IT.

Charchol drawings of the object


PART II. WE KNOW THE OBJECT BY MEASURING AND DOCUMENTING IT.

STEP1. MEASUREING_MEASURING NOTES


STEP2. CARVING FOAM TO DUPLICATE THE OBJECT


STEP2. DOCUMENTING_ Axonometric drawing

These axonometric drawings shows the sequence of how I carved out the object out of cubic foam. It shows from big junk of foam piece to small piece for detail such as handle and curvature.


PART III. DEVELOPING NEW MEASURING METHODS

Developing one measuring method and rules(even though it is not perfect to describe real object) and comparing the object that we get from that method with actual objec t. Because any measuring method is not per fec t, there is a space gap bet ween real and measured object.

Overlap of ac tual objec t and measured object.


space gap between real and measured space

space gap between real and measured space


FINAL PROJECT _Missing space by measuring tool

Every measuring tool has their own characteristics and so its missing space from real object is. Because my measuring methos is one directional(1 dimensional) and dull, it could not catch the space behind the barrier and d et ail s. M y p roje c t s s how s this characteristic of my measuring method. After I created the space gap, I projected the line drawing of the real object onto the space gap.


laser cut drawing on paper


CUBIST LIGHTING CONTEST

ASDFASDFASDFASD ASDNFUAS D FA S D FA S D FA S D J FA S FA S A SDJFLAJ DFAJ

| 2017 Spring


SUBWAY EXIT DOME MODELING 2016 Summer


DRAM SEMICONDUCTOR STRUCTURE

A SDFA SDFA SDFA SD ASDNFUAS DFASD FA S D FA S DJ FA S FA S A SDJFLAJ DFAJ


HAND SKETCH

pen&marker sketch


Sunset(right) /pastel on paper / 2010

Architecture Portfolio_ Kyuyeon Park_RISD_2018  

Architecture Portfolio_ Kyuyeon Park_RISD_2018

Architecture Portfolio_ Kyuyeon Park_RISD_2018  

Architecture Portfolio_ Kyuyeon Park_RISD_2018

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